Pathfinder Chronicles: Classic Horrors Revisited (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Chronicles: Classic Horrors Revisited (PFRPG)
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Things from Beyond the Grave

Born of myth, legend, and even modern film and literature, monsters such as the mummy, vampire, werewolf, and zombie are the stuff of nightmares—and frequent foes of heroic adventurers! Along with flesh golems, gargoyles, ghosts, ghouls, hags, and the mysterious derro, these ten monsters are staples of horror fiction and the bane of countless would-be heroes.

This 64-page book explores the origin of these creatures (in both the game world and real-world history), as well as their creation, habitat, society, motivations, and role in a campaign. Each creature also includes information on new and deadly creature variants, such as nosferatu vampires, corpse chill mummies, gemstone gargoyles, host corpse zombies, and phantasmagoric ghosts. What’s more, each chapter provides several new and notable examples of each creature, as well as a fully statted and ready-to-run sample monster, whether it’s a flesh golem barbarian, a derro magister, a ghoul necromancer, a hag water-witch, or a lycanthrope-hunting werewolf.

Whether your campaign is a standard fantasy monster hunt, a gothic romance, or an exercise in terror, Classic Horrors Revisited provides both historical insight and fresh new spins on these traditional icons of fear!

by James Jacobs, Rob McCreary, and F. Wesley Schneider

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-202-9

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Fantastic Writing

5/5

The idea behind Classic Horrors Revisited is to take ten classic "horror" monsters from D&D's past and expand and update them for Pathfinder. This is the sort of book that could be a bit "blah" in lesser hands, but Paizo put their A-list writing talent on the project: James Jacobs, Rob McCreary, and Wes Scheider. The result is a really good book that adds depth and detail to these monsters while sticking fairly closely to the common understanding of how they operate. In other words, this book isn't a crazy-cool re-imagining of the monsters, but a well-written, cohesive elaboration.

Classic Horrors Revisited is a 64-page, full colour book. I would label the interior artwork as "okay". Better than most other companies', but not as good as Paizo has done in other books. The interior front cover lists books and films that can serve as inspiration for using each of the monsters, while the interior back cover is a reprint of the front cover art (which is a bit too-obviously Dracula to interest me).

The ten monsters covered are: Derro, Flesh Golems, Gargoyles, Ghosts, Ghouls, Hags, Mummies, Vampires, "Walking Dead" (zombies and skeletons), and Werewolves. Each monster receives six pages of coverage, and each entry is broken down into a "flavour" page (a half-page illustration and a half-page in-universe bit of prose), a couple of pages of overview and ecology/society, a few paragraphs on their role in a campaign (which I really liked), a paragraph on two or three known monsters of that kind in Golarion, and then a named NPC example with full stat block and picture. Most monster entries also contain at least a little rules-option "crunch," such as variants, new feats, etc. Here's a little more info about each of the entries:

1. Derro: I really love the Pathfinder approach to Derro--they are creepy, malevolent, and almost alien abductors of people on the surface so that they can perform strange experiments and then return them with no or fragmented memory of what happened. This book introduces four new Derro weapons (Aklys, Crystal Chakram, Fauchard, and Injection Spear) and a new poison (Cytillesh Extract). The sample is Evehxa, a derro magister (enclave leader) and 6th-level sorcerer.

2. Flesh Golem: This will sound stupid, but I never really made the connection between flesh golems and Frankenstein's monster before reading this book! The section has a good discussion of different types of flesh golems, and the writing and world lore is superb. Rules are provided for awakened (sentient) flesh golems, as well as for electrified and unholy variants. The sample is the Beast of Lepidstadt, an awakened flesh golem that haunts Ustalav (written up with 6 levels of barbarian).

3. Gargoyle: I've never found anything particularly interesting about gargoyles in the past, but this book has changed my mind. It's made them scary! Their love of sadism and perverse games gives them an interesting role as capable of inflicting both physical and mental pain. Six variant gargoyles are discussed (arctic, forest, gemstone, obsidian, sandstone, and waterspout), making them useful in far more than just urban environments. The sample is "Ajekrith, the Nightwing Snatcher", a gargoyle with 4 levels of rogue who preys on lone wanderers in Magnimar's Underbridge District.

