Halfling Outrider

Phosphorus's page

Organized Play Member. 185 posts (236 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 14 Organized Play characters.


Grand Lodge

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I am sad that you can't buy vanities in Core. :(

Grand Lodge

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Combine Alchemical Allocation with Seishinru, Spirit Elixir :)

True Strike is very useful with Parry & Riposte - a parry counts as an attack roll!

Grand Lodge

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The Romans had hamburgers.

In Golarion, the Taldan Empire is an analogue of the Roman Empire.

All the places which speak Common,(ie Taldane), could have similar cuisine to ancient Romans.

Grand Lodge

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Also, a gold-plated club is free! (0 gp x 3 = 0)

:-D

Grand Lodge

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Earl of Essex0 wrote:


It also states that Gold can be magically hardened to steel-like consistency but no price is listed.

From Ultimate Equipment:

"The following section presents general rules for armor and weapons made of bone, bronze, gold, obsidian, and stone. Most of these materials aren't as strong as steel and refer to the fragile quality for weapons and armor.

Items made from these materials can be magically strengthened at an additional cost of 100 gp per pound. See the individual material descriptions for the effect this has on the material's properties."

Grand Lodge

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Dylos wrote:
Well, I know that my swashbuckler will no longer qualify for Slashing Grace now that the prerequisites changed.
p. 27 of Guide to Pathfinder Society Organised Play, Version 5.0 wrote:


First, you may either switch the old feat for an updated feat of the same name in another legal source (if available), ignoring any prerequisites of the new feat you do not meet. Alternatively, you may replace the feat entirely with another feat for which you meet all the prerequisites.

You can keep your feat.

Grand Lodge

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trollbill wrote:


How about something like this:

Beginning 8/14/2014 aasimar, teifling, or tengu races will no longer be considered available PFS content and you may no longer create characters of these races without a boon. If you have an existing aasimar, tiefling, or tengu character whose first Adventure Chronicle is dated prior to 8/14/2014 you may continue playing that character as if you had a boon for it.

This would allow people who have already invested in these characters to continue playing them, and over time would cut down on their abundance (some would say over abundance) and increase the number of races available as boons. Sure we would see a mad rush for people trying to get their aasimar, tiefling or tengu character concept played so they can grandfather in, but it will eventually have an impact.

Do this and I will make 10 level 1 Tieflings and Aasimars, this is a bad idea...

My suggestion for race boons is to tie it into a reward system. It could be linked to the GM star system, or simply be a reward for playing multiple games. For example, play 50 games and get one race unlocked.

Grand Lodge

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OK, the results are in and the draw has been made!

Thanks to everyone who helped for this thread.
Every class has a race, archetype and prestige class they must enter!
No dump stats allowed, every stat must be a minimum of 10 after racial adjustments!

We have the following characters:

Gnome, Barbarian (Titan Mauler, must dual wield two handed Gnome Weapons), Low Templar.

Gnome, Barbarian (True Primitive), Knight of Ozem.

Gnome, Monk (Core rulebook and Gnomes of Golarion only), Brother of the Seal.

Tengu, Cavalier (Strategist, Order of the Tome), Battle Herald.

Elf, Cleric (Cloistered, Variant Channel), Balanced Scale of Abadar.

Halfling, Fighter (Crossbowman), Halfling Opportunist.

Halfling, Rogue (Filcher), Bellflower Tiller.

Dwarf, Witch (White Haired Witch), Riftwarden.

Dwarf, Wizard (Scrollmaster), Prophet of Kallistrade.

Dwarf, Wizard, class each level determined randomly... no two levels allowed to be the same... first random level was Wizard...

The gnomes and dwarves are triplets, the halflings are twins.

Bring on the Dalsine Affair! :-)

Updates will follow...

Grand Lodge

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Chris Sharpe, Venture Captain of New Zealand, has thrown down the gauntlet!

We need to make characters using the worst archetypes and classes possible.

No dump stats are allowed, and every character must enter a class appropriate Prestige Class. All characters must be races from the Core Rulebook only.

So far suggestions include a Mystic Theurge sorcerer / oracle without early entry, and a rogue / bellflower tiller. Any monks will be required to have a vow of poverty. There will be a Crossbowman Fighter.

Can you help us? The best entries will go into a hat for us to draw out a character we will have to build.

Their first scenario will be the Dalsine Affair. Can you suggest other hard scenarios for us to play these characters in?

Thanks for your help :-)

We will keep you updated about their glorious exploits (and horrible deaths)....

Grand Lodge

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James Krolak wrote:

Just got and read through the new scenario 5-19 The Horn of Aroden. There's something that's confusing, though:

- In the Conclusion section, first paragraph on page 19, the last line says that "Each PC earn the Horn of Aroden boon on his or her Chronicle sheet."
- Under the Faction Notes section on that same page, though, it says, "If Taldor faction PCs accomplish both goals, they each receive the Horn of Aroden boon on their Chronicle sheets."

Which is correct? The Chronicle Sheet itself doesn't offer any further clarification.

I asked Mike Brock about who got the boon, and he confirmed that the boon was for Taldor PCs only.

Grand Lodge

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I don't think that the character with Butterfly's Sting counts as the 'next ally'. I think that character is the same ally. Only another character would be the 'next ally'.

Grand Lodge

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...you start the game with 4 players, and one is a new player running an iconic. The new player chooses Harsk, because he has a beard...

...then you find out that Harsk has the highest charisma in the party, at a charming 8, and has the best bluff skill at -1!

Grand Lodge

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I have hit FAQ, but if it is legal, I think there is room for abuse as everyone with a reach build would take the 'Rough and Ready' Equipment Trait and one rank in Profession (Blacksmith) or Profession (Longspear Maker), to allow them to have a weapon that they could use at 5 and 10 foot.

Grand Lodge

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Jelloarm wrote:
It could grip you by the husk.

It's not a question of where he grips it, It's a simple matter of weight - ratios ... A five-ounce bird could not hold a a one pound coconut.

Grand Lodge

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Pupsocket wrote:
Given that common sense, SKR and and the 3.5 FAQ to the exact same question (and neither the charge rules, the mounted combat rules or RBA were changed) both say the same thing: Draw a line that goes by the target, not through him, I think the matter is settled.

I agree that this is a reasonable conclusion, but it is a houserule.

