Pathfinder Companion: Dwarves of Golarion (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Companion: Dwarves of Golarion (PFRPG)
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Born ages ago in lightless caverns, the dwarves surged upward in pursuit of a divine prophecy, driving the feral orcs before them until they reached the surface world in the fabled Quest for Sky. Now established with their own lands and customs, the dwarves work their forges, sing songs of legendary heroes, brew signature beers, and wage war against evil humanoids and hideous monsters.

    Inside this Pathfinder Companion you’ll find:
  • Details on the dwarves of Golarion—where they live, what they eat, how they dress, and their ideas about work and war.
  • New combat feats for dwarven fighting styles.
  • History of the dwarven people.
  • Descriptions of the Five Kings Mountains, the oldest and most stable dwarven homeland.
  • Obscure magic of the dwarven gods.
  • Spells for ancestral communication, warding, and surviving the Darklands.
  • New character traits.
  • Game stats for three dwarf NPCs, suitable for hirelings or cohorts.

Written by David Eitelbach, Russ Taylor, JD Wiker, Keri Wiker, and Hank Woon

Each bimonthly 32-page Pathfinder Companion contains several player-focused articles exploring the volume’s theme as well as short articles with innovative new rules for social, magic, religious, and combat-focused characters, as well as a persona section detailing helpful NPCs and traits to better anchor the player to the campaign.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-204-3

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

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An Unessential Look at Typical Fantasy Dwarves

3/5

Dwarves of Golarion is one of the earlier entries in the Pathfinder Player's Companion line, and the first book dedicated to a specific race. The artwork, though serviceable, is clearly inferior to the current Paizo standard. The inside front cover of the book has a nice, full-page summary of Dwarf racial traits and a list of dwarven gods, while the inside back cover has a map of the Five Kings Mountain region that is rather-well detailed, containing over two-dozen settlements, fortresses, and mines. The 32 pages of the interior are divided into the following sections:

1. "Dwarves of Golarion" (10 pages): An introduction and overview to Dwarven physical, mental, and cultural norms. Everything from Dwarven diet to Dwarven fashion is covered here. Frankly, there's little that strays from the stereotypical fantasy notion of a dwarf, and players experienced with previous versions of D&D will find most of their preconceptions confirmed. There are a few pages on Golarion-specific history of the Dwarves which is reasonably interesting--events like the Quest for the Sky and places like the Sky Citadels offer some insight into Dwarven culture.

2. "Dwarven Character Traits" (1 1/2 pages): This section introduces eight race traits, six religion traits, six regional traits, and four magic traits. The traits are flavourful and tie in well to Golarion's conception of dwarves. Mechanically, they are certainly not game-breaking and for the most part rather bland in effect.

3. "The Five Kings Mountains" (8 pages): This is a gazetteer of the Five Kings Mountains, the center of Dwarven culture in known Golarion. Several major cities like Larrad, Highhelm, Kovlar, Rolgrimmdur, Taggoret, and Tar-Kazmukh receive at least a couple of paragraphs each. Other topics include natural hazards and foreign relations. Four pages of this section are actually about other Dwarven enclaves beyond the Five Kings Mountains, and cover the Darklands, Kalsgard, the Kodar Mountains, the Mindspin Mountains, the Shattered Range, and Osirion. This section would be extremely useful for GMs planning to run Dwarf-centered adventures in any of these locations. My guess is that most players probably don't need so much information and will just skim it.

4. "Combat" (2 pages): There's a brief, non-mechanical but flavourful description of legendary Dwarven combat tactics to start this section. Next, five Dwarven combat feats are covered and a new Dwarven weapon (the Dorn-Dergar) is introduced. The feats are really fun! If I had a Dwarf PC, I could definitely imagine taking some of them like Bounding Hammer or Sliding Axe Throw, as they have a nice Dwarf-specific flavour and would be effective in combat.

5. "Faith" (2 pages): This section is almost entirely new spells. Nine new spells are introduced, and all of them are divine spells for clerics, rangers, and paladins. An odd mechanic is set forth that limits these spells to worshippers of particular Dwarven deities unless a special ritual prayer is said.