4. Ghost: There's an insightful discussion here about the differences between ghosts and other undead: not only are they usually bound to a fixed location, but they exist for a particular purpose. I've panned the artwork in this book, but the picture on page 22 of a ghost carrying its own head is fantastic. This entry provides new abilities for ghosts depending on why they're materializing; it's a great way to better tie a ghost's powers to its story, and I highly recommend using it. The sample ghost is Maven Mosslight, a ghost with 9 levels of sorcerer who seeks her lost love in the Boarwood in Galt.

5. Ghouls: I've been running an adventure path that happens to features ghouls quite prominently in one chapter, so I've had a lot of time to think about them. This entry offers some surprisingly deep insights into them. And, I managed to incorporate the symptoms of ghoul fever into the game when a PC got infected. So . . . bonus! This entry includes rules for making ghouls of larger and smaller races, as well as specific mention of what happens if other creatures (like lycanthropes or fire giants) get transformed. Three new feats are added for ghouls, but they have *really* high prerequisites and only exceptional ghouls would be able to qualify. Still, I like them in the abstract: one gives a ghoul bonuses for eating brains, one allows ghouls to pass as humans (and ghasts to suppress their stench), and one gives a ghoul a burrow speed. The sample ghoul is Ehrimun, a 14th level necromancer exiled from the ghoul city of Nemret Noktoria.

6. Hags: I've never really used these in a game, but the entry does provide a useful discussion of the relationship between the three most common types of hags (Annis, green, and sea hags) as well as night hags. There's some discussion of the powers that hag covens (as opposed to individual hags) could possess. The sample is Ulla Jarnrygg, a formidable hag with 9 levels of sorcerer and ice giant ancestry.

7. Mummies: There's an excellent discussion here of the role of mummies in a campaign: as (un)living transmitters and reminders of the game world's history. Mummies are often focussed on recreating the society and time period from when they died, and this allows GMs to incorporate otherwise dry historical information as an important part of a story arc. The entry gives four different ways to re-flavour mummy rot, and the sample mummy is very cool: Shielseis, Queen of Asps in Osirion. The artwork for her is great.

8. Vampires: I'm one of those annoying people who think vampires have been overused in pop culture, and frankly there wasn't anything in this entry that I found new or exciting. The entry offers five new variant vampire abilities, including everything from changing into a swarm to being able to survive longer in daylight. The sample vampire is Audbrey Aldamori, a pretend "aristocratic fop" who travels the Inner Sea feasting on those of noble blood.

9. Walking Dead: We're talking zombies and skeletons here, and Pathfinder sticks with the traditional concept of them being mindless, low-level threats. The artwork in this entry is pretty bad. There's 13 variants, however, which really spice things up. Throw some "Exploding Skeletons" or "Gasburst Zombies" at your players and watch them recoil in surprise! The sample is a "Gillamoor Plague Zombie", which (unlike all the other samples in the book) is not a named NPC.

10. Werewolves: This entry has a good, clear summary of what it means to be a werewolf in Pathfinder (different forms, means of transmission, etc.). I was intrigued by a passing mention of good werewolves inspired by the dead god Curchanus. The sample NPC is Ruxandra Katranjiev, a werewolf with levels in ranger who is also a cleric of the goddess Jezelda and wants to purge the Varisian town of Wolf's Ear of all non-werewolf lycanthropes.

Classic Horrors Revisited is an older book (2009), and some of the monsters here have also been revisited in more recent Pathfinder products (such as ghouls and vampires in the Monster Codex and derro in the Inner Sea Monster Codex). That being said, there's great value for the money here if a GM is hoping to gain better understanding of these monsters and to add more depth to running them in a storyline. Bestiaries can give a basic stat block, but usually don't have room for much description, making books like this one quite useful. As I said at the beginning, the writing is top-notch even if the artwork is of varying quality. I'd definitely recommend this one for a GM who is interested in any of the monsters covered.


Things that go bump in the night

5/5

These books are brilliant. They give you the flavour that you wish they could fit into the one page creature descriptions which you just know they cannot.

Buy these books, as I have never struck a bad one yet :)


Bring the Horror! Classic Horrors Revisited!

4/5

This is a great suppliment made to spark the fevered imagination of the most Jaded DM back to sadistic life! Check out my full review: Classic Horrors Revisited


Paizo brings the Horrors home

5/5

I love horror, and I love pulp fantasy, so it's no surprise that I love this. It's a great collection of classic monsters, from immortals like vampires and werewolves through their lesser-known cousins like the ghoul and the hag, to newcomers like the derro and the flesh golem.

