Cruel Instructor

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Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber. *** Pathfinder Society GM. 348 posts (4,886 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 25 Organized Play characters. 29 aliases.


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Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

The spell, Illusory Creature, states that the creature you make can take 2 actions when you sustain the spell and rolls to hit and deals mental damage, etc. However, does the creature possess any of its special abilities? Can it use its grab? Any of its reactions? Any of its special attacks as long as it has the actions? The spell is already like a 5 paragraph essay, but I feel like it still needs more information on how it works.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Dirge of Doom says: "Foes within the area are frightened 1. They can't reduce their frightened value below 1 while they remain in the area."

Bravery says: "In addition, anytime you gain the frightened condition, reduce its value by 1."

Which one wins? I'm under the impression that Dirge of Doom prevents you from ever reducing your frightened below 1, no matter what the ability states. In addition, Bravery says you need to gain the frightened condition before it reduces it, it doesn't prevent you from getting frightened 1 in the first place, making it sound more likely Dirge of Doom wins in my book.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Blave wrote:

Can I target a concealed ally with a spell like heal without the DC 5 flat check?

The concealed condition doesn't seem to differentiate between hostile and non-hostile effect. Neither does it mention anything about willing targets or distinguish between friend and foe.

My group has been playing through Age of Ashes with the understanding that you need to make a flat check to target allies. My character was blinded at one point, making it very difficult to heal allies correctly, which makes sense. My GM, however, and I think most other GMs could do this too, allowed us to help each other bypass the concealment. For example, when I was blind, I stumbled over to my ally in touch range and they could grab my hand or "lean into" my spell effect if its off target, making it impossible to miss them since we were already now touching or in point-blank range.

Scarab Sages 3/5

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Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I could see it either way. The GM boon is easier to get so you get less interesting kobolds than the other, harder to earn, kobold boon...but, I don't think that makes a lot of sense and I'd like to see all the kobold boons being treated equally.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Paolotsname wrote:
Do I need to be good aligned to multiclass into champion since it has you chose a cause?

"Choose a deity and cause as you would if you were a champion"; I think this line indicates that yes, you need to be the appropriate alignment for your cause.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Squiggit wrote:
zer0darkfire wrote:
Do you automatically learn your signature spells or do you need to pick one you already know?

As written? Neither. You can pick any spell as your signature spell, but you can't do anything with it if you don't have the ability to cast that spell. This is pretty self evident, there's nothing in the rules to suggest that you can cast spells that aren't part of your repertoire without specific, explicit permission to do so.

This is a relevant choice for Sorcerers with Arcane Evolution or Sorcerers who want a specific Signature spell for a certain spell level but don't want to learn that spell right away or Sorcerers who want a signature spell they can't normally access but are planning on learning later.

Chances are the errata you're asking for will just end up taking that option away instead of giving you the extra spell slots you're looking for.

Quote:
You can't say we can't cast it when we don't know the spell when that's literally the issue signature spells has.
Uh, why can't I? You say it's ambiguous. I say it's not. Saying I'm not allowed to disagree with you is... a pretty weird stance to take.

I'm not saying you can't disagree with me, although, technically, unless you're saying that this ability is somehow not unclear, then you can't disagree with me because I'm not arguing any particular way it should work, I just want clarification. What I am saying is that you cant say "you can't do this because you can't do this", its a circuitous logical fallacy.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Squiggit wrote:
Right, and you can't cast it, because you don't know it. If you at some point later on learn it, great, but until you do you're left with a signature spell that you can't do anything with. Because you don't actually know the spell in the first place.

And that is the part we are debating. Do you automatically learn your signature spells or do you need to pick one you already know?

