Such a Lovely Place, Such a Lovely Face

Friday, August 16, 2019

Portrait picture of a woman with angled markings on her forehead and chin, shoulder length dark hair and dark eyes. She wears a bandana across her forehead and red feathers are placed on each side of her head, tucked in.
Illustration by Mary Jane Pajaron
Portrait of a woman with light brown eyes and black braided hair, secured in blue and brownish red beads.
Illustration by Valeria Lutfullina

One of the strengths of the games set in the Age of Lost Omens is the diversity of setting. From classic staples like dragonslaying and piracy to outlandish adventures fighting robot scorpions in a rugged wasteland, no matter what genre of game you want to play, you can likely find a spot on Golarion to suit your interest. With that diversity of setting comes a diversity of people. Every nation has its own vibrant cultures, traditions, and ethnicities—not just among humanity, but among all of the ancestries found within the Inner Sea region. In Golarion, the home of the shattered clans of the Five Kings Mountains, the tunnel-dwelling Kulnett of Geb, the dragon-worshiping Mwangi tribes of the Mbe'ke and the Taralu, and the completely subterranean grondaksen, there's no such thing as playing "just" a dwarf.

Portrait of a woman with long dark hair and black eyes. She wears swirling earrings with arrows poking out from one side. She wears a red scarf with gold edges, folded neatly, and a chunky necklace of stones in different sizes and shapes. Her upper right arm can be seen and has a hexagonal pattern on it.
Illustration by Valeria Lutfullina

At least, that's always been the theory. In practice, many of these disparate cultures haven't gotten the setting support they deserved. That's why when we set out to decide on the topic for the second of our new World Guides, Luis Loza quickly suggested a book that outlined the people of Golarion, especially those not well-covered in the Core Rulebook. In the Lost Omens Character Guide, we provide the information and mechanics to allow our players to create character concepts from all over the world. Just as importantly, we also sought to provide a more focused vision of what these people looked like!

The Lost Omens Character Guide makes heavy use of a rules concept introduced to the Rarity system in the Lost Omens World Guide: Access. Many of the ancestry feats in this book have a specific basis in the distinct traditions of various cultures and ethnicities, and as such, are listed as Uncommon rules options. The Access entry on these feats lists the criteria that allow a character to gain automatic access to a rules element. For example, the Erutaki people have a tradition of creating magical scrimshaw constructs; an Erutaki PC that meets the prerequisites can gain immediate access to the feat that represents that ability below, while another PC would have to learn the skill from an Erutaki carver or otherwise gain GM permission to take the feat.


TUPILAQ CARVER.  FEAT 1.
Prerequisites: You have a spellcasting class feature with the divine or primal tradition 
Access Erutaki ethnicity.
You know the truth behind old stories that tell of sending a fetish of bone and sinew to seek vengeance. These old magics allow you to conjure constructs with ease. Add the summon construct spell to your spell list. The constructs you summon have a distinct ivory scrimshaw appearance, and if you include a drop of blood, lock of hair, or other portion of a creature's body as part of the spell's material component, the summoned construct gains a +4 status bonus to Perception checks to sense or locate that creature.
​ ​

That's not to say there aren't a few ancestry feats that are entirely dependent on heritage. For example, those of Nidalese ancestry can find the blessings of Zon-Kuthon manifesting as they grow stronger, granting the ability to see in darkness and other shadowy powers. Since these feats come as a direct result of Zon-Kuthon's pact with the people of Nidal, only Nidalese characters can take them—while a PC could try to gain access to such feats by seeking out Zon-Kuthon himself, as the three Kellid horselords that founded Nidal once did, such a bargain would likely have far more dramatic results than a few extra human ancestry feats.

