The Play's the Thing

Monday, July 8, 2019

Last week, we built a character together, so now let's talk about how the game plays!

Digital artwork: Lush forest, night time. Aged vines and moss wrap around thick tree branches. In the foreground, Harsk, a gruff gnome ranger with long hair and an almost equally long beard, is peering out from behind large, leafy plants. Behind him, Lini - an excited-looking gnome druid, uses her right hand to brush back overgrown greenery from a stone column twice her height and half as wide. She holds a torch in her left hand, which lights the image in dark red. She has partially revealed square-shaped carvings in the side of the column. Behind her - to the right - her snow leopard companion Droogami, looks  to see what she's discovered.

Illustration by Will O'Brien

Exploring

Most of the time when you're adventuring, you're exploring. Whether you're examining a dusty tomb, blazing trails through a dense jungle, or disguising your way into an enemy fortress, exploration is all about discovery. It takes place on a fluid time scale, ranging from roughly 10 minutes to hours, or even days for a long overland expedition. It's dangerous to go alone, especially when you don't know if you'll have an important skill you need to brave the perils of a dungeon, but fortunately you'll be part of a team. If you're an expert or better in a skill, you'll be able to help your allies with that skill while exploring, by coaching your less athletic teammates up the cliffside and spotting the worst of the climb, using hand gestures to sneak your louder allies past the guards at the best moment, and more!

In addition to a handful of exploration actions characters can take while in this game mode, the book also presents a number of skills that can be used while exploring.

Text inset: SKILL EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES. Chapter 4: Skills include numerous additional exploration activities, which are summarized here.  
Borrow an Arcane Spell: You use Arcana to prepare a spell from someone else's spellbook (page 241).
Coerce: You use Intimidation to threaten a creature so it does what you want (page 247).
Cover Tracks: You use Survival to obscure your passing (page 252).
Decipher Writing: You use a suitable skill to understand archaic, esoteric, or obscure texts (page 234).
Gather Information: You use Diplomacy to canvass the area to learn about a specific individual or topic (page 246).
Identify Alchemy: You use Craft and alchemist's tools to identify an alchemical item (page 245).
Identify Magic: Using a variety of skills, you can learn about a magic item, location, or ongoing effect (page 238). 
Impersonate: You use Deception and usually a disguise kit to create a disguise (page 245).
Learn a Spell: You use the skill corresponding to the spell’s tradition to gan access to a new spell (page 238).
Make an Impression: You use Diplomacy to make a good impression on someone (page 246). 
Repair: With a repair kit and the Crafting skill, you fix a damaged item (page 243).
Sense Direction: You use Survival to get a sense of where you are or determine the cardinal directions (page 252).
Squeeze: Using Acrobatics, you squeeze through very tight spaces (page 241).
Track: You use Survival to find and follow creatures’ tracks (page 252).
Treat Wounds: You use Medicine to treat a living creature’s wounds (page 249).

Encounter

When every action matters, your characters enter an encounter, proceeding turn by turn, action by action. These crop up in the middle of exploration, putting your travels on hold so you can deal with an immediate danger or opportunity. Combat encounters are the most typical encounters, taking place on a scale of mere seconds between life and death, but all encounters share a common structure: you roll initiative to determine turn order, then you take turns, performing your actions and determining what happens. In a combat encounter, each turn you get one reaction and three actions you can spend however you want. For instance, on her turn in combat, a sorcerer might spend all three actions to unleash a deadly barrage of magic missiles while a fighter might raise his shield and then use a Sudden Charge to rush an enemy and attack.

It's during encounters that most player characters will bestow conditions upon their foes, or gain a condition as the result of the conflict. To make the wide range of conditions that can come into play easier for new players to learn, we provide a full-page list of them without any of the associated rules. This allows someone to quickly reference what it means to be stunned or stupefied, and tell the difference between being undetected, invisible, or concealed.