6. "Magic" (2 pages): Three spells relating to veneration of one's ancestors are introduced for Dwarven clerics and bards only. There's one new spell for Dwarven rangers & druids and two new rune-focussed spells for sorcerors and wizards.

7. "Persona" (4 pages): Three NPCs are given full stat blocks and descriptions. I still don't really see the value of including NPCs like this in a Player's Companion, but it has potential value for GMs who buy the book and need to provide a contact, a cohort, etc. There's also a one-page overview of Dwarven deities, each of whom only has a paragraph or so. I'm not sure why this wasn't placed in the "Faith" section, and the description of each is quite cursory.

8. "Social" (2 pages): Three topics--Dwarven beards, ales, and craftsmanship--are discussed. Definitely not essential, but could be good for players wanting to add a little more flavour to their PCs. A couple of the ales even provide alchemical bonuses for an hour or so, an idea which I can safely say I've never seen before.

Overall, there's not a lot in this book that is especially memorable or innovative. A player with this book and a player without this book would probably portray Dwarves in Golarion equally well, especially now that the feats and spells would be available on various websites. If anything, I'd recommend this book more to GMs who need a relatively quick overview of Dwarven history in Golarion and the Five Kings Mountains for a campaign set in the area.


Adequate, but... I expected a bit more.

3/5

The only other races-of-Golarion book I have is the Gnomes of Golarion... which I really love, so it may have raised a rather high bar for me.

In both cases, I bought the splat books because I was picking up a character of that race, and I wanted to get a better feel for what it means to BE that race, especially in Golarion.

Gnomes of Golarion was a great book that gave me ideas on family structure, how long it takes to 'grow up', and, with the introduction of the Bleaching concept, really made the gnomes of Golarion feel like their own unique thing.

....and then there's Dwarves of Golarion.

I don't think it's an awful book on its own, but compared to Gnomes, I was disappointed. It felt much lighter on content. I don't really know at what age dwarves are considered mature, what the rate of childbirth is among the species, if a dwarf would have lots of siblings or very few, what gender roles are like other than a references to the wimmen staying home and the men goin' out to fight (which, if that's how dwarven culture is, fine, but... make it clearer to me than just off-hand references), what family structures are like, how the settlements are ruled and organized other than 'monarchy'...

Judging by the book, there are exactly three life paths you will take if you are a dwarf: you will Craft Things, you will Fight Things, or you will Heal Things. Presumably the dwarven culture has room for people who aren't actively being craftsmen (craftsdwarves?), fighters, or clerics, but it's not really outlined at all what those might be.

Many of the specific discussions of the dwarven culture seemed like they were there just to elaborate on mechanical things-- like the numerous references to dwarves not being slowed down by their gear.

Perhaps most damningly to me, there just didn't feel like there was anything new or original in here that goes beyond Tolkien's dwarves. There were a few mentions of the dwarf-tribes of Garund, sure, but beyond that this was nothing but the dwarf trope of fantasy for the last 50 years: forge, beer, beards. Golarion dwarves seem interchangeable with the dwarves of a half-dozen fantasy settings, and after the unique feel of the Golarion gnomes, I did find that a little disappointing.

Nothing in here was awful. But nothing was terribly surprising or interesting, either.


Solid Book but rather Bare Bones.

2/5

This book does have some of interesting background concerning dwarves in Golarion. It has a special focus on the region known as the Five Kings Mountains. The overarching history of the dwarf race is given along with some neat cultural tidbits. The new spells items and traits are fun as well.

For me though the book lacked a lot of the depth that I really love in source books. The addition of a dwarf name table a page of common dwarven words with some language structure would have been appreciated. This book just failed to touch on so many potentially interesting points. What type of calendar do dwarves use to track time? (A timeline would have been another good addition) How about listing some dwarven holidays? What types of animals do dwarves like to keep as pets? Are there any popular dwarf sports? It would be nice to see sketches of dwarven clothes and jewelry. In the end other than some general history specific to dwarves in Golarion you won't be learning anything new about the Stout Folk.


