Pathfinder Chronicles: Gods & Magic (OGL)

4.70/5 (based on 18 ratings)
Pathfinder Chronicles: Gods & Magic (OGL)
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Immortal Power Lies Within!

Creators of life, forgers of worlds, and rulers of reality—these are the gods and goddesses of the world. They have existed for eons. The countless worlds of the Great Beyond are their playgrounds and battlefields. Yet for all their vast power, it is not the gods of Golarion who shape nations and write history—this task falls instead to their greatest creations: the mortal races of the world. It is through their priests and paladins, their clerics and cultists that the gods make their will known in this world, be it for good or ill.

In Gods and Magic, you will learn not only of the core twenty deities of the Pathfinder Chronicles campaign setting, but of a multitude of other deities whose flocks, while smaller and more isolated, have just as much potential for greatness. Yet this book isn’t just for clerics—religion and faith are important factors in the lives of many, be they stalwart paladins, brave rangers, mysterious druids, or dedicated monks. Even those whose talents lie beyond the divine, such as the scholarly wizard or the god-fearing barbarian, find that faith has its advantages.

    Within this 64-page book you will find:
  • Detailed descriptions of the core twenty deities of the Pathfinder Chronicles campaign setting, complete with symbols and full illustrations
  • Details on over 40 additional deities, including the gods of dwarves and elves, gnomes and halflings, giants and dragons, and more
  • Over 20 new spells associated with the most powerful religions, yet usable by both arcane and divine spellcasters
  • Dozens of new magic items keyed to the world’s religions, ranging from minor trinkets to powerful artifacts

Written by Sean K Reynolds

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-139-8

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Almost perfect

5/5

Almost perfect guide to the Gods of Golarion. Personally Cayden Cailean is going to show up as a religion in all my campaigns, Golarion or non-Golarion-best God since Discworld's!
One Boo-Pharasma's "anti-abortion" views. Unless there are no such things as miscarriages on Golarion (that would apparently be caused by Pharasma), they make no sense whatsoever.


Deus ex Machina

5/5

This is a fun and very well done supplement for the Pathfinder Roleplaying game. It is mostly world specific, designed to be used for the world of Golarion.

The book/supplement is very well laid out. First we have a totally spiffy and handy chart of the Deities, with Domains, favorites weapon, and etc. This is almost worth the price of admission all by itself. This includes the lesser known deities, too, which is nice.

Each of the better known deities is given a nice spread, with a fantastic illustration of that deity. There a even score of these. Plenty of roleplaying info is given here, with backgrounds, philosophies, and everything you need or want. It even explains why Shelyn is packing a glaive.

There's also some cool magic items and spells as bonus materials.

The price is a tad steep, but for what you get, I think it's well worth it. Mind you, I admit this could be a "one copy per table" purchase, every player doesn't need his very own copy.


Portuguese - Br

4/5

Para jogadores do Pathfinder RPG este é um livro meio ultrapassado embora ainda seja a fonte com melhor custo beneficio sobre informações sobre os deuses de Golarion. Agora que os 20 artigos sobre os deuses serão completados com a quinta aventura de Skulls and Shackles, talvez seja feita uma nova compilação voltada para o Pathfinder RPG. Mas mesmo assim a parte sobre os deuses é muito boa e serve como ótima referencia sobre este novo panteão que embora não tenha uma tradição ou reconhecimento como os dos deuses de Forgotten Realms ou Dragonlance, são muito bem projetados e executados para se tornarem futuros clássicos e merecem uma chance.


This book is an absolute must-have

5/5

I have to be honest, I completely love this book. Without this book, picking deities basically consists of running your finger down the list of gods in the cleric's list, and finding someone who matches your alignment or vague ideals. At best, without this book, you could pick up the Campaign Setting book for $50. Not only does this book save you money, it adds an incredible amount of depth to the character creation process.

For the people who prefer the table approach, the inside cover offers a tabled list of 61 deities, both major and minor. They are laid out in the comprehensive setup we are all used to in the Core Rulebook. There being so many of them, they are really crammed in there, but the text is decently sized and easy to read.