The rules are badly written. Here is the 3.5 FAQ about Ride-By Attack, which is pertinent to this discussion:

________________________________________________

With the rules erratum that prohibits overruns as part of a charge, the Ride-By Attack feat is now nearly useless. You must use the charge action to use the Ride-By Attack feat, and that requires you to travel in a straight line toward your target. Using the example in the PH, this would appear to rather specifically mean along a line from your entire square (or squares if riding a horse or other mount with a space of 10 feet or greater), to the target square. Ride-By Attack allows you to continue moving along the straight line of the charge after your attack. This would have to mean that at some point you would enter the square (or squares) of the creature you attacked. (At least I cannot conceive of any other way it could be done). Since you cannot enter your foe’s space unless the creature is already dead, Ride-By Attack is now pretty much useless if you can’t also overrun the foe. Some have suggested that you could charge in a manner that would not bring you through the target creature’s square (or squares). To do so, you would not be charging directly toward the target and likely not moving by the shortest route (also a charge requirement) or attacking it from the first possible square(another charge requirement). In any of these cases, you would be breaking the rules for a charge. Am I wrong about any of this?

No, you’ve got it about right.

When using the Ride-By attack feat, you must conduct your charge so that you move in a straight line toward the closest square from which it is possible to attack your chosen foe, so long as it is a square that allows you to attack and then continue on in the straight line of the charge. You still must attack your foe the moment you reach that square. (Although the feat description doesn’t say so, you and your mount also must move at least 5 feet after you make your attack to get the benefit of the feat.) This is a special rule for charging when using the Ride-By Attack feat. Note that the Flyby Attack feat (discussed in the previous question) does not require you to move in a straight line. You merely make a single move and take another standard action at some point during that move.

________________________________________________

The language of the feat and the relevant charge rules have not changed significantly between 3.5 and Pathfinder.

Pathfinder is not 3.5, and the 3.5 FAQ is not RAW, but there is not yet any official FAQ in Pathfinder for this feat, or a mounted charge.

The only thing that will really settle it is errata so that the rules are clear and easily understood.

I hope if and when Paizo provides errata, it is better than the 3.5 FAQ!

Grand Lodge

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Maezer wrote:

While this probably needs an official FAQ at some point, this has come up multiple times on the forums.

SKR post on the matter: *note he posts multiple times in the thread so reading the whole thing might be worthwhile.

http://paizo.com/threads/rzs2l5b9?Mounts-with-attacks-and-the-RideByAttack- Feat#13

Here are some pictures he made on the subject:

http://s248.photobucket.com/user/seankreynolds/media/angled-charges.jpg.htm l

Sadly, SKR's interpretation of the rules have flaws that were discussed in the thread. He wrote that he would be lobbying for change after his errors were pointed out but no changes have occurred, and it has been several years since this thread.

The whole mounted combat system needs a rewrite so that it is clear and easy to understand.

Grand Lodge

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I have revised my gunslinger:

Double Happy II

Halfling

Mysterious Stranger 5 / Trench Fighter 5 / Urban Barbarian 2

Str:8
Dex:24 (Raging)
Con:8
Int:7
Wis:7
Cha:22

Feats: PBS, Deadly Aim,Weapon Focus,Weapon Special,Quick Draw,Rapid Shot,Rapid Reload, Improved Critical, TWF, ITWF, GTWF.
Rage Power:Reckless Abandon

Attack: 13/13/13/13/8/8/3/3; 2nd hand 13/13/8/8/3/3, d6+25, (19-20 x4)

Gear: 6 Double Barreled Pistols, Paper Cartridges.

Fires main hand pistol first, then drops it and quick draws another pistol, and fires that with his off hand.

Can add Dexterity to damage as a Trench Fighter, can add Charisma to damage as a Mysterious Stranger by spending 1 point of grit and a swift action a round.

Can ignore six misfires, which should be enough for ~3 rounds on average.

DPS ~476, DPS over 3 rounds ~1428

Feel free to find mistakes, as I am sure some must of slipped through!

Grand Lodge

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I think a Gunslinger would win. Here's a quick build, probably contains a few errors...

Double Happy the Goblin

Musket Master 5 / Trench Fighter 5 / Urban Barbarian 2

Str:16
Dex:28 (Raging)
Con:10
Int:7
Wis:8
Cha:5

Feats: PBS, Precise Shot,Deadly Aim,Weapon Focus,Weapon Special,Quick Draw,Improved Precise Shot,Rapid Shot,Rapid Reload (Double Barreled Musket), Goblin Gunslinger, Improved Critical (Double Barreled Musket)

Rage Power:Reckless Abandon

Attack: 20/20/20/20/15/15/10/10, d12+29, (19-20 x4)

Gear: 7 Masterwork Double Barreled Muskets, Paper Cartridges, Masterwork Backpack.

Fires both barrels of his musket at once, drops double barreled musket and quick draws another double barreled musket when a misfire occurs. The DPR maths is complicated, as you have to take into account misfires...

He goes through an average of 1.11 Muskets a round due to misfires.

I get a DPR of ~307, giving a 3 round DPR of ~921

(If my maths is correct)

Edit: Assuming Dex x 2 to damage is legal. Without Dex x 2 to damage
I get a DPR of ~229, giving a 3 round DPR of ~686

Grand Lodge

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The Wakizashi is the best light weapon.

The Scimitar, thanks to Dervish Dance is the best weapon for 1 handed dex builds.

The Falcata becomes the best weapon when you have a high bonus to damage. It also has the advantage that you can use it 1 or 2 handed. This is a great advantage if you are grappled and unable to use a 2 handed weapon.

The Nodachi is also good, but if you have a low bonus to damage, the Two-Handed Sword or Earhbreaker is better.

If you have a build that relies on criticals, an 18-20 range weapon is the best.

Ultimately, I think it comes down to whether you like to do criticals more often, or want to do spectacular criticals.

Also, the Cracked Opalescent White Ioun Stone will grant you Weapon Familiarity with one exotic weapon (i.e. it makes that weapon useable with Martial Weapon Proficiency). It only costs 1,500 gp. Stick it in a wayfinder to help prevent theft.

Grand Lodge

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I think Channel Energy is an iconic ability of the Cleric, and a Fighter/Cleric should be able to do this. It also allows access to feats such as Guided Hand. You can also use it activate Channel Foci, some of which are quite useful.

