Bard Class Preview

Monday, July 16, 2018

The bard—it's arguably the most iconic support character. For some reason, bards are often the butt of goofy jokes, even though they're powerful force multipliers who can contribute to just about every aspect of play. Bard is one of my favorite classes in Pathfinder, and it has some of the most exciting changes of any of the classes in the Pathfinder Playtest, but I'm going to start you with a big one first. Are you sitting down yet? OK, good:

Bards are full 10-level spellcasters.

Spellcasting

As before, bards are spontaneous spellcasters who make up for having not quite as many spells as the other spontaneous caster, the sorcerer, by having special bardic performances. But this time around, bards don't have a delayed spellcasting progression. Instead, they have one fewer spell in their repertoire and one fewer spell slot per day at each spell level, compared to the sorcerer. That's pretty awesome already, but here's the even cooler part: bards have collected all sorts of esoteric bardic knowledge since forever, right? With an offbeat spell list that combines mental magic, a handful of unique additions, and a little bit of healing, bards are the primary occult spellcasters, blending mental and spiritual essences. That brings bards, whose spell list has grown with far less than that of wizards, to the forefront among the other primary spellcasters. This has given us the opportunity to create a bunch of cool never-before-seen bard spells for the playtest. Also, as I mentioned in the spells blog, bards can replace the Somatic Casting and Verbal Casting components of spellcasting by playing a musical instrument, in case you want a bard who plays the violin to cast his spells! But what about their performances? How do those come into play?

Compositions

Compositions are a special type of spell that only bards gain. You might be thinking these are probably powers like other classes, right? Not so! In exchange for their slightly lower number of spells bards get, most of their compositions are cantrips, usable at will, meaning you no longer need to worry about running out of bardic performance rounds per day. Not only that, they're often cast with a single action. They start out with a composition that will likely look familiar.

Inspire Courage Cantrip

Cantrip, Composition, Emotion, Enchantment, Mental
Casting [[A]] Verbal Casting
Area 60-foot aura
Duration 1 round

You inspire your allies with words or tunes of encouragement. You and all allies in the aura gain a +1 conditional bonus to attack rolls, damage rolls, and saves against fear.

Usually, a bard can cast only one composition per turn and have only one active at a time.

Bards have powers and Spell Points in addition to their compositions. Many bard powers allow you to manipulate and customize your performances as you desire, including increasing the duration, granting a more significant bonus (an extremely powerful benefit), or having multiple compositions active at a time. Typically, these extra benefits require a successful Performance check to activate and provide an even more powerful effect on a critical success. Take for example, lingering composition.

Illustration by Wayne Reynolds

Lingering Composition Power 1

Enchantment, Power
Casting [[F]] Verbal Casting; Trigger You finish casting a cantrip composition with a duration of 1 round.

You attempt to add a flourish to your composition to extend its benefits. Attempt a Performance check. The DC is usually a high-difficulty DC of a level equal to the highest-level target of your composition, but the GM can assign a different DC based on the circumstances. The effect depends on the result of your check.

Success The composition lasts 2 rounds.
Critical Success The composition lasts 3 rounds.
Failure The composition lasts 1 round.

But altering your performances with special modifications like this is just one of several paths represented by a new bardic class feature…

Muses

A bard's inspiration comes from a unique place—his muse. There are three muses in the Pathfinder Playtest. The first is maestro, focused on powers that alter compositions. Next is lore, focused on Occultism, willpower, and unusual knowledge. The third is polymath, focused on being a jack of all trades with increased skills and ability to handle unexpected situations, including the ability to keep a spellbook to prepare a small number of new spells to add to your repertoire each day. As befits the individualistic nature of a performer's muse, none of the initial muse abilities are exclusive, so you can use your feats to traverse as deeply as you want into the abilities from each path; your muse merely represents a starting point on your bardic journey.

For example, if you select the maestro muse at 1st level, you gain the Lingering Composition bard feat (granting you the lingering composition power detailed above) and add soothe to your spell repertoire, but any bard can take this feat or learn this spell—selecting the maestro muse just grants them as a default.