The monsters are brought to (un)life in classic style, and the NPC critters are very well done and nicely illustrated as well. There are new feats and tips to individualize any monsters of your own creation as well. This book is worth every penny I paid for it.


Even More Horrifying

5/5

A solid product packed with suggestions on how to add a new twist on a number of gothic monsters. Tons of hooks and ideas to help spark a GM's imagination.

Absolutely worth picking up if you're planning on running a horror themed adventure, and are looking for something a little different to terrify your players with.


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Sovereign Court

Heh. Well, with the Teros I was hoping for something a little more than a namedrop, but I can see how that would be inappropriate without basically having to provide an entire secondary "build" for them, given the nature of PFRPG Derros.

The Egyptian mummy thing is just the simulationist realism nerd in me; I get that in movies like Abbott and Costello Versus The Mummy, the reasons why Egyptian mummies were created the way they were and the theological baggage associated with them are entirely irrelevant to "creepy super-strong guy in bandages menaces our protagonists", and really that's what Mummies in the old World's Most Popular Fantasy Role-Playing Game are all about. There's just an evil, niggling part of my brain that wonders why Osirion (to pick an example completely at random) with its ties to Sarenrae and Pharasma, and absolutely no (known to date) tradition of needing the physical body to continue on to the afterlife, would manufacture Egyptian-style mummies. And naturally occurring mummies would be, as you say, just Wights with a disease-power instead of level-drain.

And thank you for your response to the hag question. It clarifies some of the design goals regarding this book much better than the general goals for a series, or the cover blurb, ever could. Horrors Revisited is aiming to be something more strongly about themes and niches than Classic Monsters or Dungeon Denizens would be. Makes sense - expecting something like Classic Monsters and then seeing the Hags all put in one chapter might have been jarring. Knowing that the larger intent is that the various Hags are all just illustrative of the role of The Hag in an adventure-horror story, and Gargoyles are illustrations of The Lurker, and so on, puts a whole different spin on the proceedings.

I can't wait!

Scarab Sages

flash_cxxi wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
If it's going to have zombies, that's all I need to know.
It'll even have a sidebar: How to use the Aberzombie in Golarion.

Sweet! I wonder who wrote it, and I hope they cover my skills at basket weaving and homebrewing.

Mairkurion{tm} wrote:
...over-sexed young zombie...

I wish. Sadly, I'm married.....


Oh...Aberzombie...you've probably set off the one of the wife's psychic alarms.

Cappa, isn't it funny that we give mummies disease ability, but our forbears ground them up into medicene? Yeah, I definitely want the theology and the technology behind mummification in Osirion (and on Golarion in general).

Sovereign Court

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cappadocius wrote:

The Egyptian mummy thing is just the simulationist realism nerd in me; I get that in movies like Abbott and Costello Versus The Mummy, the reasons why Egyptian mummies were created the way they were and the theological baggage associated with them are entirely irrelevant to "creepy super-strong guy in bandages menaces our protagonists", and really that's what Mummies in the old World's Most Popular Fantasy Role-Playing Game are all about. There's just an evil, niggling part of my brain that wonders why Osirion (to pick an example completely at random) with its ties to Sarenrae and Pharasma, and absolutely no (known to date) tradition of needing the physical body to continue on to the afterlife, would manufacture Egyptian-style mummies. And naturally occurring mummies would be, as you say, just Wights with a disease-power instead of level-drain.

One option would be to connect it with prehistoric Greece. There were some cultures that appear to have regularly revisited tombs, placing bodies in different positions and different areas of shared tombs and eventually just keeping the skull.

A variant of that could see the body preserved so that it could be used for various cultural rites without the diminishing that occurs if the body decays.

plus...

SRD wrote:
If the corpse has been subject to speak with dead within the past week, the new spell fails. You can cast this spell on a corpse that has been deceased for any amount of time, but the body must be mostly intact to be able to respond. A damaged corpse may be able to give partial answers or partially correct answers, but it must at least have a mouth in order to speak at all.

As long as they don't animate you've got the wisdom of the ancients right there.