Text Inset: CONDITIONS. These conditions appear often in the game and are defined in detail in the Conditions Appendix on pages 618-623. Here’s a brief summary of each.
Blinded: You’re unable to see.
Broken: This item can’t be used for its normal function until repaired.
Clumsy: You can’t move as easily or gracefully as usual.
Concealed: Fog or similar obscuration makes you difficult to see and target. 
Confused: You attack indiscriminately.
Controlled: Another creature determines your actions.
Dazzled: Everything is concealed to you.
Deafened: You’re unable to hear.
Doomed: With your soul in peril, you are now closer to death.
Drained: Blood loss or something similar has leached your vitality.
Dying: You’re slipping closer to death.
Encumbered: You’re carrying more weight than you can manage.
Enfeebled: Your strength has been sapped away.
Fascinated: You are compelled to focus your attention on something.
Fatigued: Your defenses are lower and you can’t focus while exploring.
Flat-Footed: You’re unable to defend yourself to your full capability.
Fleeing: You must run away.
Friendly: An NPC with this condition has a good attitude toward you.
Frightened: Fear makes you less capable of attacking and defending.
Grabbed:  A creature, object, or magic holds you in place.
Helpful: An NPC with this condition wants to assistantships you.
Hidden: A creature you’re hiding from knows your location but can’t see you.
Hostile: An NPC with this condition wants to harm you.
Immobilized: You can’t move.
Indifferent: An NPC with this condition doesn’t have a strong opinion about you.
Invisible: Creatures can’t see you.
Observed: You’re in plain view.
Paralyzed: Your body is frozen in place.
Persistent Damage: You keep taking damage every round.
Petrified: You’ve been turned to stone.
Prone: You’re lying on the ground and easier to attack.
Quickened: You get an extra action each turn.
Restrained: You’re tied up and can’t move, or a grappling creature has you pinned.
Sickened: You’re sick to your stomach.
Slowed: You lose actions each turn.
Stunned: You can’t use actions.
Stupefied: You can’t access your full mental faculties, and you have trouble casting spells.
Unconscious: You’re asleep or knocked out.
Undetected: A creature you are undetected by doesn’t know where you are.
Unfriendly: An NPC with this condition doesn’t like you.
Unnoticed: A creature is entirely unaware you’re present.
Wounded: You’ve been brought back from the brink of death but haven’t fully recovered.

Downtime

Even heroes sometimes need a break from the incredible stress of an adventuring life! During downtime, you can earn money, craft items, swap out old character choices for different options, or just take a rest and carouse with the locals. You take your downtime when you return to the safety of a town or home base, usually after completing an adventure. While downtime in general flows quickly through days or weeks at a time, depending on the choices you make, new options might open themselves up to you as the GM sprinkles special downtime events into your chosen downtime activity, zooming in temporarily to highlight interesting or unusual occurrences when you're not out on an adventure.

Downtime gets the least amount of space of the three game modes, but it's an incredibly rich design space built into the core of the game that may lead to new innovations over the lifespan of Second Edition (some of which we're already working on). As in Exploration Mode, players can utilize some of their skills for downtime activities.

Text inset: SKILL DOWNTIME ACTIVITIES.
Chapter 4: Skills includes several downtime activities, which are summarized here.
Craft: Using the Crafting skill, you can create items from raw materials (page 244).
Create Forgery: You forge a document (page 251).
Earn Income: You earn money, typically using Crafting, Lore, or Performance (page 236).
Subsist: You find food and shelter in the wilderness or within a settlement (page 240).
Treat Disease: You spend time caring for a diseased creature in the hope of curing that creature (page 248).

Treasure

While many adventurers risk their lives due to heroism or a sense of duty, treasure is a major motivator for others. And let's be honest, even when playing an altruistic PC, it's still a lot of fun to find a cool magic item for your character. In Pathfinder, your characters will find a fairly steady stream of magic items, ranging from simple healing potions to the mighty skyhammer. Some of the more inexpensive items are consumable, meaning they can be used once, like alchemical elixirs you drink, scrolls you read, and special talismans you can attach to your other items. Others, like magic weapons or enchanted clothing and tools, serve you again and again as you adventure. You could wield a storm flash rapier arcing with electricity and wear a dread blindfold to strike fear into your foes! You can also find magic runes you can etch onto weapons and armor to build all kinds of powerful combinations!