Dwarves to every mountain range!

5/5

This book managed two seemingly conflicting things - to keep the traditional feel of the Dwarven race (one of the most conservative races that even in Eberron stayed rather unchanged if compared to others) and at the same time to add some new features that spice up the solid dwarven gravy. It's nice to see that they are people like any other with brighter and darker aspects on them.


impressive from so many angles

5/5

After reading the book I have to say I am very impressed. It details the background of the dwarves and their collectivist culture. Describes their attitudes and how they were raised thus giving rise to their strengths but also glaring weaknesses.

The history section was filled with so much bloodshed and tragedy with one standing point; even the hardy dwarves have been routed and experienced low points in their racial history.

The new feats were balanced and the traits were unique, especially the regional ones. All in all a very realistic book almost reminiscent of historical texts on ancient civilisations. A very well thought-out product.


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Grand Lodge

Craig Shackleton wrote:

I like dwarves.

Just sayin'

It's true. Craig loves him some dwarfs. Probably cuz he's so short and stumpy.

I'm pretty sure that I've killed off a dwarf of his in every edition: from Zeffin in "B1: In Search of the Unknown" in our first session 29 years ago, right up to his first character in the-edition-which-shall-not-be-named.


Mammy Mæch'Hæmmær wrote:
Mammy Mæch'Hæmmær wrote:
"Ah'll tak' ye it ay thes warld Stiggy, jist as Ah birthed ye in. Lest born, farst tae die. Ah aye kent ay ye."
KaeYoss wrote:

Can we please set down right now that Golarion dwarves don't talk like that? Make them order-lovers who abhor accents or slang!

That alone would make that book so worth buying.

"By th' hairs ay mah undahbeart, whit kin' ay pish is 'at. Yu'r th' dolpid goblabairns 'a dinnae gab reit!"

*WHACK*

Wadd? Eich vaschtehn kä wodd. Awwa wenn dau so komisch schwätze duscht, mache eich dadd aach!


James Jacobs wrote:

I don't like dwarves. Doesn't mean that NO one likes dwarves. Not everything Paizo publishes needs to be something I like! :)

In any case, my name's up top as the author just as a placeholder. We don't have an author yet (we're assigning one this week, in fact). In fact... whenever you see my name listed as an author when we release a new product, it's pretty sure that, like the cover image, it's just a placeholder.

ANYway... the key is to assign an author who LOVES dwarves, so that way they get the quality writing they deserve!

James, you just haven't realised how much you really love dwarves - yet...

DWARVES!!DWARVES!!DWARVES!!DWARVES!!DWARVES!! yes!!!!

I'm so happy, that I'll postpone whining about a BOOK ABOUT GNOMES for a couple of days!
(By the way, really think that halflings are boring...)

GRU


I'll be dleighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.


Eric Hinkle wrote:
I'll be dleighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.

I don't know. They've been overpowered in 3.5e, gods know why - maybe to make them more attractive to players.

All it achieved was to make them more attractive to powergamers.

Sadly, the number of decent roleplayers I've seen use dwarves is the minority. The majority is powergamers or people who want a convencient excuse to play a racist, sexist, rude sociopath. Usually it was both.


KaeYoss wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
I'll be delighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.

I don't know. They've been overpowered in 3.5e, gods know why - maybe to make them more attractive to players.

All it achieved was to make them more attractive to powergamers.

There I've got to respectfully disagree. I don't see the 3.5 dwarves as "overpowered". Though I'm sorry to hear it made things difficult for you in your own gaming.

KaeYoss wrote:


Sadly, the number of decent roleplayers I've seen use dwarves is the minority. The majority is powergamers or people who want a convencient excuse to play a racist, sexist, rude sociopath. Usually it was both.

A "racist, sexist, rude sociopath"? Sorry to hear it. It sounds odd to me, though, as all the racist-sexist-sociopath characters I've seen played in D&D used to be half-orcs but have since become elves.

Though there is a halfling ranger I've read about. ;)


Mammy Mæch'Hæmmær wrote:
Erik Mona wrote:

Ha ha ha ha! I knew this would happen.

