Urban Adventures: The Great City Campaign Setting (OGL) PDF

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Based on their acclaimed The Great City Blueprints Series, 0one Games introduces an ambitious and detailed look at the locations behind the maps.

This sourcebook portrays a struggling mercantile colony ruled by the incompetent son of a brutal emperor—a city whose earliest citizens proudly trace their history back for thousands of years, but now struggle against social and political oppression; a city where a brooding underbelly of resistance fighters, and crime syndicates, and a proud but disillusioned military all wait for their lord to fail. It is a city where night cloaks the deviant works of social outcasts, mad alchemists, and corpse robbers.

The Great City is rife with excitement, intrigue and adventure; dare your characters make it their home?

This book contains the detailed description of the six wards of the Great City, including most relevant NPCs, adventure locations, encounters and more.

  • A large, gorgeous two-page map of the city is included, with detailed key.
  • Within each chapter you'll find a full-page map detailing the ward.
  • "The Cost of Freedom," a short introductory adventure by Tim Hitchcock, is provided for a fresh start of your Great City campaign.
  • A chapter with unique creatures of the Great City provides you with some foes to throw at your group.
  • A separate chapter with 3.5 statblocks for each NPC complete the book.

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Campaign setting for the Great City.

4/5

The Great City Campaign Setting by 0Onegames

This product is 162 pages long. Cover, credits and ToC. (4 pages) There is far far to much information for me to get into a detailed review, so I will give a overview as best I can.

Forward (1 page)

Introduction (6 pages)
Gives a general overview of the city. Including taxes, politics, and two page map of the city.

History (3 pages)
Gives a brief overview of the history of the city.

City Wards
It breaks the city down into wards. Each section list it's Special Interest, Power Groups, Citizens and Activities, Notable NPC's, Keyed Locations, Wandering NPC's and Adventure Locations. Each section has a map of that ward of the city and several maps of key locations in the ward. A note about the wards. The truth is they are so detailed I could have written a full paged review easy for each one.
Army Ward (15 pages)
Home to the cities military. As well as a guild and some other power groups.

Castle Ward (15 pages)
Seat of the rulers of the city.

Dock Ward (12 pages)
Covering the docks, warehouses, fishermen and taverns and such that serve them.

Residential Ward (15 Pages)
Former nobles district now taken over by the middle class and poor of the city.

Temple Ward (17 pages)
Where most of the temples are located. It also includes information on some of the gods and price of healing magics.

Trade Ward (16 pages)
Mostly shops, while the owners typically live above their shops. Where most things are bought and sold in the city.

The Cost of Freedom (8 pages)
It introductory adventure. A merchant is on trial for murder and the PC's have 3 days to find out what really happened. It does a good job of introducing many aspect of the city. It is fairly short adventure but looks like a fun adventure that will help players want to learn more about the city.

Monsters (6 pages)
There is 5 new creatures in this section will full stats.

Important NPC's (30 pages)
In this section is gives stat blocks for all the NPC's mentioned in the varies ward sections. This section is broken up by ward as well to make finding the NPC you need pretty easy.

It ends with a OGL, 1 page of add, 1 blank page and the back cover. (4 pages)

Closing thoughts. This book is just stuffed with neat locations, groups, NPC's etc. I could have easily done a full 1 page review on each ward alone. There was just no way to give a detail review and actually cover all the good points in this book. There is enough plot hooks with a little work you could set a whole campaign here in the city and never leave. Also when a section touches on something they have done another product about it mentions the name of the other product. So you can find it if you would like more information. It has extensive bookmarks. There was a few spelling errors and grammar errors but honestly with a book this big that is to be expected. The artwork is mostly fair to good.

My only real critic is I would have liked to have seen this book cover the culture of the city a bit more. What do the people dress like, maybe even cover popular foods are drink. Really that is the only thing lacking from being able to really bring this city to life. If you want a in depth city to drop into your campaign or looking for a well done city to center a campaign on, then this is a very good pick up. Even if you don't want to use the city as is, it is still a good pickup. There is plenty of locations, groups and NPC's you can steal for your own stuff. My rating is a 4 star. I liked the book, I think it is a good pickup. But I do think with a dozen more pages it could have been fantastic.


A wonderful setting

4/5

This campaign setting/city source book is 162 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page blank inside front cover, 1 paged editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page blank inside back cover and 1 page back cover, leaving a whopping 154 pages of content for us to lose ourselves in, so let's check it out!