In fact, I would like to see it uncoupled from Fervor to make it a more viable option.

Liberty's Edge

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Starfox wrote:


Actually, having to take martial arts style feats is in itself a failure for a class built to simulate western-style fencing. The swashbuckler should be able to perform at this level of competency out of the box.

I agree, I would like to see some western-style fencing feats, maybe ones that are similar to the monk style feats, but have more appropriate fluff. Perhaps the Swashbuckler could get them instead of its bonus feats, or avoid prerequisites. An alternative may be to make them Swashbuckler only feats, linked to Swashbuckler levels in a similar way to the Fighter only feats. Or make new Fighter only feats, so that Fighters, Swashbucklers, Brawlers and Samurai can take them also. This may give incentive to stay in the class.

Using Crane Style with a rapier doesn't really make sense, although it is legal RAW.

I want my Swashbuckler to be able to have this exchange:

Inigo: You are using Bonetti's defense against me, uh?
Man In Black: I thought it fitting, considering the rocky terrain.
Inigo: Naturally, you must expect me to attack with Capo Ferro.
Man In Black: Naturally, but I find that Thibault cancels out Capo Ferro, don't you?
Inigo: Unless the enemy has studied his Agrippa,which I have!

Liberty's Edge

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A big problem with the Swashbuckler is that it seems nobody can build one without dipping into another class. Popular options are Monk archetype Master of Many Styles (MoMS), Paladin and Urban Barbarian.

If the goal of class design is that it should be desirable to make single class characters, the Swashbuckler is a failure.

I think the swashbuckler should be able to obtain easy access to the Style feats in some way other than dipping MoMS. As it stands, a MoMS dip is almost compulsory. The question is not shall I dip MoMS, but when.

Perhaps if they could take the style feats as bonus feats without having to meet the prerequisites?

P.S. Please fix the Fortitude save.

Grand Lodge

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Get this feat:

Equipment Trick (Combat)

Spoiler:
Choose one piece of equipment, such as boots, cloak, rope, shield, or even Kaava musk. You understand how to use that item in combat. For a list of additional equipment tricks, see Pathfinder Companion: Adventurer’s Armory.

Prerequisites: Base attack bonus +1.

Benefit: You may use any equipment tricks relating to the item if you meet the appropriate trick requirements. If the item would normally be considered an improvised weapon, you may treat it as a normal weapon or an improvised weapon, whichever is more beneficial for you.

Special: You can gain Equipment Trick multiple times. Each time you take the feat, it applies to a new type of equipment.

You can then take Weapon Focus with your improvised weapon.

Select your deity's holy symbol and fight with that!

The bonus is it's PFS legal!

You can also build some great NPCs!

It would also allow you to build some great NPCs!

Some other fun PFS legal items:

Spoiler:

anvil
bellows
any musical instrument
umbrella
croquet set
polo, rounders or tennis gear
air bladder
bottle
caltrops, cold iron
cauldron
coffee or tea pot
coffin (bonus points if it is ornate)
bucket
swim fins and snorkel
ear trumpet
fangfile
firewood
folding pole
hip flask
holy text
inkpen
ladder
manacles
mug / tankard
periscope
pickle extractor
prosthetic limb
skillet
spyglass

Any masterwork tool!


You can also fight with food - chocolate (bar), haggis, fortune cookie etc.

Liberty's Edge

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I played a level 1 Swashbuckler in The Confirmation in PFS on Tuesday night, and came to some conclusions. Our party was entirely arcane except for my Swashbuckler. The rest of the party was- 1 arcanist, 2 wizards (one of them Ezren), and a Bloodrager.

Character:

Spoiler:

Human Swashbuckler

Str: 14
Dex: 18
Con: 12
Int: 12
Wis: 7
Cha: 14

Feats: Extra panache, Combat Reflexes.
Traits: Dangerously Curious, Fencer.

Important Gear: Masterwork Rapier, Chain Shirt, Buckler, Wand of Cure Light Wounds, other adventuring stuff.

1. My damage was appalling. The Bloodrager was hitting for 2d6 + 13. He did 15 damage at one point, and announced that was his minimum damage. I was doing 1d6+2, so my maximum damage, on a critical was 16, only one better than his worst. I got fatigued, and then my damage fell to 1d6+1, meaning even with a critical my damage would be less than the Bloodrager. I really felt that my character was a bit of a passenger in combat, and just a meat shield (and not a very good meat shield).

2. My fortitude save was the worst in the party - the wizards and arcanist had better fortitude saves and this made me a bit concerned, especially as the first encounter was with monsters that required a fortitude save on a hit.

3. The Bloodrager had only 1 AC less than mine, and when he later swopped from his two-handed weapon to sword and board, his AC was better than mine.

3. The parry was good, and I had enough panache to attempt to parry every attack. However, I only managed one parry all night which was due to bad rolls. Nonetheless, it was fun.

4. Dodging panache allowed me to step back, and avoid a full attack and saved my Swashbuckler's life, so that was good.

5. Derring-do allowed me to make a critical acrobatics check.

Conclusions - I felt I contributed little to combat. It was a bit like playing a rogue without sneak attack, and with less skills. The Bloodrager made a much better martial character.

Grand Lodge

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Cheapy wrote:
I'm particularly interested in brawler archetype ideas. Any ideas?

Gladiator: Can only use flurry with performance weapons.

Liberty's Edge

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Swashbuckler Archetypes:

Braggadocio: Can use Derring-do for Diplomacy, Bluff, Intimidate and Perform.

Blade: Can use the Elven Curve Blade (Elf swashbuckler archetype)

Liberty's Edge

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I am concerned that the optimal build appears to be dumping Charisma.

To fix this, I would suggest that Charisma be made more important to the class.

Suggestions:

Allow Charisma to replace the relevant ability score required to qualify for bonus feats - e.g. Allow Charisma 13 to qualify for Power Attack instead of Strength 13, and Charisma 13 to qualify for Combat Expertise, instead of Intelligence 13.

Make a feat or ability to add Charisma to damage. Ensure it doesn't stack with dexterity to damage.

Liberty's Edge

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Thoughts so far –

Great class, but the bad saves will probably make it squishy, especially at high levels.

1. I think the swashbuckler needs something to make up for its bad saves – maybe Charisma to saves like Divine Grace, or an ability to spend panache points to add Charisma to saves. This could replace the worthless Bravery.