Bard Features

As a bard, you gain spellcasting and occult spell proficiency at the same levels as the other spellcasters, new spell levels at every odd level except 19, expert proficiency in occult spells at 12th level, master proficiency at 16th level, and legendary proficiency at 19th level. You also have the most trained skills at 1st level except for rogues, just barely edging out rangers. Finally, you begin play at 1st level with two compositions, the inspire courage cantrip (which has been detailed above) and the counter performance power.

Counter Performance Power 1

Composition, Enchantment, Fortune, Mental, Power
Casting [[R]] Verbal Casting or [[R]] Somatic Casting; Trigger You or an ally within 60 feet must roll a saving throw against an auditory or visual effect.
Area 60-foot aura

You protect yourself and allies through performance. Choose an auditory performance if the trigger was auditory or a visual performance if it was visual, then roll a Performance check for the chosen performance. You and allies in the area can use the higher result of your Performance check or their saving throws.

Since you need to use only a reaction to cast counter performance, rather than needing to activate it ahead of time like in Pathfinder First Edition, creatures that rely on visual or auditory effects will have a really hard time messing with you!

Bard Feats

Bard feats tend to fall in two categories: feats associated that are loosely associated with one of the three muses, and those that grant you a new composition.

For instance, the Cantrip Expansion feat at 4th level allows you to add two cantrips from the occult spell list to your spell repertoire, which can come in handy for those bards with the lore or the polymath muses. The powerful 14th-level Allegro feat, on the other hand, grants you the following cantrip to add a spring to an ally's step.

Allegro Cantrip

Cantrip, Composition, Emotion, Enchantment, Mental
Casting [[A]] Verbal Casting
Range 30 feet; Targets one ally
Duration 1 round

You perform rapidly, speeding your ally. The ally is quick and can use the action to Strike, Stride, or Step.

There's plenty of favorites in there from among bardic masterpieces from Ultimate Magic too, like house of imaginary walls, which Cosmo used with his goblin bard to mime a box around my ranger, trapping me with a dangerous enemy while Cosmo remained safe and sound.

In a nutshell, bards now have a vast number of quality-of-life improvements, while fundamentally staying true to the way they worked before. Fellow bard fans, what do you think?

Mark Seifter
Designer

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Tags: Pathfinder Playtest Wayne Reynolds
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Un-Bear-able Puns wrote:
The Sideromancer wrote:
Brock Landers wrote:
Ever since 1st Ed AD&D the Druid has had some good blasting spells, better than the cleric. The balance lies with not letting it get out of control, like in 3rd Ed (Wild Shape casting feat, etc). A spellslinging bear, with a buffed bear sidekick, and summons more bears, can get unwieldy.

I think you mean unbearable. But thanks for laying your thoughts bear. I hope you'll continue to bear with us.

Edit: and ninja'd.

Oh those puns where grizzly. the worst part is you were making them without me.

Support the right to bear arms!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
graystone wrote:
Un-Bear-able Puns wrote:
The Sideromancer wrote:
Brock Landers wrote:
Ever since 1st Ed AD&D the Druid has had some good blasting spells, better than the cleric. The balance lies with not letting it get out of control, like in 3rd Ed (Wild Shape casting feat, etc). A spellslinging bear, with a buffed bear sidekick, and summons more bears, can get unwieldy.

I think you mean unbearable. But thanks for laying your thoughts bear. I hope you'll continue to bear with us.

Edit: and ninja'd.

Oh those puns where grizzly. the worst part is you were making them without me.
Support the right to bear arms!

You can't have my arms! I need them. they are a bear necessity.


Un-Bear-able Puns wrote:
graystone wrote:
Un-Bear-able Puns wrote:
The Sideromancer wrote:
Brock Landers wrote:
Ever since 1st Ed AD&D the Druid has had some good blasting spells, better than the cleric. The balance lies with not letting it get out of control, like in 3rd Ed (Wild Shape casting feat, etc). A spellslinging bear, with a buffed bear sidekick, and summons more bears, can get unwieldy.

I think you mean unbearable. But thanks for laying your thoughts bear. I hope you'll continue to bear with us.

