Meet the Iconics: Navasi

Monday, May 1, 2017

The countdown to Starfinder has officially begun, and to kick us off, we're highlighting the iconic characters and core classes that appear throughout the pages and covers the Starfinder line. Today we meet Navasi, the iconic envoy!

Illustration by Remko Troost

Born into a prominent family on Absalom Station, the envoy who calls herself Navasi spent much of her childhood avoiding her parents in their "sky-villa," as they called their sprawling, six-story home in the Nyori Palisades. Navasi's mother had designs on her canny-but-headstrong daughter inheriting the family's business. Her father had visions of a queenly young woman sitting in silk among the station's most prominent socialites.

Navasi wanted neither. A quip on her lips, she eschewed glitzy playdates and family soirees in favor of zipping through Absalom Station's streets with her best friends, the children of the household employees. She'd take the rush of riding a screaming hovercycle over the pompous sniggering of the wealthy any day of the week.

As she befriended more and more stationers from less-privileged walks of life, Navasi's irritation with her parents and their deliberate aloofness from the rest of society turned into outright disgust. The inequities of Absalom Station, where the rich lived in fortified enclaves and the poor lived in little more than metal boxes, pained her. Simply giving away her pocket money didn't seem like enough. She began to dream of a fairy-tale life in which she could steal the affluent's unearned wealth and give it to those truly in need, and idolized the Free Captains of the Diaspora—pirates living by their own rules. Navasi could only imagine the fun she'd have with such freedom—and the good she'd do, of course.

On the eve of her eighteenth birthday, Navasi sat in her plush quarters, staring at the gold-fibered holo-gown that was to be her debut dress. Two choices stood before her. She could don that false uniform, attend the gala, and accept her mother's gift of an executive position in the family company. Or she could leave.

It took less than an hour for Navasi to slip out of the manor and stow away onto a ship bound for the Diaspora.

Navasi arrived on Broken Rock with a pocketful of stolen credsticks and a gleam in her eye. She quickly signed up as a "procurement specialist" with a contracting firm called the Sixth Finger—little more than a starfaring thieves' guild—ready to use her new position to steal from exploitative corporations and make herself a hero to those in need.

The reality of life in a pirate enclave hit her like a meteorite. Having quickly blown through her money, and too stubborn to return home in shame, Navasi found she no longer had a choice in which jobs she took. Under the guildrunners' threats, she roughed up innocents, stole from the less fortunate, and worse. Though she never completely lost her egalitarian beliefs, she hardly recognized the naïve idealist she'd once been. A few years in the streets showed her how much of her former life she'd taken for granted, and taught her that if she wanted to take care of others, she first needed to take care of herself. That, at least, she was good at, and she quickly gained a reputation in the gang as the best fast-talker and facewoman around, spinning bold plans and quick wits into fat paydays.

Now a jaded young woman, Navasi found that the wealth from her scores brought little joy without friends to share it with, and she took comfort in the hardscrabble survivalists and secretly softhearted rogues she recruited to her crews. Yet it was in one particular woman that Navasi truly found herself again. Purple-haired and tattooed, with eyes like blue supergiants, the newcomer was outspoken against those in power. She bucked the pirates' authority and operated alone, pulling the sorts of righteous jobs Navasi had once dreamed of. She was the bravest, most exciting woman Navasi had ever met, and despite Navasi's continuing allegiance to the Sixth Finger, the two quickly became inseparable.

That all came crashing down the day the Sixth Finger arranged to knock over a medship full of supplies bound for Absalom Station. To the gang's leaders, the ship's mission—aiding refugees of a wartorn star system—was inconsequential compared to the valuable drugs in its cargo bays. Navasi's objections were overruled.