You gnomes have a glong gway to go.

"Noo thes striplin fellah gabs a bree wit. Aw ye feckin' gnomes hae ur a puckl'a lettahs 'e swap aroond. We Khazak hae coolchah."

Sunna tha wah cah gri tuih ochyer gret narsty tairlt!


Kannonfodder wrote:
Craig Shackleton wrote:

I like dwarves.

Just sayin'

And we dwarves like Craig Shackleton.

Aye! After I give 'im a few pints o' brew, I'll be askin' him 'bout that Hamatulastu style I got beat with...


Eric Hinkle wrote:


There I've got to respectfully disagree. I don't see the 3.5 dwarves as "overpowered". Though I'm sorry to hear it made things difficult for you in your own gaming.

To be honest, if they weren't that overpowered, the problem players would find something else. Still, no need to make their life too easy.

Dwarves get too much in 3.5e: They get a bonus on one of the most powerful and versatile ability scores, get a penalty one the one that is the least useful (at least to powergamers who don't play a paladin or sorcerer - as we know they don't play bards), get a +2 bonus to most saving throws in the game (much of it is magic, and those who aren't are often poison). They also get weapon familiarity.

In essence, if you're powergaming, there's basically no reason not to go for dwarf if you want to play a fighter, since you get no disadvantage at all. And for many other classes, they're a too strong choice, too.

Eric Hinkle wrote:


A "racist, sexist, rude sociopath"?

Yes.

racist: "Elves are vermin, and humans are little better. The rest doesn't matter, anyway."

sexist: "If it doesn't have a beard, it's not fit to be anything than a slave."

You get the idea. Have seen that so often. I broke several Sticks of Pain on these people.

Eric Hinkle wrote:


Sorry to hear it. It sounds odd to me, though, as all the racist-sexist-sociopath characters I've seen played in D&D used to be half-orcs but have since become elves.

I have seen one particular player who played some of the most horrible elf characters, but other than that the elves were okay.

Seems that in my neck of the woods, the guys who enjoy playing antisocial characters and the powergamers are quite often the same.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion, Pawns, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

Gnomes shouldn't be complaining. The elves and dwarves are having all their secrets revealed. Gnomes don't want or need that kind of attention. ;)

On that note.. I'm shocked the dwarves aren't tearing this place up in joy.

Sovereign Court Contributor

Interesting discussion.

I can certainly see a player trying to justify playing a "racist" character based on being a dwarf, but like some others, I've seen it happen with elves a lot more often, both in D&D and in other fantasy sources. I'll support that with the claim that it has most often been elf rangers (remember when favoured enemies were racial enemies?), and dwarves don't typically make good rangers (and used to be forbidden from the class).

Still, I'd say that unfortunately D&D/Pathfinder support this kind of racism to a degree. Of course, it isn't quite the same as real world racism, since it's specieism or something like that. But the fact remains that on most fantasy RPGs it is okay to kill things and take their stuff as long as they are green-skinned. The line blurs further when you get into elf-dwarf relations etc.

As far as power-gamers playing dwarves, I'm a little surprised to hear that, since most power-gamers don't play fighters, and let's face it, the place where dwarves outshine humans is as fighters. I'd say though, that they only outshine humans when you already want to play a fighter that is typical of dwarf fighters. Of course, I know that you (Kaeyoss) don't subscribe to the belief that fighters are underpowered, but most power gamers seem to.

I also have to say that I don't really subscribe to the funny accent model of dwarves myself. I gather that started with Warcraft (maybe before) and I don't have anything particularly against it, but it's never quite done it for me, at least as a primary depiction. In many ways, I most often think of dwarves in a somewhat Roman context. Not that I want to dress them in togas, but the social and military structure match for me, and I like to play off that (while ignoring the overt trappings). One of my all-time favourite characters was a dwarf named Hadrius Breechblock (killed by my other brother) who was a siege engineer. He was a fighter rogue, and every night he built fieldworks around the party's campsite. That's how I see dwarves.

Grand Lodge

Rats! I missed one.