Kulenett dwarf with leather goggles and mask, thick facial hair. Darker skinned Mbe'ke dwarf with wire framed glasses. A white scarf is wrapped around the head, leaving the top of the head exposed. He wears what looks like a heavy red robe with an animal pattern on it. Female Pahmet dwarf, long wavy hair pulled back behind her ear. She wears a green top with purple striping on the sleeves and a gold chevron necklace. Vahird dwarf, black shoulder length hair on the sides of the head but only a light bit of fuzz on the top. They are wearing a plain white shirt and appear to have a dagger on a braided rope around their neck.

Illustrations by Katerina Kirillova

Inside the Lost Omens Character Guide, you'll find more heritages and ancestry feats for each of the Core ancestries that help to support a variety of ethnicities, both new and old. For instance, we've mentioned the mountain-dwelling Mbe'ke tribe of dwarves that live in the Mwangi Expanse in passing—we've now provided a new dwarven heritage to grant those dwarves an affinity with the dragons that they worship, but can also be used to represent dwarves with a connection to azers, the fiery god Angradd, or other elemental forces!

ELEMENTAL HEART DWARF
Whether through a connection to Torag's forge, the azers of the Plane of Fire, or another source, you can exude a burst of energy. Mbe'ke and Taralu dwarves of the Mwangi Expanse believe this heritage is a gift from dragons or elemental spirits. Choose one of the following damage types: acid, cold, electricity, or fire. Once chosen, this can't be changed. You gain the Energy Emanation activity.
ENERGY EMANATION [two-actions]
Evocation, Primal
Frequency once per day
Energy bursts forth from your body. You deal 1d6 damage of your chosen type to all adjacent creatures (basic Reflex save using your class DC or spell DC, whichever is higher). At 3rd level, and every 2 levels thereafter, this damage increases by 1d6.
Slender elf in a long thick cloak with ornate shoulder pads.

Illustration by Rogier van de Beek

In addition to new ethnicities, the Lost Omens Character Guide offers a more detailed look at some familiar cultures within the setting. For instance, inside this book lies the true name of the Snowcaster elves, as well as a number of secrets about their true origins. Of course, this knowledge only raises more questions, such as whether the events that created the modern-day culture of the Snowcasters are also connected to a peculiar oddity of the elven goddess Findeladlara. As an aside, the Snowcasters have always had a distinct look, but when ordering art for the Lost Omens Character Guide, I asked for a specific addition to their silhouette—a pair of antler-like blades that the elves can quickly combine with other gear to transform into skis or a sled. These allow the Snowcasters to move rapidly over snow and ice, and also makes them somewhat intimidating at a distance, which might explain why many outsiders claim Snowcaster elves are demon-worshipping cannibals.

To those of you who love multiclassing, there is also a new elven heritage available to any elf of a certain age that might be of interest:

Ancient Elf.
In your long life, you've dabbled in many paths and many styles. Choose a class other than your own. You gain the multiclass dedication feat for that class, even though you don't meet its level prerequisite. You must still meet its other prerequisites to gain the feat.

But wait, there's more!

A monkey pirate goblin!

Illustration by Klaher Baklaher

With gnomes, we're taking the opportunity to emphasize that not all ancestries view ethnicity in the same way as humans do. Gnomes especially tend to possess a riot of unusual hair, eye, and skin colors that can often seem disconnected from genetics entirely. When gnomes speak of their ethnicities, they are usually referring to a natural affinity toward different kinds of magic that a gnome might possess—due to their souls' abrupt disconnect from their ancestral home in the First World, gnomes are more affected by nearby sources of magic when they are growing up. For example, gnomes who grow up near sources of divine power have more affinity with magic that changes reality or creates figments, while the unsettling fell gnomes have a stronger connection to occult magic or dark fey.