Text inset: Storm Flash. Item 14+. Electricity. Evocation. Magical. 
Usage: held in 1 hand; bulk 1.
Description: This +2 greater striking shock rapier has a golden blade, and miniature electric arcs flash across its guard while it’s wielded. When out of its sheath under an open sky, the blade causes storm clouds to gather slowly above.
Activate  command, envision;
Frequency: once per day;
Effect: You cast a 60th level lightning bolt (DC 33).
Activate reaction command; Frequency: once per 10 minutes; Trigger: An electricity effect targets you or a creature within 10 feet of you, or has you or a creature within 10 feet of you in its area; Effect: You try to divert the electricity off course, to be absorbed by storm flash. Choose one eligible creature to protect and roll a melee attack roll against the DC of the electricity effect. If you succeed, the chosen creature takes no electricity damage from the triggering effect.
Type: storm flash; Level 14; Price 4000 gp.
Type: greater storm flash; Level 18. Price: 21,000gp.
This is a +3 greater striking shock rapier. When activating the sword to cast lightning bolt, the spell is 8th level. Text inset: Dread Blindfold. Item 17.
Emotion. Enchantment. Fear. Invested. Magical. Mental.
Price: 15,000 gp.
Usage: worn eyepiece.
Bulk: none.
When tied over your eyes, this ragged strip of black linen gives you a +3 item bonus to Intimidation checks and darkvision. You can see through the blindfold, but only using darkvision. 
The first time a particular creatures sees you in a day, it must succeed at a DC 37 Will save or be frightened 1. This is an emotion, fear, and mental effect, and your allies become immune to it after about a week.

Activate command; Frequency: once per minute; 
Trigger: You damage a creature with a Strike; Effect: Your target is gripped by intense fear. This has the effect of a DC 37 phantasmal killer spell, but it is an enchantment instead of an illusion. The creature is then temporarily immune for 24 hours.

Experience Points and Levels

In Pathfinder, you learn from your adventures, both your triumphs and your failures, growing more powerful and gaining fantastic new abilities. We measure that progress with Experience Points (XP), and typically the more impressive and insurmountable the challenge for your character, the more XP you gain for overcoming it. Once you earn a total of 1,000 XP, you reach a new level, opening up new options for your character. Next week we'll go into detail about leveling up!

Three characters sitting on the grass in the shade under an old, very leafy tree. The weather is partially cloudy. Kneeling on the left is Kyra, a cleric, is holding up a glowing idol in both hands and looking at it intently. She is wearing long flowing blue and white garments with gold dotted circular designs.  She is facing away from the group, to the left of the picture. In the center and further back, Lem, a halfling bard, is sitting barefoot, wrapped in a short-sleeved cloak or jacket. He is playing the flute with his eyes closed. On the far right, Ezren the wizard, a human male with long white hair, is studying from two open books floating in front of him. He has one hand on the pages of each book, and his hands are glowing. The book on the left has a glowing circle of glyphs surrounding his hands

Illustration by Matteo Spirito

Mark Seifter
Designer

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TOZ wrote:
But they aren’t. They’re “about” four weeks.

The default is 4 weeks or 30 days with specific months varying. For me it's crystal clear. This seems more like a semantic quibble for a 'gotcha' moment instead of an actual worry over vagueness. As such, I'll bow out as you don't seem to be debating in good faith.

Rysky wrote:
What’s a generic month?

Not a specific one... Much like the difference between a generic year and 2020. [they have different day counts] :P


So I looked at this years calendars just to be sure, because this isn't something I pay attention to. There's only one month in the year that comprises only 28 days (or exactly four weeks, I guess). The remaining 11 are all *approximately* four weeks.

I don't think a four week month is "generic". Unless I misunderstood your meaning.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
graystone wrote:
For me it's crystal clear. This seems more like a semantic quibble for a 'gotcha' moment instead of an actual worry over vagueness.

You are the one worried about vagueness. I'm perfectly fine with the 'about a week' duration.


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I enjoy a good s*%+ stirring. But perhaps we could lay off graystone just this once?

Graystone's made their opinion clear. You might think it's a ridiculous opinion (or at least an opinion worthy of ridicule), but I think we've all had our laughs and given graystone doesn't seem to be laughing maybe we should all let it go?

Anyone know what the next blog entry will be about?


Magic isn't beholden mortal reckoning (which would likely vary by region anyway) so with month I would presume we're talking about a standard lunar month of 28 days (or whatever the equivalent is on Golarion). Essentially this is the same as Year or Day though the question of whether we're talking about a 'full X' or merely 'until the next X' will likely have to be resolved elsewhere.

My own preference (as a GM) is for strong guidelines that I can then use to make informed decisions as befits the situation. For this reason, I tend to favour lighter systems than PF2 looks to be.


