Western City RPG

Our Price: $19.95

Discontinued

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DRAW, ya varmint!

A roleplaying game designed so everyone can play... as players!

Western City introduces immersive mechanics so all the players share the spotlight without anyone being the gamemaster. Toss your chips in the pot where the story matters most to you, and work together to bring a spaghetti western to life around your gaming table.

Frame the story and design your own High Noons. Strive to fulfill your character's goals, while stepping into the shoes of a supporting cast you have a stake in. Come on down to Western City...

...or are you yella?

Product Availability

Discontinued

This product has been discontinued by the manufacturer or is no longer being carried by our distributor.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

MGP6136


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Dark Archive

im sorry but this tells me nothing about the game mechanics. Is it d20, or is it fully original?

Contributor

Another Screen Name wrote:
im sorry but this tells me nothing about the game mechanics. Is it d20, or is it fully original?

Western City is fully original. It has a new, innovative "cooperative GMing" system (where the players each take turns as GM). It's actually more like a board game/RPG mix (though it could be used just as an RPG, I suppose). It's been about a year since I worked on this game (as an editor), so all of the details are a little fuzzy.

Sovereign Court

How many pages?

Contributor

Zootcat wrote:
How many pages?

88 pages.

Dark Archive

Sounds original enough to be worth a try

Contributor

Another Screen Name wrote:
Sounds original enough to be worth a try

I think it's pretty fun. But then again, I'm partial to westerns. ;)

Dark Archive

Hank Woon wrote:
Another Screen Name wrote:
Sounds original enough to be worth a try
I think it's pretty fun. But then again, I'm partial to westerns. ;)

Hank, how would this game compare (mechanically and thematically) to other popular western RPGs, such as 'Dogs in the Vineyard', 'Deadlands' and 'Aces & Eights'?


I own and have read through Western City - but haven't played it as yet.

It's a collaborative storytelling game, so no GM/Player divide - instead everybody bids to be involved in scenes throughout the game as PCs or playing NPCs and antagonists. The game follows a loose narrative structure of scenes agreed in rough outline in advance by all of the players.

For example a session structure, agreed in advance by the players might be - a train pulls into town, a stolen kiss, an argument in the saloon, a disussion in the sherrifs office, a hurried exit from the livery stables, a sad goodbye at the mittchell farmstead, a shootout in the high street, at the cemetary. Players then build a narrative from these scenes incorpotrating their characters aims/goals and weaving NPCs in and out of teh story as things go along.

Looks and sounds very similar to Primetime Adventures - which our group absolutely loved.

Contributor

Asgetrion wrote:
Hank, how would this game compare (mechanically and thematically) to other popular western RPGs, such as 'Dogs in the Vineyard', 'Deadlands' and 'Aces & Eights'?

Well, the game isn't really meant to take itself seriously. It all takes place in "Western City," which is a generic Old West-style town. It's meant to capture the feel of old spaghetti westerns, so all of the characters, lingo, and so on is very cliche. A session is supposed to be a day in Western City, from sunup to sundown.

Dark Archive

Hank Woon wrote:
Asgetrion wrote:
Hank, how would this game compare (mechanically and thematically) to other popular western RPGs, such as 'Dogs in the Vineyard', 'Deadlands' and 'Aces & Eights'?

Well, the game isn't really meant to take itself seriously. It all takes place in "Western City," which is a generic Old West-style town. It's meant to capture the feel of old spaghetti westerns, so all of the characters, lingo, and so on is very cliche. A session is supposed to be a day in Western City, from sunup to sundown.

Is there any sort of "showdown" or "climax" that's supposed to take place at sundown? I mean, is it like the indie western RPGs in which the protagonists must deal with personal issues and serious themes, or is it basically a "D&D-goes-western" in which the PCs have some sort of a structured "adventure" that happens within one day (i.e. is it campaign-based, or is every session meant to be played with different characters)?

Contributor

Asgetrion wrote:


Is there any sort of "showdown" or "climax" that's supposed to take place at sundown? I mean, is it like the indie western RPGs in which the protagonists must deal with personal issues and serious themes, or is it basically a "D&D-goes-western" in which the PCs have some sort of a structured "adventure" that happens within one day (i.e. is it campaign-based, or is every session meant to be played with different characters)?

Both, actually. Every day follows this sort of structure with a big finale, but you can continue on with the same characters, treating each session as a separate episode of an ongoing Western TV show.


Western City is a game from three to five players and could enjoyed without the need for a gamemaster. By limiting the players’ resources, it is ensured that everybody receives a fair share of the game time.

In a gamemasterless game, it’s easy to run into problems with the various motivations of the individual characters. This is the reason why the game includes a “goal of the day” which gives both the characters and extras a direction for existing adventure. The players choose their motivations before the game to set up the events occurring during the adventure. The players align these goals together to provide a the so-called Line of Events, which provides the basic structure for the adventure to play.

Each player gets a handful of poker chips which can be used to introduce ideas or influence the direction the game takes. While preparing a scene, the players may disagree on how to frame it. The poker chips come into play here; players bid for the right to see their ideas happen in the scene. After each scene, the chips spent on ideas or narration rights are redistributed among the players. The player with the biggest influence on the scene just played does not get any chips back so that his influence on the next scene is limited. It doesn’t matter who starts the bidding. Players may decide at anytime during the bidding stage how many poker chips they are willing to spend to impose their will on the scene.

If you have more Questions, ask me. My English ist not very good, but it will work for some Questions.

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