2. The weapon choice needs to be expanded – the current selection is bizarre – a swashbuckler can wield a Heavy Pick, Morning Star or Taiaha, but not an Aldori Duelling Sword.

I would like to see the Swashbuckler able to use all light weapons, one handed weapons and all weapons that can be used with Weapon Finesse. (Including the Elven Curve Blade – this would give this weapon a niche.)

3. Precise strike needs to lose its many restrictions – I don’t know why it is also precision damage, as the Precise Strike of the Duellist is not.

4. I would like to see Dexterity to damage or maybe Charisma to damage instead of Strength to damage as a class feature. If it is Charisma to damage there needs to be wording to prevent stacking with current methods of Dexterity to damage. As it currently stands many Swashbucklers will end up with Dervish Dance or Agile Weapons.

5. Opportune Parry and Riposte probably should be broken up and spread out –Parry at level 1, and Riposte at level 3. Also, Opportune Parry is really bad for small Swashbucklers – I think this should maybe be a -4 for every size larger than medium, or dropped entirely. Giving Opportune Parry and Riposte at level 1 means you have a feat tax of combat reflexes at level 1.

6. Swashbuckler Finesse should function as Weapon Finesse for prerequisites and be given at level 1. It could be broken up so that +4 bonuses come in at level 2.

As it currently stands Weapon Finesse is a pre-requisite for Dervish Dance and Piranha Strike which will both be popular feats for the Swashbuckler. This means half of Swashbuckler Finesse is useless to many builds.

7. I think Evasive should be also broken up, rather than all given in one go at level 11.

8. Pommel Strike – How does this work? Does it count as a trip attack? Does it provoke an attack of opportunity?

Grand Lodge

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Michael Brock wrote:

I've talked to the Design team about this topic. Here is a summation of their response:

There is no explicit rule in the Core Rulebook that says a Medium creature can't ride a Medium mount, but it is implied in secondary rules, such as the description of the riding dog and horse and the description of the paladin's divine bond. And it's explicitly called out in the beast rider archetype: "The animal chosen as a mount must be large enough to carry the beast rider (Medium or Large for a Small character; Large or Huge for a Medium character)."

Yes, the beast rider archetype (UC page 36) offers Medium riders extra animal companion choices, and at that level some of those cavalier's companions will be Medium rather than Large. But at the "you can't select things unless you can use it as a mount" rule still applies. So unless you're beast rider level is high enough to make the animal in that list mount-appropriate for you, you can't select it as a mount. It's presented the way it is so we didn't have to have separate 4th- and 7th-level lists for Small and Medium characters (space is short, and writing it that way is cumbersome because at 7th level you'd either have to look at two lists, as in "anything from the previous list plus these new ones," or repeat all of the 4th-level list in the 7th-level list).

Another way to look at it from a different situation. The fighter class gets bonus combat feats. But that class feature still follows the normal prerequisite rules for selecting feats—a 2nd-level fighter can't select Weapon Specialization because he doesn't meet the "fighter 4th" prerequisite. A 2nd-level fighter arguing "but it just told me I can select a combat feat, and Weapon Specialization is a combat feat!" doesn't hold water; you don't meet the prerequisites, so you can't select it.

This is the PFS ruling on medium characters and medium mounts.

It means that a medium creature, such as a human, can never ride a mule, a donkey or pony!

Grand Lodge

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LoneKnave wrote:

Lances can be used with one hand from horseback and it is a piercing weapon; does that make it eligible for the duelist to use for his abilities if he's mounted?

No.

"Precise Strike (Ex): A duelist gains the ability to strike precisely with a light or one-handed piercing weapon, adding her duelist level to her damage roll."

A lance used mounted remains a two-handed piercing weapon, even though it is used in one hand.

Unless you use the Jotungrip ability of the Titan Mauler.

see this thread

Grand Lodge

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"Unlike a locked gauntlet, you can still use a hand with a weapon cord, though a dangling weapon may interfere with finer actions."

Why not say that reloading is a finer action.

Or rewrite the relevant FAQ:

Do weapon cords prevent reloading?

Yes.

Grand Lodge

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Quote:

Power Attack: If I am using a two-handed weapon with one hand (such as a lance while mounted), do still I get the +50% damage for using a two-handed weapon?

Yes.

—Pathfinder Design Team, 05/24/13

Weapons, Two-Handed in One Hand: When a feat or other special ability says to treat a weapon that is normally wielded in two hands as a one handed weapon, does it get treated as one or two handed weapon for the purposes of how to apply the Strength modifier or the Power Attack feat?

If you're wielding it in one hand (even if it is normally a two-handed weapon), treat it as a one-handed weapon for the purpose of how much Strength to apply, the Power Attack damage bonus, and so on.

—Pathfinder Design Team, 07/19/13

Are these two FAQ entries contradictory. If so, which one is correct?

No, they are not contradictory (but they are a bit confusing). A mounted lance is the only two handed weapon that can be used in one hand, and still be treated as a two handed weapon: 'While mounted, you can wield a lance with one hand.' There is no text to tell you to treat it as a one handed weapon, hence the mounted lance is still a two handed weapon. To my knowledge, the mounted lance is the only weapon that is treated as a two handed weapon when used in one hand.

This is a 'special feature' of the lance, not a special ability.

In all other cases, the feat or special ability says to treat the two handed weapon as a one handed weapon. This means you are using a one handed weapon in one hand, not a two handed weapon in one hand.

For example:

Spoiler:
"Jotungrip (Ex): At 2nd level, a titan mauler may choose to wield a two-handed weapon in one hand with a –2 penalty on attack rolls while doing so. The weapon must be appropriately sized for her, and it is treated as one-handed when determining the effect of Power Attack, Strength bonus to damage, and the like. This ability replaces uncanny dodge."

"Phalanx Fighting (Ex): At 3rd level, when a phalanx soldier wields a shield, he can use any polearm or spear of his size as a one-handed weapon. This ability replaces armor training 1."

Thunder and Fang wrote "Benefit: You can use an earth breaker as though it were a one-handed weapon."