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Aiden2018 wrote:

So I looked at this years calendars just to be sure, because this isn't something I pay attention to. There's only one month in the year that comprises only 28 days (or exactly four weeks, I guess). The remaining 11 are all *approximately* four weeks.

I don't think a four week month is "generic". Unless I misunderstood your meaning.

If a woman is 3 months pregnant, you aren't concerned with which exact months she's been pregnant in: you use the generic totals, each month is 4 weeks or 30 days. So when you're told a month without any other information, you use 4 weeks if you are measuring weeks or 30 days if you are measuring days. If you don't like the word generic, default works too.

John Lynch 106 and Steve Geddes, I do appreciate the good faith, civil debate we've had.


graystone wrote:
Aiden2018 wrote:

So I looked at this years calendars just to be sure, because this isn't something I pay attention to. There's only one month in the year that comprises only 28 days (or exactly four weeks, I guess). The remaining 11 are all *approximately* four weeks.

I don't think a four week month is "generic". Unless I misunderstood your meaning.

If a woman is 3 months pregnant, you aren't concerned with which exact months she's been pregnant in: you use the generic totals, each month is 4 weeks or 30 days. So when you're told a month without any other information, you use 4 weeks if you are measuring weeks or 30 days if you are measuring days. If you don't like the word generic, default works too.

John Lynch 106 and Steve Geddes, I do appreciate the good faith, civil debate we've had.

I think it bears pointing out that the very statements you use to defend the lack of ambiguity in the duration of a month is itself full of ambiguity. You are literally saying that the assumed duration of a month would differ based on whether you were measuring in weeks or days. Which would mean that if something lasts/takes a month, even by the "use the default month" assumption, it could be 28 days, could be 30. So if it doesn't say whether the month is measured in days or weeks the GM has ro guess. That sounds like quite an ambiguity to me. Which, so there no misunderstanding, is an ambiguity I'm fine with. But you have claimed to not be.

I only point this out because it's frankly a contradictory defense and it would feel a disservice to not point it out in a reasonable manner before someone does so less reasonably.

(And I'd like to think I've been reasonably civil in this debate. ;P)

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
graystone wrote:
TOZ wrote:
But they aren’t. They’re “about” four weeks.

The default is 4 weeks or 30 days with specific months varying. For me it's crystal clear. This seems more like a semantic quibble for a 'gotcha' moment instead of an actual worry over vagueness. As such, I'll bow out as you don't seem to be debating in good faith.

Rysky wrote:
What’s a generic month?
Not a specific one... Much like the difference between a generic year and 2020. [they have different day counts] :P

But there you have ambiguity. "The default is 4 weeks or 30 days". Four weeks and thirty days are two different time measurements. So if a duration in the Rulebook said "a month" it would be up to the GM whether that means 28 days or 30 days, or even until the same day of the next month.


Edge93 wrote:

I only point this out because it's frankly a contradictory defense and it would feel a disservice to not point it out in a reasonable manner before someone does so less reasonably.

(And I'd like to think I've been reasonably civil in this debate. ;P)

For me it's not ambiguous, it's rounding to the nearest whole week. You normally don't talk about fractional weeks, months or years like 2.65 weeks, 8.6 months or 6.2 years instead rounding or converting to a smaller unit. It's like in pathfinder and getting a free feat every 3 level and being 5th and saying you have 1 free feat instead of 1 and 2/3 free feats. So it's ALWAYS 30 days but in terms of weeks, those 2 days get dropped for most reasons that get measured in weeks: if days matter, you aren't counting in weeks. So there's never 28 days in a generic month, only 30.

This is vs around where there isn't a standard to anticipate an answer: around can be more or less or the same.

As to civil, I don't recall you being not civil: it's more you only commented a few times. ;)

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

It is not always 30 days in a generic month, or a year would be 360 days.


Cori Marie wrote:
It is not always 30 days in a generic month, or a year would be 360 days.

I went over that already, specific months vs generic months. Also see my rounding comment [5/12'ths of a day get rounded down]. No one talks about 30.41666666666666666666666666 days instead rounding to a whole number. If those spare minutes and hours are meaningful, you aren't counting in days alone.

EDIT: bottom line, I find no ambiguity. I don't really see much point in further beating a dead horse over this quibble over rounding. Unless something new comes up about months, I think i'm done.


