Tales of Lost Omens

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Now that we've concluded our Iconic Evolutions video series, I'm sure all of our readers are eagerly awaiting news of what exciting content we'll be sharing on Tuesdays going forward. Have no fear, brave Pathfinders, for I've got you covered!

Starting next week, hot on the heels of what's sure to be the best PaizoCon yet, we'll be showing the first of the new regions of the Pathfinder setting as presented in the Lost Omens World Guide, coming out on August 1. These 10 meta-regions are geographically contiguous and thematically linked sections of the Inner Sea region, each intended to be a bit more accessible to new players and Game Masters than the previous 40+ nations presented in the Inner Sea World Guide.

Cartography by Rob McCaleb

In addition to new groupings of neighboring nations, we've also updated the "status quo" of the setting to incorporate the effects of the past 12 years of adventures. We'll share a few of these changes every Tuesday until August, giving you a glimpse of the state of the world in 4719 AR and beyond. Don't worry, though, we'll do our best not to spoil past APs for those still finishing up their First Edition campaigns, and we'll leave plenty of reveals for August when you can read the full book yourselves.

Illustration by David Alvarez

For fans of the Iconic Encounters series of flash fiction we've tied to the weekly Iconic Evolution videos, we'll be continuing that with a piece starring Fumbus on Thursday of this week, and then continuing the flash fiction trend with a new series beginning next week: Tales of Lost Omens. These pieces are slightly longer than James Sutter's Iconic Encounters, but are still closely tied (as best we could) to an epic piece of art from the forthcoming Lost Omens World Guide. Fans of past Pathfinder Tales novels will be happy to know that we've gotten some of our most prolific authors to return for this series, so stay tuned!

Let us know in the comments or at PaizoCon this weekend what you've thought of the Iconic Evolutions, Iconic Encounters, and other preview content we've featured over the last few months here on the blog. We've been really pleased with the level of engagement on both series so far, and hope that varying the format a bit will keep things fresh and exciting for the coming months.

I've got lots of PaizoCon preparation to get to, so I'll wrap this up, but I look forward to seeing everyone at the con and then showing off our first region next week. Until then, Pathfinders, may your wayfinders always point toward adventure!

Mark Moreland
Franchise Manager

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Tags: Pathfinder World Guides Tales of Lost Omens Web Fiction
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Well Oprak is new...and is situated around where a lot of the later conflict for Ironfang Invasion took place.


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Adam Daigle wrote:
Edit: Geez. I didn't realize that I was replying to Quandry, who has been on our boards for over a decade and knows the stuff in my first paragraph, but my second paragraph still stands. :)

Hehe :-)

Mark Moreland wrote:
No one in-world uses these names, at least not that we've explicitly said in print so far. That's why I call them meta-regions. They're to help us organize the book and to give players and GMs common terms for different parts of the world. Apart from how the book is organized and how we refer to general regions instead of specific nations, you should be able to entirely ignore the new meta-regions if you want.

I agree keeping in mind "you should be able to entirely ignore the new meta-regions" is good perspective... That this meta-formatting mostly serves as marketing and intro-point to setting, fitting the mold of Paizo's Patchwork/Genre approach. Personally I *would* better appreciate more fully organic setting-centric approach, grounded in in-world details, rather than 4th wall Genre pigeon-holing. But maybe other products are better format for that. Honestly I have quite liked the organic details of the most recent Qadira and planar products (with great subjective narrative), and anticipate the upcoming Druma CS product also in that vein, so hopefully that trend continues.

I do think much of my critique re: particular divisions stands, even from Genre-Marketing perspective, but perfection is the enemy of production deadlines :-).


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So I've been thinking about how all the Adventure Paths of First Edition have ended trying to figure out what the best endings/possible endings which will have now been canonized moving forward.

Spoiler:

All of the Runelords related stories have been canonized going forward since Rise of the Runelords ends with New Thassilon being created though...who is in control could be shifted around a bit by GM's nut the canon states that Sorshen and Belimarius are splitting control of the country though the former is more powerful at least.

Second Darkness well, the Lantern Bearers have been canonized as a force for good meaning the Kyonin's power base has been redistributed in favor of Queen Telandia however I can't really think of any wider effects it could have on Golarion as a whole. Of course, the optional continuations hint at the Drow invading the surface, and the Dark Fate curse being revealed to the wider world.

Legacy of Fire, well Kelmerane and it's strengthened position is all I can really think could change, though the Templars of the Five Winds could have also found a resurgence.