Craig Shackleton wrote:


I can certainly see a player trying to justify playing a "racist" character based on being a dwarf, but like some others, I've seen it happen with elves a lot more often, both in D&D and in other fantasy sources.

I hear that all the time. It's just that my personal experience is quite different. While there are bad elf players, I've had more bad dwarf players, and they were more annoying to boot.

Craig Shackleton wrote:


Still, I'd say that unfortunately D&D/Pathfinder support this kind of racism to a degree.

I don't know: PF seems to work against it. Elves of Golarion points out that there's no enmity between elves and dwarves, though it is at least in part because they have little enough to do with each other that they don't wearing on each others' nerves.

I certainly hope that DoG puts an end to all bad dwarf stereotypes (and I've been doing my part by deriding the racist dwarf in our RotRL group by pointing out that he's quite undwarven in his racist and beardist ways).

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
KaeYoss wrote:


Sadly, the number of decent roleplayers I've seen use dwarves is the minority. The majority is powergamers or people who want a convencient excuse to play a racist, sexist, rude sociopath. Usually it was both.

Tell me about it, KaeYoss. I live in a post-WFRP community which means that Elves are PANSY FEMININE SISSIES and Dwarves are REAL MEN, TRUE STUFF MADE OF BEER AND IRON !

The blame is on Games Workshop making Gotrek their equivalent of Drizzt and never coming up with a comparable Elven "iconic", but I'm somewhat jaded.

Granted one of my players took a novelty directiony with his Dwarf, making him a master cook and purveyor of exotic meal recpies (as opposed to usual "MOAR BEER !" apporach), but the problem persists. Here's to hoping Paizo dwarves break the stereotypes. You guys hit it perfect with Gnomes and very well with Elves.


Please, please no STUPID ass scottish accents.

Or any accents. I like dwarves, but I hate that moronic, WoW cast-off accent. This is one area that should have no influence from that source.

I have two types of dwarf players. People with meaningful stories and personalities, often focused on family or matters of duty and honor, OR dwarves with a ****ing accent.

Whoever writes it, no accents.

--

Can't wait for this book!

Scarab Sages

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
KaeYoss wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
I'll be dleighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.

I don't know. They've been overpowered in 3.5e, gods know why - maybe to make them more attractive to players.

All it achieved was to make them more attractive to powergamers.

Sadly, the number of decent roleplayers I've seen use dwarves is the minority. The majority is powergamers or people who want a convencient excuse to play a racist, sexist, rude sociopath. Usually it was both.

Hi KaeYoss,

I had a similar series of bad encounters with elf players back in the 2e days. Elves seemed to be the minmaxer race of choice in those days, and the obnoxious players seemed to love them.

Personnaly, I love dwarves. I love to play them, and I love to read about dwarf characters. I like the positive aspects of the race: courage, loyalty, love of ale, axes, and such.

I think the Scottish accent thing started with the R.A. Salvatore books. I more picture dwarves with Scandanavian or German accents myself, if at all.


Boerngrim wrote:
Personnaly, I love dwarves. I love to play them, and I love to read about dwarf characters. I like the positive aspects of the race: courage, loyalty, love of ale, axes, and such.

Same here. They always reminded me of my relations, to tell you the truth, even in appearance to some extent -- short, stocky, blunt-yet-polite in speech, and as tough as rawhide.

Boerngrim wrote:


I think the Scottish accent thing started with the R.A. Salvatore books. I more picture dwarves with Scandanavian or German accents myself, if at all.

I can't speak for anyone else, but I always figured on dwarves having accents like the Katzenjammer Kids. "Now ve go and vork in the mines for a day or three, den ve have de beer und schnitzel, ja?"


A definite must-add. I'll be interested in seeing what makes Golarion dwarves unique. I've always been a big fan of dwarves, despite the common gaming stereotypes that have haunted them for so long.


vagrant-poet wrote:


Or any accents. I like dwarves, but I hate that moronic, WoW cast-off accent. This is one area that should have no influence from that source.

The dumb accent is far older than WoW. They stole that themselves.