You can't say we can't cast it when we don't know the spell when that's literally the issue signature spells has. It's unclear and needs an errata or FAQ because even if its intended to be able to pick a spell you don't know for no benefit, that makes it very confusing and it needs to be addressed.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Yeah, seriously, I think Jump might be one of the best 1st level spells in the game for a non DC focused caster. For example, my cleric/monk only had 10 wisdom (16 charisma), and used the divine list, but really wanted to get into melee to punch people. This spell was great at getting into melee range in weird places or generally quickly. In addition, you can jump (up to two times) and then grapple a creature before you would "fall", keeping you from falling while doing some...weird things to a flying creature.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Squiggit wrote:
zer0darkfire wrote:


Except for the lines that specifically say you can cast your signature spells, you'd be right.
No, the line says you can heighten them freely. Which is great, but that means nothing if you can't cast the spell in the first place.

You clearly didn't read what the term "heighten" means in 2e. "Both prepared and spontaneous spellcasters can cast a spell at a higher spell level than that listed for the spell. This is called heightening the spell"

In order to heighten a spell, you must cast it, otherwise, you're not heightening anything.

Scarab Sages

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First World Bard wrote:
Wait, are we suggesting that you cast the Jump spell multiple times in consecutive actions (perhaps by using the heightened to 3rd level casting) to perform a video-game style double/triple jump?

Yes, yes we are. By RAW it can do exactly that, however it's pretty easy for a GM to say that because it's transmutation magic, it isn't capable of allowing such actions, like air (double) jumping that disregard physics to that degree. However, wall jumping is definitely acceptable as an option because there is literally a wall jump feat in the game already.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Squiggit wrote:
zer0darkfire wrote:


So, in signature spells, nothing indicates that you pick a spell currently in your repertoire. Is it intended to be a spell you already know, or can it be any spell of that level, and if so, do these spells functionally become bonus spells in your repertoire?
You can pick spells you don't know as signature spells, but you can't do anything with them because you can't cast them at all in the first place.

Except for the lines that specifically say you can cast your signature spells, you'd be right.

"You don’t need to learn heightened versions of signature spells separately; instead, you can heighten these spells freely. If you’ve learned a signature spell at a higher level than its minimum, you can also cast all its lower-level versions without learning those separately. "

"Both prepared and spontaneous spellcasters can cast a spell at a higher spell level than that listed for the spell. This is called heightening the spell...while a spontaneous spellcaster can heighten a spell by casting it using a higher-level spell slot..."

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ed Reppert wrote:
I would say it should be a spell you already know.

I agree that it could simply say "For each spell level you have access to, choose one spell of that level to be a signature spell that is in your repertoire." but I also think its totally ok for them to simply be extra spells that are in addition your spells known. They are your signature spells after all, they shouldn't count against you in my opinion and knowing them as extra spells isn't game breaking at all in my opinion when a wizard could literally know any spell.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Bandw2 wrote:
Saldiven wrote:
zer0darkfire wrote:

I think the second casting would override the firsts "fall after next action" since the next action prevents you from immediately falling with the same line. I know this isn't a card game, but in most games, you resolve chains in reverse order, so the second and third jump spell checks would happen before the firsts.

If the implications of what you're saying are true, that means if your next action is to cast fly, you'd still fall because you haven't met jumps condition of finding solid ground to stop on.

I have to disagree. PF2e has no system for action stacking and reverse resolution. We only do exactly what we are told to do by the rules.

If you cast Jump, regardless of what your next action is, you fall after completing it, unless that next action specifically provides a protection from from falling.

So, yes, if you Jump, fail to land in an appropriate spot, and then cast Fly, you still fall. But, since you have a Fly speed while under the effects of the Fly spell, you could use a subsequent action to use the Arrest a Fall action.

I very much disagree with this being RAW or RAI.

it's written in the way that most easily saves space, but doesn't say anything about forcing you to fall regardless of any other effects.

if you're being forcefully levitated, you cannot use this to negate the hostile effect and land back on the ground.

english is filled with subtext because being overly verbose is tiring.