Council of Thieves was already canonized, as a shadow and Thieves Guild free Westcrown appeared in Hell's Vengeance. Of course, according to the Adventurer's Guide, the Thieves Guild is once more on the rise though, they are not the horrid blackmailers and murders of the past but instead are occultist "gentleman" thieves.

Kingmaker...man where to start with Kingmaker. See this is the one that could go oh so many ways, and with it being turned into a somewhat popular video game and being adapted into Second Edition a lot is left up in the air. I remember that the first city of the nation is called Tuskdale, though there is no specific canon name of the country so Narland from the AP could be the name of the newest and largest of the River Kingdoms, Pitax would be gone and in the video game and hinted at with the Adventure Path Brevoy is even closer to entering civil war and it actually does occur. Seeing how Brevoy is in the Brokenlands it is possible that the war is happening as 2E starts. There's also the fact that the golden end of the video game is killing the Lantern King and marrying Nyrissa fusing Fey and Mortals into a united nation...there is so much that can occur with this and I'm honestly the most excited for whatever is happening here.

Serpents Skull, well you kill a God and find a lost city, which could end up being another force vying for control in the midst of the Expanse interestingly enough Sargava has been replaced by Vidrian so who exactly knows what is going on there.

Carrion Crown seems kind of moot to bring up in light of Tyrant's Grasp so moving on.

Jade Regent, well Ameiko should be the ruler of the Empire of Minkai if things stuck to canon, though what effects that could have on the Inner Sea Region I'm not really sure of other than someone new running the Rusty Dragon in Sandpoint. Though if we ever get an expanded 2E primer for Tian Xia then I'm sure certain things will have changed.

Reign of Winter, well again this one has a lot of possible endings though all of them have Baba Yaga back on top in Irrisen, with three new Riders pulled from a bevy of characters who aided the PCs and has possibly placed her granddaughter who is also the heir to the Russian Throne in control of the nation. This one is another adventure I have paid very close attention to and would like to know more.

Now Wrath of the Righteous has clearly ended in the favor of Mendev and the PCs, however there is no way Sakoris has fully recovered which means there Mendev would still be fighting the demons though now Barbarians from Numeria and the Realm of the Mammoth Lords could be making more headway in claiming back some of their peoples lands and maybe cause a resurgence of the Sarkorin culture. Also, a demon lord or two has been murdered/severely injured and Nocticula has turned her tail for the Chaotic Neutral kind of life meaning there are new positions to fill in the Demonic Hierarchy.

Mummy's Mask, this one I'm not so sure about, there is a possibility that Pyramids now fly across the skies of Osirion, and there is a possibility not much of anything has changed at all.

Iron Gods, well since the Triune includes Casandelee it appears things have taken a turn for the better in Numeria on top of the Technic League taking a major hit and the possibility that Kevoth-Kul has been cured of his addiction still stands.

Giantslayer ends with the party possibly taking control of a massive flying castle and it could be parked over Truana in Belkzen according to one of the continuing the campaign snippets so we will see.

It seems clear that Hell's Rebels ended in the favor of the Silver Ravens, and Hell's Vengeance ended with the Glorious Reclamation on the backfoot/destroyed though some changes to the map hint that some of the things that took place in the Beyond the Border's section of Scourge of the Godclaw came to pass.

Strange Aeons...honestly I have no clue how much this will have changed Golarion regardless of the ending except you know Thrushmoor being gone/empty.

Ironfang Invasion ends with Nirmathus still free, Molthune possibly down a territory, and well it seems like Oprak might be the name of a Hobgoblin nation meaning things may have been resolved peacefully Azaersi and the Blight is stopped/ending in the Fangwood which is pretty good.

Ruins of Azlant, while this doesn't truly affect the Inner Sea Region, colonies are now possible in part of the Isles remaining from Azlant, of course, there is also the SynChrony Device which would be bad in any number of hands.

War for the Crown, well Princess Eutropia claiming the throne could clearly explain Taldor being counted amongst the Shining Kingdoms as she leads the nation into the new world after it stagnated for so long. Of course, it is possible that Cheliax is looking to attack Taldor and an army of free soldiers once under the control of Maxillar Pythareus could lead to some problems.

Tyrant's Grasp has Lastwall gone not long into the Adventure Path with the collapse of Vigil and it doesn't seem like they recover at all. I'm wondering how that one is going to end.

[Note: Moderator added spoiler tags.]