It was the final straw. Together, Navasi and her partner formulated a plan, alerting the medship to the imminent heist and carefully sabotaging the fighters the gang had designated for the assault. It all might have gone unnoticed, had the gang's resident technomancer not decided to check the security cams one final time. In the ensuing ambush, Navasi and her partner were pinned down, their backs to the sole spaceworthy ship—a single-seat fighter with only enough life support for one of them. Unwilling to leave her companion, Navasi prepared for them to go out in a blaze of glory—only to have her partner shove her into the cockpit and slam the canopy. As Navasi scrabbled with the latch, the other woman winked, pulled the pins on her grenades, and sprinted straight at their ambushers.

The wealthy scion of Absalom Station died that day, as did the pirate she'd become. As she made her way back to Absalom Station with the medship, knowing that neither the Sixth Finger nor her spurned family would ever stop looking for her, she forsook both of her previous incarnations. Abandoning her old identity, she took the name of her fallen love—Navasi—and swore that henceforth she'd carry on the fight they'd started together, only stealing from those who deserved it, putting her finger in the eye of anyone who thrived on exploitation, regardless of which side of the law they were on. Knowing she'd need a new appearance as well, she continued borrowing from her partner, dyeing her jet-black hair purple and adding a single blue contact. Yet when she considered mimicking the original Navasi's tattoos, she was shocked to learn that they were symbols of Weydan, the god of discovery and equality, famous for taking mortal form. Though her partner had never spoken of religion, Navasi took it as a sign, and even holds out some hope that perhaps her companion might have been more than she seemed, though she recognizes that such thoughts are probably just a manifestation of her grief.

Today, Navasi has built a reputation—perhaps more than is truly wise for a woman with a price on her head—as a talented freelance captain, putting together crews for adventures ranging from planetary scouting and private security to her old talent for "procurement," though she's careful about what sorts of jobs she and her friends take on. Navasi still believes in freedom for all, spreading the wealth, and taking plutocrats down a peg—but she also knows the value of earning credits, and takes pride in the ability to take care of herself and her crew (though she still has a sometimes inconvenient tendency to empty her pockets for those in need). As a scoundrel, a fast-talker, and a brilliant negotiator, Navasi is happiest when the chips are down and lives hang in the balance, as that's when you truly know who your friends are. Above all, she knows to always look beneath the surface, for like Navasi herself, nothing is ever quite what it seems.

Amanda Hamon Kunz
Developer

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Dark Archive

It is a trope in stories for someone to die and the surviver to emulate the person in someway. Zack and Cloud from Final Fantasy 7 is the a story that comes to mind that has that trope in it.


CKent83 wrote:

Does anyone else think it's a little weird that Navasi kinda stole the identity of her dead lover? When the real Navasi died, she copied her hair, personality, name, and one eye.

I know everyone comes to grieve in their own way, but is that what's going on, or is this assumption of identity normal on Absalom Station?

If it isn't normal, would "Navasi" begin to acquire a collection of fallen companions traits? Sort of totemic-like? If so, will she be calling on her different "personalities" for different situations, like if she needs to be in charge and charismatic, then she's Navasi. If she needs to be in the gunner's seat during ship combat (and something unfortunate has happened to Obozaya) then she's sees herself as a vesk with knowledge of heavy weapons.

In a technologically advanced society, it is hard to survive with a completely fake identity. It's far easier to use the identity of someone who has died, especially if they haven't been proven dead (i.e. dying in an explosion). Navasi needed a new identity, and depending on how intimate the two were, it would be increasingly easy to fake her identity as Navasi.


Wei Ji the Learner wrote:
Torbyne wrote:
I also wonder now if that holstered pistol of hers is from the previous Navasi since its so unique compared to the other weapons we've seen. Perhaps a divinely powered weapon?
"This here is a GOD Gun. Don't make me draw it." ???

"Divine intervention is... unlikely."

Edit: Or imminent depending on which side of the gun you are on.


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Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
Okay I know I'm going to catch hell for this too but.... Does every group of characters need to have a gay character? Do we really need to know? It's starting to seem forced. And before everyone jumps on me, I don't care what your orientation is its your business, not mine. Do what makes you happy.

Counterpoint: Does this kind of question have to come up every time there is a non-hetero iconic?