Due to the size of this book, I'll not comment on each and every nook and cranny of the city as detailed in this pdf, but rather give you an overview, some examples and generally tell you which components caught my fancy.
After a 1 page foreword, we're treated to an introduction to the city per se in chapter 1, complete with a nice map, heraldry of the noble houses and basic information such as political positions and taxation. The basic premise for the general political landscape is that there are two human ethnicities, the Azindraleans and the Kortezians and the latter have subjugated the land in the past, now having been installed for a very long time. While this might look like a colonial backdrop, it really isn't - the city is aptly named after London in its imperial heyday, as it is a blistering metropolis of trade, intrigue and adventure, at the same time blessed and cursed by the cultural discrepancies between the houses of its ruling class.

Set against this backdrop of a now semi-independent metropolis with political unrest, we are introduced to the individual wards of the city, all of which get their own maps. Even better, we get personalities of interest, a huge plethora of interesting locations that fit to the ward and even some more than interesting adventure locales. Each of the wards comes with such a distinct flair that they might actually serve as their own towns and the distinctiveness of the wards lends itself to comparisons of the best among modern urban fantasy writing: Though I happen to love the work of e.g. China Míéville, you don't have to necessarily dwell upon the more urban/steam-punkish/weird elements of the city, as this setting succeeds in walking the tightest of lines, providing on the one side all you'd need to do to steer your campaign in that direction, while still having the option to ignore the almost industrial-revolution feeling of the city. Nice bits of details like parade, festivities, etc. are also presented as are new and old street names, taking to conflict between Azindraleans and Kortezians and their supporters to the linguistic level. That being said, on to the wards (which all get their alternate monikers to choose from depending on the NPC):

-The Army Ward contains both a coliseum and of course, the judicial branch as well as the barracks for the military. Consequently, we are also introduced to several generals and to the intrigues within the military.
-The Castle Ward contains, surprise, the castle and the manions of the ruling class. As such, it's of course heavily patrolled And features some nice ideas with regards to the politics of the city. We also get a sidebar detailing the prejudices of the different ethnicities towards other factions and people, which proved to be immensely useful. Once again, the adventure hooks are plain awesome.
-Dock Ward, the trade-hub could have easily fallen prey to feeling somehow like Freeport. Thankfully, due to the great writing, the docks feel unique and even comes with a ncie, creepy children's rhyme.
-Residential Ward: Probably one of the coolest districts, at least in my humble opinion, this is the hot-bed of Kortezian resistance against their oppressors. The district is almost catatonic in day-time. At night, however, the whole district erupts into an extremely atmospheric carnival and drunken revelry, including a butcher that makes entertainment of his slaughtering pigs likened to the nobility, a group of creepy mimes as well as hilarious jokes played upon the tax-collecting lord. This chapter alone is probably cooler than almost any ward I've ever read in any medium.

-Temple Ward: A rather safe place, the temple ward features a procession of benevolent ghosts that seek to ease the burden of the downtrodden, cultist and clerical intrigues and a disfigured, albeit brillant soprano who has become a kind of celebrity with a nice twist and potential for political unrest.
-Trades Ward: This is where both mercantile feuds and criminal syndicates/gangs clash, where the slave-trade is orchestrated and where adventueres can both spend and earn money in a plethora of different ways.
After that, we get a great investigation-style introductory adventure in whcih the PCs have 3 days to prove the innocence of a man who is charged for murder and can expect no justice from the court.
We also get some nice monsters, one of which, an aberration, is just plain genius.
Finally, we get a huge amount of pages devoted to providing stat-blocks for all the NPCs introduced in the book.

Conclusion:
Layout adheres to the two-column standard, is clear and concise and printer-friendly b/w. The book is extensively bookmarked, but could have used another pass at editing: I noticed a bunch of minor typos & editing glitches as well as some minor homophone-errors. While none impeded my ability to understand the content, it's the only significant problem I have with this book. The writing of the were-cabbages is absolutely stunning and the city comes to life in a way I have rarely encountered in any work of fiction, be it RPG-book or fantasy novel. The huge amount of unconventional ideas and hooks for adventures is enough to keep a DM going for years and even make you actually want to do it. While the details presented, the setting falls somewhat short on the item/drugs/poison/etc. section, but with e.g. 4Wind Fantasy Games "Luven Lightfingers"-book, you can easily remedy that. Usually, I'd settle for a verdict of 3 or 3.5 stars due to the amount of editing glitches, HOWEVER: Even if you're as nitpicky as I am, at least think about giving this book a chance - the writing is that good. Yeah, it's 3.5 and while the stats thus are not PFRPG, the writing alone is more than sufficient to make up for that. My final verdict will thus be 4 stars: One of the best, most imaginative city-sourcebooks out there.


An RPG Resource Review

5/5

Over the past few years, 0one Games has been regaling us with a series of exceptional city maps, laying out in minute detail The Great City. It's just been crying out for information about who lives there, what's going on and even some adventures to await visiting characters - and here at last is a campaign setting worthy of those map!

You get detailed descriptions of each Ward including notable NPCs, locations and adventure ideas, plus a full-blown adventure for 1st-level characters.