"You must land on a space of solid ground within 30 feet of you, or else you fall after using your next action."

should more or less at most verbose probably read like this

"You must land on a space of solid ground(i.e. anything that can hold you weight, not just dirt) within 30 feet of you, or else you fall as normal after using your next action."

if falling is not normal for your current situation you continue doing whatever is normal. if you jump to a 2 foot wide plank of wood(ground this is not solid) you don't...

Yep, thats what I was saying. The next jump spell also prevents you from falling because your currently jumping with it.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I think the second casting would override the firsts "fall after next action" since the next action prevents you from immediately falling with the same line. I know this isn't a card game, but in most games, you resolve chains in reverse order, so the second and third jump spell checks would happen before the firsts.

If the implications of what you're saying are true, that means if your next action is to cast fly, you'd still fall because you haven't met jumps condition of finding solid ground to stop on.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I played a cleric/monk up to level 5 in Age of Ashes and Jump was literally the only spell I prepared in my 1st level slots because it was really quite versatile. If you jump straight forwards, you just "Strided" faster than a human, I used it to jump over a gust of wind, increase the reach of water from a bucket, and to start an encounter earlier than intended. It's a really fun spell.

In addition, I want to point out a key, but honestly insane point about the jump spell. "You must land on a space of solid ground within 30 feet of you, or else you fall after using your next action."

Why is this crazy? Because if you cast jump multiple times in a row, you can wall jump. Technically, you could simply air jump, arguing that its magic and you meet all the conditions to cast the spell, but there is a good argument against this simply by stating that this is transmutation magic, so it simply alters already possible physics.

As stated above, just because its a 1st level spell, doesn't mean you can afford to spam your slots, you really don't get too many slots of 1st level as you level up, but if someone wants to burn 3 jumps (and all their slots) consecutively, it could be a really niche, but amazing turn.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Pathfinder 2nd edition rulebook wrote:
Experience allows you to cast some spells more flexibly. For each spell level you have access to, choose one spell of that level to be a signature spell. You don’t need to learn heightened versions of signature spells separately; instead, you can heighten these spells freely. If you’ve learned a signature spell at a higher level than its minimum, you can also cast all its lower-level versions without learning those separately. If you swap out a signature spell, you can choose a replacement signature spell of the same spell level at which you learned the previous spell. You can also retrain specifically to change a signature spell to a different spell of that level without swapping any spells; this takes as much time as retraining a spell normally does.

So, in signature spells, nothing indicates that you pick a spell currently in your repertoire. Is it intended to be a spell you already know, or can it be any spell of that level, and if so, do these spells functionally become bonus spells in your repertoire?

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1
Baroness Bobbi wrote:
I want to do so, but there was never a clarification that stated lunar oracles can get Grizzlies, alas. If I could get a grizzly, Hoot might actually become competent.

Well, there is this line: A grizzly bear animal companion can qualify for and be subject to boons as though it were a bear animal companion.

But I don't think that helps. We all know that crocodile is the best lunar animal companion anyway :P

Scarab Sages

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Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

I personally suggest the pathbuilder2e app. Mythweavers also has a good sheet with a mix of manual and automated sections.

Scarab Sages

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Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

From my quick research on aiding another knowledge checks, it sounds like its GM discretion if they feel it would make sense to apply. On a strict reading, knowledge checks aren't one of the skills that mentions that you cannot aid another like use magic device, but that doesn't mean it makes sense for there always being a way to aid someone on it.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

My 770g "basic" adventuring kit

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

In this edition, a creature is only immune to nonlethal if it says it is. For example, a stone golem lists nonlethal in its immunities, but undead for some reason do not. While weird to players of 3.pathfinder, it looks like something new we just have to forget our preconceptions about. However, undead are immune to being unconscious, so they just get destroyed by nonlethal damage once they hit 0hp.