Grand Lodge

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Howie23 wrote:
Phosphorus wrote:
Howie23 wrote:
There is little change between 3.5 and PF regarding mounted combat rules. There is a very good set of articles in how the mounted combat rules work in 3.5 as part if the Rules if the Game series. There is a link in my profile.
Thanks Howie23. The articles are good, but unfortunately I cannot cite these articles in PFS. Also, the explanation that both the character and the mount are charging has been rejected in Pathfinder due to the nerf of RAGELANCEPOUNCE.

The RotG articles form a pretty coherent system that works. It isn't a matter of citing them as rules, it is a matter of adopting them as reasonable interpretations. What are you seeing that is contradictory with PF RAW? I'm probably do for an in depth re-read of them, but will put that off until I ever figure out how lighting, stealth, and grapple work in PF. ;)

Edit: For PFS, playing a mounted character requires a healthy dose of being willing to accept table variance and/or educate GMs away from the table.

Quote:

Spoiler:

Full-Round Actions

If a full-round action is shown on Table 8-2 but not included here, you can perform it from a moving mount. You complete the action after the mount completes its movement for the turn. Some full-round actions require some additional notes:

Charge: Performing a mounted charge works just like performing a charge on foot. You use your mount's speed rating. Remember that no creature can charge through an obstacle, another creature, or terrain that hampers movement. Due to its larger size, your mount might be unable to charge in a location where you could if on foot (see page 148 in the Player's Handbook).

The lance charge rules in 3.5 required both you and your mount to charge, which was denied in Pathfinder during the nerf of RAGELANCEPOUNCE. In Pathfinder, only your mount charges leaving the mounted lance attack as a standard action.

PS If you are only going to reread them when you figure out how lighting, stealth and grapple works, then I predict you will never read them again!

PPS I would like a consistent rule to apply for PFS, as although I have only recently started PFS, I both play and GM.

Grand Lodge

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How does a mounted charge with a lance work?

More specifically:

1 . If you making a mounted charge and attack with a lance, does:

a. The charge of the mount stop at the reach distance of the lance (ie 10 foot away from the enemy), and then your PC makes a lance attack. Your mount gets no attack unless it has reach, or

b. You treat your lance attack as a readied attack. Your PC makes a lance attack when the charge brings the lance into reach (ie 10 foot away from the enemy). The mount's charge then continues "to the closest space from which you can attack the opponent" and your then mount attacks the enemy, or

c. Some other interpretation.

If you have an opinion, please post below. Either way please click on FAQ, as I think there is enough confusion to try and sort this out.

Grand Lodge

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I started a thread on this, but there was no real consensus, so I thought I would ask here. :-)

There was a very good blog on poison use in Pathfinder, and I wonder if a similar one could be made to clear up mounted combat and charging issues.

I am going to be running a cavalier in PFS, and have realised that the mounted combat rules are extremely confusing, especially when combined with a charge…

As a result I have some questions:

1 . If you making a mounted charge and attack with a lance, does:
a. The charge stops at the reach distance of the lance (ie 10 foot away) from the enemy, and you then make your lance attack, and your dog stops and gets no attack, or
b. You make your lance attack at the reach distance of the lance (ie 10 foot away) and the dog charge then continues and your dog attacks the enemy when it is adjacent. You get to CHARGELANCEBITE!

2. What happens if your mount has reach, such as an axe beak?

3. If you have ride-by attack, can your mount attack the same enemy (E1) as you did? Or does it need spring attack? Can it instead go on to attack a 2nd enemy (E2) at the end of its charge? Or do you simply lose the attack of the mount if you use Ride-By Attack? (See diagram below)

4. When you and your mount attack, do you just make a ride check, or do you also need to make a handle animal check?

5. Given that Sean K Reynolds said “If YOU are mounted, the MOUNT is making the charge, YOU are NOT making a charge”, is this a valid interpretation of Ride-By Attack?

The additions are in bold and brackets:

Ride-By Attack (Combat)

While mounted and charging, you [and your mount] can move, strike at a foe, and then continue moving.

Prerequisites: Ride 1 rank, Mounted Combat.

Benefit: When you [,the PC,] are mounted and [your mount] use[s] the charge action, you [and your mount] may move and attack as if with a standard charge and then move again (continuing the straight line of the charge). Your total movement for the round can't exceed double your mounted speed. You and your mount do not provoke an attack of opportunity from the opponent that you attack.

I think this is a valid interpretation as in English, 'you' is both singular and plural. Hence 'you' can be interpreted as both the PC and the mount.

What do you think?

This interpretation would also allow both you and your mount to attack on the way through. (You both attack enemy E1), and the Ride-by Attack stops at any point between E1 and E2.

Y = Y
E1 = 1st enemy
E2 = 2nd enemy
| = path of your charge
Y
|
|
|
|E1
|
|
|
E2

6. One suggestion that helps clear up problems is the idea that you treat the attack of the PC as a readied attack, which gains the benefit of the mount's charge. Is this a valid interpretation?

Questions about mounted charges seem to crop up again and again, and most threads seem to reach no consensus. It would be great to have your input, especially as I am now playing PFS.

Thank you in advance for your time and reply.

Some relevant rules for easy reference:

Spoiler:

Ride-By Attack (Combat)
While mounted and charging, you can move, strike at a foe, and then continue moving.
Prerequisites: Ride 1 rank, Mounted Combat.
Benefit: When you are mounted and use the charge action, you may move and attack as if with a standard charge and then move again (continuing the straight line of the charge). Your total movement for the round can't exceed double your mounted speed. You and your mount do not provoke an attack of opportunity from the opponent that you attack.

Charge

Charging is a special full-round action that allows you to move up to twice your speed and attack during the action. Charging, however, carries tight restrictions on how you can move.
Movement During a Charge: You must move before your attack, not after. You must move at least 10 feet (2 squares) and may move up to double your speed directly toward the designated opponent. If you move a distance equal to your speed or less, you can also draw a weapon during a charge attack if your base attack bonus is at least +1.
You must have a clear path toward the opponent, and nothing can hinder your movement (such as difficult terrain or obstacles). You must move to the closest space from which you can attack the opponent. If this space is occupied or otherwise blocked, you can't charge. If any line from your starting space to the ending space passes through a square that blocks movement, slows movement, or contains a creature (even an ally), you can't charge. Helpless creatures don't stop a charge.
If you don't have line of sight to the opponent at the start of your turn, you can't charge that opponent.
You can't take a 5-foot step in the same round as a charge.
If you are able to take only a standard action on your turn, you can still charge, but you are only allowed to move up to your speed (instead of up to double your speed) and you cannot draw a weapon unless you possess the Quick Draw feat. You can't use this option unless you are restricted to taking only a standard action on your turn.
Attacking on a Charge: After moving, you may make a single melee attack. You get a +2 bonus on the attack roll and take a –2 penalty to your AC until the start of your next turn.
A charging character gets a +2 bonus on combat maneuver attack rolls made to bull rush an opponent.
Even if you have extra attacks, such as from having a high enough base attack bonus or from using multiple weapons, you only get to make one attack during a charge.
Lances and Charge Attacks: A lance deals double damage if employed by a mounted character in a charge.