Overall, this product really brings The Great City to life, while providing enough about the layout that it should not pose a problem if you do not have the earlier maps. You'll probably want to get them if you decide to spend much time here - and after reading this, I for one want to do so! Apart from a few niggling mis-spellings that a good proof-read should have caught, presentation is good with clear maps which are an advance visually on those in the previous maps, yet of course fully-compatible with them. Definately recommended to anyone who likes city-based adventures, or whose campaign needs a well-designed city as a base or place to visit.




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Squeee! It's out! It's out! I may be a writer on this, true, but oh my I think it's beautiful! Can't wait to hear what my lovely fellow Paizoans think. Many Werecabbages on this one!


#1 on RPG now with a bullet. Wow. When I wrote the Great City's Temple Ward I thought maybe five people would see it. I'm so incredibly glad to be so incredibly wrong. :) Go Team!

Writers: Lou Agresta, Rone "The Jade" Barton, Tim Hitchcock, John E. "Zherog" Ling Jr., Greg Oppedisano and Brendan Victorson.

Scarab Sages

Is there any chance this is going to see a print version? I love the Blueprints you guys do, but I also enjoy having nicely bound books to put on my shelves, particularly those with a campaign setting. it just makse it easier for me to referance and use at the table. If not, I suppose I could always go to a staples and get them to print one out and bind it for me, it would just be nice to have an official version.


kessukoofah wrote:
Is there any chance this is going to see a print version?

We offer a POD version in hardcover: http://www.lulu.com/content/3238951

enjoy

Scarab Sages

Awesome! yet another purchase to make with my next paycheck. At any rate, thanks for the high quality products. and this in particular is great since I was planning to make the Great City the central port of my new Homebrew.

Scarab Sages

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

So is this a generic city set in a generic world?

Are there suggestions on where to put it in an already-created world?

Does the POD have a map?

Scarab Sages

Mactaka wrote:

So is this a generic city set in a generic world?

Are there suggestions on where to put it in an already-created world?

Does the POD have a map?

In answer to the first question, yes. it is extremely generic. to the point where it's actually named "the great city".

the second question: i don't knwo if there are suggestion in the setting book now, but as it's a port with an open countryside at the back, you can stick it in to replace any port town.

The POD would have all the maps, but I'm betting they'd all be part of the book, not pull out ones. Bear in mind that this setting is a lot of maps. a big one for the city, one overview for each of the 6 quarters and then i think 4-5 describing individual buildings in each quarter. and i think there's even some new ones here.

hope that helped, and if i'm wrong on either of those points, i'm sure someone will correct me.


Thanks, Kessukoofah!


Mactaka wrote:

So is this a generic city set in a generic world?

Are there suggestions on where to put it in an already-created world?

Does the POD have a map?

You could place this city anywhere in your homebrew, or favored setting. It's truly plug and play, and its only reference to anything outside itself is that part of its population came from overseas.

There are factions at play that are locally important but never speak to the world in general... and though I've devised a few locally important gods, you could easily replace them with other gods of their domain.

Any map in the PDF will be in the POD, but there isn't any extra full size map that I know of.


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

I had 2 questions over in the original Great City product thread but one of them (what are the 5 non-ward pdfs?) was answered above. My other inquiry is in regards to the generic nature of the city.

I know from other products that you guys use some pretty advanced PDF features. Is there a way to print/view the maps without any street or place names being visible?

Basically, I have a large port city in my homebrew that I'm short-on-time to map so at this stage, I'd rather just buy a product and populate it with my own names were appropriate. Also, it doesn't do for players to see the names of places their characters don't know yet. Would this product facilitate such an endeavor or would I have to Photoshop out any names I need to change/hide?

Paizo Employee Chief Creative Officer, Publisher

What a fantastic idea for a product.

The dominion of the Werecabbages continues!

(And they throw the best parties at Gen Con.)

Liberty's Edge

I'm still confused as to the whole "werecabbage" thing. How did this start, is there a thread or something? I feel left out of the loop or something.


Congrats Jade and all who worked on this. I can't wait to check it out, but I want to get the PC and GM precious stones first!

Liberty's Edge

Nevermind my previous question: After a great and perilous search(which I think involved the brutal slayings of numerous beasts), I discovered their website. Now I understand.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

you read my mind with the POD question. I'll have to see how my budget goes

Sovereign Court

This looks great! One question: What's the page count?


Laithoron wrote:

I had 2 questions over in the original Great City product thread but one of them (what are the 5 non-ward pdfs?) was answered above. My other inquiry is in regards to the generic nature of the city.

I know from other products that you guys use some pretty advanced PDF features. Is there a way to print/view the maps without any street or place names being visible?