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Crystal Frasier wrote:
EltonJ wrote:
Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
I had read the above as the two women being friends without having to read in gay. Let people choose.
That's how I read it.
Okay, but ask yourself why you feel the need choose a world without minorities.

I tend to think of the world of Absalom Station to be a Frontier like world. Everyone united and ready to explore the unknown. Space is the last frontier, and people can go out and explore space and find new worlds to colonize.

Liberty's Edge

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I didn't read anything about her sexuality either, especially with the heroic sacrifice. I love my bros from the army and have seen some of the same types of heroic sacrifice from my closest friends, but we were totally straight. Without the author saying that she was specifically a lesbian I wouldn't have put that together.

Not that it really matters any ways. I am just intrigued on how people caught on to it so quickly, just like how I didn't pick up that Shardra was a transgendered iconic either.

Maybe it is just my cis gendered white male privlage.


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I HATE HER!!!!

Stupid job-ruining do-gooder...

Kicks rocks, muttering about stupid longshanks and their stupid scruples


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Wherever the plausibility exists, I read characters as queer as heck. More gay space ladies, please! :P


Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
Oh jeez.... Technology and I are not buddies isee it now I read it as less than three. Which made zero sense.

Man you inadvertently kicked the hornet's nest.

The only thing worse would have been to say that The Force Awakens isn't the best Star Wars film since 83; it isn't but that's a fight for a different forum.

All people want the hero to be cast in their image and for the story and its central conflict to resonate with their lives, and more importantly their common-sense.

This is of course impossible because "if you try to please all you please none",somebody in someway is going to feel disinterested,excluded, and at worst offended.


Wei Ji the Learner wrote:


tries to sound out Weydan, and it keeps sounding 'Whedon' to him. Does FreeholdDM know?

I thought it would be pronounced WayDan.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Quote:
The countdown to Starfinder has officially begun..

Helllll yeah!!!

I love the world Navasi's background details, but I feel bad for her parents. Sure we want things for our kids and try to encourage them, but between never seeing them again or letting the kid go their own way? Most will definately want to stay involved in the kid's life.

So straight disappears on her 18th birthday? Heart wrenching! They must be devastated, never knowing if she is alive or what happened. And now with her living back on the station in secret, we'll have to wait and see of they can reunite.

Dark Archive

Thrice Great Hermes wrote:
Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
Oh jeez.... Technology and I are not buddies isee it now I read it as less than three. Which made zero sense.

Man you inadvertently kicked the hornet's nest.

The only thing worse would have been to say that The Force Awakens isn't the best Star Wars film since 83; it isn't but that's a fight for a different forum.

All people want the hero to be cast in their image and for the story and its central conflict to resonate with their lives, and more importantly their common-sense.

This is of course impossible because "if you try to please all you please none",somebody in someway is going to feel disinterested,excluded, and at worst offended.

h

Only to lighten the mood.....you mean you haven't seen Rogue One yet?

Liberty's Edge RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32, 2011 Top 16

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The end of the story is actually creepier to me if Navasi and her friend were romantically involved. I didn't read it that way at all, but seeing the thread it seems a lot of people do. If your great friend dies valiantly saving you and you emulate how they look, that's honoring them. If you start changing your appearance to look just like your dead lover, that crosses over into creepy.

Creepy is generally good for a fictional character, but viewing the story that way, I'm not sure I'd want to hang out with Navasi if I ever learned that she's trying to look like her dead lover. That's a bit Single White Female


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
McBugman wrote:
Quote:
The countdown to Starfinder has officially begun..

Helllll yeah!!!

I love the world Navasi's background details, but I feel bad for her parents. Sure we want things for our kids and try to encourage them, but between never seeing them again or letting the kid go their own way? Most will definately want to stay involved in the kid's life.

So straight disappears on her 18th birthday? Heart wrenching! They must be devastated, never knowing if she is alive or what happened. And now with her living back on the station in secret, we'll have to wait and see of they can reunite.