G.E., you've got an interesting idea there at its roots. Under the right conditions (hallowed or desecrated area) in a place where other effects (perhaps Gentle Repose) might have gotten mixed in over time, what effect might a regular, ongoing practice of casting Speak with Dead have on a corpse?


In the case of the Chinchorro mummies (South America), the process was universal and not just limited to the higher socal levels. There is some debate as to whether the bodies were mummified to make the corpses less frightening or to assist the soul in reaching the afterlife.

Regardless, the process could well be culturally driven as suggested by G.E.

The process could also be used to create a tomb guardian by mummifying a loyal soldier or pet.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Aberzombie wrote:

Sweet! I wonder who wrote it, and I hope they cover my skills at basket weaving and homebrewing.

Don't forget stamp collecting!

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.

There are those buddhist monks who mummified themselves as well (Sokushinbutsu is the name: thankyou, internet).

Mummies dedicated to Irori?

But I am generally more in favour, especially with the current state of Galorian religion, of a desire to preserve corpses so you can carry on doing stuff with/to them. That can go in many directions depending how kindly or depraved you want to be.

I can imagine a new Pharoah having to consult every single one of his ancestors before taking the throne and having to plan very carefully the single question that he was traditionally permitted to ask before the pyramid/tomb was resealed.

Hey, this is my first good idea in years. How do you cast Summon F. Wesley Schneider?

I probably need his true name - what does that F stand for?!

Liberty's Edge

cappadocius wrote:
The Egyptian mummy thing is just the simulationist realism nerd in me; I get that in movies like Abbott and Costello Versus The Mummy, the reasons why Egyptian mummies were created the way they were and the theological baggage associated with them are entirely irrelevant to "creepy super-strong guy in bandages menaces our protagonists", and really that's what Mummies in the old World's Most Popular Fantasy Role-Playing Game are all about. There's just an evil, niggling part of my brain that wonders why Osirion (to pick an example completely at random) with its ties to Sarenrae and Pharasma, and absolutely no (known to date) tradition of needing the physical body to continue on to the afterlife, would manufacture Egyptian-style mummies. And naturally occurring mummies would be, as you say, just Wights with a disease-power instead of level-drain.

i respectful disagree

as a Ravenloft fan I need a reason for them to be... ok I know there are natural made ones, and cultures different from the Egyptians... still I expect the reasons behind it :)

GeraintElberion wrote:

But I am generally more in favour, especially with the current state of Galorian religion, of a desire to preserve corpses so you can carry on doing stuff with/to them. That can go in many directions depending how kindly or depraved you want to be.

I can imagine a new Pharoah having to consult every single one of his ancestors before taking the throne and having to plan very carefully the single question that he was traditionally permitted to ask before the pyramid/tomb was resealed.

interesting concept, i like it

Sovereign Court

Montalve wrote:


i respectful disagree

I expect the reasons behind it :)

That's agreeing with me.

Sovereign Court

GeraintElberion wrote:


I probably need his true name - what does that F stand for?!

Fabulous

Liberty's Edge

cappadocius wrote:
Montalve wrote:


i respectful disagree

I expect the reasons behind it :)

That's agreeing with me.

damn :P

ok :P I thought you mean just mummies as big bad bandaged guys to be killed by american heroes without caring how they were created.

me bad :P


Dark_Mistress wrote:
Very cool though it is coming out a month late though. Really should be a Oct release.

I have to agree. October would have been very appropriate.

Sovereign Court

wspatterson wrote:
Dark_Mistress wrote:
Really should be a Oct release.
I have to agree. October would have been very appropriate.

Hi, have you met Paizo release dates? It'll be October. Unless GenCon suddenly becomes, like, easy for the company.


I do so hope it will be October. I'm already planning a spooky candle-lit, sound-tracked adventure for my nephews on Halloween, and would love to have this to enrich it.

Contributor

Wolf Munroe wrote:
I'm a bit worried since I'm not sure if/when I'll ever switch from 3.5e OGL to PFRPG, so I'm hoping the creatures are still extremely mechanically compatible.

Don't worry. While this uses PFRPG, you'll see that it's super compatible.

cappadocius wrote:


2) Will the Mummy chapter talk about how to use them in a world that doesn't have the very specific bodily resurrection concepts that led to "bandage" mummies in Egypt?