The book itself starts off with a very brief explanation of how the deities got where they are now, and a small setup of the mythology. It also explains how one can become a god, for later reference.

Immediately, on page 4, the author goes into information about the 20 major deities. Rather than a few paragraphs, the book offers two full pages of text, first describing the deity and how they rose to power, then the temples and devotees likely to associate with that particular entity. Festivals, dress, and customs are detailed as well. Included is a fully detailed and beautifully drawn representation of the god or goddess, in their favored form. For each entry, a bonus spell is added for people capable of divine casting.

I cannot overstate how spectacular this section is. Admittedly, I am a deity-heavy player and GM. This book adds a vast wealth of information for both players and GMs, ready for implementation as soon as one opens the book.

The major gods are followed by several pages of minor gods, in case the 20 core are not enough. Many people prefer not to pick the most popular choices, and make a more elaborate and unique character, and this offers choices on doing exactly that. As noted by the author, these are mostly the same as presented in the Pathfinder Campaign Setting book, and only reprinted here for reference in a less expensive book.

After this is a section about magical items, some of which are fairly interesting. An example item is the Robe of the Master of Masters, which changes color according to the will of the wearer. It grants bonuses to Perform (dance), and has a built-in switch which grants Haste for 1 round. It also allows for some minor healing. This sections presents 38 new magical items in total. It also presents 4 artifact items.

What this book is short on, is clearly stated rules. I only add this part because this is almost purely a roleplay book. Many people (read: power gamers) would consider this a "fluff" book, with nothing but a bunch of monotonous writing about all that roleplaying nonsense. For anyone serious about making a character with personality, this book is incredibly essential.

All said, only the back half of the final page is unusable, as it is an advertisement for another book. Typical books cram ads in at the back, but this one forgoes that. Starting from the inside cover, even before the first page, nearly every inch of this book is useful.

This book should be considered mandatory for PFS play, or for anyone who takes their character's spiritual beliefs seriously. I can't imagine making any divine character, or even a pious martial character, without the use of this book. For the $17.99, this book is absolutely worth every penny. I can't imagine anyone being disappointed with Gods and Magic.


Near perfect

4/5

As was written by others before me, the material itself matches Paizos usual high standards and is without a doubt useful to anyone playing in Golarion.
What stops me from rating 5 stars is two things:
The whole book feels a bit like it is just a bit of a overview on the pantheon and I felt left with a a need for more indepth information (which is often provided in the APs). So, if you use this book just to give new players a glimpse of the pantheon to decide which deity to attach your cleric to, that works, but not much more.

What actually bugs me more is the unusual high rate of mistakes. On the first 2 pages alone there are three mistakes and that is not anything I am used to from Paizo.


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Paizo Employee Franchise Manager

Montalve wrote:
TheTwitch King wrote:
A small question. Where could I find the name of the bar and what city that bar is in that Cayden Cailcan was in when he agreed to go to take the test of the Starstone? I believe a pilgrimage is in order.

Absalom

but i don't know the name of the bar

Whatever the bar was called at the time, I would assume that it has either been renamed and is now some sort of shrine or temple to its most famous (and powerful) patron, or was lost to the constant churning of the city and is now a flower shop, schoolhouse, or high-rise condo with a starbucks and a mcdonalds on the ground floor.

Dark Archive

There are probably six bars (at least) in Absalom that claim to be 'that bar.' Attempts at using Commune to verify the claims of any of them lead to such 'helpful' replies as, 'I don't know. I was drunk at the time! I was probably in that bar, too, at some point that night...'

Liberty's Edge

Set wrote:
There are probably six bars (at least) in Absalom that claim to be 'that bar.' Attempts at using Commune to verify the claims of any of them lead to such 'helpful' replies as, 'I don't know. I was drunk at the time! I was probably in that bar, too, at some point that night...'

jajajajaja quite adequate

i would say that any of those 6barwould be good enough for Cailean followers :P

Liberty's Edge

Sean, Jason, James... question!!!!

i was reading a bit ago about Torag, there is no description of his avatar, that parragraph begans with his Herald, but nothing about the avatar

there is anything about this? (aside the fact that he might look as he is depicted in art?)