You know, that would be an interesting character twist, if her parents didn't end up being deplorable McScrooges, but were simply rich, naive people that annoyed the heck out of their adolescent daughter. I mean, I love the evil, rich parents trope as much as any chap, but this idea has some nice sentiment to it. That the hardest thing about facing them again is Navasi's own guilt about what she'd done.

Grand Lodge

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I enjoyed Navasi before I knew her back story: it was a fun image that I wanted to cosplay. Plus... a purple-haired bard. How can one go wrong with that? But now I just simply adore the richness and depth of the backstory that was represented here. This made me see Absalom Station, and understand so much more about the setting. I felt like I was following Navasi around and getting a personal tour of the place.

As much as I enjoyed Navasi's backstory, I too felt a pang for her parents. Maybe this is because I have a 17 year old daughter who is taking flight and opening her own wings. Seeing my child develop a social consciousness, go to political protests where I worry for her safety yet still encourage her to follow her heart, watching her give readings of her poetry, seeing her expanding her world beyond her parents -- I am so proud of her. I am also terrified, knowing that she has to fly on her own and I can no longer protect her as I did when she was a young child. Being a parent of teens means that I can empathize with the loss those parents must have felt!

Is taking on your lover's identity and characteristics slightly creepy? Yes, I think so, but I really enjoyed that Navasi did this. It is an interesting question of when such actions cross over from being homage to obsessiveness... On the other hand, I like obsessive people. This quirk breathed life into the character for me. I now see her not just as a Robin Hood on the run, but as a real person who has found a way to cope in the face of enormous grief.

Amanda, I think you did a lovely job and gave us lots of interesting story hooks to play with. Thanks for giving us a new god, as well as Space Pirates and Street Gangs! I am so looking forward to seeing what you do with all the other iconics!

Thank you!

Hmm


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Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
Thrice Great Hermes wrote:
Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
Oh jeez.... Technology and I are not buddies isee it now I read it as less than three. Which made zero sense.

Man you inadvertently kicked the hornet's nest.

The only thing worse would have been to say that The Force Awakens isn't the best Star Wars film since 83; it isn't but that's a fight for a different forum.

All people want the hero to be cast in their image and for the story and its central conflict to resonate with their lives, and more importantly their common-sense.

This is of course impossible because "if you try to please all you please none",somebody in someway is going to feel disinterested,excluded, and at worst offended.

h

Only to lighten the mood.....you mean you haven't seen Rogue One yet?

I was mildly amused by TFA it was diet soda to me, I loved Rogue One that was A&W Root beer. III is the best Saga film since 83 and I doubt that VIII is going or even IX are going to change that.

On the subject of Navasi I'm just not impressed.

Her back story might have worked better in comic or novel form.

Even when I was at the age, I never immediately connected with the rebellious teen. So Navasi's little "I Do What I Want", ending badly for her, warmed my heart.


Thrice Great Hermes wrote:


The only thing worse would have been to say that The Force Awakens isn't the best Star Wars film since 83; it isn't but that's a fight for a different forum.

Sure it was... if you ignore Rogue One and a few of the better fan films out there, then yeah, i totally see it.

Grand Lodge

Since this took the place of the normal Monday PFS blog, should we expect the coming weeks to do the same? If so, will the PFS blog be moved to another day, suspended, or cancelled?

Contributor

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CKent83 wrote:

Does anyone else think it's a little weird that Navasi kinda stole the identity of her dead lover? When the real Navasi died, she copied her hair, personality, name, and one eye.

I know everyone comes to grieve in their own way, but is that what's going on, or is this assumption of identity normal on Absalom Station?

Probably not, but its so normal for a protagonist background that it literally has its own TV Tropes page.

A bittersweet way of looking at it would be, "I loved you so much that when you died, I died. It should have been me who died back there, and it will have been, for I will take your name and your hair and every piece of the wonderful person that was you and embody them. I will stop living, as I should have done, and instead I will give back life to you."

Admit it, it is rather touching when you actually LOOK at the motivation behind making a choice like that.