While goblins often receive little distinction from adventurers beyond what color splatter they leave behind, the recent slowing of humanoid/goblin aggressions has allowed the differences between goblin cultures to become better understood. The forest goblins of the Chitterwood lived through the Goblinblood Wars (more accurately, many of them did not live), which has given them a different approach to life when compared to the wilder goblins of Varisia. A relatively quick goblin lifespan and a traditional worship of Lamashtu means that goblins can also adapt to new environments very quickly, leading to some startling physiological differences between certain goblin ethnicities. The frost goblins of the north have blue skin and occasionally blue fur, but the most striking ethnicity of goblin is likely the monkey goblin, which possesses a long tail! A heritage for monkey goblins is provided for those who wish to play these unusual offshoots:

TAILED GOBLIN.
You have a powerful tail, likely because you descend from a community of monkey goblins. You gain a +2 circumstance bonus to Athletics checks to Climb, you gain Combat Climber as a bonus feat, and you reduce the number of free hands required to Climb or Trip by one.
Othoban halfing with dark swept-back hair is wearing green vertically striped pants that stop at the calf and is barefoot. Under a red vest and brown and gold belt is a white and red striped shirt.

Illustration by Emile Denis

Finally, we have halfling ethnicities, including a number of new cultural groups that don't simply copy the traditions of the taller humans around them. I'll leave most of them for those who pick up the book, but I'd be remiss not to mention Luis Loza's favorite of the bunch: the Othoban halflings, who he fondly refers to as "Time Halflings." What are time halflings? The answer involves the city of Xin-Edasseril and the events of the Return of the Runelords adventure path—after all, you didn't think there were only humans in that city, did you?

Tune in next week when we'll be here to talk about some of the new ancestries that will be appearing in the Lost Omens Character Guide!

Eleanor Ferron
Developer

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Tags: Lost Omens Character Guide Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Pathfinder Second Edition
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PossibleCabbage wrote:

I feel like the biggest impediment (for me at least) to taking ancient elf for that sweet sweet optimization is trying to come up with a backstory for how I didn't gain a single class level in the last 280ish years.

Like Goblins who are 8 years old have picked up as many trained skills as I have...

Some possibilities people had suggested in an old thread were-

1) you used to be higher level, but you got rusty
2) you used to be an adventurer like me, then you took an arrow in the knee (no, but really - you were gravely wounded)
3) magical mishaps (iirc the concept of a time-displaced gnome was bandied around. Time gnomes! Also see Captain America's frozen yogurt stasis... time humans!!)
4) well, elves are lazy unfocused underachievers who value their relationships much more than their skills and train only in unpractical stuff...
5) there were other ideas but old thread is old...

Grave Ol' Salty wrote:
Fighter/Wizard?!? Fighter/Mage/Thief? It’s Magic User. And the only, one, true calling was and always will be F/MU/C. So get the FMUC off my lawn!!!!!

My girl says back in her day all this multiclassing b##&%#&! didn't even exist, and the classes were something like man-at-arms, cleric, magic user, thief, elf, dwarf and halfling. I asked her if she's f@&%ing with me and she just laughed O___O


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Really looking forward to exploring the flavors of this world. Thanks for all of the hard work.

Dark Archive

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Shisumo wrote:
This looks ****ing amazing.

You nailed it! Sweet Asmodeus, I think I'm going to love this book! :)


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Roswynn wrote:
My girl says back in her day all this multiclassing b@##@*!$ didn't even exist, and the classes were something like man-at-arms, cleric, magic user, thief, elf, dwarf and halfling. I asked her if she's f%!+ing with me and she just laughed O___O

Your girl is right, although they were always called "Fighter" - the man-at-arms category is from Palladium, if memory serves.

Although actually, she's sugar coating it some; there were no cantrips (that's right, lowly Magic-User: you get one spell per day. Choose wisely); and carrying a 2-handed weapon meant you automatically lost initiative (were you about to ask about 1.5 times Str bonus to damage?! Oh, it is to laugh). Elves capped out at 10th level and Halflings at level 8 (out of a possible 36). Oh yeah, and your Thief failed their save against that poison needle trap? Time to roll up a new character...

There is such a thing as progress. I mean, I share the doubts about the Ancient Elf feat (there'd damn well better be something equivalent for other long-lived races like dwarves), but let's keep things in perspective.