Mounted Combat

These rules cover being mounted on a horse in combat but can also be applied to more unusual steeds, such as a griffon or dragon.
Mounts in Combat: Horses, ponies, and riding dogs can serve readily as combat steeds. Mounts that do not possess combat training (see the Handle Animal skill) are frightened by combat. If you don't dismount, you must make a DC 20 Ride check each round as a move action to control such a mount. If you succeed, you can perform a standard action after the move action. If you fail, the move action becomes a full-round action, and you can't do anything else until your next turn.
Your mount acts on your initiative count as you direct it. You move at its speed, but the mount uses its action to move.
A horse (not a pony) is a Large creature and thus takes up a space 10 feet (2 squares) across. For simplicity, assume that you share your mount's space during combat.
Combat while Mounted: With a DC 5 Ride check, you can guide your mount with your knees so as to use both hands to attack or defend yourself. This is a free action.
When you attack a creature smaller than your mount that is on foot, you get the +1 bonus on melee attacks for being on higher ground. If your mount moves more than 5 feet, you can only make a single melee attack. Essentially, you have to wait until the mount gets to your enemy before attacking, so you can't make a full attack. Even at your mount's full speed, you don't take any penalty on melee attacks while mounted.
If your mount charges, you also take the AC penalty associated with a charge. If you make an attack at the end of the charge, you receive the bonus gained from the charge. When charging on horseback, you deal double damage with a lance (see Charge).
You can use ranged weapons while your mount is taking a double move, but at a –4 penalty on the attack roll. You can use ranged weapons while your mount is running (quadruple speed) at a –8 penalty. In either case, you make the attack roll when your mount has completed half its movement. You can make a full attack with a ranged weapon while your mount is moving. Likewise, you can take move actions normally.

Link to old thread with input from Sean K Reynolds
link
Link to more recent thread
link

Sovereign Court

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Calling all Cavaliers, Samurai and Paladins!

There was a very good blog on poison use in Pathfinder, and I wonder if a similar one could be made to clear up mounted combat and charging issues.

I am going to be running a cavalier in PFS, and have realised that the mounted combat rules are extremely confusing, especially when combined with a charge…

As a result I have some questions:

1 . If you making a mounted charge and attack with a lance, does:

a. The charge stops at the reach distance of the lance (ie 10 foot away) from the enemy, and you then make your lance attack, and your dog stops and gets no attack, or
b. You make your lance attack at the reach distance of the lance (ie 10 foot away) and the dog charge then continues and your dog attacks the enemy when it is adjacent. You get to CHARGELANCEBITE!

2. What happens if your mount has reach, such as an axe beak?

3. If you have ride-by attack, can your mount attack the same enemy (E1) as you did? Or does it need spring attack? Can it instead go on to attack a 2nd enemy (E2) at the end of its charge? Or do you simply lose the attack of the mount if you use Ride-By Attack?

Y = Y
E1 = 1st enemy
E2 = 2nd enemy
| = path of your charge
Y
|
|
|
|E1
|
|
|
E2

4. When you and your mount attack, do you just make a ride check, or do you also need to make a handle animal check?

These questions seem to crop up again and again, so it would be great to have developer input, especially as I am now playing PFS.

I have done multiple searches, and managed to find very little developer input:

Here is what I have found

Spoiler:

link

The thread dates from 2010
This is a brief summary of Sean K Reynolds main posts.

Sean K Reynolds wrote:


Sean K Reynolds Oct 12 2010
If you want to move, have the mount attack, and move, the mount has to have Spring Attack. Ride-By Attack lets you attack in the middle of moving; it doesn't change the attack sequence for your mount (it doesn't mention your mount attacking at all).
Sean K Reynolds Oct 17 2010
Many, many times I say while running a game, "don't let the squares on the map tell you what is or isn't a straight line."
I just can't draw a straight line in the message boards except in 45-degree-angle increments. :p
Here's a diagram I put together. All four of the charge paths shown (gray, yellow, green, and orange) are perfectly valid charge attacks. The red asterisk shows the "closest space from which you can attack your opponent" according to the charge rules. If you don't have RBI, you have to stop there as the end of your charge; if you do have RBI, you can keep moving past that (as the arrow does).
Hello, I am a link to a charge diagram. ….
Well, if you look at my diagram, you'll note that most of those paths mean you attack at about a 45 or 60 degree angle from your attack vector. Only the yellow path puts you at a steeper angle, and that's probably because it's debatable whether or not you should be counting the square to the left of the asterisk--the line passes right through the intersection of four squares northwest of that asterisk, so if you ruled that the hero passed through the square west of the asterisk as part of his charge, that square would be the closest square from which the hero could attack, in which case even the yellow path's attack angle would be about 45 degrees.
A handy thing about being a creature with bendy arms is that even if your weapon is long and rigid (like a lance), your body lets you hold it at an angle from your movement vector; don't let the grid confuse you into thinking that the situation is any different than two jousters approaching each other on parallel separate paths. Take away the grid and look at the approach... it's still a guy charging and hitting someone in a square he could reach with the weapon if he were standing still (i.e., if the Hero could hit an Enemy from an asterisk square in the diagram when he's not charging, he should still be able to do it when he's charging).

Ravingdork wrote:
Sean, the very definition of charging (both as a gaming term and as a real world term) requires that you be moving directly towards your enemy.