Edit: and ninja'd.

Oh those puns where grizzly. the worst part is you were making them without me.
Support the right to bear arms!
You can't have my arms! I need them. they are a bear necessity.

Am I being bar-BEAR-ic?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
graystone wrote:
Un-Bear-able Puns wrote:
graystone wrote:
Un-Bear-able Puns wrote:
The Sideromancer wrote:
Brock Landers wrote:
Ever since 1st Ed AD&D the Druid has had some good blasting spells, better than the cleric. The balance lies with not letting it get out of control, like in 3rd Ed (Wild Shape casting feat, etc). A spellslinging bear, with a buffed bear sidekick, and summons more bears, can get unwieldy.

I think you mean unbearable. But thanks for laying your thoughts bear. I hope you'll continue to bear with us.

Edit: and ninja'd.

Oh those puns where grizzly. the worst part is you were making them without me.
Support the right to bear arms!
You can't have my arms! I need them. they are a bear necessity.
Am I being bar-BEAR-ic?

If you want some Fur-roscios bear claws you will need to wait in line at the bakery.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I missed, upthread, the topic of Spontaneous non-sorcerer casters, so for what it's worth, I feel like what we've seen with the bard makes it fairly clear at least my expectations for the oracle:

The sorcerer is the master of spontaneous casting, of any list. Their class feats will be far more casting focused, and if you're playing an arcane, divine, primal or occult sorcerer, you're essentially sitting down to play a full time spontaneous caster, with maybe a few extra tricks based on bloodline.

All other spontaneous casters are going to be 3-slots-per-level, and while they will have some abilities that improve their casting, they're defined by what they do that's not casting. For an oracle, I think this means that we'll get curses to be a far greater aspect of the character, that may even fill double duty with revelations. A blackened oracle is an oracle of flame, a haunted oracle is and oracle of bones, ect, and while, like the bard, they're probably not limited to their curse, like the druid previewed, they probably get some decent incentive to go that route.


Brock Landers wrote:
Excaliburproxy wrote:
That said, I also like the design space of a completely mundane/martial leadery class (as I have discussed elsewhere).
The best implementation of that is the Noble class for d20 Star Wars Saga Edition, I find it vastly superior to the Marshal and Warlord of 3rd and 4th Ed, respectively.

I'm looking at it and what does it do? It seems like its just a generic 3E fighter.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Tholomyes wrote:
For an oracle, I think this means that we'll get curses to be a far greater aspect of the character, that may even fill double duty with revelations. A blackened oracle is an oracle of flame, a haunted oracle is and oracle of bones, ect, and while, like the bard, they're probably not limited to their curse, like the druid previewed, they probably get some decent incentive to go that route.

Really hope you're not correct about the curse being mystery specific. It's possible, as we see with barbarians, but I think that would ultimately be limiting, since every time they wanted to create a new mystery they'd also need to either create a new curse or reuse an old one, which would weaken the very concept your proposal would push.

For that matter, I hope they ultimately let us pick our barbarian anathema, in order to mix and match and really customize our character concept there. And even further, I hope they create new bloodlines that use the same spells and powers, but different spell lists. Don't even get me started on paladins. But all that is an argument for another thread.

All that said, I do agree that when they roll out spont casters, you're probably right that new ones will have fewer spells than sorcerers, but more abilities.


What crap, where have all the interesting posts gone?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Excaliburproxy wrote:
Cole Deschain wrote:
*lights a candle to the idea of somehow getting a spell-free bard*
Maybe people will be able to do "spell-less bards" through feat-based multiclassing? I'd really dig building something like a rogue or barbarian (*cough*skald*cough*) and being able to get the inspire courage cantrip (and be otherwise spell-free).

I want someone who has Bardic Performance, access to whatever form Masterpieces end up taking, but DOESN'T pack an array of discrete spells.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

What do you mean by bardic performance here? Are you specifically okay with the cantrip/power method they picked, or would you rather something else?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Cole seemed to only be complaining about the discrete spells (like Magic Missile and such)...