Rysky wrote:

How so? It lets you have a Multiclass Dedication at first in place of other Heritages, but it only moves the level requirement, not anything else.

It’s good, for those who want to multiclass, but I don’t see it as a must have.

It's nice but seems like it basically just giving you one level boost in how fast you can get a devotion feat. Humans ancestry ability to get two class feats at first level probably works out stronger overall mechanically as it more directly boosts the parent class.


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Real benefit of the Ancient Elf is psychological. Class feats are precious; you never have enough of them. In terms of "what you get from spending a feat on it" the dedication part of the multiclass archetype is the least exciting part of multiclassing- it's the cost you pay for access to the neat stuff.

So being able to trade something perceived as less critical (you can live without darkvision or cold resistance) for the dedication which would otherwise cost something more precious and give less immediate benefit than other things you could spend a class feat on.

For example, a ranger who wants to MC fighter for more archery feats gets only 1 trained skill from the fighter dedication (as they were already trained in martial weapons). "Trained in a skill" is something I can live with for a heritage, but it's a tough sell compared to Hunter's Aim or something.


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PossibleCabbage wrote:
Real benefit of the Ancient Elf is psychological.

No, the real benefit of Ancient Elf is speed. Using a heritage to pick up your dedication means that you don't lose out on your second level class feat, thereby pushing your entire build back two levels since you're less likely to miss something fundamental.

You know what that reminds me of? The Human bonus feat. I'm sure y'all remember how fair and balanced that feature was.


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Arachnofiend wrote:
PossibleCabbage wrote:
Real benefit of the Ancient Elf is psychological.

No, the real benefit of Ancient Elf is speed. Using a heritage to pick up your dedication means that you don't lose out on your second level class feat, thereby pushing your entire build back two levels since you're less likely to miss something fundamental.

You know what that reminds me of? The Human bonus feat. I'm sure y'all remember how fair and balanced that feature was.

Yeah, never played Human more than once, and was still boring then. The most the Heritage does is lock you into an Ancestry and gives you access to a 2nd level feat. Humans can do the same thing at level 9, only better. It’s fairly equivalent to the current Human’s extra 1st level class feat, except you lose more for an earlier dedication and a 2nd rather than 1st level class feat.

If this worked for any 2nd level archetype dedication, i could actually see it being useful, but it just looks eh, neat; next?


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Wandering Wastrel wrote:
Roswynn wrote:
My girl says back in her day all this multiclassing b@##@*!$ didn't even exist, and the classes were something like man-at-arms, cleric, magic user, thief, elf, dwarf and halfling. I asked her if she's f%!+ing with me and she just laughed O___O
Your girl is right, although they were always called "Fighter" - the man-at-arms category is from Palladium, if memory serves.

I think the very earliest version of D&D (the 1974 set) had the class called 'Fighting-Man.' Although I also think classes and races were separate in that version. This was actually before my time. I started with the Red Box Basic Set (the 1983 version with the Larry Elmore cover) where the demi-humans were classes. I think the races as class was an invention of the "Basic" line, when they split AD&D and the boxed sets in 1977 (the year before I was born). All of this is to say, D&D has a really convoluted history. I still kind of boggle at the idea of making AD&D and Basic D&D as incompatible games that evolved separately. It's a really weird way of doing things.

PossibleCabbage wrote:

I feel like the biggest impediment (for me at least) to taking ancient elf for that sweet sweet optimization is trying to come up with a backstory for how I didn't gain a single class level in the last 280ish years.

Like Goblins who are 8 years old have picked up as many trained skills as I have...

I had a hard enough time justifying that for a 136 year old elf. Especially since I reject the idea that they physically mature that much slower. Someone who's an infant for decades is just a bit too absurd for me. I went for having to save up a lot of money for magical college (she's an Arcanist) after her parents cut her off, and then getting distracted a lot by life along the way.