As for how nonlethal works: Nonlethal Damage
Source Core Rulebook pg. 453
You can make a nonlethal attack in an effort to knock someone out instead of killing them (see Knocked Out and Dying on page 459). Weapons with the nonlethal trait (including fists) do this automatically

As a player character, when you are reduced to 0 Hit Points, you’re knocked out with the following effects:
You immediately move your initiative position to directly before the creature or effect that reduced you to 0 HP.
You gain the dying 1 condition. If the effect that knocked you out was a critical success from the attacker or the result of your critical failure, you gain the dying 2 condition instead. If you have the wounded condition, increase your dying value by an amount equal to your wounded value. If the damage was dealt by a nonlethal attack or nonlethal effect, you don’t gain the dying condition; you are instead unconscious with 0 Hit Points.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

1) Typically you follow the scenario because maybe these are just unique ones that are large. Size doesn't really do much in 2e, so it shouldn't really affect us at this level.

2) Any DC based on skill or stats is just 10+bonus, so a reflex DC is 10+reflex save bonus

3) I'm not sure why you need a hand free to trip, but unarmed attacks are free-hand weapons and this is the entry for unarmed: "An unarmed attack uses your body rather than a manufactured weapon. An unarmed attack isn’t a weapon, though it’s categorized with weapons for weapon groups, and it might have weapon traits. Since it’s part of your body, an unarmed attack can’t be Disarmed. It also doesn’t take up a hand, though a fist or other grasping appendage follows the same rules as a free-hand weapon." Based on that, it sounds like you can definitely kick to trip

4) I think trip is implied to be melee based on the ranged trip trait existing: This weapon can be used to Trip with the Athletics skill at a distance up to the weapon’s first range increment. The skill check takes a –2 circumstance penalty. You can add the weapon’s item bonus to attack rolls as a bonus to the check. As with using a melee weapon to trip, a ranged trip doesn’t deal any damage when used to Trip. This trait usually only appears on a thrown weapon.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1
GM_CariMac wrote:
I’ve looked on the boards but I can’t find information. Is there a list of Blakrose Museum scenarios? I have a friend whose never played in the museum.

Check out this list I made. It doesn't specify Blakros museum scenarios, but its close. It was originally intended for Vigilante renown locations, but Absalom missions are likely to be Blakros ones

There is also this list from the wiki, but I'm not sure how up to date it is.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Penthau wrote:

Does Detect Magic work through materials (such as wood and stone) or is it limited by line of effect? I don't see any language about emanations or detection spells ignoring line of effect.

Line of Effect

Source Core Rulebook pg. 457
When creating an effect, you usually need an unblocked path to the target of a spell, the origin point of an effect’s area, or the place where you create something with a spell or other ability. This is called a line of effect. You have line of effect unless a creature is entirely behind a solid physical barrier. Visibility doesn’t matter for line of effect, nor do portcullises and other barriers that aren’t totally solid. If you’re unsure whether a barrier is solid enough, usually a 1-foot-square gap is enough to maintain a line of effect, though the GM makes the final call.

In an area effect, creatures or targets must have line of effect to the point of origin to be affected. If there’s no line of effect between the origin of the area and the target, the effect doesn’t apply to that target. For example, if there’s a solid wall between the origin of a fireball and a creature that’s within the burst radius, the wall blocks the effect—that creature is unaffected by the fireball and doesn’t need to attempt a save against it. Likewise, any ongoing effects created by an ability with an area cease to affect anyone who moves outside of the line of effect.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

Ok, sure, give me a moment then.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

Do you still need more players? I'll take a spot with a level 7 medium if you do. I'll need to write up my tagline quickly, but I can be ready pretty fast.

Edit: I see part 1 is almost finished and I'd rather not miss out on parts of a special, so good luck guys!

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Grimmstories wrote:
Crafting is extremely imbalanced part of the game. Taking minimum 4 days period to make anything even items that should only take a single day, for an example a elixir of life. Even if you completed the craft time, it still cost full price for the item even though you clearly completed the item and the only way to reduce that price is spending more downtime instead of earning money. How does any craftsman actually make any money if they are not adventuring? How will this be fixed?