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
Well, that's stupid. (And not how we did it in 3.0. Another annoying 3.5 change, I guess.)
If I charge someone, I should be able to charge directly at them, or obliquely. If I charge and cut a guy as I run by, that should still be valid... my momentum applies to the weapon whether it's in front of me or to my side.
And the 3.5 ruling (as people have pointed out) basically makes it impossible to use RBA because you'd have to move *through* your target. Which means it should be called Ride-Through attack.
Noting for personal houserule and errata-lobbying.
Stephan Neufang wrote:
Sean, would you please answer us the following questions:
- Can a mount attack at a ride by attack?
- If not, can a mount with spring attack attack at a ride by atack
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
1) No, because the mount is doing all the work moving. If the mount is to attack, it needs to use Spring Attack.
2) Without rereading all of the mounted combat rules, I think so.

and also this

link

Brief summary:

Sean K Reynolds wrote:


Sean K Reynolds said on Dec 12 2012 :
“If YOU are mounted, the MOUNT is making the charge, YOU are NOT making a charge.”

Some Rules:

Spoiler:

PRD wrote:


Ride-By Attack (Combat)
While mounted and charging, you can move, strike at a foe, and then continue moving.
Prerequisites: Ride 1 rank, Mounted Combat.
Benefit: When you are mounted and use the charge action, you may move and attack as if with a standard charge and then move again (continuing the straight line of the charge). Your total movement for the round can't exceed double your mounted speed. You and your mount do not provoke an attack of opportunity from the opponent that you attack.

ride
handle-animal

Charge
Charging is a special full-round action that allows you to move up to twice your speed and attack during the action. Charging, however, carries tight restrictions on how you can move.
Movement During a Charge: You must move before your attack, not after. You must move at least 10 feet (2 squares) and may move up to double your speed directly toward the designated opponent. If you move a distance equal to your speed or less, you can also draw a weapon during a charge attack if your base attack bonus is at least +1.
You must have a clear path toward the opponent, and nothing can hinder your movement (such as difficult terrain or obstacles). You must move to the closest space from which you can attack the opponent. If this space is occupied or otherwise blocked, you can't charge. If any line from your starting space to the ending space passes through a square that blocks movement, slows movement, or contains a creature (even an ally), you can't charge. Helpless creatures don't stop a charge.
If you don't have line of sight to the opponent at the start of your turn, you can't charge that opponent.
You can't take a 5-foot step in the same round as a charge.
If you are able to take only a standard action on your turn, you can still charge, but you are only allowed to move up to your speed (instead of up to double your speed) and you cannot draw a weapon unless you possess the Quick Draw feat. You can't use this option unless you are restricted to taking only a standard action on your turn.
Attacking on a Charge: After moving, you may make a single melee attack. You get a +2 bonus on the attack roll and take a –2 penalty to your AC until the start of your next turn.
A charging character gets a +2 bonus on combat maneuver attack rolls made to bull rush an opponent.
Even if you have extra attacks, such as from having a high enough base attack bonus or from using multiple weapons, you only get to make one attack during a charge.
Lances and Charge Attacks: A lance deals double damage if employed by a mounted character in a charge.

Mounted Combat

These rules cover being mounted on a horse in combat but can also be applied to more unusual steeds, such as a griffon or dragon.
Mounts in Combat: Horses, ponies, and riding dogs can serve readily as combat steeds. Mounts that do not possess combat training (see the Handle Animal skill) are frightened by combat. If you don't dismount, you must make a DC 20 Ride check each round as a move action to control such a mount. If you succeed, you can perform a standard action after the move action. If you fail, the move action becomes a full-round action, and you can't do anything else until your next turn.
Your mount acts on your initiative count as you direct it. You move at its speed, but the mount uses its action to move.
A horse (not a pony) is a Large creature and thus takes up a space 10 feet (2 squares) across. For simplicity, assume that you share your mount's space during combat.
Combat while Mounted: With a DC 5 Ride check, you can guide your mount with your knees so as to use both hands to attack or defend yourself. This is a free action.
When you attack a creature smaller than your mount that is on foot, you get the +1 bonus on melee attacks for being on higher ground. If your mount moves more than 5 feet, you can only make a single melee attack. Essentially, you have to wait until the mount gets to your enemy before attacking, so you can't make a full attack. Even at your mount's full speed, you don't take any penalty on melee attacks while mounted.
If your mount charges, you also take the AC penalty associated with a charge. If you make an attack at the end of the charge, you receive the bonus gained from the charge. When charging on horseback, you deal double damage with a lance (see Charge).
You can use ranged weapons while your mount is taking a double move, but at a –4 penalty on the attack roll. You can use ranged weapons while your mount is running (quadruple speed) at a –8 penalty. In either case, you make the attack roll when your mount has completed half its movement. You can make a full attack with a ranged weapon while your mount is moving. Likewise, you can take move actions normally.

Thanks in advance for any input!

Grand Lodge

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Does a buckler arm have a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” and “holding nothing”?

This came up in a recent advice thread on the Aldori Swordlord.

I am of the opinion that a buckler arm has a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” and “holding nothing”. Others may disagree.

What is your opinion?

If you believe you a buckler arm does not have a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” and “holding nothing” please quote a relevant rule if possible. Feel free to bring up real life, or speculate on the intent of the rules, but bear in mind that intent is not a rule and Pathfinder is (thankfully) not real life. As rule 0 overrides all other rules, please do not use it as the basis for your argument.

I believe the rules clearly support the position that a buckler arm has a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” and “holding nothing”.

Firstly, let us look at the rules for shields.

PRD wrote:

Shield, Heavy; Wooden or Steel: You strap a shield to your forearm and grip it with your hand. A heavy shield is so heavy that you can't use your shield hand for anything else.

In the case of a Heavy Shield, it is clear that your shield arm does not have a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” and “holding nothing”.

PRD wrote:

Shield, Light; Wooden or Steel: You strap a shield to your forearm and grip it with your hand. A light shield's weight lets you carry other items in that hand, although you cannot use weapons with it.

With the light shield you are gripping the shield with your hand but you can still use it to “carry other items”. (Some consider an arm with a Light Shield may have a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” and “holding nothing”, but this is even more controversial than the buckler arm providing a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” or “holding nothing”, and an issue for another thread.)

However, the wording for buckler is quite different:

PRD wrote:

Buckler: This small metal shield is worn strapped to your forearm.

Your hand is not mentioned. Your forearm is not your hand. A light shield allows you to “carry other items”, so it would be reasonable to assume this also applies to the smaller buckler.

However, does this mean you have a “free hand” and are “carrying nothing” in it?