But I've always had a hard time visualizing pre-1st level characters. Before 1st level they're kind of in this nebulous state where they don't really have any stats. Back in AD&D you had 0-level characters, but with 3rd ed that got replaced by NPC classes. I think there's a 3rd party pathfinder supplement with different classes for non-adult characters that get changed into a standard class at 1st level after they mature. I never did get around to checking it out (and don't recall what it was called or who made it), but I thought the concept sounded interesting.

Of course I think the starting ages of elves will be closer to humans now with PF2. It no longer has the starting age table where you can't start younger than 114 if you're doing it all by the table. And it's explicitly stated in the core book that elves reach maturity by 20 (so slightly slower than humans, but not absurd). So I figure starting in their 20s and 30s might be more the norm going forward, which is much easier to justify.


Wow the reaction on Ancient Elves...

If anything, I'm more concerned about using Adopted for things like Human Natural Ambition, Dwarf Unburdened, Elf Nimble.
There is stuff which clearly is illegal because "the physiology" but none of above stuff clearly says "no" to me by RAW.
Which IMHO is even design flaw in Humans, since there seems premise that no Human abilities are physiology-limited.
I don't even think the criteria should be something inherently visualized as physical, "Human soul" should be valid limit.
I mean, even if Natural Ambition etc is considered legit for Adopted, there should be SOME Human stuff which isn't. IMHO.

I don't quite get Luis' comment on Othoban halflings...
Is that to say Othoban halflings are one of either Human-parallel ethnicities or new Halfling ethnicties?
Or are Othoban of multiple ethnicities that happened to get timewarped via Runelords? Or something else or nothing? :-)


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Isabelle Lee wrote:
Sebastian Hirsch wrote:
Since this seems to be a callback, I wonder how old you have to be to remember the D&D and AD&D times where elves could be fighter/wizards ^^

About my age, as it turns out. ^_^

(Though you'll need something even spicier than Ancient Elf to go fighter/mage/thief.)

My age as well. :)

Liberty's Edge

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I do like the theming (and am also old enough to remember Elven Fighter/Magic Users), I'm just concerned with power creep.

My current hope is that there's an Ancestry Feat for 'Enhanced Heritage' or something that allows a more powerful Heritage and this is one of them (it'd be pretty balanced if it effectively cost both an Ancestry Feat and a Heritage), but that seems a very slim possibility.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Arachnofiend wrote:
PossibleCabbage wrote:
Real benefit of the Ancient Elf is psychological.

No, the real benefit of Ancient Elf is speed. Using a heritage to pick up your dedication means that you don't lose out on your second level class feat, thereby pushing your entire build back two levels since you're less likely to miss something fundamental.

You know what that reminds me of? The Human bonus feat. I'm sure y'all remember how fair and balanced that feature was.

The only real difference between the Ancient Elf and the Versatile Human is the order in which you take your class feats. The Ancient Elf takes the multiclass dedication feat at 1st level and some other non-multiclassing class feat at 2nd level. The Versatile Human takes an extra general feat at 1st level (and can turn their ancestry feat into nearly any other type of feat, including a class feat, even if they don't have the Versatile heritage) and then their multiclass dedication feat at 2nd level.

Liberty's Edge

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That's not true, 1st level and 2nd level Feats are different lists and the 2nd level one is usually a quite a bit better.

That makes the difference quite a bit more than just order.

Paizo Employee

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Deadmanwalking wrote:

That's not true, 1st level and 2nd level Feats are different lists and the 2nd level one is usually a quite a bit better.

That makes the difference quite a bit more than just order.

I would counter that somewhat by noting that for many classes, the 2nd level feats are building blocks that are contingent to some extent on your choice of 1st level feat or class path. The pregen for the iconic monk Sajan isn't actually something you can build with anything other than a human. There's quite a few potential builds on classes like the champion, fighter, monk, ranger, and rogue where even if you gained a "bonus" feat at 2nd level you'd still want to spend it on a 1st level feat to open up a secondary combat style or a character progression that simply wouldn't be possible/feasible otherwise. While 2nd level feats are slightly more powerful than 1st level feats (as they should be), they also tend to be much more narrow in focus, applicability, and/or accessibility.