The benefit of crafting items over earning income is the Specialty Crafting and Impeccable Crafter feats, especially when paired with assurance. With the chain of feats, you can just choose to critically succeed at all your crafting checks where you couldn't do that for earning income. For most characters, yes, crafting doesn't do a whole lot, however that is why it is balanced in my opinion.

If you think about it from a market point of view, your town blacksmith is purchasing the materials for half the cost of an item, then sells the item for its full sale price when he is done crafting it. Until he is an impeccable crafter, this is functionally an extremely fair way to price his time and skill because it literally earns him the same income as simply "earning income". Once he becomes an impeccable crafter, he starts to be able to make items much faster making them sell for the same price, but in a shorter time span, earning him more money.

Edit: Don't get me wrong though, my pfs alchemist is a member of envoy's alliance for the sole purpose of getting the Crafters workshop book to remove the 4 day start up time. I honestly wouldn't be surprised if lowering the startup time becomes a feat or ability in the future though.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
graystone wrote:
Thomas Keller: you've posted your question and even gotten answers. I think it might be time to start your own thread instead of derailing a thread collecting various different questions to ask. It's not really the place to debate a single question.

I second this, but only because it doesn't really feel like a rules question anymore, but one of game/world design. You could put a question more worded in this direction in the "Ask Mark Seifter Anything" thread, but I don't know if he really checks that thread very often right now.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1
SodiumTelluride wrote:
Elsa is probably the easiest: elemental (cold) sorcerer. I have one in Core!

Actually, I think of her as more of an ice kineticist. She can't do a whole lot other than shoot ice and make stuff out of it, all of which can be covered by wild talents and infusions.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

1) An archmage medium. It just doesn't seem to be that effective, mainly because its spirit bonus is practically useless.

2) A doll-like halfling vizier mesmerist with concealed casting that just rides in someone's backpack and casts spells and abilities without anyone knowing its them

3) An esoteric magus or a sohei monk/wizard/eldritch knight. The wizard/monk concept is just way easier in 2e.

4) A witch hunter (malice binder) investigator that just hates magic and doesn't think anyone is responsible enough to use it.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Thomas Keller wrote:
zer0darkfire wrote:

The names could be better, but there are bloodline spells and "granted spells" from your bloodline, which are totally different things. A bloodline always gives you a spell at each level from 1st to 9th, but there are also "bloodline spells" which are just focus powers.

Aberrant for example:
Granted Spells cantrip daze, 1st: spider sting, 2nd: touch of idiocy, 3rd: vampiric touch, 4th: confusion, 5th: black tentacles, 6th: feeblemind, 7th: warp mind, 8th: uncontrollable dance, 9th: unfathomable song
Bloodline Spells initial: tentacular limbs, advanced: aberrant whispers, greater: unusual anatomy

So, what do you get from level 10 to 20?

Those spells? Those levels are spell levels, not character levels. For example, unfathomable song is a 9th level spell, so you get it at level 17 added to your 9th level spells known.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

The names could be better, but there are bloodline spells and "granted spells" from your bloodline, which are totally different things. A bloodline always gives you a spell at each level from 1st to 9th, but there are also "bloodline spells" which are just focus powers.

Aberrant for example:
Granted Spells cantrip daze, 1st: spider sting, 2nd: touch of idiocy, 3rd: vampiric touch, 4th: confusion, 5th: black tentacles, 6th: feeblemind, 7th: warp mind, 8th: uncontrollable dance, 9th: unfathomable song
Bloodline Spells initial: tentacular limbs, advanced: aberrant whispers, greater: unusual anatomy

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Mark, let me ask you some questions about the class you designed, the medium. Hopefully you'll be able to answer these questions pretty easily since its your class!