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^Probably would have been good to put those in spoilers, but still, good analysis.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Secrets of Golarion panel seemed to hint that Oprak is indeed a hobgoblin nation, but one that has switched gears from military conquest to instead become a commercial powerhouse, which is no less terrifying in its own way.


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Vorsk, Follower or Erastil wrote:
Secrets of Golarion panel seemed to hint that Oprak is indeed a hobgoblin nation, but one that has switched gears from military conquest to instead become a commercial powerhouse, which is no less terrifying in its own way.

Hobgoblin merchants? ❤❤❤

I hope they're not an evil culture necessarily, at least not to an obvious degree like the orcs of Belkzen... it's not that I don't want bad people in the seats of power (I love to hate House Thrune and its agents), I just can't take monolithically evil cultures seriously, because they're so unlike anything we've ever had irl... and in the case of the various humanoid species, they carry a racist undertone I'm really not comfortable with.


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Roswynn wrote:
Vorsk, Follower or Erastil wrote:
Secrets of Golarion panel seemed to hint that Oprak is indeed a hobgoblin nation, but one that has switched gears from military conquest to instead become a commercial powerhouse, which is no less terrifying in its own way.

Hobgoblin merchants? ❤❤❤

I hope they're not an evil culture necessarily, at least not to an obvious degree like the orcs of Belkzen... it's not that I don't want bad people in the seats of power (I love to hate House Thrune and its agents), I just can't take monolithically evil cultures seriously, because they're so unlike anything we've ever had irl... and in the case of the various humanoid species, they carry a racist undertone I'm really not comfortable with.

I've long throught that hobgoblins could be an industrial superpower if they just got over the whole "We're evil monsters who only fight!" thing. They've got strong organizational skills and talents with alchemy and engineering. Those are all great for industry. It's also kind of odd that such an organized group didn't have an actual nation in the Inner Sea Region. Where are they organizing these armies, under stumps?

They probably will have shakey relations with their neighbors, who won't be happy with the remnants of a conquering army setting up shop. And the racist reaction to them being hobgoblins at that. Looks like they're mostly taking land from Molthune. They're also really near Kragodan, which will not sit well with the dwarves. Plus they'll likely be big competitors with dwarven industry. Will you buy Kragodan steel, or Oprak steel? Both will probably be top quality.

And yeah, the whole "Aways evil" thing does have all sorts of unfortunate implications. It could be that Oprak is founded by the less militant and evil hobs. Possibly the supply companies who were left behind when their invasion stalled out. That would possibly justify a country alignment of LN, although likely with some solid evil tendencies.


Doktor Weasel wrote:

I've long throught that hobgoblins could be an industrial superpower if they just got over the whole "We're evil monsters who only fight!" thing. They've got strong organizational skills and talents with alchemy and engineering. Those are all great for industry. It's also kind of odd that such an organized group didn't have an actual nation in the Inner Sea Region. Where are they organizing these armies, under stumps?

They probably will have shakey relations with their neighbors, who won't be happy with the remnants of a conquering army setting up shop. And the racist reaction to them being hobgoblins at that. Looks like they're mostly taking land from Molthune. They're also really near Kragodan, which will not sit well with the dwarves. Plus they'll likely be big competitors with dwarven industry. Will you buy Kragodan steel, or Oprak steel? Both will probably be top quality.

And yeah, the whole "Aways evil" thing does have all sorts of unfortunate implications. It could be that Oprak is founded by the less militant and evil hobs. Possibly the supply companies who were left behind when their invasion stalled out. That would possibly justify a country alignment of LN, although likely with some solid evil tendencies.

I like your ideas, Herr Doktor, you have good instincts. As for why they didn't have a country until recently, I think it's because they're not as many and as prolific (and as historically successful) as orcs, and quite simply they've been beaten in other occasions (the Goblinblood Wars saw lots of hobs and gobs against Isger, if you recall, but at great costs Isger won, iirc with help from mighty Cheliax).

I also think the hobs quite certainly have at least 1 little militocracy in the River Kingdoms.

As for "where do they organize their armies from", mainly in the forests and Shadowlands of Isger, and inside the Molthuni army too, judging from Ironfang Invasion.


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I’m just going to quote my man Davos right now, “If he commands you to burn children your lord is evil!”

Even Melisandre could come up with a retort to that besides I can think of a few countries in this game that definitely count as evil. Cheliax and Nidal right off the bat.