If I were planning on making what would traditionally be considered a "multiclass" build like an arcane archer or eldritch knight I don't know that Ancient Elf would unseat human as my main choice; if anything it broadens the field a bit and gives me a few reasons to look at a race other than human when I want to break away from the assumed character progressions and combat play-styles.


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I am liking what I am seeing, especially the Ancient Elf!

Shadow Lodge

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But... it doesn't come out until 11 days AFTER my birthday... :(

Liberty's Edge

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Ssalarn wrote:
I would counter that somewhat by noting that for many classes, the 2nd level feats are building blocks that are contingent to some extent on your choice of 1st level feat or class path. The pregen for the iconic monk Sajan isn't actually something you can build with anything other than a human. There's quite a few potential builds on classes like the champion, fighter, monk, ranger, and rogue where even if you gained a "bonus" feat at 2nd level you'd still want to spend it on a 1st level feat to open up a secondary combat style or a character progression that simply wouldn't be possible/feasible otherwise. While 2nd level feats are slightly more powerful than 1st level feats (as they should be), they also tend to be much more narrow in focus, applicability, and/or accessibility.

Sure, I'm not saying that Ancient Elf is better than Human for all builds at all times or anything, my issue is purely that it seems more powerful than the other available Heritage options. By quite a bit. Even if Natural Ambition is as good (which I'm not quite convinced of), it's an Ancestry Feat rather than a Heritage.

I mean, higher level Feats are supposed to be notably better and yet, for practical purposes, this is almost as good as a 9th level Human Ancestry Feat, while Heritages are generally on par with 1st level Ancestry Feats at best (and often not as good). Yeah, the 9th level Feat is definitely better...but 8 levels better? I don't think so.

Ssalarn wrote:
If I were planning on making what would traditionally be considered a "multiclass" build like an arcane archer or eldritch knight I don't know that Ancient Elf would unseat human as my main choice; if anything it broadens the field a bit and gives me a few reasons to look at a race other than human when I want to break away from the assumed character progressions and combat play-styles.

I'm actually less worried about traditional multiclass builds and more about people who aren't planning on multiclassing and simply take the Muticlass Dedication over whatever other effect they'd normally have as a Heritage. Two cantrips and a Skill rather than one cantrip, for example.

It can wind up evening out for the most part if they pursue the multiclass...but what if they don't? In that case, if they weren't planning on an Archetype, it's just better than the other options available.

Silver Crusade

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Do you know what other Heritage is good? That Monkey Goblin.

In PF1 a Monkey Goblin Pirate rogue was a laugh and all, but not all that. In PF2 that pictured PC is very strong. Rogue is a good class, Sailor is a good Background and Monkey Goblin makes it all the sweeter. Grab Cat Fall as one of the Rogue's many Skill Feats and you are a v mobile and deadly striker pretty much out of the gate. Nice.


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Help, I’ve somehow stumbled into trying to assemble a Mwangi Expanse Primer, and I dearly need more info on the Song’o halflings, the local orcs, and any non-awful Bekyar tribes you can spare.

(There’s a lot more Mwangi dwarf lore already published than I thought!)

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
keftiu wrote:

Help, I’ve somehow stumbled into trying to assemble a Mwangi Expanse Primer, and I dearly need more info on the Song’o halflings, the local orcs, and any non-awful Bekyar tribes you can spare.

(There’s a lot more Mwangi dwarf lore already published than I thought!)

Firesoul and its prequel web fiction The Gem has a bunch.

Beyond the Pool of Stars and Through the Gate in the Sea does too, the former has Lizardfolk stuff, haven't read the second one yet sadly, it went missing so had to reorder a copy.

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Also I knew that Iobarian looked really familiar but it wasn't clicking till I stared for a bit (the hair decs gave it away).