Boerngrim wrote:


I had a similar series of bad encounters with elf players back in the 2e days. Elves seemed to be the minmaxer race of choice in those days, and the obnoxious players seemed to love them.

I knew ODP (obnoxious dwarf players) even in 2e.

The fun part is that in 3e, elves were not that overpowered, dwarves were, and the big "STOP THE DWARF POWERGAMING" wave someone didn't occur. To me, that shows that the "min-maxer" angle was just an excuse for elf-haters to bash elves.

I think it's all part of a big inferiority complex: Elves usually look good, those guys have spent years telling themselves that they're hideous nerds, so they hate the jocks. On the other hand, dwarves can be looked down on (literally and figuratively) by them - so they think - and so they're liked, as the Scapegoat race!

Boerngrim wrote:


Personnaly, I love dwarves. I love to play them, and I love to read about dwarf characters. I like the positive aspects of the race: courage, loyalty, love of ale, axes, and such.

Courage is pretty much an universal trait. I see few if any standard races that aren't courageous.

Dwarven loyalty is usually to their clan and their traditions. Stuff that never makes sense to me. Traditions have to prove themselves to me before I become loyal to them, and as for family... the less said the better.

Alcoholism isn't really a virtue, I'd say.

And a love of wealth and weapons isn't something to be proud of, too.

Shadowborn wrote:

A definite must-add. I'll be interested in seeing what makes Golarion dwarves unique.

Not hating elves, or anyone without a beard, would be more than enough. You'd probably not recognise them if they didn't flood that companion with pictures of beardy short fellas and write "DWARF" underneath.

If they can do a couple more unique things with them, they'll replace Moradin as the main D&D dwarf deity.

Shadowborn wrote:


I've always been a big fan of dwarves, despite the common gaming stereotypes that have haunted them for so long.


Well, I for one, Kaeyoss, am convinced by your generalizations about people who play dwarves and understand that my self degradation is an embarrassment to both myself and those I play with.

I was foolish to think that it would be fun to add a little humanity to a hilarious and tired old stereotype!

In fact, I now think the term dwarf itself is demeaning to those who suffer from actual dwarfism and hereby swear to fight a battle everlasting against the munchkin nitwits who embrace this core race!

TO ARMS!

Grand Lodge

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

YYYYYYYYYYEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS


"Eh'd loch tae shaur e wee hoozlin' ditty wi' mah Khazak brethren, thocht frae enbred leid minin' clans 'ey main be."

...

"Ahem..."

...

<Singing now...>

"Oan th' fields ay Grivwhartle 'e dwarves ay Morebattle did faa.
Sooch battle 'ey waged,
Sooch coorage 'ey staged,
Ne'er seen by ye aw
'Ey answered 'e caaaaaaaawwwwwwwww!"

<Stig does a belly bouncing, grunting dance solo.>

"O' the bravest 'ey lost 'e dwarvest was Migweld MacKrackennnn!
'E charged en attacked
'Eir melons 'e cracked
'E dwarf 'e right smacked 'em
En left right he macked 'emmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm!"

<Another solo...>

"But buck if he vied, when he shoods hae gain flied!
En 'e dragon ay Grath
Gae 'eem a bath
En in acid 'e fried
En 'at ale hoozlah diiiiiiiiiieeeeeeeed!

Lift yer tankards tae Migweld Mackrackennnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn!"

<On that last note Stig lifts his tankard and downs it in one gulp.>


Got I just can't stop myself.

The shame.

No fun shall be had around here.

Move along.


Awa' an bile yer heid!


Eric Hinkle wrote:
I'll be dleighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.

Oh, we'll make sure that dwarves get plenty of respect in Pathfinder.

Paizo Employee Director of Brand Strategy

David Eitelbach wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
I'll be dleighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.
Oh, we'll make sure that dwarves get plenty of respect in Pathfinder.

You tell 'em, intern!


Kruelaid wrote:

Well, I for one, Kaeyoss, am convinced by your generalizations about people who play dwarves and understand that my self degradation is an embarrassment to both myself and those I play with.