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Isn't there already a hobgoblin nation thing in Tian Xia? Guess this'll be Electric Boogaloo! I guess it'll still be interesting to have it somewhere where campaigns actually take place but the novelty factor is weak. I think this has even been done in other campaign settings for the same reason.

Paizo Employee Developer

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Folks, if you're looking to discuss cultures and their inherent evil or lack thereof, it's probably best to take it to a new thread.

Silver Crusade

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Vorsk, Follower or Erastil wrote:
Secrets of Golarion panel seemed to hint that Oprak is indeed a hobgoblin nation, but one that has switched gears from military conquest to instead become a commercial powerhouse, which is no less terrifying in its own way.

Ferengi :)


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber
thejeff wrote:

I've often toyed with running something in a setting where the gods played that kind of role, rather than the more typical fantasy RPG role. Where the sun was actually the Sun-god's chariot rather than the sun god just sort representing abstract sun-ness.

Max Gladstone's Craft Sequence plays with this: Mortal wizards have risen up and slain the gods, only to discover someone has to keep the world running. In one city, they have to keep up the old sacrifices to sustain enough power to keep the rains coming and the city from perishing in drought.

In Godbound (an OSR-style ttrpg), a similar story plays out; mortals attack heaven, to find the Creator missing from the throne. They've driven the few remaining angels to hide in hell, and the damage from the fighting and lack of angelic maintenance causes issues with the celestial machinery that keeps the material plane functioning. So mortals take pieces of Heaven to create their own 'Made Gods' to champion the beliefs of/enforce the morality of their own nations or organizations. Wars between the Made Gods' nations break out... Shocking no one, this nearly destroys the world.

Some time later, normal people occasionally find themselves connected to a piece of the Divine; they gain power from the Divine Words this grants them, and start gathering a cult of worshipers. They are the Godbound, and are humanity's last real hope for saving the world as it falls apart. It sounds like a pretty neat game.


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Danubus wrote:
Vorsk, Follower or Erastil wrote:
Secrets of Golarion panel seemed to hint that Oprak is indeed a hobgoblin nation, but one that has switched gears from military conquest to instead become a commercial powerhouse, which is no less terrifying in its own way.
Ferengi :)

Shouldn't Ferengi be Goblins (rather than Hobgoblins) that have gone mercantile?

Dave Skidmore wrote:
thejeff wrote:

I've often toyed with running something in a setting where the gods played that kind of role, rather than the more typical fantasy RPG role. Where the sun was actually the Sun-god's chariot rather than the sun god just sort representing abstract sun-ness.

Max Gladstone's Craft Sequence plays with this: Mortal wizards have risen up and slain the gods, only to discover someone has to keep the world running. In one city, they have to keep up the old sacrifices to sustain enough power to keep the rains coming and the city from perishing in drought.

In Godbound (an OSR-style ttrpg), a similar story plays out; mortals attack heaven, to find the Creator missing from the throne. They've driven the few remaining angels to hide in hell, and the damage from the fighting and lack of angelic maintenance causes issues with the celestial machinery that keeps the material plane functioning. So mortals take pieces of Heaven to create their own 'Made Gods' to champion the beliefs of/enforce the morality of their own nations or organizations. Wars between the Made Gods' nations break out... Shocking no one, this nearly destroys the world.

Some time later, normal people occasionally find themselves connected to a piece of the Divine; they gain power from the Divine Words this grants them, and start gathering a cult of worshipers. They are the Godbound, and are humanity's last real hope for saving the world as it falls apart. It sounds like a pretty neat game.

Now for a Starfinder sort-of-equivalent (but AP rather than whole separate game): Picture a space station or generation starship sort of like the Idari, but lousier, and ruled by a dystopian government. Rebels finally manage to overthrow the dystopian government, but the dystopian rulers were responsible for keeping the rustbucket running . . . .


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Awright, let's look this puppy over...

Meta-Regions: I like the concept, not because I need it, but because it lets new groups- new GMs, in particular- figure out rough thematic groupings- the parts of the sandbox most likely to be linked to one another.

Now, ONWARD!

Saga Lands: Interesting that we get Kodar Mountains as its own thing. Otherwise, few to no surprises here. "Realm of the Mammoth Lands." Heh.

Old Cheliax: No real shockers here.

Eye of Dread: Oh dear oh dear. Interesting to see Nirmathas and Molthune in here, but I suppose Tyrant's Grasp and the Ironfang Invasion would force both nations to take at least some notice. A bit surprised Razmiran isn't lumped in here, since their faith barges always made them seem more interested in Lake Encarthan than in their neighbors to the east. Oprak, huh? Interestin'.