Dark Archive

Neat story. Ok Iconic. But the envoy is not a class I am really all in about anyway.

Also would not have gotten her sexual orientation from the story itself.


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I love this. The quality of the writing is just sublime. Thank you for that, and for making her queer.


Agree with Joel above on creep factor with "adopting wholesale identity of dead lover" bit. That said, the virtual transference of deity's personality is a cool concept, especially if you suppose it to be a periodically recurring process, possibly across species or genders.

Seriously, if you are complaining about representation of sexual minorities in a SF universe where 1000s of species co-exist, some of whose sexualities diverge from what any human can comprehend, you are playing the wrong game. Exploring all possibilities is a staple of SF, and that extends to sexualities. If anything, Navasi fails to fulfill the "minority representation mascot" role by the relevant facts being so underplayed and ambiguous... even by the author's follow-up in this thread, I can't say if old-Navasi fully reciprocated new-Navasi's feelings.


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Opsylum wrote:
McBugman wrote:
Quote:
The countdown to Starfinder has officially begun..

Helllll yeah!!!

I love the world Navasi's background details, but I feel bad for her parents. Sure we want things for our kids and try to encourage them, but between never seeing them again or letting the kid go their own way? Most will definately want to stay involved in the kid's life.

So straight disappears on her 18th birthday? Heart wrenching! They must be devastated, never knowing if she is alive or what happened. And now with her living back on the station in secret, we'll have to wait and see of they can reunite.

You know, that would be an interesting character twist, if her parents didn't end up being deplorable McScrooges, but were simply rich, naive people that annoyed the heck out of their adolescent daughter. I mean, I love the evil, rich parents trope as much as any chap, but this idea has some nice sentiment to it. That the hardest thing about facing them again is Navasi's own guilt about what she'd done.

Even if they were nice, I'm guessing they'd still try to reassert control over their daughter. They know much better! And have so many more resources! After all, look at what happened to her on her own. Now be a good girl and put on the dress, we're having a few friends over that can't wait to see you again after all these years. Except, maybe don't mention the piracy? And I'm not going to call you Navasi, I gave you your name already.

Parents don't always accept their children's choices, or even that their children have choices (chance of that seems to increase with higher status, but I've not made a study of it). And sometimes that leads to them not accepting their children.

If you think that's far-fetched, some of my friends, even in this year, can't talk to their parents, because they're queer or genderqueer (or both) and their parents would rather write them off than deal with that. It's increasingly uncommon, especially in the US, but it still happens. And just yesterday I read about a woman whose husband had been disowned when he married her. 18 years later, and his parents still hate her and refuse to see them or their children.

So perhaps they might mean well, and we may see that explored if Starfinder gets a comic line. But they might not be capable of doing well by Navasi, whatever their intentions.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
AnimatedPaper wrote:


Even if they were nice, I'm guessing they'd still try to reassert control over their daughter. They know much better! And have so many more resources! After all, look at what happened to her on her own. Now be a good girl and put on the dress, we're having a few friends over that can't wait to see you again after all these years. Except, maybe don't mention the piracy? And I'm not going to call you Navasi, I gave you your name already.

Parents don't always accept their children's choices, or even that their children have choices (chance of that seems to increase with higher status, but I've not made a study of it). And sometimes that leads to them not accepting their children.

If you think that's far-fetched, some of my friends, even in this year, can't talk to their parents, because they're queer or genderqueer (or both) and their parents would rather write them off than deal with that. It's increasingly uncommon, especially in the US, but it still...

Eesh, stories like that eat me up inside. Rejection and betrayal by one's own family really stings like nothing else. I get the impression Navasi's story might be timely in a number of ways. Speaking of which - I did not notice any reference to her former name or identity before Navasi - was this deliberate, or was this tidbit just not mentioned?


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Thank you for this, Amanda. Navasi is amazing. And thank you to the devs who have chimed in on this thread.