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2009 Top 4

Well the Absalom source book will be out next month... so hopefully that can put some light on this for the drunken faithful.

Contributor

{i was reading a bit ago about Torag, there is no description of his avatar, that parragraph begans with his Herald, but nothing about the avatar there is anything about this? (aside the fact that he might look as he is depicted in art?)}

As a dwarfy god of dwarves, depicted in art as a dwarf, and known to manifest as his own reflection in a shiny surface, yes, his avatar looks like him ... a dwarf. :)


Sean K Reynolds wrote:
As a dwarfy god of dwarves, depicted in art as a dwarf, and known to manifest as his own reflection in a shiny surface, yes, his avatar looks like him ... a dwarf. :)

Ya, but ye did not say he looks like one's own pa - did the scribe not get that to ye? That's what ye get for hirin' gnomes to do yer courier business. ;)

Liberty's Edge

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
As a dwarfy god of dwarves, depicted in art as a dwarf, and known to manifest as his own reflection in a shiny surface, yes, his avatar looks like him ... a dwarf. :)

ok :)

thanks

Dark Archive

I have a question about Torag too (to be honest, I don't but the guy who wants to play his cleric does): In Gods and Magic: "...the dwarves were born made of stone with belies full of fire." Torag is god of forge and artifice, one of his servitors is an azer - and he doesn't have Fire as a domain. Why is that?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

nightflier wrote:
I have a question about Torag too (to be honest, I don't but the guy who wants to play his cleric does): In Gods and Magic: "...the dwarves were born made of stone with belies full of fire." Torag is god of forge and artifice, one of his servitors is an azer - and he doesn't have Fire as a domain. Why is that?

Because Torag isn't a fire god. He's a god of protection, wartime strategy, and the forge. Not just the fire in the forge.

More to the point... We max out our deities at 5 domains, and they HAVE to have the appropriate alignment domains. For Torag, that means he has Law and Good and 3 others. One of those is Artifice, because he builds stuff. One is Earth, because he works with stone and metal and his favored race, the dwarves, come from the earth. And one is protection, since that's one of his big things.

There's no room for fire, in other words, and fire was already more than covered by Sarenrae and Asmodeus.

Contributor

And if you bang rocks together, it makes fire, so you've got it covered there.

Heck, if you bang dwarven skulls together, it makes fire.


Sean K Reynolds wrote:

And if you bang rocks together, it makes fire, so you've got it covered there.

Heck, if you bang dwarven skulls together, it makes fire.

Aye, we do have a hard head...but it's easier when we're wearin' helms, you see.

Dark Archive

Yeah, well, the guy wants to play dwarven cleric who uses firearms. What about Angradd The Forge-Fire? I suppose Chaos, Good, Fire, War, Strength?

Liberty's Edge

nightflier wrote:
Yeah, well, the guy wants to play dwarven cleric who uses firearms. What about Angradd The Forge-Fire? I suppose Chaos, Good, Fire, War, Strength?

firearms? go for Torag... not for "firearms" but bfor artifice... for creating them in the 1st place

a firearm is more an artifice than an object related to fire in a nany sense except to make the initial charge... but without all the mechanism is useless

Dark Archive

Well, that was my initial judgment. But I have a dwarf-fanatic on my hands, who's constantly bugging me about dwarven gods, chaos dwarves and battleragers in Golarion.


This just occurred to me. I understand that when a spell has the deities' name in parentheses behind it, that means only divine casters whose patron is that god can cast the spell, but when arcane classes are listed as having the spell as well, do those arcane casters have to have that god as their patron in order to cast it?

The main reason I'm wondering this is that Asmodeus' spell would be an interesting temptation to arcane spellcasters that aren't evil and wouldn't mind having a healing spell as a back up, even if devil's blood isn't easy to come by.

Liberty's Edge

nightflier wrote:
Well, that was my initial judgment. But I have a dwarf-fanatic on my hands, who's constantly bugging me about dwarven gods, chaos dwarves and battleragers in Golarion.