1) "Seance Boon: Your damaging spells deal an additional 2 points of damage of the same type that they would normally deal to each target." How does this ability interact with spells that have multiple hits, like magic missile? I get that it says "to each target", but what if I aim 5 magic missiles at a single enemy?

2) What counts as "your...spells"? Does it work with a wand? A scroll? A staff of entwined serpents with the line "At will, the wielder can use the staff to cast magic missile"?

3) If I played a storyteller medium that focused on the Marshal spirit, would inspiring call do absolutely nothing or can I use the bonus to knowledge skills in place of my spirit bonus since they scale at the same speed and are functionally the same thing?

4) Not entirely a medium question, but can a spiritualist's phantom participate in a seance? They are intelligent and can maintain contact for an hour (although everyone will get slimed), but I'm not sure if they could open their spirit to another spirit, granted that is essentially what the players are doing.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Thomas Keller wrote:


And what are the number of known spells for spontaneous casters?
"Sorcerer class entry, Page 190+ wrote:


Spell Repertoire
The collection of spells you can cast is called your spell repertoire. At 1st level, you learn two 1st-level spells of your choice and four cantrips of your choice, as well as an additional spell and cantrip from your bloodline (page 194). You choose these from the common spells from the tradition corresponding to your bloodline, or from other spells from that tradition to which you have access. You can cast any spell in your spell repertoire by using a spell slot of an appropriate spell level.

You add to this spell repertoire as you increase in level. Each time you get a spell slot (see Table 3–17), you add a spell of the same level to your spell repertoire. When you gain access to a new level of spells, your first new spell is always your bloodline spell, but you can choose the other spells you gain. At 2nd level, you select another 1st-level spell; at 3rd level, you gain a new bloodline spell and two other 2nd-level spells, and so on. When you add spells, you might choose a higher-level version of a spell you already have so that you can cast a heightened version of that spell.

Though you gain them at the same rate, your spell slots and the spells in your spell repertoire are separate. If a feat or other ability adds a spell to your spell repertoire, it wouldn’t give you another spell slot, and vice versa.

Scarab Sages

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Cintra Bristol wrote:

Actually, if you look at the Areas images on CRB page 456, the emanation for a Large creature, the same darker-green color that fills the emanation area is used on the corners of the 2x2 space covered by the "L" circle. If the caster's space were not included in the area of an emanation, then the corners around the "L" should be the lighter green of the rest of the grid outside the displayed Areas.

So while they say it emanates out from the sides of the caster's space, I think that's how the explain how to count distance; but if you think about it, a person standing in that space would have at least a few inches from the edges of their actual skin to the edges of their 5' square; yet it seems kind of silly to imagine in-world that the caster sees a 5' box of immunity around themselves. What are they, mimes? Plus, the second sentence under Areas on p.456 starts "An area effect always has a point of origin" - so it makes much more sense to imagine it originating at a point inside the core of the caster's body.

Let's look at other supporting examples from a handful of other spells that are Emanations:
(1) Antimagic Field - I've never seen any version of the game that said the caster at the center of an Antimagic Field was immune to that field.
(2) Bane only targets enemies, so that one works fine either way.
(3) Bless states "You and your allies" because it doesn't affect Enemies, and you never count as your own Ally, so it has to mention You and your Allies to do as intended.
(4) Circle of Protection has always included the person at the center.
(5) Invisibility Sphere - another example of "You and any number of creatures" - and the text goes on to say you are affected as long as you "remain within the spell's area"
(6) Pass Without Trace - similar to above
(7 & 8) Synaptic Pulse and Wail of the Banshee are examples of harmful emanation spells - and one targets only Enemies, the other targets Selected Creatures; so they are written to ensure the caster needn't be affected.
(9) Weapon Storm is...

This!

This is entirely what I was trying to explain, but not anywhere as well as you!