Basically, I have a large port city in my homebrew that I'm short-on-time to map so at this stage, I'd rather just buy a product and populate it with my own names were appropriate. Also, it doesn't do for players to see the names of places their characters don't know yet. Would this product facilitate such an endeavor or would I have to Photoshop out any names I need to change/hide?

Laithoron, the original maps that Mario put out for the Great City did have that strip out the layers you don't want ability. I'm not sure if the setting book has the same ability, but I passed the question along and will get back to you as soon as I find out. I can tell you that the original blueprints (which were sold just as maps) were far more wordy than the maps in this book, which are very name light.

Erik Mona wrote:

What a fantastic idea for a product.

The dominion of the Werecabbages continues!

(And they throw the best parties at Gen Con.)

Thanks, Erik. :)

Freehold DM wrote:
Congrats Jade and all who worked on this. I can't wait to check it out, but I want to get the PC and GM precious stones first!

Come and get you some! And thanks for the kind words.

Zootcat wrote:
This looks great! One question: What's the page count?

Zootcat, this book weighs in at 162 pages and, despite being a PDF (unless you go through Lulu for the harcover)... its virtual weight is 20,000 tons.


Laithoron wrote:

I had 2 questions over in the original Great City product thread but one of them (what are the 5 non-ward pdfs?) was answered above. My other inquiry is in regards to the generic nature of the city.

I know from other products that you guys use some pretty advanced PDF features. Is there a way to print/view the maps without any street or place names being visible?

Basically, I have a large port city in my homebrew that I'm short-on-time to map so at this stage, I'd rather just buy a product and populate it with my own names were appropriate. Also, it doesn't do for players to see the names of places their characters don't know yet. Would this product facilitate such an endeavor or would I have to Photoshop out any names I need to change/hide?

The cool PDF map features from the Blueprint products (like the ones that let you blank names and such) are not part of the Campaign Setting product, but I expect them in Map Folio product (available in Oct. I believe); however, you'd have to check 0onegames to be certain.

The Campaign Setting has these super cool high quality, partial 3d maps for every ward and for select buildings. With a lot of setting to go with them!

Hope that helps.

Just wait until the Campaign Arc gets released!

EDIT: Oh, cool. I see Jade answered for me.


Erik Mona wrote:

What a fantastic idea for a product.

The dominion of the Werecabbages continues!

(And they throw the best parties at Gen Con.)

Thanks, Eric! Hitchcock worked our little tales off writing it!

Hope you can join us for Werewolf at the Canterbury next GenCon!


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

Thanks for looking into the matter for me Lou & Jade. I'll be interested to see what you learn. That map folio sounds promising. Color maps would be great if they are also in PDF with the advanced show/hide options. :D

Somewhat OT...

Spoiler:
I had a look thru the free DL of the Castle Ward and the 3D images interested me. I do 3D level design on a contract basis (archeological reconstructions for education/museums) using SketchUp, 3ds max, Photoshop, and Unreal Engine. Just out of curiosity, were the 3D scenes done free-hand by an architectural artist, in SketchUp, or in some other program that I might want to look into? I was quite impressed with the level of detail, and I'm always on the lookout for better tools. :)


I'm curious, how large is this city population wise?


Laithoron wrote:


I know from other products that you guys use some pretty advanced PDF features. Is there a way to print/view the maps without any street or place names being visible?

The Color Map Folio will have this feature and the already-released Blueprints, have it. Check them out here:

http://paizo.com/store/downloads/01Games/01Blueprints/theGreatCity


Somewhat OT...

Spoiler:
The maps have been all drawn by graduated professional architects, me and my father (76 years old 3d modeler guy!). they were modeled using very old version of FormZ and rendered using Maya. The images are then retouched with Photoshop. Same procedure is used for our Battlemaps.


Lou wrote:


Just wait until the Campaign Arc gets released!

I caught you! No spoilers please! :) :)

Scarab Sages

Master of the Zero One wrote:

Somewhat OT...

** spoiler omitted **

wow. that definaltly puts my map drawing cred to shame. "ya, I use a 2H pencil so the fainter lines are easier to erase and fix and it holds a point better". ya, not even close.

but seriously, I do appreciate the work you did/do/will do. and my favorite map by far is either the temple of the silver lady (i think that was the name) or the boats at the dock. got me all excited about running more dock-central adventures.

Sovereign Court Contributor

Master of the Zero One wrote:
Laithoron wrote:


I know from other products that you guys use some pretty advanced PDF features. Is there a way to print/view the maps without any street or place names being visible?

The Color Map Folio will have this feature and the already-released Blueprints, have it. Check them out here:

LINKED


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Master of the Zero One wrote:

Somewhat OT...

** spoiler omitted **

You and your Dad have my professional admiration. Very nicely done! :)

Also, thanks for the clarification on the PDF hide/reveal functionality. I'm going to hold out for the "colorized" version.