The rules do not define what constitutes a free hand, but there are actions that require a “free hand”, or two hands to perform. Can these actions be performed whilst using a buckler?

If they can, we can conclude that your buckler hand is a “free hand”.

In some instances the rules are clear, for example:

Casting a spell with a somatic component requires a free hand, can this be done while using a buckler?

PRD wrote:

Somatic (S): A somatic component is a measured and precise movement of the hand. You must have at least one hand free to provide a somatic component.

…You can cast a spell with somatic components using your shield arm, but you lose the buckler's AC bonus until your next turn...

When casting a spell, the buckler hand can count as a free hand, but this action causes you to lose the buckler’s AC bonus.

Using a weapon two handed, or fighting two handed obviously requires two hands, and can you also use a buckler whilst doing this? This would require the buckler arm to have a “free hand” that is available to be used to wield a weapon.

PRD wrote:

Two-Handed: Two hands are required to use a two-handed melee weapon effectively.
Two-Weapon Fighting (Combat): You can fight with a weapon wielded in each of your hands.

Buckler: …You can also use your shield arm to wield a weapon (whether you are using an off-hand weapon or using your off hand to help wield a two-handed weapon), but you take a –1 penalty on attack rolls while doing so. This penalty stacks with those that may apply for fighting with your off hand and for fighting with two weapons. In any case, if you use a weapon in your off hand, you lose the buckler's AC bonus until your next turn…

You can fight two handed with a buckler, but with penalties.

Using a bow, crossbow, a two handed firearm or reloading a sling requires two hands, can you simultaneously use a buckler? On a related matter, a rotating a pepperbox barrel requires a “free hand”, can you do this whilst using a buckler?

PRD wrote:

Loading a Firearm: You need at least one hand free to load one-handed and two-handed firearms.

Pepperbox: This pistol has six barrels instead of one. The entire barrel housing can be quickly rotated by hand between shots (a free action requiring one free hand), allowing all six bullets to be fired before the weapon must be reloaded.

Longbow: …You need two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size.

Bucklers: You can use a one-handed or two-handed firearm without penalty while carrying a buckler.

Buckler: …You can use a bow or crossbow without penalty while carrying it.

You can use a buckler and a bow or firearm, “without penalty”. There is no AC loss. The rules are silent on the sling. Halflings are bitter.

To sum up so far – the buckler hand is available for spell use, two handed fighting, and two weapon fighting, but with penalties such as the loss of AC. However, you can use bows, crossbows,firearms, and rotate a pepperbox barrel with a buckler with no penalty at all. In all of these instances, a buckler arm is considered to have a “free hand”.

In other instances, a "free hand" or a hand "carrying nothing" or "holding nothing" is required, but the rules do not mention a buckler. Some of these many instances include:

PRD wrote:

Lay On Hands: …Despite the name of this ability, a paladin only needs one free hand to use this ability.

Word of Healing: …You must be able to speak and have a free hand to use this ability.

Crane Wing (Combat): ..Once per round while using Crane Style, when you have at least one hand free

Snapping Turtle Style: …While using the Snapping Turtle Style feat with at least one hand free, you gain a +1 shield bonus to AC.

Deflect Arrows (Combat):… You must have at least one hand free (holding nothing) to use this feat.

Snatch Arrows (Combat):…You must have at least one hand free (holding nothing) to use this feat.

Spell Combat (Ex): ...To use this ability, the magus must have one hand free (even if the spell being cast does not have somatic components), while wielding a light or one-handed melee weapon in the other hand...

Pool Strike (Su): …The magus can expend 1 point from his arcane pool as a standard action to charge his free hand with energy...

Wind Servant (Sp): ..If you have a free hand, you can catch an object hurled toward yourself...

Hurling Charge (Ex): …The barbarian must have a thrown weapon in hand or have one hand free at the beginning of her charge...

Ancient Healing Hand (Su): … He needs at least one hand free to use this ability, and cannot heal himself...

Steal: …You must have at least one hand free (holding nothing) to attempt this maneuver...

Ill Omen: …A target who can speak and has at least one free hand and who is aware of the spell and its effects (such as from a Spellcraft check to identify the spell as it is cast) can negate one reroll by spending a move action to utter a brief prayer or good luck charm to appease the spirits of ill fortune...

Light Lance: ...You must have a free hand when casting the spell and, once you call the lance into being, you cannot switch it to another hand or put it down without prematurely ending the spell...

Free Hand Fighter …His fighting school benefits only apply when he is using a one-handed weapon and carrying nothing in his other hand...

And of course, the Aldori Swordlord : …The following benefits only apply when a swordlord is using an Aldori duelling sword and carrying nothing in his other hand....

Can you use a buckler in these cases? I am not aware of any rule that says you cannot. We have already seen that there are several clear instances in the rules were a buckler arm is treated as having a free hand.

In the absence of an official FAQ, the next best authority is James Jacobs. So what are his views on using a buckler in some of these instances?

James Jacobs wrote:

mark kay wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
mark kay wrote:
Just sort of rules-y, if you're wearing a buckler while using crane style/crane wing from ultimate combat, do you lose its ac bonus in any round you use your buckler arm for your free hand to deflect a melee attack?
And similar question for deflect arrows and buckler use.
James Jacobs wrote:
Only if you do if you lose the AC bonus for doing other things with your shield arm when there's a buckler.
Hum, so, as long as you're not otherwise attacking with that hand that round or, I don't know, grabbing something from a pouch, you keep your buckler ac while deflecting?
Sorry, it just read a bit unclearly.
James Jacobs wrote:
Sounds good to me!

James Jacobs wrote:

You could use a buckler and still do Spell Combat; that's sort of the whole point of the buckler

James Jacobs wrote:

Sammy123 wrote:
Can a paladin do LoH with during combat when holding a sword and light shield?
I believe so. A light shield allows spellcasters to use their hand to cast, and lets you carry an object; the only thing it actually prevents is wielding a weapon. Since lay on hands only requires you to touch someone, you could indeed use this ability while wearing a light shield.

So for spell combat, deflect arrows and crane wing, the opinion of James Jacobs is that you can use a buckler with these actions. All require a “free hand”. In the case of lay on lands and spellcasters using their hand to cast, James Jacobs believes even a light shield allows you to have a “free hand”.

In conclusion, the rules are clear - a buckler arm has a “free hand” that is “carrying nothing” and “holding nothing”.