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Rysky wrote:
zer0darkfire wrote:
Rysky wrote:
The 3A action of Heal includes the Caster because it says Burst as well. The 3A Harm does not because it does not say Burst.
A spell cannot be both a burst and an emanation according to the spell section of the rulebook, so in my mind heal should be a burst effect. For harm, I feel like it should be a burst that states that you can choose to include yourself if you want to otherwise undead clerics with minions get the short end of the stick there.
Where does it state that?

"Areas

Source Core Rulebook pg. 304
Sometimes a spell has an area, which can be a burst, cone, emanation, or line. The method of measuring these areas can be found on page 456.”

Not and/or, or. A spell cannot be more than one type of area by RAW.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Rysky wrote:
The 3A action of Heal includes the Caster because it says Burst as well. The 3A Harm does not because it does not say Burst.

A spell cannot be both a burst and an emanation according to the spell section of the rulebook, so in my mind heal should be a burst effect. For harm, I feel like it should be a burst that states that you can choose to include yourself if you want to otherwise undead clerics with minions get the short end of the stick there.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Rysky wrote:
lemeres wrote:
Gisher wrote:
Here is the complete description of the Aldori dueling sword from a recent blog. I strongly suspect that the 20 gp cost is a misprint. An Elven curve blade is only 4 gp.

Who knows. It might be horrifically overfancy and given ridiculous smithing requirements that ultimately do little to improve the item (such as 'folded 1000 times', when you only get benefit from the first...dozen or so?).

The sword is the key feature of the swordstyle, as well as the symbol of the school (which has a mix of nobility, 'super special club', honor obsession, and general 'prickly' nature as its characteristics). So they might go overboard in order to have something they can use to look down on others.

This is honestly why I didn’t question the price, given who the Aldori are.

Honestly, same. I just assumed it was correct because it almost makes sense.

Scarab Sages

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Squiggit wrote:
zer0darkfire wrote:
Nothing in emanation technically says you're not included in your own spell, we are simply reading into the fact that an emanation extends from "each side of your space".
It's pretty clear to me (and most people I've talked to) that that's exactly what that means. Because that's what it says, right there. It extends from each side of the square.

So does heal/harm include the caster or not if it's clear?

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

You're missing my point here, does this indicate there is an error with emanation spells in general or only specific spells? Nothing in emanation technically says you're not included in your own spell, we are simply reading into the fact that an emanation extends from "each side of your space". Looking at offensive emanations, it still isn't clear because they all seem to specify enemies or that you can choose who is affected.

Scarab Sages

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Personally, as a base chassis, I think monk is the strongest class in the game. Legendary in 1 save (with evasion), master in 1 save (with evasion), and expert in 1 save. Master in attacks, legendary in defense. Right now, if I want to play a spellcaster, I'm probably playing a monk with multiclass dedication because of all the abilities being a main monk gives you that feats simply cannot and all it costs is slightly slower spell progression and 9th and 10th level spells, seems worth it to me.

Scarab Sages

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Yes, we know how it works, but what does "you and your allies in the area" imply? Is the cleric in the area or not? You can read it in two ways, on one hand, the cleric is not in the area so its explicitly included, on the other hand, it implies that the cleric is always in the area because it says "in the area" and includes the cleric and their allies.

Scarab Sages

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Is it really both or is that a typo? I'm really curious where the error lies, as there definitely is an error in the ability. Is it an emanation or a burst? Why is heal different than harm in this regard? Are emanation's supposed to include the caster? How does synaptic pulse work as a 30ft emanation with a 30ft range? If heal is supposed to include the cleric, why wasn't the area written as "a 30ft burst centered on you" like sanctified ground is? Why is Bless written strangely so that you can read it as "you" and also "your allies in the area" or as "you while in the area and your allies in the area" when the spell is an emanation? If you cast circle of protection on yourself, does it not affect you?