EDIT: Oh, since I'm not likely to use the idea anytime soon, I had a PDF idea [for generic settings] I figured I might as well share. Mind you, I don't have much experience with authoring PDFs, so I don't know if this is possible but...

Have you ever considered authoring a product where the DM can modify a "Cast of Characters/Places" sheet and have those changes propagate throughout the entire product? (i.e. sort of like using form/merge fields in MS Word)

I can't speak for other DMs, but for me, such a feature who increase the appeal of a product by a considerable margin — no more saying/pasting the wrong city name when reading boxed text, NPCs can be renamed to their equivalents in your own homebrew, etc. I'd love that sort of a feature.

Whatcha think?


Laithoron wrote:
Master of the Zero One wrote:

Somewhat OT...

** spoiler omitted **

EDIT: Oh, since I'm not likely to use the idea anytime soon, I had a PDF idea [for generic settings] I figured I might as well share. Mind you, I don't have much experience with authoring PDFs, so I don't know if this is possible but...

Whatcha think?

This is definitely a thing we can work on. We have implemented something similar in this line of products where you choose the encounter level at it scales the whole adventure to the desired EL

http://paizo.com/store/downloads/01Games/theDungeonUnderTheMountain/roomsAn dEncounters


Master of the Zero One wrote:
Lou wrote:


Just wait until the Campaign Arc gets released!
I caught you! No spoilers please! :) :)

D'oh! *claps hand over stupidly excited mouth*


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Master of the Zero One wrote:
Laithoron wrote:

*stuff*

Whatcha think?

This is definitely a thing we can work on.

That is music to my elven ears! The last campaign I ran, Red Hand of Doom, would have been so much easier to adapt with the ability to swap out NPC and location names.

Master of the Zero One wrote:

We have implemented something similar in this line of products where you choose the encounter level at it scales the whole adventure to the desired EL

http://paizo.com/store/downloads/01Games/theDungeonUnderTheMountain/roomsAn dEncounters

Very, very cool! Might I suggest a 4th difficulty entitled "METAL"? ;)


Staff writer Nate Collins (the two time Iron DM) at RPG Now gave us five out of five stars. :)

The Great City Campaign Setting

Publisher: 0one Games

by Nathan Collins [Staff] Date Added: 09/26/2008 09:47:52

Rating: [5 of 5 Stars!]

Campaign settings centered around a particular city or small region are a special kind of campaign setting for a specific type of gamer. This gamer often forgoes the world exploration and dungeon hopping romps of a world campaign setting in lue of intricate political schemes and lost haunts within and surrounding a large city.

For the gamer looking for an expansive city to adventure, 0Ones Games presents The Great City Setting. The Campaign Setting is a well crafted anthology of regions composed of the talented writers at werecabbage, headed by notable RPG Adventure writer Tim Hitchcock. The setting is designed for the 3.5 edition and compatible systems.

The biggest fear about City Adventures is that there will not be enough to do. One of my early D&D Campaigns consisted of waking up in the city, talking to the governor and then heading off to the underdark for the day. The city was uneventful and the NPCs lacked any color. The writers of the Great City avoid this pitfall. With the writing spread out, each region feels alive like its own world with Hitchcock skillfully applying the glue to make it all cohesive. The 162 page PDF starts off with a strong introduction and almost too lengthy history and moves into the description of the various wards. The city history revolves around the Azindraleans and the Great City that was conquered by the Kortezians. The tension between the two sides is evident throughout each region. Each region is divided into subsections of special interests, power groups, important NPCs, keyed locations, adventure opportunities and adventure locations. Each also has a detailed map of the area.

The regions or Wards, step away from what is too be expected. There are no merchant wards or noble wards. Instead the wards appear to be more organic, generating from the back-story of the occupation. There is the Army Ward, where the major armed forces reside; the Castle Ward, where the elite live and the government offices lie; The Dock Ward, where merchant ships and the large navy dwell; The Residential Ward, housing roving gangs and common citizens who secretly plan rebellion; the Temple Ward, constituting a number of faiths and the Trade Ward, an area similar to a merchant area with a strong blackmarket feel to it.

The Great City does not simply hand you the keys and drop you off at the door, it provides you an introductory adventure to ease your players into the world as well as a list of creatures unique to the setting.

For the Player
City Campaigns are great places for players who like campaigns with more of a political edge to it. The NPCs in the Wards seem to come to life on the pages.

For the Dungeon Master
The most creative parts of the book are the Adventuring Hook descriptions of the Wards. Sure there is a large dungeon nearby, but instead of resting solely on that, the Wards include a lot of other places for the PCs to find trouble. The Underscore, located in the Traders Ward, is a fun, moody place to flesh out an adventure and stood out as one of my favorites.