I was foolish to think that it would be fun to add a little humanity to a hilarious and tired old stereotype!

In fact, I now think the term dwarf itself is demeaning to those who suffer from actual dwarfism and hereby swear to fight a battle everlasting against the munchkin nitwits who embrace this core race!

TO ARMS!

Aye! To arms!

Ah ... what?


Kannonfodder wrote:

Aye! To arms!

Ah ... what?

Haha, now you must kill yourself!


GRU wrote:


(By the way, really think that halflings are boring...)

GRU

Blasphemy! :shakesfist:

BTW, the Scots-dwarves alts on this thread had me cracking up - glad I haven't left the house yet. ^_^


David Eitelbach wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
I'll be dleighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.
Oh, we'll make sure that dwarves get plenty of respect in Pathfinder.

"Mammy seen ye lookin' at 'er striplin'. Ye ken she's nae abune a wee thigh crushin' wi' a humankin'. Aw in fin."


They can tak' oour lives, but they cannae tak' oour troousers!


David Eitelbach wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
I'll be dleighted to buy this when it comes out. Dwarves never seem to get the respect they deserve in RPGs.
Oh, we'll make sure that dwarves get plenty of respect in Pathfinder.

For example, they have a lot of respect for kobolds, goblins, small children, ferrets, gnomes, the sun, water....

And with "respect", I mean of course "sheer abject terror"! :D

Liberty's Edge

Whoohoo!!


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Is this really written by James Jacobs? Or is his name a stand-in again here? I remember James professing to not being the greatest dwarf fan on several occasions...

Contributor

Zaister wrote:
Is this really written by James Jacobs? Or is his name a stand-in again here? I remember James professing to not being the greatest dwarf fan on several occasions...

There are several different writers on this one.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Zaister wrote:
Is this really written by James Jacobs? Or is his name a stand-in again here? I remember James professing to not being the greatest dwarf fan on several occasions...

The authors are still being chosen, but since we had to put this up online before we nailed that part down, I got to be the placeholder; I'm not actually writing this one.


James Jacobs wrote:
Zaister wrote:
Is this really written by James Jacobs? Or is his name a stand-in again here? I remember James professing to not being the greatest dwarf fan on several occasions...
The authors are still being chosen, but since we had to put this up online before we nailed that part down, I got to be the placeholder; I'm not actually writing this one.

Why not use a pseudonym as a place holder?

P Seu Donim or something

RPG Superstar 2011 Top 32

Turin the Mad wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Zaister wrote:
Is this really written by James Jacobs? Or is his name a stand-in again here? I remember James professing to not being the greatest dwarf fan on several occasions...
The authors are still being chosen, but since we had to put this up online before we nailed that part down, I got to be the placeholder; I'm not actually writing this one.

Why not use a pseudonym as a place holder?

P Seu Donim or something

Hmmm ... Sue D. Nihm would work :)

Grand Lodge

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
The authors are still being chosen, but since we had to put this up online before we nailed that part down, I got to be the placeholder; I'm not actually writing this one.

You should only consider authors who are short. The author should not be tall. A tall author will not have the proper "perspective."

That is all.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Turin the Mad wrote:
Why not use a pseudonym as a place holder?

I'm not really sure why we don't use placeholders. Though I'd use "Author(s) to be announced" instead of a fake name.

Maybe I'll do that starting with the next batch.


Alan Smithee

Dark Archive

Ed Greenwood did a nice job with his Dwarves Deep accessory. One of the things I enjoyed the most was dwarven steel. I hope that you do something like that again.

Silver Crusade

thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!

was hoping the dwarves would get the next racial book

again, thanks!

RM

Sovereign Court Contributor

Vic Wertz wrote:
Turin the Mad wrote:
Why not use a pseudonym as a place holder?

I'm not really sure why we don't use placeholders. Though I'd use "Author(s) to be announced" instead of a fake name.

Maybe I'll do that starting with the next batch.

I always assumed Amazon and such other places that need your publication schedule way in advance wanted actual names. Although I know some products get listed as written by "Paizo Staff."