One thing about ambiguity, I feel, is that it is much more appropriate for higher level items, feats, spells, etc. than lower ones. Not only is "we need some room for interpretation to make this sufficiently impressive" (think the "or any other effect" clause in "Wish") a real thing, but the overwhelming majority of "pick up and play" games with unfamiliar GMs won't be "make an 18th level character"- if you've gotten to the point where you have 10th level spells available, you presumably have some kind of an understanding with your GM.


PossibleCabbage wrote:
One thing about ambiguity, I feel, is that it is much more appropriate for higher level items, feats, spells, etc. than lower ones. Not only is "we need some room for interpretation to make this sufficiently impressive" (think the "or any other effect" clause in "Wish") a real thing, but the overwhelming majority of "pick up and play" games with unfamiliar GMs won't be "make an 18th level character"- if you've gotten to the point where you have 10th level spells available, you presumably have some kind of an understanding with your GM.

I can agree with this: I overlooked the blindfold because it was higher level than I thought I'd ever use. If ambiguity is weighted towards the higher levels, it would be much less of an issue for me. Out of sight, out of mind as it were.


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How is there a 5-page argument about something that lasts 1/14400th of a day, at the same time as daily preparations?

I cannot think of a single time in at least 5 years that this distinction would have been relevant.

It's like saying that daily preparations last "about an hour", except I can think of times where that'd have actually mattered. (Okay, one time, and even then not really.)


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Cyouni wrote:
How is there a 5-page argument about something that lasts 1/14400th of a day, at the same time as daily preparations?

There isn't a 5-page argument about 5-page argument about something that lasts 1/14400th of a day, at the same time as daily preparations. If you honestly think that is what this argument about then either (a) your not trying very hard or (b) you've failed to actually read the last 5 pages you're complaining about.


John Lynch 106 wrote:
Cyouni wrote:
How is there a 5-page argument about something that lasts 1/14400th of a day, at the same time as daily preparations?
There isn't a 5-page argument about 5-page argument about something that lasts 1/14400th of a day, at the same time as daily preparations. If you honestly think that is what this argument about then either (a) your not trying very hard or (b) you've failed to actually read the last 5 pages you're complaining about.

No, it's technically about ambiguities that will never matter in any game, and the need to prevent such.

Does that really change any factor of the situation?


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Either way the argument about the 'about' a week is really boring and tiring.

Liberty's Edge

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Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

It's about dissenting voices and how we treat them


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Cyouni wrote:

No, it's technically about ambiguities that will never matter in any game, and the need to prevent such.

Does that really change any factor of the situation?

If you're going to b**!! about an argument that is clearly important to at least one poster, at least have the decency to frame the argument honestly.


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Cyouni wrote:
No, it's technically about ambiguities that will never matter in any game, and the need to prevent such.

If everyone else felt that way, why debate me for 5 pages? A simple 'I disagree' and moving on would have resulted in 5 less pages of argument. I didn't pursue this debate, I only defended an off comment about not liking ambiguity...

Paizo Employee Designer

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Shisumo wrote:
Rounds are 6 seconds long. Nothing in the rules *anywhere* tells you how to subdivide a round into less time than that. The quantum limit for magic's timing precision is +/- 3 seconds at best; below that, uncertainty reigns.

Combat encounter rounds are generally around 6 seconds, yep, but you can wind up with rounds and turns that take longer if you're running a different sort of encounter. Like you can have a social encounter where each round each PC can have a long conversation for their turn. Then again, if we're talking about spell durations measured in rounds, those are combat encounter rounds, so the around 6 seconds does apply as you say!


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I wouldn't say any game, clearly it can happen in some games (even if it's the bare minority). Also the argument wasn't about just any ambiguities, it was about Graystone hoping the ambiguities that plagued PF1e were as little as possible.

People then decided to argue about how "about a week" isn't a problem, and that ambiguity isn't bad. Remember how people kept complaining about rules ambiguity for the last 10 years? (I'm rounding)


If we can't even go "about a week" without trying to remove the ambiguities, what are we going to do about the rest of the game? There's a practically infinite number of situations that are going to have different interpretations, some of the most obvious being what you roll for initiative, what modifiers apply to Athletics checks to climb, what other checks can be used to Recall Knowledge about a particular subject, and how long a character sleeps for. There is physically no way you can remove ambiguity from the game, unless you turn it into a CRPG.