The Iron Word
0Ones is more known for their amazing map cartography, however, they score a home run with their first campaign setting. There are a few typos, but never to the point of distraction. The Great City offers a far different setting that creates a dynamic city with a wealth of material to take a party from levels 1 to 20. The history is very intriguing, though a bit too long in many places, it does benefit the story and add to the richness of the campaign.

Sovereign Court Contributor

/Begin Shameless Self Back Patting

Our Great City Campaign Setting became a copper pick on RPGnow! I'm so excited. Top 14% of sales. Awesome.

/End Shameless Self Back Patting

Contributor

/Begin Shameless Plug

TGC was the featured product on Atomic Array 008

/End Shameless Plug


I am new to this Great City thing, just heard of it.

Does the Campaign Setting include the previous maps/blueprints?

Can i just get the campaign setting then the adventures or would I need something else.

Is there any thought to at some time in the future :
a) a Pathfinder RPG conversion doc
b) a Golarion setting conversion doc

Sovereign Court Contributor

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Werecorpse wrote:

I am new to this Great City thing, just heard of it.

Does the Campaign Setting include the previous maps/blueprints?

Can i just get the campaign setting then the adventures or would I need something else.

Is there any thought to at some time in the future :
a) a Pathfinder RPG conversion doc
b) a Golarion setting conversion doc

Hey Werecorpse,

The short answer to your question is yes, you can get the campaign setting and the adventures and that is all you need.

In more detail: the Great City is divided into wards, and in addition to a map of the whole city, the campaign setting/city book has a zoomed map of each ward at the beginning of the ward's chapter.

The campaign setting/city book, comes with a small adventure as an appendix. There is another intro/stand-alone adventure written by Tim Hitchcock, called Pound of Flesh. Awesome freaking adventure!

These two -- Pound of Flesh and The Cost of Freedom (as mentioned, the latter is part of the city book/campaign setting) -- are not part of the Adventure Path. But really rock as a way to introduce yourself or your players to the Great City.

There is another product that goes along with all this, not necessary but awfully tasty -- the Great City Color Map Folio. Amazing map PDF, which includes a poster sized/quality map you could print, either in sections or one massive poster-sized sheet (requires a Kinko's or equiv, I would guess).

Last, but definitely not least, there is the Great City Adventure Path that starts with Ling's the "Skullcrackers," then has The Jade's and my "The Bloody Fix" out so far, with adventures by Adam Daigle, Greg Oppedisano, another by The Jade and myself, Brendan Victorson, Liz Courts, and Tim Hitchcock coming very soon.

To summarize, the products are:
1. The Great City Campaign Setting (city book)
2. Pound of Flesh (stand alone adventure)
3. Map Folio (not required, but boy is it cool!)
4. Adventure Path (2 out, 4 more coming)

As for PFRPG or Golarion adaptation...

While the Great City has a very unique flavor, it's really intended to slot into any campaign. So if your campaign is in Golarion, it should work with little or no adaptation necessary. Just slot it in a slightly off the beaten track location.

PFRPG? That I don't know. I think its a great idea, though, and will pass the idea onto the publisher, 0onegames.

I hope that helps answer your questions. If you pick it up, please let us know how you liked it!


Whoa Lou, may I hire you? ;)

I would just add the Blueprint Backdrops series detailing specifc buildings of the Great City, all written by Tim Hitchcock...

Also, I would love to do a PFRPG conversion. Just waiting for some kind of license...

Sovereign Court Contributor

Master of the Zero One wrote:

Whoa Lou, may I hire you? ;)

I would just add the Blueprint Backdrops series detailing specifc buildings of the Great City, all written by Tim Hitchcock...

Also, I would love to do a PFRPG conversion. Just waiting for some kind of license...

You already did!

Oh, and I forgot to add, that Master of the Zero One here puts out free color download goodies for each Adventure Path adventure, just for the jazz of it.


OK Thanks for that I have resolved to get most of this urban adventure/great city stuff (initially strongly influenced by Nick Logues review BTW)

further questions

are the blueprints (like the ruined town, and the other stuff 'city of the dead' 'dragons peak' etc) just pretty clever maps? without encounter details.

what is the 'rule the Dungeon' feature.

I have read the blurb about these things but they dont say what isnt in them (ie encounters/ stats, storyline etc- how they are expected to be used

(or they probably do but I need it explained)

finally can I use my paizo holiday discount on this stuff


You are correct

The Blueprints are just clever maps. Mostly they come with short suggestions for adventures and description of locations where needed.

The Rule the Dungeon feature is a cool big button on each map allowing you to customize the appearance of the map before printing it. You could, for example, remove the grid, the room numbers, the fill in the walls and print it as a cool handout for your players...