I wonder if Jadrenka has any siblings? :3

Sovereign Court

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion Subscriber

There's also the fiction from Legacy of Fire. ^_^

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Ooo I need to get around to reading that, there's some AP fictions I've missed.

Dark Archive

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Rysky wrote:

Also I knew that Iobarian looked really familiar but it wasn't clicking till I stared for a bit (the hair decs gave it away).

I wonder if Jadrenka has any siblings? :3

She has same eye color as Jadrenka so uh, it might actually be Jadrenka O_o;

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Changelings have heterochromia, but that gets missed a lot (even for Jadrenka in Maiden, Mother, Crone) so it very well could be her :3


^I thought heterochromia was merely common in Changelings, not universal.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Ah, good catch.

But Jadrenka has multiple pieces of art in MMM due to her role, sometimes they have her eyes as green and brown and sometimes both brown like above.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Rysky wrote:
keftiu wrote:

Help, I’ve somehow stumbled into trying to assemble a Mwangi Expanse Primer, and I dearly need more info on the Song’o halflings, the local orcs, and any non-awful Bekyar tribes you can spare.

(There’s a lot more Mwangi dwarf lore already published than I thought!)

Firesoul and its prequel web fiction The Gem has a bunch.

Beyond the Pool of Stars and Through the Gate in the Sea does too, the former has Lizardfolk stuff, haven't read the second one yet sadly, it went missing so had to reorder a copy.

The Song'o play a role in Ire of the Storm module as well

Dark Archive

Vorsk, Follower or Erastil wrote:
Rysky wrote:
keftiu wrote:

Help, I’ve somehow stumbled into trying to assemble a Mwangi Expanse Primer, and I dearly need more info on the Song’o halflings, the local orcs, and any non-awful Bekyar tribes you can spare.

(There’s a lot more Mwangi dwarf lore already published than I thought!)

Firesoul and its prequel web fiction The Gem has a bunch.

Beyond the Pool of Stars and Through the Gate in the Sea does too, the former has Lizardfolk stuff, haven't read the second one yet sadly, it went missing so had to reorder a copy.

The Song'o play a role in Ire of the Storm module as well

Ire of the Storm also has lizardfolk(as you can guess from cover) and one grippli :D

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
CorvusMask wrote:
Vorsk, Follower or Erastil wrote:
Rysky wrote:
keftiu wrote:

Help, I’ve somehow stumbled into trying to assemble a Mwangi Expanse Primer, and I dearly need more info on the Song’o halflings, the local orcs, and any non-awful Bekyar tribes you can spare.

(There’s a lot more Mwangi dwarf lore already published than I thought!)

Firesoul and its prequel web fiction The Gem has a bunch.

Beyond the Pool of Stars and Through the Gate in the Sea does too, the former has Lizardfolk stuff, haven't read the second one yet sadly, it went missing so had to reorder a copy.

The Song'o play a role in Ire of the Storm module as well
Ire of the Storm also has lizardfolk(as you can guess from cover) and one grippli :D

With art for all too!

Liberty's Edge

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I just hope we see more Ancestral weapons. Right now, pickings are thin in the PF2 CRB; elves can only pick Elven Curveblade. And I don’t relish waiting another full year for a PF2 equivalent to Ultimate Equipment after the long wait for one for Starfinder. I’m STILL waiting for a Starship Guide for that system!


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Deadmanwalking wrote:

I'm actually less worried about traditional multiclass builds and more about people who aren't planning on multiclassing and simply take the Muticlass Dedication over whatever other effect they'd normally have as a Heritage. Two cantrips and a Skill rather than one cantrip, for example.

It can wind up evening out for the most part if they pursue the multiclass...but what if they don't? In that case, if they weren't planning on an Archetype, it's just better than the other options available.

Yeah. I mean Seer Elf is just a worse version of picking up a spell-casting dedication, right?

Seer Elf
detect magic at will, +1 on very specific skill checks.

Ancient Elf (Wizard)
know 4 arcane cantrips, prepare 2 every day. Trained in Arcana.