Well, expect some changes. As in, the world for this is loosely Golarion (though still applicable to any world). So as to the question of will this have mummies for non-"Egyptians?" Yes.

cappadocius wrote:
3) Will Kapoacinth have to share with the Gargoyles, or can I reasonably wait patiently for the possibility of an Aquatic Monsters revisited book?

Don't expect "Aquatic Monsters Revisited" to hit any bestsellers list any time soon. The kapoacinth are discussed, but the focus is on the race as a whole.

cappadocius wrote:
4) Are we really cramming all three (four, if we count Night Hags) Hags into one chapter? Poor old biddies.

Few designers like hags more than me, and yes, the three primary mortal races of hag are going to together get the same number of pages as the other creatures. Breaking them up either separates the information across multiple books or causes one monster to dominate a single book, neither of which is any good. So they get their racial overview same as any other beastie.

wspatterson wrote:
I have to agree. October would have been very appropriate.

Yeah, I think all of us would, but when we came up with this, we already had work on October projects underway. It ultimately just came down to realities of our schedule outweighing the sync-up of spooky stuff coming out in October. And we decided we didn't care that much because that kind of shtick preciousness for maybe about three weeks before everyone forgets about when the book came out.

GeraintElberion wrote:
There are those buddhist monks who mummified themselves as well (Sokushinbutsu is the name: thankyou, internet).

Expect this kind of thing to feel right at home. While Egyptian mummies remain the classic go-to for this creature, the mummy section is foremost a discussion of faith, not merely embalming practices.

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
Sigh...I wonder how many subscriptions I can get away with...

All of them. ^_~

Dark Archive

Nice. Can't wait to see this.


F. Wesley Schneider wrote:

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:

Sigh...I wonder how many subscriptions I can get away with...

All of them. ^_~

Try tellin' that to Mrs. Mairkurion...


F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Few designers like hags more than me, and yes, the three primary mortal races of hag are going to together get the same number of pages as the other creatures. Breaking them up either separates the information across multiple books or causes one monster to dominate a single book, neither of which is any good. So they get their racial overview same as any other beastie.

Thanks, Wes - I was afraid you'd lump in the Night Hags with the others, although they have entirely different roles in D&D history (IMO). Night Hags fit better with a 'planes' themed book, which is why I hope the esteemed Mr. Stewart will devote some space to them in 'The Great Beyond' :).

Contributor

Dance of Ruin wrote:
Thanks, Wes - I was afraid you'd lump in the Night Hags with the others, although they have entirely different roles in D&D history (IMO). Night Hags fit better with a 'planes' themed book, which is why I hope the esteemed Mr. Stewart will devote some space to them in 'The Great Beyond' :).

Nope! I totally agree. While there's likely some relation, they're very different creatures now. And yeah, they get hit on a bit in Great Beyond, no worries!

Contributor

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Dance of Ruin wrote:
Thanks, Wes - I was afraid you'd lump in the Night Hags with the others, although they have entirely different roles in D&D history (IMO). Night Hags fit better with a 'planes' themed book, which is why I hope the esteemed Mr. Stewart will devote some space to them in 'The Great Beyond' :).
Nope! I totally agree. While there's likely some relation, they're very different creatures now. And yeah, they get hit on a bit in Great Beyond, no worries!

They're there in The Great Beyond, and they've moved to a slightly different cosmological neighborhood versus the Planescape archetype, but one that I think actually fits them considerably better. I actually went into considerable detail on them and their patron goddess Alazhra the Dream Eater, but as a result of my mangling the concept of a word limit on a manuscript, a good chunk of that section was cut for space.

At least that's what I'll assume was the reason, as opposed to it sucking and the Paizo guys hating it. ;)

Of course it might reappear in something in the future I suppose. And yes, I would -really- like to do something with the Night Hags in the future if given the option to do so. Hint Hint Hint Wesley. Wink Wink.


Todd Stewart wrote:
They're there in The Great Beyond, and they've moved to a slightly different cosmological neighborhood versus the Planescape archetype, but one that I think actually fits them considerably better. I actually went into considerable detail on them and their patron goddess Alazhra the Dream Eater... (snip)

Great, I can't wait to see what you have come up with :)...

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
And yeah, they get hit on a bit in Great Beyond, no worries!

... although the concept of hitting on a Night Hag ... ugh ;).

Todd Stewart wrote:
And yes, I would -really- like to do something with the Night Hags in the future if given the option to do so. Hint Hint Hint Wesley. Wink Wink.