Broken Lands: Aside from my prior comment about Razmiran, this feels about right- although Galt seems to fit the general vibe a bit better than where it ended up...

Shining Kingdoms: Would someone please tell me why Druma needs to be a thing? Not being flippant, just noting that it's almost criminally under-developed at this point. Prior comment about Galt aside, this makes sense to me.

Absalom: Heh. Fights its way free of the catch-all "High Seas" through sheer thematic force of will ;)

Golden Road: Interesting name. Also like it, though, because of the implied ties to... elsewhere. All roads lead to the Padishash Empire.

Impossible Lands: That's about right.

Mwangi Expanse: HUZZAH for nation-names! Also... Vidrian, huh? Well, considering that Sargava was a name imposed by Cheliax, who they pointedly made themselves independent of, a name change is hardly beyond the pale. Wonder what the new flag looks like...


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Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Cole Deschain wrote:
Would someone please tell me why Druma needs to be a thing? Not being flippant, just noting that it's almost criminally under-developed at this point.

It gets the last Campaign Setting slot of P1e, so maybe that will set it up for more development in 2e.


Hmm so Oprak is *Azaersi’s Nation* the Army of Ironfang supposedly still stands and a nation of Hobs and other monsters now exists. I like it. I wonder if a bunch of Hobs from Isger decided to move North.

Razmiran doesn’t just sent Faith Barges on the lake they send them down the Sellen and technically it’s been more connected to the River Kingdoms since it’s birth.

Galt could be on an upturn that we don’t know about yet, or simply put Taldor could be making a move to solve the chaos on their Northern border. Druma is getting some new info next month and I’m intrigued to read about it because all I know is it’s a bunch of prophet-merchants and that their private army worked with the Eagle Knights and Hellknights to save Isger in the Goblinblood Wars.


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Anxiously waiting for the first blog post from this new series of previews and the tales.

VerBeeker wrote:
Hmm so Oprak is *Azaersi’s Nation* the Army of Ironfang supposedly still stands and a nation of Hobs and other monsters now exists. I like it. I wonder if a bunch of Hobs from Isger decided to move North.

Since the Monster Codex the hobgoblins have become one of my favorite monster races and I was really happy with the Ironfang Invasion AP and the many hobs in it, but obviously none of them could amaze me more them Azaersi. And now you are telling me she is alive and ruling a nation of hobgoblins? *---*


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I just keep wondering if -- as Golarion's technology finally advances -- Oprak is going to host an amazingly popular talk show . . . .


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UnArcaneElection wrote:

I just keep wondering if -- as Golarion's technology finally advances -- Oprak is going to host an amazingly popular talk show . . . .

UnArcaneElection, meet Katina Davis.

Paizo Employee Customer Service Representative

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Removed several posts and the replies to them.

This isn't the thread to discuss real world cultures and whether or not they are evil. If you want to discuss that do so in a thread dedicated to it, let's keep this one on topic. If you do start that topic it may be valuable to consider why we only associate the Aztec with human sacrifice, but associate peoples like the Romans with their social and technological contributions instead of the atrocities they committed.

Shadow Lodge

Michael Sayre wrote:
Seventh Seal wrote:
David knott 242 wrote:
It does look like the "Old Cheliax" region is a bit too small. Andoran, Galt, and Isger are in other regions even though they all split off from Cheliax in the last century.
Umm... Isger is part of the "Old Cheliax" region...
And both Andoran and Galt, while they could fall under the heading "Old Cheliax", are much more strongly defined by their separation from Cheliax and what came next than they are by their association to it.

Molthune and Nirmathas would weep for being ignored, but they're too busy coping with their inevitable conquest-by-lich.

In any event, the more appropriate name for the meta-region is "Greater Cheliax," seeing as how it is not coextensive with "Old Cheliax" as a polity but is more or less coextensive with the modern empire's alliance system (also the northernmost frontier seems to cut Korvosa off from its holdings south of the Storval Rise; what's up with that?).

Also, words cannot express how vindicated I feel at it being confirmed that Ravounel's status is akin to Isger's. Separatism can get in the sea.


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zimmerwald1915 wrote:
Also, words cannot express how vindicated I feel at it being confirmed that Ravounel's status is akin to Isger's. Separatism can get in the sea.

You're right, it was foolish to secede from a fascist country ruled by a noble house dedicated to literally the devil and hell and patrolled by "knights" whose only interests are torturing rebels, eradicating ethnic minorities, and so on. The historical revisionism and chattel slavery are charming as well. What were the Ravens thinking?