Can we please try and leave room for things to be written by humans? Sure, let's try and reduce ambiguity where we can remove a possibility for a straight up incorrect interpretation, but can we have space for words to be used without trying to lock everything down into the most specifically defined scenarios?

Do we really want to go back to the need for charts to define the exact widths and DCs for a "narrow surface" or the angles for "uneven ground"?


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Cyouni wrote:
If we can't even go "about a week" without trying to remove the ambiguities, what are we going to do about the rest of the game?

Absolutely nothing. The playtest is over. All we're doing is wasting time until the rules come out. Once the rules do come out there'll be a flurry of arguments over how good and awful the rules are. Then after a short while people will either move onto other things or accept the game for what it is and play it.

If you don't want to read pointless conversations, can I suggest coming back in about 3 weeks?


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Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

So, in 19 days? 20? 21? Or 22 even?


Zaister wrote:
So, in 19 days? 20? 21? Or 22 even?

Depends when the archives of nethys put the rules up online for me. I'm on the fence enough that I'm going to need to see the whole thing, and play a few games, before I buy things or move on.

Scarab Sages

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On the week versus month thing.
If a month is 4 weeks we are missing a month each year. 4*12=48 not 52
Also, while stated a pregnancy is 9 months, a full term baby is 40 weeks, which would be 10 months if 4 weeks=1 month.
(Btw just having fun with this at this point :D)

On magic items in general, I like the whole "Higher level means more ambiguity" thing. Gives GM's more leeway to customize situations for their group.

I always see rules as a means to an end. The point of P&P RPGs is to cooperatively tell an engaging story. Rules should facilitate this without getting in the way.

I've seen/ played/ gm'ed systems so rules heavy and bloated it got in the way of the story. Players spent all their time searching rules books or number crunching that they forgot their characters and/or story.

I've seen and played systems so rules light they required extremely good gm's and players to keep from going off the rails.

This is why I like the new proficiency system so much and I see it kind of like how I see players notoriety based on level.

In general I see it like:

Origin stories
Level 0
Untrained
Unknown quantity
Unheard of
Almost completely random if able to accomplish a task
people will hire if desperate

Small/Local(Village or city neighborhood) scale problems
Level 1-5
Trained
Known to have a focus(Class)
Locals might know them for their focus
Can accomplish easy tasks. More iffy the more difficult the task
People will hire for easier tasks or tasks hire-er lack specifics abilities/skills to do

Big local/ small region(whole small city or group of villages) scale problems
Level 6-10
Expert
Known to be good at their Focus
Locals will know them for their focus and so will people in their field(adventurers, soldiers, spell-casters, or the like)
Can accomplish moderately difficult tasks and can help others along as well
People will put some effort to seek out to hire for difficult tasks

Big Region(Major City or small country) level problems
Level 11-15
Master
Known to be great at their focus
Well known and may have stories being told of their exploits
Can accomplish very difficult tasks
People will definitely seek out for help/ Bad guys may hunt them preemptively

Multiple nation or world endangering scale problems
Level 16-20
Legendary
This is who people picture when they think of a thing
Everyone has heard at least something about them and stories of their exploits are told far and wide
Can accomplish the seemingly impossible
People will beg for their help/ most bad guys will fear running into them


Bhrymm wrote:

On the week versus month thing.

If a month is 4 weeks we are missing a month each year. 4*12=48 not 52
Also, while stated a pregnancy is 9 months, a full term baby is 40 weeks, which would be 10 months if 4 weeks=1 month.
(Btw just having fun with this at this point :D)

There could be ambiguity on when to collect those extra days and add an extra week for multiple months: Vic's question was "If we'd said the effect lasts "a month,"" though and for a single month it's straight forward IMO. Even then I think most people would divide days by 7 and round down for weeks. Technically a year isn't exactly 365 days either but you don't count the 1/4ths on non-leap years. ;)


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We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty! :)


Sir NotAppearingInThisFilm wrote:
We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty! :)

How about doubt and uncertainty about rigidly defined areas? ;P


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The Amalgamated Union of Philosophers, Sages, Luminaries and Other Thinking Persons would also accept that.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

@John Lynch: Gorbacz is always like that. In my entire time on this site I've seen maybe... two?... non-sarcastic comments? It's just his thing. Everyone kind of accepts it and moves on.