+1!

Dark Archive

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:

Sigh...I wonder how many subscriptions I can get away with...

All of them. ^_~

Try tellin' that to Mrs. Mairkurion...

Or Mrs. Asgetrion... *sigh*


OT:

Spoiler:
Mrs. M saying of the week: "Those little plastic miniatures you got yesterday made you so happy...why don't you go back today and get some more."

Scarab Sages

Asgetrion wrote:
Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:

Sigh...I wonder how many subscriptions I can get away with...

All of them. ^_~

Try tellin' that to Mrs. Mairkurion...
Or Mrs. Asgetrion... *sigh*

And it's not like we can hide it from them. They just....know!


Mrs. M is an accountant...only a fool would attempt hiding anything financial from her! (And Mrs. M didn't marry no fool, just to cut short all foreseen retorts.)

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
Mrs. M is an accountant...only a fool would attempt hiding anything financial from her! (And Mrs. M didn't marry no fool, just to cut short all foreseen retorts.)

Sounds like a good woman. Don't let her leaf.

Dark Archive

Aberzombie wrote:
Asgetrion wrote:
Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:

Sigh...I wonder how many subscriptions I can get away with...

All of them. ^_~

Try tellin' that to Mrs. Mairkurion...
Or Mrs. Asgetrion... *sigh*
And it's not like we can hide it from them. They just....know!

Yeah... these days I order Paizo stuff to my FLGS, and try to "sneak" the books into our bookshelf. Doesn't work really well, because she seems to have memorized what I already have...

If I would try to get the subscriptions, she would flay me alive!


I loved what F. Wesley Schneider & Paizo did in Pathfinder #8. And if the Nosferatu in that issue was any "omen" of things to come, I'm gonna love this as well.

Dark Mistress is right though. Would've been nice to get the brain gears turning for an all night nail-biting Halloween session! Oh well, all the more planning for next year.

Ravenloft anyone?

Though seriously I'm a horror junkie & I love the classic stuff from the Silents to the Hammer films & I can't wait to see Paizo's take on some of the gothic horror tales.

Any chance that some folklore will be added/taken into account with any of the monsters? The Romanian Strigoi/vampire stuff for example?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Count Orlok wrote:
Any chance that some folklore will be added/taken into account with any of the monsters? The Romanian Strigoi/vampire stuff for example?

Yes. A very good chance.


James Jacobs wrote:
Count Orlok wrote:
Any chance that some folklore will be added/taken into account with any of the monsters? The Romanian Strigoi/vampire stuff for example?
Yes. A very good chance.

I assumed it would given the track record. I've been digging the Lovecraft & general horror movie influence. Genius at work! You guys keep it up, and I'll keep nudging folks towards your products & game system.

Scarab Sages

This is awesome, I'm running Ravenloft next year and am planning to convert everything (or as much as possible) to PFRPG - w00!

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Updated author listing: James Jacobs, Rob McCreary, and F. Wesley Schneider

Dark Archive

I just hope the new artwork when you get it, is as cool as the current pic. I do like the current one, even if it only questionably matches.

Paizo Employee Managing Developer

Vic Wertz wrote:
Updated author listing: James Jacobs, Rob McCreary, and F. Wesley Schneider

Nice trio there!

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pawns, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

Is this thing mostly written already? If not, may I suggest/request including some ghost classes, a la Ghostwalk. I thought that book had some great ideas and a lot of potential, but fell right at the end of 3.0 and then fell off the radar. But the ability to become a ghost and then get better at it was genius. I also appreciated that ghosts were NOT undead, just restless souls. Wraiths and allips, etc. might be bad, but ghosts just aren't ready to go on yet. Anyway, I look forward to this regardless.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Mosaic wrote:
Is this thing mostly written already? If not, may I suggest/request including some ghost classes, a la Ghostwalk.

I wouldn't count on it. These books are rules-light, and the Ghostwalk Campaign Setting was... well, its own campaign setting. Also, the "Revisited" line seems to focus on creatures more as NPCs/enemies, not as potential PCs.


wspatterson wrote:
Dark_Mistress wrote:
Very cool though it is coming out a month late though. Really should be a Oct release.
I have to agree. October would have been very appropriate.