Cole Deschain wrote:
I want someone who has Bardic Performance, access to whatever form Masterpieces end up taking, but DOESN'T pack an array of discrete spells.

Personally I think your best bet there will be to hope that a Minstrel Archetype grants Compositions, or that Rogues have some way to learn them.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Cantriped wrote:
Cole seemed to only be complaining about the discrete spells (like Magic Missile and such)...

Correct.

I want a bards whose music can coax tears from a stone, but who don't necessarily cast actual spells as they're presented in-game.


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Cole Deschain wrote:
Cantriped wrote:
Cole seemed to only be complaining about the discrete spells (like Magic Missile and such)...

Correct.

I want a bards whose music can coax tears from a stone, but who don't necessarily cast actual spells as they're presented in-game.

While I really like the music officially being magic and the same thing as spellcasting now, I think that, once we found out the class feat/etc. progression system we can cross reference bard, rogue, and maybe fighter to work out what is being subbed for spellcasting. Then you sub in whatever the rogue would get instead, re-label the signature bardic cantrips as "totally not magic", and then you'd have a rough spell-less bard ready to go for home games.

This does depend on progression being as standardised as it looks though, and as a bard is getting said cantrips in exchange for less slots and spells so you might need to work out what to axe in order to make room for them.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Okay, then yes. I don't think any class with magic is going to avoid spells entirely, but I think it is quite likely we will get a class that is all cantrips and powers like the kineticist, and not a single spell slot. An alternate version of the bard might fit in with it well. Maybe give the class a way to further interact with their spell points, like the grit/panache mechanics in PF1?

Anyways here's hoping you get your wish, Cole.

Elleth wrote:
While I really like the music officially being magic and the same thing as spellcasting now, I think that, once we found out the class feat/etc. progression system we can cross reference bard, rogue, and maybe fighter to work out what is being subbed for spellcasting. Then you sub in whatever the rogue would get instead, re-label the signature bardic cantrips as "totally not magic", and then you'd have a rough spell-less bard ready to go for home games.

I think they mostly get skill feats. LOTS of skill feats.


AnimatedPaper wrote:

Okay, then yes. I don't think any class with magic is going to avoid spells entirely, but I think it is quite likely we will get a class that is all cantrips and powers like the kineticist, and not a single spell slot. An alternate version of the bard might fit in with it well. Maybe give the class a way to further interact with their spell points, like the grit/panache mechanics in PF1?

Anyways here's hoping you get your wish, Cole.

Elleth wrote:
While I really like the music officially being magic and the same thing as spellcasting now, I think that, once we found out the class feat/etc. progression system we can cross reference bard, rogue, and maybe fighter to work out what is being subbed for spellcasting. Then you sub in whatever the rogue would get instead, re-label the signature bardic cantrips as "totally not magic", and then you'd have a rough spell-less bard ready to go for home games.
I think they mostly get skill feats. LOTS of skill feats.

Yeah. Also skill ranks. The real trick is going to be to work out how many of the bard powers are against that "class budget". I suggest comparing fighter because it makes a good 3rd comparison.


MadScientistWorking wrote:
Brock Landers wrote:
Excaliburproxy wrote:
That said, I also like the design space of a completely mundane/martial leadery class (as I have discussed elsewhere).
The best implementation of that is the Noble class for d20 Star Wars Saga Edition, I find it vastly superior to the Marshal and Warlord of 3rd and 4th Ed, respectively.
I'm looking at it and what does it do? It seems like its just a generic 3E fighter.

The Envoy in starfinder is a good example- they inspire and motivate and demoralise people without using magic, giving their allies bonuses to hit designated targets, extra move actions and restoring stamina points while applying status effects to opponents. It's basically a nonmagical bard and is surprisingly fun without the magic (but works better in a Sci-Fi or modern setting)

Shadow Lodge

It seems weird that the Bard is getting a ton of auto-scaling spells when that same thing was deemed too powerful for a sorcerer. Guess we gotta let the Wizard shine still, eh?


Dragonborn3 wrote:
It seems weird that the Bard is getting a ton of auto-scaling spells when that same thing was deemed too powerful for a sorcerer. Guess we gotta let the Wizard shine still, eh?

