This is Not a Dream

Friday, November 18, 2016

The end of 2016 is proving to be an exciting and incredibly busy time around the office! The Starfinder team is chipping away at the process of filling the gaps in our grand science fantasy plans and working with our playtesters. More and more bits of truly stunning artwork are trickling in, and it's starting to feel like this is all really happening now! Yesterday Polygon released an exclusive article, and since I've taken over the blog for today, it's about time we show off some places and a new iconic character here. Meet Navasi, an iconic Envoy!


Illustration by Remko Troost
The envoy is a class dedicated to aiding and manipulating others. They are giving orders and encouragement that help your allies do better, while taunting and demoralizing your opponents. Envoys are naturally charismatic leaders and smooth-talkers, ranging from celebrities and starship captains to con artists and cult leaders. Lando Calrissian, General Leia Organa, Ruby Rhod and Inara Serra would all be envoys. And as you can see, Navasi and Lando would definitely appreciate each other's taste in clothes.

Earlier this year we revealed a preview of Absalom Station on the main Starfinder page, and the final illustration is even more fantastic! Akiton and Eox are new planetary locations, seen below, and were also shown off in the article.


Illustration by Leon Tukker


Illustrations by Sebastien Hue and Leon Tukker

Keep an eye out for more Starfinder news as we get closer to it's launch next August!

Chris Lambertz
Community & Digital Content Director

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Iconics Leon Tukker Navasi Remko Troost Sebastien Hue Starfinder
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Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2011 Top 32

John Napier 698 wrote:

I hate to point out an error, but:

Actually 2S-S = (2 - 1) + (4 - 2) + (8 - 4) + (16 - 8) +(32 - 16)..., which reduces to 1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + 16, which equals S, since 2S-S = S.

Of course there's an error in the "proof," X-1 isn't really greater than X.

All I did was match up the terms differently than you did, and got a different answer, which is really the true problem with treating infinity like a number. Your version along with mine shows that somehow this sum violates associativity.

A sound striker who tried to make me take damage from math would have a tough time of it :) This stuff is fun.

To get back to actual Starfinder stuff, what prevents a group from going a few hundred light years away from where Golarion used to be, and using a (possibly magical) high powered telescope to watch what happened when it disappeared? The light from that event and before is still out there presumably...

FTL travel lets creative players do weird stuff with causality so I hope some of that is addressed.


John Napier 698 wrote:

To get back to actual Starfinder stuff, what prevents a group from going a few hundred light years away from where Golarion used to be, and using a (possibly magical) high powered telescope to watch what happened when it disappeared? The light from that event and before is still out there presumably...

FTL travel lets creative players do weird stuff with causality so I hope some of that is addressed.

I'd assume that they'd most likely see some form of cosmic static during that 'timeframe' when viewed from those distances.


Freehold DM wrote:
ryric wrote:

Wah wah wahwah wah wahwaha waaaaaah

loads shotgun

You brought math into this!

Think bigger, think 'splodey-er... launch the Infinity Ball at Ryric!


Warhawk7 wrote:


I'd assume that they'd most likely see some form of cosmic static during that 'timeframe' when viewed from those distances.

Actually, if the AI deity or other agency is able to stop time on a planetary scale, then I doubt that anything could be seen. One instant, Golarion is there. The next, it isn't.


Or, observers watching from slightly different vantage points see completely different events, thus leading to even more confusion.


UnArcaneElection wrote:

Or, observers watching from slightly different vantage points see completely different events, thus leading to even more confusion.

More quantum-mechanical "strangeness." :)

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2011 Top 32

Oh, I agree that there are all sorts of possible explanations/fixes. I just want there to be one because FTL travel really lets you look back in time and it was one of the first things I thought of when they mentioned the mystery of Golarion's disappearance.


John Napier 698 wrote:

Infinity is just a theoretical abstraction, anyway. It's a signpost that something went seriously wrong in a calculation. For example, let's consider a singularity. Stars rotate, and are subject to the law of Conservation of angular momentum. This means that when you reduce a star's radius by half, it's rate of spin doubles.

So, what happens when the star becomes a singularity? Its radius becomes zero. What happens when you divide a quantity by zero? You get infinity.
This brings up an interesting point. An arbitrary point on the surface of a singularity would have an infinite velocity. But then, a point on a sphere with a radius of zero is itself a theoretical abstraction.

The point singularity is formed by a collapsing star that's not rotating.

A rotating collapsar forms a singularity in the shape of a ring of zero thickness. Most stars rotate, therefore most black holes formed from collapsars will also have a rotation and be ring-shaped.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Matthew Shelton wrote:


The point singularity is formed by a collapsing star that's not rotating.

A rotating collapsar forms a singularity in the shape of a ring of zero thickness. Most stars rotate, therefore most black holes formed from collapsars will also have a rotation and be ring-shaped.

What about a star that has a rotation that's a slight bit of a degree off -- not enough to shear, mind -- such that the ultimate result is a spheroid configuration rather than a ring?


As far as I know, all the star material goes into the ring (or the torus, if you will) and all information about the star is lost except for the eleven values conserved according to the No-Hair Theorem. Are you asking if a star could collapse into anything but a perfect 2D circle or a zero-D point?