Maybe we'll get lucky and they'll release the pdf on the 31st. This does have kinda a feel of "we where aiming for October but the printer couldn't schedule it."

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Mosaic wrote:
Is this thing mostly written already? If not, may I suggest/request including some ghost classes, a la Ghostwalk. I thought that book had some great ideas and a lot of potential, but fell right at the end of 3.0 and then fell off the radar. But the ability to become a ghost and then get better at it was genius. I also appreciated that ghosts were NOT undead, just restless souls. Wraiths and allips, etc. might be bad, but ghosts just aren't ready to go on yet. Anyway, I look forward to this regardless.

The goal of this book is, like the other Monsters Revisited books, to present 10 classic monsters and revitalize them with new material and to look back at what makes them classic and reintroduce some old material from myth and legend. There'll be some crunch in there as well, but it'll be crunch to support the flavor; new feats or powers or whatever for the monsters to be used as monsters. Details on how to play these monsters as PCs isn't what the book's about.

That said, I agree: Ghostwalk is genius.


James Jacobs wrote:
That said, I agree: Ghostwalk is genius.

Not to threadjack, perhaps these ideas could be explored in some future core rule book in 2010 or 2011?

They sounded intriquing.


Thraxus wrote:
Matthew Morris wrote:

Hmm, vampires...

Specific alergies (white ash stake vs generic wood stake)

Vampire detection (In Russian myth, a virgin boy riding a white horse could not walk over a vampire's grave for example)

Dhampires!

Russian lore also had iron nail through the forehead instead of the stake through the heart thing. I used that once in a Ravenloft game. Surprise the heck out of my players when the Vampire pulled the stake out.

I thought that Russian vampires were supposed to be decapitated in a single blow?

And I like Polish vamps for sheer ghoulishness. Not only do they stay active from noon to midnight, they sleep in a coffin literally floating in blood!


Eric Hinkle wrote:
And I like Polish vamps for sheer ghoulishness. Not only do they stay active from noon to midnight, they sleep in a coffin literally floating in blood!

Ah, that's how Carmilla does it in le Fanu's story. I had never heard of that before.

I'm hoping the "Vampire, Nosferatu" for Pathfinder RPG will have a Create Spawn ability. I found it odd that it lacked that when the template appeared in the adventure path.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

I've updated the image and description to match the finished product.


*salivates*

Oh man.

Dark Archive

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:

*salivates*

Oh man.

My thoughts exactly! Amazing cover! :)

Sovereign Court

Aww, Seoni vs Hot Female Vampires got changed. At least this cover is cool though.. but I'd have enjoyed looking at the old cover more. Ahem.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 8

Uzzy wrote:

Aww, Seoni vs Hot Female Vampires got changed. At least this cover is cool though.. but I'd have enjoyed looking at the old cover more. Ahem.

Hot female succubi. The art was reused from one of the modules.

I have to say, the new cover isn't doing it for me. I know vampires are big right now, and it's a nice vampire, but it doesn't seem very cover-worthy.

Paizo Employee Franchise Manager

Demiurge 1138 wrote:
I have to say, the new cover isn't doing it for me. I know vampires are big right now, and it's a nice vampire, but it doesn't seem very cover-worthy.

It's true, there's not a ton of action in the shot, nor any iconics, but it does evoke the classic vampire image. I could see this as the movie poster or book cover for a traditional adaptation of Dracula, for example.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Demiurge 1138 wrote:
I have to say, the new cover isn't doing it for me. I know vampires are big right now, and it's a nice vampire, but it doesn't seem very cover-worthy.

It does when you stop to think just HOW hot vampires are these days. Pathfinder loyalists and folks who post here know what's in the book and relatively unlikely to change their decision to buy based on what we do for the cover, but folks who see the cover on the shelf at a bookstore who like vampires (and there are a LOT of them out there) are likely to pick up the book and check it out even if they've never heard of Pathfinder. And presto: New customer, hopefully!


Demiurge 1138 wrote:

Hot female succubi. The art was reused from one of the modules.

Would you happen to remember which module offhand?

And I did immediately think succubus when I saw the old cover, and was disappointed when I discovered they aren't in this book; I think they're another monster with all kinds of untapped potential as major baddies, but they usually get stuck in a supporting role it seems...I'm hoping to see Paizo put something out in future with more succubi options, maybe in book of the damned vol. 2?

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