That's kind of insane for two ostensibly equal options. And it's not like seer elf even has really strong character concept niche. It's almost completely redundant, even if neither choice ends up being a huge difference in power, their very lopsided.

I'd personally have played the age part up a bit, make there be a drawback. Stuff like you have some of the training of a past life, but didn't start this one clean, gain one less skill trained from your class. Cancels out one of the big advantages of the heritage, the bonus trained skill on top of the class feature. You could probably also lose low-light vision for it, your eyes aren't what they used to be. Now it's more flavorful and more balanced.

But it doesn't matter now, because the book is printed and delivered, and this heritage and it's lopsided design are just out there as a (presumably) Common option. A bit sad, not the end of the world, but just a bit sad. And it suggests I'll have to start printing either a list of not-allowed options, or add my own little nudges to stuff almost constantly. Like a lot of PF1. Because maybe the core rulebooks will be better balanced than the Lost Omens products.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
vagrant-poet wrote:
But it doesn't matter now, because the book is printed and delivered,

It doesn't release till October, the Lost Omens World Guide is the one that is currently coming out in a few days.


Rysky wrote:
vagrant-poet wrote:
But it doesn't matter now, because the book is printed and delivered,
It doesn't release till October, the Lost Omens World Guide is the one that is currently coming out in a few days.

Yeah, sorry. I more so mean that it's contents are locked. There is nothing that can change the fact that this is what ancient elf will look like in the release version of this book. Or they wouldn't be sharing it on the blog.


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Something that drew me to Golarion has always been the ethnic diversity in nonhumans, although it's often very difficult to get all the information on them in the same place. So I'm very much looking forward to this book.

From the looks of existing core options, do Heritage rules have anything to do with ethnicity at all? Heritage appears to be biological, psychological and magical traits innate to an ancestry, and any ethnic group of a given ancestry can be composed of all of its heritages, albeit in different proportions. So for example, Snowcaster/Ilverani elves are an ethnic group of elf with a majority arctic elf heritage, but an Aiudeen elf with no cultural or familial relation to Snowcasters can also have the arctic elf heritage by virtue of living in Irrisen for generations. Is that a good way of looking at it?

I have another question relating to ethnic groups in Golarion. Reading through the Lost Omens section of the Core Rulebook, I noticed a really odd convention where human ethnic group names are capitalized, but nonhuman ethnic group names are not. What's the reasoning behind that?


Rysky wrote:

Ah, good catch.

But Jadrenka has multiple pieces of art in MMM due to her role, sometimes they have her eyes as green and brown and sometimes both brown like above.

This must be an example of temporal heterochromia.


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Eh ancient elf is pretty good but it isn't going to be game destroying, there are always optimal routes and it doesn't touch on the half level requirements.

Wizard dedication vs seer is not a straight upgrade, and cavern elf will likely be more useful than either.

Adopted ancestry will likely get a "uncommon" tag at my table, mechanically I don't see an issue for the most part. But it is thematically garrish if the player doesn't put in the effort.


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PossibleCabbage wrote:

I'm just going to come right out and say that "incredibly long lifespan" is one of those things the "you can’t select a heritage that depends on or improves an elven feature you don’t have" clause in Elf Atavism, since Half-Elves lack an elf's ability to live that long.

Still, if you want to get all the free multiclassing, the Ancient Elf + Adopted Ancestry (Human) + Multitalented seems to work. Makes for an odd story though- I was adopted by humans.... two hundred years ago. Could be a super-fun character to RP, since your upbringing leads you to believe that you "understand the ways of humans" but all of your assumptions are ridiculously old-fashioned.

The character could be old, Half-Elves usually live significantly longer than humans (Half-Elves ~150, Humans ~90).

If Half-Elves age like humans, a Half-Elf at 100 is a human at 60.


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I love what I am seeing.

With the elven feat is this a way to make a magus type character or even a mystic therugish character?

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