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Matthew Shelton wrote:
As far as I know, all the star material goes into the ring (or the torus, if you will) and all information about the star is lost except for the eleven values conserved according to the No-Hair Theorem. Are you asking if a star could collapse into anything but a perfect circle or a zero-D point?

That's more math than I know. But for some reason the idea of 'just one plane' of material just started bugging me, for some reason?


Matthew Shelton wrote:


The point singularity is formed by a collapsing star that's not rotating.

A rotating collapsar forms a singularity in the shape of a ring of zero thickness. Most stars rotate, therefore most black holes formed from collapsars will also have a rotation and be ring-shaped.

Out of curiosity, what's the source material for this? I've read the book written by Kip Thorne, but it was several years ago. I may have read that, but then forgot it. *sigh* Growing old sucks.

Creative Director, Starfinder Team

9 people marked this as a favorite.

I love that this thread has become a big physics discussion! And as a liberal arts major who hasn't taken a math class in 15 years, I'm *really* glad that we made this science fantasy rather than science fiction, so that I can answer any questions with:

**waves hands**

Gods.

:D


Your Gods won't save you when I hotwire a life boat and turn it into an improvised relativistic planet cracker.

Yes, this is actually a thing. See Friends Don't Let Friends Use Reactionless Drives In Their Universes..

Actually, if you want the science part of your science fantasy to have a small degree of authenticity, take a skim through some of the stuff on that site. You might get some ideas, and you might pick out some hilariously exploitable flaws in your setting technology before Starfinder goes to print.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

So THAT's what happens to all the 'missing' Gods!

They become the drives for interstellar craft!

...shudder...


1 person marked this as a favorite.
John Napier 698 wrote:
Matthew Shelton wrote:


The point singularity is formed by a collapsing star that's not rotating.

A rotating collapsar forms a singularity in the shape of a ring of zero thickness. Most stars rotate, therefore most black holes formed from collapsars will also have a rotation and be ring-shaped.

Out of curiosity, what's the source material for this? I've read the book written by Kip Thorne, but it was several years ago. I may have read that, but then forgot it. *sigh* Growing old sucks.

One could cite Wikipedia but that is somewhat bad form, so I found these too:

http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/103232/how-can-a-singularity-in- a-black-hole-rotate-if-its-just-a-point

http://www.gothosenterprises.com/black_holes/rotating_black_hole.html

https://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/comments/4w0y59/so_i_read_that_rotating _black_holes_have_ring/d6330iw/


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Matthew Shelton wrote:

One could cite Wikipedia but that is somewhat bad form, so I found these too:

http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/103232/how-can-a-singularity-in- a-black-hole-rotate-if-its-just-a-point

http://www.gothosenterprises.com/black_holes/rotating_black_hole.html

https://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/comments/4w0y59/so_i_read_that_rotating _black_holes_have_ring/d6330iw/

Linkified for your convenience.

One thing I don't understand (maybe I'll find it in the above links when I manage to get through them) is why a spinning singularity would form a ring instead of a disk, and if it did form a ring, why the ring wouldn't break up into multiple point singularities orbiting each other. Edit: Now read these pages, and in the first one, somebody even asks this question, but I didn't find an answer.


Hey, Snowblind,

Great link you provided. Saved the page as a PDF so I could study it later. I should point out that while Traveller is notorious for using reactionless drives, there are two instances when it didn't. The first edition of Classic Traveller required fuel for at least the small craft, and Traveller: New Era used HEPlaR ( High Energy Plasma Recombustion) Drives ( sort of a Plasma Rocket ). Settings that don't use reactionless drives rely on Transfer Orbits for interplanetary travel.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
James Sutter wrote:

I love that this thread has become a big physics discussion! And as a liberal arts major who hasn't taken a math class in 15 years, I'm *really* glad that we made this science fantasy rather than science fiction, so that I can answer any questions with:

**waves hands**

Gods.

:D

I've asked this question earlier in a different thread. "Who says gamers aren't intelligent or well educated?"


What if the Drift is really... the Domains of Dread?

*mind blown*

On another note, I'm really enjoying the previews I'm seeing so far, but just wish it weren't so far away until Starfinder's release! :(


Cthulhudrew wrote:

What if the Drift is really... the Domains of Dread?

*mind blown*

On another note, I'm really enjoying the previews I'm seeing so far, but just wish it weren't so far away until Starfinder's release! :(

Patience, Padawan. It will come when it comes.

Grand Lodge

I always envisioned the Prime Material Plan to be not unlike a mass of "foam" where each bubble was it's own universe with it's own physics. Some of the bubbles would be endless voids, others vast heat dead expanses. Some harbored no sentient life while others had a bounty of sentient species. All of this was The Prime and if you could witness it on a long enough timescale you'd see the bubbles pop into and out of existence as entire realities were born and died.

I swear I've had this conversation on these boards before but in regards to the forms that Lovecraftian entities would take. The idea was that Yog-Sothoth was the foam and could not exist within a bubble but would ultimately subsume the bubbles back into itself. An endless cycle of creation and destruction with no net gain nor loss.

SM


Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

We have no biographical information about Navasi, correct?

I am wondering whether her hair color might provide a clue. If her hair is naturally purple and not dyed that color, then she is most likely not of Golarion origin. Maybe she is Akitonian?

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