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Can a normal Paladin become an Oathbound in game, not in character creation?


Rules Questions


Hi, is a simple question:

Can a normal Paladin become an Oathbound in game, not in character creation?

The description say "Paladins who take up an oath may make a sacred promise to their god or temple to perform some specific and grand action associated with the oath. For example, an oathbound paladin who takes the Oath of Vengeance may be tasked with killing the orc warlord who razed her home city, while a paladin with the Oath against the Wyrm may be asked to secure a nonaggression pact with a family of dragons. When a paladin completes the sacred promise, the oath is fulfilled, and she may abandon the oath if she so chooses; she may then select another oath or become a standard paladin or a different paladin archetype."

What do you tink about?

Thx 4 answer.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Roleplaying Guild, Tales Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

I'd say so, it'd be something to talk with your GM about.


retraining is an option so i would say ya

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Through retraining rules (ultimate campaign) yes. Though depending on the oath, it might not actually seem like "re"training. Retraining an archetype costs 5 days per ability replaced [b]that has already happened[b]. If an archetype changes things at levels 1 and 4 and you're level 3, you spend 5 days replacing the level 1 part but the rest costs nothing. There's also a tiny amount of gold based on the number of days and your level.

Some Oaths replace stuff early, but some don't kick in for a while. If your oath is one of the later, you spend your zero days retraining and get your new archetype.


Also of note, if you're not high enough levels that you have any ability that is traded out by the archetype then you can retrain to that archetype for free.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Oathbound Paladin wrote:
..When a paladin completes the sacred promise, the oath is fulfilled, and she may abandon the oath if she so chooses; she may then select another oath or become a standard paladin or a different paladin archetype.

This, to me, suggests that oaths are fluid. Much like a Quinggong Monk, there's no reason NOT to be an Oathbound Paladin. You just find your oaths as you adventure, and change them out as befits your character's narrative.


Thank you all guys for the answer.

Im with Davor opinion.

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