:D

let the clericcreate his own weapon (using craft: gunsmithing) in the form of a Warhammer... that should solve any doubts... he could call it "Torag's Hammer"

in Scion, Thor's Scion has an enormous gun called as Thor's Hammer

Dark Archive

We are thinking about playing in Golarion, but with gestalt characters. That would be similar to 2nd Ed. multiclassing, and we stopped playing 2nd Ed. just a year ago. So the dwarf wants to play fighter/cleric of Torag (there will probably be an elf fighter/rogue and half-elf paladin/sorcerer) and start a dwarven holy crusade agains the drow.

Dark Archive

So I was going through my copy of Gods and Magic for the umpteenth time and found something I had completely missed. The Greatcube of Jayalakshmi. Hell's bells sir! As a late late fan of Greyhawk (thanks in no small part to Dungeon and Dragon magazine and later the discovery of Canonfire and Maladin's fun little gems) the first thing that popped into my head was "They made the Codex!!" A Golarion specific, unique, and no less awesome Codex of Infinite Planes like artifact of awesomeness. The history of that thing, so quietly hinted at, just made me giggle like little kid. It's a beautiful, hidden gem that both excites the hell out of the DM in me and scares the crap out of the player in me (which in my view, is exactly what artifacts like the Codex and the Greatcube are suppose to do). I just wanted to say well done and thank you. That one little blurb made the whole world of Pathfinder that much greater. I also understand that that may have not been your intention with the artifact, but that was the first thing that popped in my head when i read it. Rock on.

Dark Archive

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
Heck, if you bang dwarven skulls together, it makes fire.

That Sir was Dwarfism!

I would appreciate it, if you made proper jokes! With Elves in it for example.

Contributor

KnightErrantJR wrote:
This just occurred to me. I understand that when a spell has the deities' name in parentheses behind it, that means only divine casters whose patron is that god can cast the spell, but when arcane classes are listed as having the spell as well, do those arcane casters have to have that god as their patron in order to cast it?

My personal preference is: if the god isn't your patron, you can't cast the spell, regardless of what type (brd, clr, drd, sor, or wiz). Part of the casting requires invoking the deity, and the deity can fiddle with the casting if they choose to do so.

That said, in pure game mechanics terms there's nothing preventing an Asmodean wizard from writing down those spells and giving them to a Desnan wizard. But the churches probably feel very proprietary about their faith-specific spells and track down copies of the spells that spread to other people.

Mr. Bojangles wrote:
The Greatcube of Jayalakshmi ... made me giggle like little kid.

Glad you like it. :)

Tharen the Damned wrote:

That Sir was Dwarfism!

I would appreciate it, if you made proper jokes! With Elves in it for example.

Meh, bang elf heads together and you just get a wet, squishy noise.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I saw this at my local gaming store. I am a big fan of Pathfinder and love the campaign setting book. This was underwhelming though. It just adds so little to what is in the campaign setting I can't see why I would buy it.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Card Game, Rulebook Subscriber
Erithtotl wrote:
I saw this at my local gaming store. I am a big fan of Pathfinder and love the campaign setting book. This was underwhelming though. It just adds so little to what is in the campaign setting I can't see why I would buy it.

Wow. Such different perspectives. This was one of my favorite source books thus far.

Liberty's Edge

Wicht wrote:
Erithtotl wrote:
I saw this at my local gaming store. I am a big fan of Pathfinder and love the campaign setting book. This was underwhelming though. It just adds so little to what is in the campaign setting I can't see why I would buy it.
Wow. Such different perspectives. This was one of my favorite source books thus far.

i agree

i can't play with it my new campaign...

i am moving the mood of one particular character a a few NPCs around her modeled in what i read in different deities...

i really love the good


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Sean K Reynolds wrote:


My personal preference is: if the god isn't your patron, you can't cast the spell, regardless of what type (brd, clr, drd, sor, or wiz). Part of the casting requires invoking the deity, and the deity can fiddle with the casting if they choose to do so.