I would suggest you visit www.0onegames.com a download a bunch of free previews.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Werecorpse wrote:
finally can I use my paizo holiday discount on this stuff

Sorry—the discount isn't valid on non-Paizo downloads. (And don't forget it expires at midnight on the 31st!)

Paizo Employee Managing Developer

Vic Wertz wrote:
Werecorpse wrote:
finally can I use my paizo holiday discount on this stuff
Sorry—the discount isn't valid on non-Paizo downloads. (And don't forget it expires at midnight on the 31st!)

On a good note, the third adventure in the series just dropped yesterday, so at least you can have a more complete collection!


Daigle wrote:
Vic Wertz wrote:
Werecorpse wrote:
finally can I use my paizo holiday discount on this stuff
Sorry—the discount isn't valid on non-Paizo downloads. (And don't forget it expires at midnight on the 31st!)
On a good note, the third adventure in the series just dropped yesterday, so at least you can have a more complete collection!

Got the campaign and the four adventures (3 in AP and the pound of flesh) (and a couple of blueprints for good measure)

Thanks for all your responses


Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

I just purchased and I am liking what I am seeing.

I was curious if any of the contributors have thought about a possible location for the Great City within Golarion?

Thanks!

Dark Archive

My review.

The Great City Campaign Setting by 0Onegames

This product is 162 pages long. Cover, credits and ToC. (4 pages) There is far far to much information for me to get into a detailed review, so I will give a overview as best I can.

Forward (1 page)

Introduction (6 pages)
Gives a general overview of the city. Including taxes, politics, and two page map of the city.

History (3 pages)
Gives a brief overview of the history of the city.

City Wards
It breaks the city down into wards. Each section list it's Special Interest, Power Groups, Citizens and Activities, Notable NPC's, Keyed Locations, Wandering NPC's and Adventure Locations. Each section has a map of that ward of the city and several maps of key locations in the ward. A note about the wards. The truth is they are so detailed I could have written a full paged review easy for each one.
Army Ward (15 pages)
Home to the cities military. As well as a guild and some other power groups.

Castle Ward (15 pages)
Seat of the rulers of the city.

Dock Ward (12 pages)
Covering the docks, warehouses, fishermen and taverns and such that serve them.

Residential Ward (15 Pages)
Former nobles district now taken over by the middle class and poor of the city.

Temple Ward (17 pages)
Where most of the temples are located. It also includes information on some of the gods and price of healing magics.

Trade Ward (16 pages)
Mostly shops, while the owners typically live above their shops. Where most things are bought and sold in the city.

The Cost of Freedom (8 pages)
It introductory adventure. A merchant is on trial for murder and the PC's have 3 days to find out what really happened. It does a good job of introducing many aspect of the city. It is fairly short adventure but looks like a fun adventure that will help players want to learn more about the city.

Monsters (6 pages)
There is 5 new creatures in this section will full stats.

Important NPC's (30 pages)
In this section is gives stat blocks for all the NPC's mentioned in the varies ward sections. This section is broken up by ward as well to make finding the NPC you need pretty easy.

It ends with a OGL, 1 page of add, 1 blank page and the back cover. (4 pages)

Closing thoughts. This book is just stuffed with neat locations, groups, NPC's etc. I could have easily done a full 1 page review on each ward alone. There was just no way to give a detail review and actually cover all the good points in this book. There is enough plot hooks with a little work you could set a whole campaign here in the city and never leave. Also when a section touches on something they have done another product about it mentions the name of the other product. So you can find it if you would like more information. It has extensive bookmarks. There was a few spelling errors and grammar errors but honestly with a book this big that is to be expected. The artwork is mostly fair to good.

My only real critic is I would have liked to have seen this book cover the culture of the city a bit more. What do the people dress like, maybe even cover popular foods are drink. Really that is the only thing lacking from being able to really bring this city to life. If you want a in depth city to drop into your campaign or looking for a well done city to center a campaign on, then this is a very good pick up. Even if you don't want to use the city as is, it is still a good pickup. There is plenty of locations, groups and NPC's you can steal for your own stuff. My rating is a 4 star. I liked the book, I think it is a good pickup. But I do think with a dozen more pages it could have been fantastic.


Great review, D_M! I'm also planning to review this, once I'm done with some Rite Publishing stuff, that is. :)


This campaign setting/city source book is 162 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page blank inside front cover, 1 paged editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page blank inside back cover and 1 page back cover, leaving a whopping 154 pages of content for us to lose ourselves in, so let's check it out!

Due to the size of this book, I'll not comment on each and every nook and cranny of the city as detailed in this pdf, but rather give you an overview, some examples and generally tell you which components caught my fancy.
After a 1 page foreword, we're treated to an introduction to the city per se in chapter 1, complete with a nice map, heraldry of the noble houses and basic information such as political positions and taxation. The basic premise for the general political landscape is that there are two human ethnicities, the Azindraleans and the Kortezians and the latter have subjugated the land in the past, now having been installed for a very long time. While this might look like a colonial backdrop, it really isn't - the city is aptly named after London in its imperial heyday, as it is a blistering metropolis of trade, intrigue and adventure, at the same time blessed and cursed by the cultural discrepancies between the houses of its ruling class.