Scarab Sages

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
KaeYoss wrote:


Dwarven loyalty is usually to their clan and their traditions. Stuff that never makes sense to me. Traditions have to prove themselves to me before I become loyal to them, and as for family... the less said the better.

Alcoholism isn't really a virtue, I'd say.

And a love of wealth and weapons isn't something to be proud of, too.

Dwarven loyalty is also loyalty to their friends and companions. A loyalty born of mutual respect, affection, and trust. Dwarves are often depicted risking and giving their lives in defense of their friends. That is admirable in my book.

There is a big difference between loving ale, and being addicted to it. In my mind loving ale means you enjoy it. Being an alcoholic means you need it.

Loving a well crafted weapon that you use to defend yourself in a world full of monsters with pointy teeth and terrible claws that would otherwise find you to be a soft snack makes perfect sense. Appreciating the craftsmanship and beauty in some of those weapons is admirable in my opinion.

I never said that love of wealth was admirable, but let's be honest here, a large component of the "fantasy" in D&D is seeking out wonderous treasures.

Scarab Sages

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

Woot! Count me in...oh wait..i subscribe already

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Craig Shackleton wrote:
Vic Wertz wrote:
Turin the Mad wrote:
Why not use a pseudonym as a place holder?

I'm not really sure why we don't use placeholders. Though I'd use "Author(s) to be announced" instead of a fake name.

Maybe I'll do that starting with the next batch.

I always assumed Amazon and such other places that need your publication schedule way in advance wanted actual names. Although I know some products get listed as written by "Paizo Staff."

Yeah—It wouldn't surprise me if the solicitations we send out to book distribution need real names, but paizo.com sure doesn't.

Dark Archive

James Jacobs wrote:
Zaister wrote:
Is this really written by James Jacobs? Or is his name a stand-in again here? I remember James professing to not being the greatest dwarf fan on several occasions...
The authors are still being chosen, but since we had to put this up online before we nailed that part down, I got to be the placeholder; I'm not actually writing this one.

Any luck with Ed Greenwood, Steven Schend, Eric Boyd or George "The Beardless One" Krashos? Sean and Craig would okay, too, I guess... ;P


Boerngrim wrote:


Dwarven loyalty is also loyalty to their friends and companions. A loyalty born of mutual respect, affection, and trust. Dwarves are often depicted risking and giving their lives in defense of their friends.

When did that happen?

Let me ask you something: If the dwarf had to decide between his companion and his clan. What would be the default choice? His friends?

Nah, didn't think so, either. :P

Boerngrim wrote:


Loving a well crafted weapon that you use to defend yourself in a world full of monsters with pointy teeth and terrible claws that would otherwise find you to be a soft snack makes perfect sense. Appreciating the craftsmanship and beauty in some of those weapons is admirable in my opinion.

Being happy and thankful that you're not molested by kobolds is one thing. Rubbing the weapon all day and going "my precious" is creepy.

I know a guy who likes weapons - and we count the days until he snaps and lays waste to his former school.

Boerngrim wrote:


I never said that love of wealth was admirable, but let's be honest here, a large component of the "fantasy" in D&D is seeking out wonderous treasures.

I often hear people bash D&D based on this. It's one thing to acknowledge that it's popular to go adventuring for greed. It's another to have a race that is proud of that trait and devotes most of their art to it.

Vic Wertz wrote:


I'm not really sure why we don't use placeholders. Though I'd use "Author(s) to be announced" instead of a fake name.

A compromise, maybe?

Toby Announced!


golem101 wrote:
YES!! *happy_dance*

This should replace my 2nd edition book that I've been making totally dogeared. That damn book looked like it had more wear and tear on it than a rental car at O'Hare International.

I can't wait.

For some odd reason, there seems to be a quality explosion in the mass majority of Paizo releases, which is awesome. I remember the mid 90's of TSR were plagued by Red Steel and a few other not too great ideas amid the "I thought" awesomeness of Planescape.

Which to others, Planescape was where we snagged story-happy emo types from local d10 games, muwhahahaha.

Thank you, Paizo, for giving me a reason to find a second job amid the gaming!

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