That said, in pure game mechanics terms there's nothing preventing an Asmodean wizard from writing down those spells and giving them to a Desnan wizard. But the churches probably feel very proprietary about their faith-specific spells and track down copies of the spells that spread to other people.

Thanks for the answer Sean, I appreciate it. Although that still gives me some ideas on an Asmodean arcanist introducing this spell to someone without any patron at all.

"Just calling out to Asmodeus while casting the spell is simply a formality, a quirk in the written structure of the original spell . . . after you've gotten used to it, I'm sure you could spend some time modifying it to your needs."

Contributor

Excellent.... /fingersteeple

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2009 Top 4

Was there a reason the Four Horsemen were left out of this book?

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

TheTwitching King wrote:
Was there a reason the Four Horsemen were left out of this book?

They weren't stable?

The writer was saddled with deadlines?

It would have been tacky?

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

Montalve wrote:

let the clericcreate his own weapon (using craft: gunsmithing) in the form of a Warhammer... that should solve any doubts... he could call it "Torag's Hammer"

in Scion, Thor's Scion has an enormous gun called as Thor's Hammer

Ack! The Hammergun hit's Golarion!

Dark Archive

He gave up on it. We're a little bit disapointed with firearms in Golarion. To modern feel to them. I'm converting Iron Kingdom rules right now.

Liberty's Edge

nightflier wrote:
He gave up on it. We're a little bit disapointed with firearms in Golarion. To modern feel to them. I'm converting Iron Kingdom rules right now.

I am inclined to agree. And that is probably your best bet. I really liked the firearm rules for Iron Kingdoms. If I am remembering correctly, the Freeport rules were not bad either. But I have used the IK rules anytime I have need of guns in my D&D.

Liberty's Edge

TheTwitching King wrote:
Was there a reason the Four Horsemen were left out of this book?

they are no gods

but they are mentioned
they are the 4 daemons mentioned within their part of their realm, they jus are not as detailed as the gods, butthey are lot more detailed than small gods around the book

or wasthis in the Campaign Setting? gah! head hurts!

nightflier wrote:
He gave up on it. We're a little bit disapointed with firearms in Golarion. To modern feel to them. I'm converting Iron Kingdom rules right now.

i did a couple of changes

well... just one
but the original mechanic is quite good: "they are ranged touch attacks" so no Armor or Shield AC does protect... my Cleric would have 10 AC against agun isntead ofher usual 16 :S

so does a hellknight with AC 20 would be toppled most of his defense :S

my only addition is an old rule for many games, but the firsti remember was 2nd Ed Ravenloft's Masque ofthe red Death

every time the dice shows max damage... you reroll, ad infinitum untill the dice lays less than max damage...

a good and lucky shot will kill a dragon :D

the bard was ewscared of the notion... butyes... weneed Desna favoring such shot

Contributor

TheTwitching King wrote:
Was there a reason the Four Horsemen were left out of this book?

Because they aren't gods.


This is a good product, but I would have liked to have seen another couple of good-aligned human deities. To me, the setting could use a couple of more choices in that area

Sovereign Court

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
TheTwitching King wrote:
Was there a reason the Four Horsemen were left out of this book?
Because they aren't gods.

Yes, but aren't they magical? The book is Gods & Magic.

Liberty's Edge

cappadocius wrote:
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
TheTwitching King wrote:
Was there a reason the Four Horsemen were left out of this book?
Because they aren't gods.
Yes, but aren't they magical? The book is Gods & Magic.

i don't think they are magical

just daemonic

Sovereign Court

Montalve wrote:


i don't think they are magical
just daemonic

The irony here is so thick I'm choking on it.


cappadocius wrote:
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
TheTwitching King wrote:
Was there a reason the Four Horsemen were left out of this book?
Because they aren't gods.
Yes, but aren't they magical? The book is Gods & Magic.

So are Unicorns and Displacer Beasts.. so?

Sovereign Court

Majuba wrote:


Because they aren't gods.

Yes, but aren't they magical? The book is Gods & Magic.

So are Unicorns and Displacer Beasts.. so?

So why aren't they in the book?

Liberty's Edge

cappadocius wrote:
Majuba wrote:


Because they aren't gods.