Set against this backdrop of a now semi-independent metropolis with political unrest, we are introduced to the individual wards of the city, all of which get their own maps. Even better, we get personalities of interest, a huge plethora of interesting locations that fit to the ward and even some more than interesting adventure locales. Each of the wards comes with such a distinct flair that they might actually serve as their own towns and the distinctiveness of the wards lends itself to comparisons of the best among modern urban fantasy writing: Though I happen to love the work of e.g. China Míéville, you don't have to necessarily dwell upon the more urban/steam-punkish/weird elements of the city, as this setting succeeds in walking the tightest of lines, providing on the one side all you'd need to do to steer your campaign in that direction, while still having the option to ignore the almost industrial-revolution feeling of the city. Nice bits of details like parade, festivities, etc. are also presented as are new and old street names, taking to conflict between Azindraleans and Kortezians and their supporters to the linguistic level. That being said, on to the wards (which all get their alternate monikers to choose from depending on the NPC):

-The Army Ward contains both a coliseum and of course, the judicial branch as well as the barracks for the military. Consequently, we are also introduced to several generals and to the intrigues within the military.
-The Castle Ward contains, surprise, the castle and the manions of the ruling class. As such, it's of course heavily patrolled And features some nice ideas with regards to the politics of the city. We also get a sidebar detailing the prejudices of the different ethnicities towards other factions and people, which proved to be immensely useful. Once again, the adventure hooks are plain awesome.
-Dock Ward, the trade-hub could have easily fallen prey to feeling somehow like Freeport. Thankfully, due to the great writing, the docks feel unique and even comes with a ncie, creepy children's rhyme.
-Residential Ward: Probably one of the coolest districts, at least in my humble opinion, this is the hot-bed of Kortezian resistance against their oppressors. The district is almost catatonic in day-time. At night, however, the whole district erupts into an extremely atmospheric carnival and drunken revelry, including a butcher that makes entertainment of his slaughtering pigs likened to the nobility, a group of creepy mimes as well as hilarious jokes played upon the tax-collecting lord. This chapter alone is probably cooler than almost any ward I've ever read in any medium.

-Temple Ward: A rather safe place, the temple ward features a procession of benevolent ghosts that seek to ease the burden of the downtrodden, cultist and clerical intrigues and a disfigured, albeit brillant soprano who has become a kind of celebrity with a nice twist and potential for political unrest.
-Trades Ward: This is where both mercantile feuds and criminal syndicates/gangs clash, where the slave-trade is orchestrated and where adventueres can both spend and earn money in a plethora of different ways.
After that, we get a great investigation-style introductory adventure in whcih the PCs have 3 days to prove the innocence of a man who is charged for murder and can expect no justice from the court.
We also get some nice monsters, one of which, an aberration, is just plain genius.
Finally, we get a huge amount of pages devoted to providing stat-blocks for all the NPCs introduced in the book.

Conclusion:
Layout adheres to the two-column standard, is clear and concise and printer-friendly b/w. The book is extensively bookmarked, but could have used another pass at editing: I noticed a bunch of minor typos & editing glitches as well as some minor homophone-errors. While none impeded my ability to understand the content, it's the only significant problem I have with this book. The writing of the were-cabbages is absolutely stunning and the city comes to life in a way I have rarely encountered in any work of fiction, be it RPG-book or fantasy novel. The huge amount of unconventional ideas and hooks for adventures is enough to keep a DM going for years and even make you actually want to do it. While the details presented, the setting falls somewhat short on the item/drugs/poison/etc. section, but with e.g. 4Wind Fantasy Games "Luven Lightfingers"-book, you can easily remedy that. Usually, I'd settle for a verdict of 3 or 3.5 stars due to the amount of editing glitches, HOWEVER: Even if you're as nitpicky as I am, at least think about giving this book a chance - the writing is that good. Yeah, it's 3.5 and while the stats thus are not PFRPG, the writing alone is more than sufficient to make up for that. My final verdict will thus be 4 stars: One of the best, most imaginative city-sourcebooks out there.


Nice endorsement End, typos and such don't bother me so much if the writing is top notch.

Dark Archive

Nice review End.


Glad you ladies enjoyed it! :)


Starting to look around for what the good 3pp adventures are and got turned onto this by a Tim Hitchcock interview on a podcast. What would be a good place to slot this in on Golarion? Riddlport? Absalom? Would it be better in that case to not get the city guide and just adapt the adventure path(s)?

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