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Derek Dalton wrote:
In 1st through 3.5 Drow have had a special piece of equipment can buy. Essentially sunglasses to prevent Light blindness is bright light. They were nonmagical pieces of dark quartz or similar material costing about a hundred or so gold. I'm curious if Pathfinder ever created something similar and where might I find it. I have a HalfElf who suffers from Light blindness.

Good news and bad news.

The good news is: yes there is an item exactly for that.

The bad news is: it costs a bit more than 100 Gold.

Lenses of Darkness


Ryze Kuja wrote:
Wonderstell wrote:
Ryze Kuja wrote:

When I think of a "tank" in Pathfinder, I

[...]
think the best way to do that is with an offensive approach.

Your definition of a tank sounds suspiciously close to the opposite of a tank. Sure you're not thinking of a frontliner?

Well, when I think of a "Tank", I think of mitigating the opponent's action economy so they can't cause damage or get any effects off, rather than just soaking up a ton of damage and effects through high AC and saves. It's not like this build can't also do that. You basically just stop any damage/effects from happening as a Proactive measure, rather than a Reactive measure. I think of someone who's so dangerous that they cannot be ignored, otherwise he's going to wreck your whole day if you don't deal with him pronto.

There's no guarantee that enemies are going to focus on the plate-wearing unkillable monstrosity. Intelligent enemies will just abuse their lack of mobility and go around them.

Yup, hence my Monk. Highest AC in our group right now, ignores damage on successful Reflex save, and hits like a truck, though not quite as much as our designated monster masher.


Halcyon Druids can choose Arcane spells every even level to add to their spell list.
the catch is that they can only choose fireball once they have access to level 4 spells.


Highest AC I've seen and built so far (in a high epic fantasy Campaign, so with tons of money, magic items readily available and high ability score point buy) is without a doubt with Unchained Monk.
Enough Dex and Wisdom and your AC leaves behind even +5 Full Plate pretty fast by the time anyone would be able to afford it.

Add to that that successful Reflex saves let you ignore damage entirely and he's basically defensively unstoppable.

Only thing that could be a problem is that enemies tend to ignore people they can't hit and go for more squishier adventurers instead.


JiCi wrote:
Ryan Freire wrote:
JiCi wrote:
avr wrote:
JiCi wrote:

Personally, prestige classes should have been reworked into archetypes. How? By replacing higher-level abilities starting at 10th level.

It,s already pretty dampening to get into a prestige class, might as well convert it into an archetype. I get that many of them are representing some sort of membership, but come on, they don't make your character any better...

The trouble with archetypes for high levels is that a lot of classes don't have much in the way of class features to swap at high levels. The trouble with using archetypes to replace prestige classes is that it makes a prestigious organisation something associated with one specific class only, and removes the multiclass-supporting prestige classes too.

The problem I see is that a good chunk of PrCs aren't part of organisations, but specializations: Battle Herald (Bard), Arcane Trickster (Magus), Horizon Walker (Ranger), Holy Vindicator (Bloodrager), Assassin (Slayer), Eldritch Knight (Fighter), Mammoth Rider (Cavalier), Pathfinder Chronicler (Bard), Winter Witch (Witch), and so on.

My major issue with PrCs is that they halt 99% of your progress for your base class(es). Most of them add one level in a spellcasting class, but I haven't seen a SINGLE one with "+1 level of fighter/rogue/monk class".

Mortal Usher
Oh yeah, thanks for the reminder :) Came out at the very last moment though...

Evangelist as well, as long as you keep your Obedience up.


Dragon78 wrote:
With that many you would need a archetype unchained hardcover book;)

In that same vein, since my newest character is an unchained monk...

They released him incompatible with any of the regular monk archetypes and then only made a handful of the monk archetypes compatible. Some of the cooler Monk archetypes are forever on the underwhelmingly weak regular monk.


Darigaaz the Igniter wrote:

My only problem with Bladed Dash is that it's better than Spring Attack, which requires a lot more resources in character creation to bring online.

I also have a problem with Greater Bladed Dash being something no martial can do ever no matter how many feats or class features they invest.

That it's easier to get and stronger should, in theory, be made up for with the fact that you can only cast it a handful of times a day and you have to forego other useful spells if you do prepare this in every slot you have to cast it the maximum amount of times. Whereas the martial with Spring Attack could use Spring Attack every single round of every single fight over the whole day if he so chooses.


Access to the effect from those 3 feats for a limited amount of uses a day. Let's not forget that part. How much would you value a wondrous item that gave you spring attack for x times a day at? That's the better equivalent.