... Huh? You mean the stronger cantrips? Inspire Courage, our example, doesn’t scale. It’s just strong because you’re getting it as a feature, part of replacing a spell per level. The other ones (some of which will scale, I’m sure) require class feats. ... huh, just noticed Bard doesn’t seem to get something to spend spell points on. Sorc’s powers auto-scale too, but are limited use.

Or do you mean one of the muses providing additional heightened spell(s) if you spend a class feat? I’d be cool with Sorc getting that kind of option, and I think Mark was at least looking at something like that?

Shadow Lodge

Hmm. I misread something. Never mind.


QuidEst wrote:
Dragonborn3 wrote:
It seems weird that the Bard is getting a ton of auto-scaling spells when that same thing was deemed too powerful for a sorcerer. Guess we gotta let the Wizard shine still, eh?

... Huh? You mean the stronger cantrips? Inspire Courage, our example, doesn’t scale. It’s just strong because you’re getting it as a feature, part of replacing a spell per level. The other ones (some of which will scale, I’m sure) require class feats. ... huh, just noticed Bard doesn’t seem to get something to spend spell points on. Sorc’s powers auto-scale too, but are limited use.

Or do you mean one of the muses providing additional heightened spell(s) if you spend a class feat? I’d be cool with Sorc getting that kind of option, and I think Mark was at least looking at something like that?

Focusing Emphasis mine

I think the default for Powers (which Counter Performance and some other Compositions are stated to be) is that they cost a Spell Point to use unless otherwise stated.


I believe Mark mentioned spell point usage on know direction, including something which kills anything up to and including an ancient black dragon with no save that costs 2 spell points. (20th level ability, but still.)


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Captain Morgan wrote:
I believe Mark mentioned spell point usage on know direction, including something which kills anything up to and including an ancient black dragon with no save that costs 2 spell points. (20th level ability, but still.)

Any idea what this ability is? I feel like embracing the rampant demise of my high-end monsters.


Elleth wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
I believe Mark mentioned spell point usage on know direction, including something which kills anything up to and including an ancient black dragon with no save that costs 2 spell points. (20th level ability, but still.)
Any idea what this ability is? I feel like embracing the rampant demise of my high-end monsters.

It was called Final Arpeggio or something in that vein. There isn't an easy way for me to verify at the moment, though I think Mark may have mentioned it somewhere in the thread.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Captain Morgan wrote:
Elleth wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
I believe Mark mentioned spell point usage on know direction, including something which kills anything up to and including an ancient black dragon with no save that costs 2 spell points. (20th level ability, but still.)
Any idea what this ability is? I feel like embracing the rampant demise of my high-end monsters.
It was called Final Arpeggio or something in that vein. There isn't an easy way for me to verify at the moment, though I think Mark may have mentioned it somewhere in the thread.

Oh god, I think it was called Fatal Aria or something.

Yay horrifying Bard Powers. Yay.


That sounds right, yeah. It seems like you're really going to be able to kick folks with a look this time around.

Shadow Lodge

Both of those names sound great.

Paizo Employee Designer

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It's a terrifying ability also because it's only a single action. However, it's fair to say that by the time you get it, an Ancient Black isn't going to be the BBEG any more.


Mark Seifter wrote:
It's a terrifying ability also because it's only a single action. However, it's fair to say that by the time you get it, an Ancient Black isn't going to be the BBEG any more.

Hopefully I can avoid making such things disposable bosses up until that point this time.

Paizo Employee Designer

Elleth wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
It's a terrifying ability also because it's only a single action. However, it's fair to say that by the time you get it, an Ancient Black isn't going to be the BBEG any more.
Hopefully I can avoid making such things disposable bosses up until that point this time.

I'm not sure I follow. Do you mean you were using CR 15-16 dragons as BBEGs for level 20 characters in PF1?


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Verbal component: “Then perish.”

Paizo Employee Designer

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"It isn't over until the valkyrie sings..."