Scarab Sages

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Is this ability an exception to the rules? Nope, it follows all the standard rules for focus powers. It doesn't give a focus pool because you already have one and nothing in the rulebook says that a focus power will always give you a focus pool/point, in fact it says the opposite, that abilities typically will do this, but not always.

Is this ability an exception in that it is one of the only abilities that gives a focus power without giving a focus point? I'd say, also no, at least for the low level options. The only pattern it breaks is that its the only ability in the game that gives you a new focus power at level 1 on a class that already has a focus pool (except Bard, but they do focus powers differently anyway). All other classes either start with a focus pool and power, have an option to gain a power and pool, or simply do not have this feature. The only pattern this "breaks" is when you compare it to higher level options that almost or always give you a focus power and a focus point, but of course they do, they are higher level abilities.

So, in conclusion, no, the ability does not give a focus point and the rules are pretty clear on this. Abilities will tell you that they give you a focus point because they have to tell you if you are supposed to gain a point, why anyone would assume this ability should also give you a focus point is beyond me as nothing in the rulebook indicates that it would.

Scarab Sages

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Deadmanwalking wrote:


2.... And Mountain Stance isn't magic, all you need is a stable surface. They don't work great with Fuse Stance, but they're very good on their own.

Actually, mountain stance does work with fuse stance, but only if the other stance doesn't also have the line of "you can only make x-type of strikes". As it is, you could fuse mountain with wolf stance, for example, not that it currently has much benefit for doing so.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I've also heard that 20g was a misprint, although 2g and 20sp is the same amount of money, so just taking off a 0 seems more likely than changing the currency type. (2g vs 20sp)

Scarab Sages

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There seems to be some misinterpretation of what the section on "If you have multiple abilities that give you a focus pool" means. Yes, if an ability says you gain a pool of focus point(s) and you already have one, then you do gain a point. However, look at the Deity's Domain feat for champion, it says you gain the domain spell as a devotion spell, it does not say it "gives you a focus pool" or that increases your focus pool by 1, so it does neither.

Now look at Domain initiate for cleric, "Domain spells are a type of focus spell. It costs 1 Focus Point to cast a focus spell, and you start with a focus pool of 1 Focus Point." This ability does give a focus pool, so normally, yes, selecting this feat more than once would increase your focus pool, however, it has the line "Special You can select this feat multiple times, selecting a different domain each time and gaining its domain spell." This line does only what it says it does, you gain the domain spell for a different domain, not the pool or the connected increase in focus points.

Scarab Sages

Male Human Teacher 2/Librarian 1

Looks like a sorcerer and two fighters so far. Leaning towards playing my level 1 healchemist then.

Scarab Sages

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zer0darkfire wrote:

So, I was looking over swarms and I don't see anything stopping you from grappling them, at least not mechanically.

Swarm: "A swarm is a mass or cloud of creatures that functions as one monster. Its size entry gives the size of the entire mass, though for most swarms the individual creatures that make up that mass are Tiny. A swarm can occupy the same space as other creatures, and must do so in order to use its damaging action. A swarm typically has weakness to effects that deal damage over an area (like area spells and splash weapons)."

I even checked some swarm creatures to see if they had common entries about it, but came up empty. Rat Swarm (276) has immunity to precision and swarm mind, but not grapple?

If you look at Incorporeal, they have this line "An incorporeal creature can’t attempt Strength-based checks against physical creatures or objects—only against incorporeal ones—unless those objects have the ghost touch property rune. Likewise, a corporeal creature can’t attempt Strength-based checks against incorporeal creatures or objects."

This is an oversight right? I'm not supposed to be able to roll around on a pile of spiders, keeping them in place or throw the entire swarm with whirling throw? Can we just add a similar line from incorporeal creatures to swarms so you can't grapple or trip them?

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I'd be inclined to agree with you if incorporeal's didn't explicitly spell out that we can't grapple, shove, trip, etc. them. If they say it for one creature, why not another?

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