To the straight people who complain that Navasi's sexuality is "too subtle", that they "didn't get it", that "stating sexuality isn't necessary" or that "pandering is insulting"... maybe consider that, for once, this character's backstory is not for you. Much like with Shardra. And that that is okay. Straight folks are plenty catered to. You can't even tell when you're being pandered to, because literally everything else in the media is a representation of what you look like and who you love. Yes, this is an effect of your privilege. If you couldn't tell that Navasi was in love with her partner, ask yourself why you are unaware of this. Ask yourself why coded language to address queer sexuality and identity has been a necessity in Europe and the US over the last few centuries. Stop assuming straight people are the default.

This goes for any time you think a minority is being "over-represented" (whatever the hell that means) or pandered to. There is no quota. Let minority people cheer for those whose identities they relate to. It's a big sandbox and you have plenty of toys.

If you need to erase her backstory or pick and choose through it to empathize with Navasi as a character... how do you manage to empathize with anything else in fantasy? Lizardfolk are fine, but you can't play a character if it turns out she canonically likes girls? When you say "let players choose" on issues like this, you are saying "let people pretend that real people, with them at the table, have identities that don't matter and can be replaced with something else". Several people who have replied to this thread aren't straight. Try to picture how reading your words feels like to us.

I have to wonder how many of the straight folks who so vehemently defend "let players choose the sexuality of an iconic" get mad when fanfiction writers come up with non-straight pairings.

Sovereign Court

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Hold on a second guys. Navasi didn't adopt wholesale her lover's identity. She took her name, her hair color, and one colored contact. That's not creepy, that's recognizing that you need to change your identity, and adopting some minor details of your dead lover to remember her by.


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Did she remind anyone else of Ameiko? Ever since the first illustration I've referred to her as "space Ameiko". First, let me be clear that's high praise - Ameiko is one of my favorite NPCs (I've DMed both RotR and JR) and I love her personality, which her Wayne Reynolds art conveys greatly.

Both have that one-sided sarcastic expression, wear short hair and are asian. Rich parents she rebelled against by engaging in an adventuring career, which ended up in a tragedy involving the loss of close friends.

Sovereign Court

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Iammars wrote:
Hold on a second guys. Navasi didn't adopt wholesale her lover's identity. She took her name, her hair color, and one colored contact. That's not creepy, that's recognizing that you need to change your identity, and adopting some minor details of your dead lover to remember her by.

I really like the one contact detail. Looking in a mirror must be like looking at a blend of herself and Navasi. Her spirit can live on.

Paizo Employee Developer

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I find it truly perplexing that someone can claim that a character's sexuality is so overt as to be beating the reader over the head with it, while also claiming that they wouldn't have assumed the character was queer at all until they read the comments. Which is it?


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Mark Moreland wrote:
I find it truly perplexing that someone can claim that a character's sexuality is so overt as to be beating the reader over the head with it, while also claiming that they wouldn't have assumed the character was queer at all until they read the comments. Which is it?

Representation: If explicit, it's "in your face" and "pandering" and "forced". If implicit, it's "too subtle, couldn't tell, I choose to erase queer folk."

If it's not catering to a cishet white majority, they will be damned sure to let you know how many things are wrong with it. How dare you create content that is not targeting straight white men. How dare you say that this heroic character is not heteronormative.

On the subject of Navasi's birth name, I not only see a firm point of not stating it for the sake of her new identity (and possibly protecting her own past), but hints of how people treat deadnames. It's not relevant, and if people knew it, they could use it to hurt her. It's safer forgotten.


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Also, I heard "sample size" mentioned. Over 7% of millennials identify as somewhere on the LGBT+ spectrum, and the number is continuing to grow every year. When you find yourselves in open-minded areas like artist communities, the percentage basically multiplies by ten. Funny, isn't it? Almost like we're not nearly as "majority heterosexual" as we tend to assume.

I tend to lean on the belief that the majority of us are a lot less straight than we think. Most of us are just het enough to avoid having to consider too much about ourselves. But hey, that's just a pet theory. EDIT: And not that it matters, because s$&@, man, it's a space game, who cares about statistics? You tell me the star goblins are the rarest s!#@ around nowadays, I don't give a f%~@, I'm gonna play me some star goblins. Since when do we care about statistical proportions? Bad nerds!