Mark Seifter wrote:
Elleth wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
It's a terrifying ability also because it's only a single action. However, it's fair to say that by the time you get it, an Ancient Black isn't going to be the BBEG any more.
Hopefully I can avoid making such things disposable bosses up until that point this time.
I'm not sure I follow. Do you mean you were using CR 15-16 dragons as BBEGs for level 20 characters in PF1?

Oh sorry. I'm more poking fun at myself for how I run 5e, where it's easier to pull hideously unbalanced encounters because with enough prep time or allies any fight is a fair fight, to the point where I've started considering such monsters disposable.

I.e. I eyeballed the maths and threw a CR 16 monster against my players when they were level 4, a CR 23 with a high damage aura against my players when they were level 6, and a cognitively impaired low AC CR 20 dragon against my players when they were level 11. I have a really tough fight to prepare for next session where the Barbarian wants to fight the BBEG in single combat, and I'm hoping it turns out fun.

I think from what we've seen of the scaling of PF2 I won't be able to get away with this, but the new action economy should give me more ways to play with interesting fights.

Paizo Employee Designer

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Elleth wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
Elleth wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
It's a terrifying ability also because it's only a single action. However, it's fair to say that by the time you get it, an Ancient Black isn't going to be the BBEG any more.
Hopefully I can avoid making such things disposable bosses up until that point this time.
I'm not sure I follow. Do you mean you were using CR 15-16 dragons as BBEGs for level 20 characters in PF1?

Oh sorry. I'm more poking fun at myself for how I run 5e, where it's easier to pull hideously unbalanced encounters because with enough prep time or allies any fight is a fair fight, to the point where I've started considering such monsters disposable.

I.e. I eyeballed the maths and threw a CR 16 monster against my players when they were level 4, a CR 23 with a high damage aura against my players when they were level 6, and a cognitively impaired low AC CR 20 dragon against my players when they were level 11. I have a really tough fight to prepare for next session where the Barbarian wants to fight the BBEG in single combat, and I'm hoping it turns out fun.

I think from what we've seen of the scaling of PF2 I won't be able to get away with this, but the new action economy should give me more ways to play with interesting fights.

Ah, so the reverse situation with extremely big foes at very low levels. That's always an easier one to pull off (with resources as you suggest) than a much weaker foe than the PCs as a satisfying BBEG fight. You are right that 5e allows you to go much farther outside the PCs' level range than PF1 and PF2 do.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Yeah that's one of the stylistic differences between the editions. Because proficiency creeps up so slowly in 5E, monsters are a threat for a loooong time, and conversely, you are a threat to monsters that would eat you unsalted in PF.

For the ease of adapting PF1 material to PF2 alone, I'm pretty glad PF didnt follow the same route, but I also prefer that style.


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AnimatedPaper wrote:

Yeah that's one of the stylistic differences between the editions. Because proficiency creeps up so slowly in 5E, monsters are a threat for a loooong time, and conversely, you are a threat to monsters that would eat you unsalted in PF.

For the ease of adapting PF1 material to PF2 alone, I'm pretty glad PF didnt follow the same route, but I also prefer that style.

I think I'm going to like how PF2 does it more. In 5e while I didn't expect it, the world's power level ended up higher than the monster manual made me expect. By this point the system is almost broken over my knee and if my PCs survive they will basically be demigods, so I'm happy that PF2 is going to possibly be nastier there.


This looks interesting.


Only another day and we get the PDFs. The bard is one of my favorite classes and I am excited to get to play test one. My first character creation will be a half-elf gladiator bard I think polymath muse. Until I get to see the full text I can't be sure.


Berselius wrote:
Hoping we get options for a dancer-type bard who works without an instrument.

I'm still hoping for a mime. The idea that performers must make noise (and cannot use non-vocalized spells) is pretty silly.


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Makarion wrote:
Berselius wrote:
Hoping we get options for a dancer-type bard who works without an instrument.
I'm still hoping for a mime. The idea that performers must make noise (and cannot use non-vocalized spells) is pretty silly.

Even the fundamental laws of the multiverse hate mimes.


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If I remember correctly, one of the developers described a bard spell where the bard trapped a character in a box created by a mime building a box.

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