Yes, but aren't they magical? The book is Gods & Magic.

So are Unicorns and Displacer Beasts.. so?

So why aren't they in the book?

lol ok sorry

mmm i think the book is about the gods... AND their magic

The Exchange

At the bottom of page 63, in the description of the Cantorian Spring artifact, there's a sentence that reads as follows:

"Many stories of magical fountains or springs crystal rests at the bottom and is obscured by plants or sediment, and it is possible that several variant races or subraces owe their existence to this artifact."

It seems that there is a section of text missing in the middle; perhaps two sentences were inadvertently combined? I.e.

"Many stories of magical fountains or springs [blah blah]. [Blah blah] crystal rests at the bottom and is obscured by plants or sediment, and it is possible that several variant races or subraces owe their existence to this artifact."


James Jacobs wrote:
We max out our deities at 5 domains, and they HAVE to have the appropriate alignment domains.

Bummer about that as the alignment domains are some of the most boring ones in the game, in my opinion. I'd rather have had them only be a must for the strongly aligned crusader types, assuming that there was going to be a max number of domains. However, given it is not a game balance issue (seeing as clerics not devoted to a specific god can choose any two domains) it seems like such a limit isn't really needed.

In particular, given what we know of him, it seems like a glaring omission for Cayden not to have the Liberation domain.

At any rate, nothing I can't house rule (and in fact already have).

Contributor

Renegade54 wrote:
At the bottom of page 63, in the description of the Cantorian Spring artifact, there's a sentence that reads as follows:

The complete text from my archive says:

"Many stories of magical fountains or springs (cursed or otherwise) probably derive from encounters with this item, where the crystal rests at the bottom and is obscured by plants or sediment, and it is possible that several variant races or subraces owe their existence to this artifact."

Liberty's Edge

The presence of the Ghost of Malthus nearly had me rolling on the floor with laughter. So very amusingly appropriate a role for old Malthus to show up in. Kudos to Sean!


The writers deserve some rep for one of the sickest magical items ever, the Mask of the Demon Mother. Which you can use to create new hybrid species (like gnolls)... provided you're, ahem, morally 'flexible'.

I get the idea that Lamashtu and her priestesses are very kinky ladies.

Liberty's Edge

Easily the best of it's limited breed. The information contained between the covers is a complete dream. The illustrations easily inspire the imagination. Compared to the WoTC deities & demigods book it is short. However unlike that book the focus has been refined to provide maximum playability.
Reading through I never once was lost


I have a kudo for Alison McKenzie and all the fine folks of Customer Service. I sent an email regarding my copy of Gods & Magic. A block of pages came unbound from the binding (pages 51-62). I asked if there were any other problems of this type and if they had any suggestions for repairing the book. Alison answered back with the shipment of a replacement copy. While I was not expecting this I do appreciate it. To me this is just another example of Paizo's commitment to their customer base. Thank you Alison and all the folks in Customer Service.

Just my 2 cp.


I was making fun of our priest of Cayden Cailean last night, thanks to a minor typo on the inside cover. We're running in RotRL, and had just saved a potential victim of the Skinsaw Men. He cast knock on the shackles holding the prisoner as the rogue was busy searching for keys on the leader. She chided him about wasting a spell, he called it necessary as his god is a god of freedom. At that point I had to correct the player, telling him he needed to let the rogue do her job and start hanging out with our druid more, as the listing on the inside cover clearly states he is the god of "treedom, wine," and "bravery."

We've certainly got an interesting theological dynamic in our group--clerics of Gorum and Cayden Cailean, a druid, and my paladin of Erastil. Fun, fun, fun.

Shadow Lodge

I'm looking at picking up some old books ... but have the PF Campaign Setting. How much of this is now covered in the CS?

Thanks!

Dark Archive

Gully13 wrote:

I"m looking at picking up some old books ... but have the PF Campaign Setting. How much of this is now covered in the CS?

Thanks!

Well in the PFCS each god has roughly half a page about them. In this book each god has 2 full pages about them or 4 times as much information. Plus this books talks about minor gods not in the PFCS.

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