Also, why would it be the movement you have if it's not bound by your movement speed in the first place? If for some ungodly reason your base speed was 5 ft., The spell would still make you move 30 ft.
If your base speed was 100 ft., Also still 30 ft.
The spell doesn't care about how fast you can ordinarily move, why would it care how you ordinarily move? Most other abilities that include you actually physically moving with your legs put a limitation on it based on your actual speed. It just flat says you can move 30ft in any direction. Straight up is included in "any direction" in my book, especially if it is magical movement and not just you walking from A to B like you would without a spell. How you land is your problem afterwards, if the fall is worth it.

And I don't feel like that would break the spell significantly more than it already is with the Magus thing.


It's only a pounce for the Magus though. That's not the fault of the spell any more than it's Shocking Grasp's fault that a Magus can crit with it for 2x 5d6 damage after rolling a 15 with a keen scimitar. And make another attack. Spell strike and spell combat are just that strong and there is any number of spells that are made far stronger because of them.


Taking the flavor text at face value would again pose the question how such a fast movement shouldn't be able to e.g. go over gaps, move over water or go straight up, as people have already proposed. If the magic gives you enough strength in your legs to move that fast on the ground horizontally, it should be enough strength to jump up that far or leap forward with no problem as well. You're already leaving physics behind then.

Else it's "just" a move action + move standard action (which you can already do in the same span of time without magic involved, and possibly further depending on your base speed) + single attack with extra bonus on the roll + not provoking AoOs.

Which is plenty good as it is, I had the spell as well when I had a Magus, but just doesn't feel like magic without the movement reflecting its magical origin, to me. That would just make it a handful of times a day usable, better version of something an appropriately trained martial character without a shred of magic can do all day long.


Yes, I get that it's mechanically a good effect. But compared to shooting fire from your hands or growing twice your size, "move somewhere and hit something" doesn't sound all that magical is all I'm saying. It doesn't seem to fit as a magical effect if that's all it is.


bbangerter wrote:

So much wrong in this thread I'd been avoiding responding, but I will respond to this comment.

D-vid wrote:

I come from the standpoint that this is magic we're talking about here.

If it would just do something you could reasonably do without magic, then it isn't really much to write home about.

Like, "Behold my magic! Bladed Dash!!! Impressed? I can only cast this powerful magic twice a day (at level 5)!" Meanwhile the Fighter is Spring Attacking everything left and right all day long.

So I'd say it letting you ignore difficult terrain and/or being able to go through enemy spaces because you're being magically moved makes sense. What else would the magic effect be? You don't need magic to walk over to a dude and whack him with your sword.

You mean like if "you got to do a spring attack with a full attack attached to the end of it" kind of magic? Cause that is what this is for a magus that it isn't for any other caster class.

Or like "If I got to take a double move and still make an attack" kind of magic? Cause it works like that for all casters. Move action move, standard action cast spell, get bonus movement, and attack. That's a bit more powerful, even if situationally so, then spring attack.

Or like "I don't have to spend a precious feat slot for a more limited form of this, and I didn't have to take any mediocre pre-req feats to get it" kind of magic? I'll happily trade spell slots all day over using a feat.

And none of those comments have anything to do with whether or not it ignores difficult terrain, let's you or not move through enemies, move in an upward direction without flight, etc. Each of those a GM allows is just additional perks above what is already categorically better than the spring attack feat.

The full attack is because a Magus is a Magus, that has nothing to do with the spell itself.

The effect is better than what you can normally do, but it's still a mundane thing (as in non-magical) if it's just "walk over there as if you're normally walking and hit thing once".

I'm going at this not thinking about game mechanics but logic of "what exactly is the magic effect taking place here" that they were thinking about when making the spell, which we can only speculate about. What does the spell do, what is the magic happening. Walking over somewhere and hitting something isn't magic, so what is the magic that's happening?
Just being slightly faster at walking? The magic of how to hit something while not standing perfectly still?


I come from the standpoint that this is magic we're talking about here.
If it would just do something you could reasonably do without magic, then it isn't really much to write home about.

Like, "Behold my magic! Bladed Dash!!! Impressed? I can only cast this powerful magic twice a day (at level 5)!" Meanwhile the Fighter is Spring Attacking everything left and right all day long.

So I'd say it letting you ignore difficult terrain and/or being able to go through enemy spaces because you're being magically moved makes sense. What else would the magic effect be? You don't need magic to walk over to a dude and whack him with your sword.