Anyways, I love Navasi. She's got just enough "classic pulp" while still standing out. I would love to roleplay her, and I don't say that often about iconics! Gay communist space pirates away!

(I'm kinda headcanoning her as ace, though, because of the vagueness of her relationship with, er, "her friend". I'm also hardcore shipping them, because come on, guys, how did anyone miss that subtext?)


Good to meet you Navasi and sorry for your lost. I hope we have good adventures and dont mind the folks they are what can we say fish out of water because of damn cryo sleep units lot of them dont have time to get corespondence course from absalom tutors so sorry on their behalf. ( fixes his tie) So lets talk of busines as you are need of crew for a mission and we need some credits to pay joining fea for starfinder guild


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I liked Navasi's story, and I'm looking forward to hearing about the others'.


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Opsylum wrote:
McBugman wrote:
Quote:
The countdown to Starfinder has officially begun..

Helllll yeah!!!

I love the world Navasi's background details, but I feel bad for her parents. Sure we want things for our kids and try to encourage them, but between never seeing them again or letting the kid go their own way? Most will definately want to stay involved in the kid's life.

So straight disappears on her 18th birthday? Heart wrenching! They must be devastated, never knowing if she is alive or what happened. And now with her living back on the station in secret, we'll have to wait and see of they can reunite.

You know, that would be an interesting character twist, if her parents didn't end up being deplorable McScrooges, but were simply rich, naive people that annoyed the heck out of their adolescent daughter. I mean, I love the evil, rich parents trope as much as any chap, but this idea has some nice sentiment to it. That the hardest thing about facing them again is Navasi's own guilt about what she'd done.

I didn't get the sense that they were evil. Just that she was naive and a bit of an idiot. And lucky she didn't end up as worse than pirate with a nagging conscience and a bizarre belief that hair dye would help her hide (which indicates that she's still naive and a bit of an idiot)

Even if it works, hiding out as your primary 'known associate' will still get you picked up.

But I got the impression she never really talked with her parents, or thought for even a moment how much good she could do from home. And more good, at that, because it meant less adventure and excitement, which is what she really wanted.

Dark Archive

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Shisumo wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
So hey, what does everyone think Navasi's leadership style would be as a captain? The last paragraph makes me think she's more of a nicer leader rather than a demanding or intimidating one, focusing on Diplomacy rather than Intimidate, and her principles might cause her to think of herself less as "the boss" than as the facilitator who brought together a particular specialist crew, so more like a first among equals. What do you think?
I think she probably views having to give orders in itself as something of a failure on her part - if she'd hired the right people, they'd already be doing what needed doing without her having to say anything. Inasmuch as she does have to tell people what to do, I really can't see her as a martinet; "first among equals" seems like it would fit her precisely.

Same here. The navigator looks to her and asks, 'Should I set a course, Captain' and she just boggles, 'Why are you asking me? You're the navigator.' <flutters her hand dismissively> 'Navigate!' 'And I'm not going to insult the giant lizard by telling him to raise shields when we're being shot at, because he'll have already done it before I got the words out anyway, and then probably chew me out for telling him how to do his job instead of doing important Captain stuff, like figuring out how we're going to get out of this in one piece...'

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It's cool that ponchos are still a thing in the future/in space. Not a lot of people could pull off that look. Are those metal inlays purely ornamental or do they have a special meaning?

Navasi seems to be the urdu word for granddaughter. I couldn't place 'Nyori'. I wonder if human ethnicities are still a thing?

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Awesome background.

However something annoys me about the drawing which I hadn't looked at closely enough before, namely the lack of trigger discipline.


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Damanta wrote:

Awesome background.

However something annoys me about the drawing which I hadn't looked at closely enough before, namely the lack of trigger discipline.

A clever distraction- that's only her posing gun. In the spacefuture, anybody who's anybody has a posing gun.

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