@graystone: I'm definitely confused, based on your comments, about how many days you think a magical effect that lasts "one month" would last. Previously I would have said that "a month" is quite well defined, but ironically you've convinced me it's ambiguous. :P


MaxAstro wrote:
@graystone: I'm definitely confused, based on your comments, about how many days you think a magical effect that lasts "one month" would last.

30.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

I didn't know people referred to a month as '4 weeks'. Genuinely, I think of months as "about 4.3 weeks". I don't even know how accurate that is exactly, I think it's something my dad told me when I was young and I just accepted it and filed it away in my head as "the correct answer".


graystone wrote:
MaxAstro wrote:
@graystone: I'm definitely confused, based on your comments, about how many days you think a magical effect that lasts "one month" would last.
30.

I second that


Why is everyone arguing about something that will barely affect the game?

Odds are that this will be created during some downtime, the party will be fine, most people in town will be fine. Also, I don't see anywhere the item preventing someone from removing the item and only using it when battle is to be expected, of course, a compromise has to be made to use such a dreadful item in the middle of a crowd.

PS: I don't know if "invested" prevents the item from being used when you want it or if there's a specific time (or interval that prevents benefits from applying) to invest the item.


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Lightning Raven wrote:
Why is everyone arguing about something that will barely affect the game?

Have we met?


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Lightning Raven wrote:
I compromise has to be made to use such a dreadful item in the middle of a crowd.

It would be not bad for evacuating a crowded place though


the Internet wrote:
Lightning Raven wrote:
Why is everyone arguing about something that will barely affect the game?
Have we met?

Hahahhaha. That's true. People are gonna argue regardless of merits.


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I don't mind arguing about details, I'm all of them because details are what makes the world feel alive and lived-in. A mark of good world-building.

But seriously debating if a week is 7 days or what not? This doesn't matter at all in the grand scheme, unless of course we're talking about how different the week is from reality, like the one in the Kingkiller Chronicle series, with eleven days named and changed based on the culture developed in the series.

Why would it matter if in 7-ish days the effect would end? It's still a really long time that doesn't actually affect gameplay for most cases. Unless the party can't refuse to attend a huge party and the item can't be removed from the user's face.


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The Dread Blindfold seems severely overpowered.

It's blinded swarms of people to the rest of the blog post.

Please errata.


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I think I'm most excited for Exploration Mode rules and how that will enhance the games I play.


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Artificial 20 wrote:

The Dread Blindfold seems severely overpowered.

It's blinded swarms of people to the rest of the blog post.

Please errata.

Wish granted! Errated below to remove all ambiguity about the week.

Dread Blindfold Item ~17
Emotion Enchantment Fear Invested Magical Mental
Price somewhere in the neighborhood of 15,000 gp
Usage worn probably on your eye or somewhere, just don’t eat it please?; Bulk
When tied or otherwise fastened over your eyes or thereabouts, this ragged strip of blackish linen gives you in the ballpark of a +3 item bonus to Intimidation checks, as well as probably darkvision, though on second thought maybe low-light vision or scent. You can in all likelihood see through the blindfold, unless you can’t, but even if you can, I can’t imagine you could see with anything other than darkvision, if you have darkvision at least, I know it might have been low-light vision or scent.
The first time, or maybe first few times, a particular creature sees you, and potentially smells you if you have scent, in about a day, it might need to succeed at a save, probably Will but could be anything, with a DC in the neighborhood of 37 or be frightened roughly 1, though maybe 2 or 3, and actually maybe doomed or sickened instead, or what about wounded? This seems to me like maybe an emotion, fear, and mental effect, and your allies, and maybe your enemies too, but probably not, become immune to it after exactly a week, down to the second.
Activate [free-action] command unless it’s envision or Interact I guess; Frequency about once per minute; Trigger You damage a creature with a Strike, or something kind of similar to that; Effect Your target is gripped by intense fear, or maybe another emotion. This might have any effect, but one thing that could be kind of cool might be a phantasmal killer or something like that, I guess at the same DC as before for the frightened, but maybe not. Whatever happens should probably be an enchantment instead of an illusion. The creature might then become temporarily immune for some time vaguely around 24 hours, or maybe not.


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I want blindfolds for the rest of the emotions to instill in people I hit- particularly "surprise" and "anticipation."

I guess "trust" and "joy" would be pretty funny too.


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This thread is bad.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Errata Bot, you are my hero.

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