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I mean, Ravounel is part of "Old Cheliax" since they have been an independent nation for like 3 years.

From the map, it appears Ravounel is much larger than I thought it was, comprising everything between the Menadior Mountains and the Sea that's not Nidal. It is, at the very least effectively impossible for Cheliax to blockade (if they even had the resources to do so.)

But if we're going to put Galt and Andoran in "Greater Cheliax" I move we put Cheliax itself in "Old Taldor" which is equally accurate.


I believe I already suggested "The Old Empire" since it leaves those distinctions unspoken of, and AFAIK Cheliax just took over most of remaining Empire when Taldor faltered, as all of that was already part of Taldan Empire so it's silly making big deal of distinction.

Hard to say about Ravounel until we see the actual details, it could very well have no plans at merely subsisting as dirty secessionists, the map shown border could merely be provisional and they plan to liberate all of Cheliax.


I mean, aren't Ravounel's main exports grain, silver, and culture? I feel since the last two are effectively luxury goods, you don't want to provoke your big markets.

I mean the plucky little CG nation between two LE powers can't feel two comfortable, even if Nidal will never invade anyone and Cheliax has to tread extremely carefully lest they accidentally dissolve the entire country.

But everybody is going to be primarily concerned with that Lich to the north, so I don't think anybody is going to start unnecessary military action any time soon. As evil as Cheliax is, I'm pretty sure they still ferventpy oppose the apotheosis of the whispering tyrant.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Ravounel also exports a lot of marble and fish - more than they do actual silver, I believe - but I don't think that meaningfully changes your point. :)

Shadow Lodge

MaxAstro wrote:
Ravounel also exports a lot of marble and fish - more than they do actual silver, I believe - but I don't think that meaningfully changes your point. :)

While Ravounel produces marble (and granite, and clay, and probably concrete), it doesn't export them in meaningful quantities. It does transship black marble and gold from Arcadia, or did, before that traffic was shifted to Corentyn by government decree.

Headcanon is that it exports textiles (native wool and linen, and Arcadian and Garundi cotton; spun, half-finished, and finished goods) and timber byproducts (charcoal, pitch) too. But as you say, that doesn't meaningfully change anything. In fact, the greater the export share of the economy, the more illusory independence is, since maintaining an export trade necessarily means retaining access to your export market. Opening export markets in a stronger nation as a weaker nation means subordinating your nation politically by joining a political or tariff union; opening export markets in a weaker nation as the stronger nation means economic conquest or imperialism.

Ravounel doesn't have the strength to compel Cheliax to open its tariff wall (which it surely has - it's a Lawful empire that relies heavily on patronage), either to imports from Ravounel or to imports generally. That means that it has two policies open to it: 1) maintain itself within Cheliax's tariff system in the name of preserving its existing export market and thereby subordinate itself politically to Cheliax or 2) adopt a free trade policy and attempt to conquer new markets. If it opts for the latter, it is likely to find these new markets either by reestablishing semi-colonial relationships with Korvosa and/or Sargava (which may not exist anymore as it's not named on the map), by reconquering Anchor's End economically, by resettling Canorate, or by joining the Scramble for Azlant kicked off by Andoran.

Shadow Lodge

Roswynn wrote:
You're right, it was foolish to secede from a fascist country ruled by a noble house dedicated to literally the devil and hell and patrolled by "knights" whose only interests are torturing rebels, eradicating ethnic minorities, and so on. The historical revisionism and chattel slavery are charming as well. What were the Ravens thinking?

Not only was it foolish to leave the regime unchallenged on its home ground, since that means reconquest in some form is only a matter of time, "screw you, got mine" is also a morally repugnant attitude.

Liberty's Edge

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Now wait just a bloody minute, are you hinting that the Tales line has officially been announced as returning for new soft-cover fiction and I somehow overlooked it?!

Is it possible to setup a Tale Subscription like one does for other product lines? If so, where, how and when will I be able to do this?

Even if the books only release to subscribers and you push out another 5000 total copies in excess of KNOWN demand, jack the price up to $17.99 per softcover, and only include front-cover art instead of wraparound to save on costs let me be clear- I will buy it.

RPG Fiction is what got me into RPGs as a child, not TV, not Players Handbooks, not MtG, and certainly not the usenet groups that existed back in the day, it was those cheap paperback TSR novels and I want to PAY you to bring those days back.

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