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Spaceroad Truckers


Starfinder General Discussion


Each cargo mod holds 25 tons. The maximum weight limit for a truck in the US is 40 tons (truck and cargo), but 25 tons of cargo is about right for a smaller modern shipping container. A modern Panamax ship carries 5000 of these containers and some of the largest container ship carry over 15,000 of them.

For comparison, a Caravel had between 50 to 60 tons.

Roman ships had a cargo capacity between 100 and 150 tons with the largest going up to 600 tons of cargo.

A Cog, probably, had a cargo capacity of around 100 tons.

A Spanish Galleon had a cargo capacity of around 500 tons.

The largest cargo ship in starfinder has ten expansion bays, which you could fit with 5 shuttle bays bring the total number of cargo holds to 15 or 375 tons.

By contrast, pathfinder ships are very fast. 1d6+2 days in system or 1d6 day for a basic drift drive. With an advanced drift drive you could pull 1d6/2 in system or even 1d6/4 (though limited to large ship). Given the speed of shipping, it might make sense to simply swap docked shuttles so that the ship does not need to hand around to load and unload cargo.

Put another way, maybe cargo hold capacity should scale with the size of the ship.


This reminds me of the old Marvel Comic U.S. 1, the 1st ever space trucker comic...


Scrapper wrote:
This reminds me of the old Marvel Comic U.S. 1, the 1st ever space trucker comic...

Wasn't he just a normal trucker with a metal plate in his head that cought CB radio signals?


All those expansion bays are just internal. I'd say slapping on a couple 100 shipping boxes on some tow cables in 0g is totally feasible. Just amp up the Piloting checks for slowing down and turning at all.

Not sure if spoiler from AP:
The ship in the AP towed an entire asteroid.


Nicola The Necromancer wrote:

Each cargo mod holds 25 tons. The maximum weight limit for a truck in the US is 40 tons (truck and cargo), but 25 tons of cargo is about right for a smaller modern shipping container. A modern Panamax ship carries 5000 of these containers and some of the largest container ship carry over 15,000 of them.

For comparison, a Caravel had between 50 to 60 tons.

Roman ships had a cargo capacity between 100 and 150 tons with the largest going up to 600 tons of cargo.

A Cog, probably, had a cargo capacity of around 100 tons.

A Spanish Galleon had a cargo capacity of around 500 tons.

The largest cargo ship in starfinder has ten expansion bays, which you could fit with 5 shuttle bays bring the total number of cargo holds to 15 or 375 tons.

By contrast, pathfinder ships are very fast. 1d6+2 days in system or 1d6 day for a basic drift drive. With an advanced drift drive you could pull 1d6/2 in system or even 1d6/4 (though limited to large ship). Given the speed of shipping, it might make sense to simply swap docked shuttles so that the ship does not need to hand around to load and unload cargo.

Put another way, maybe cargo hold capacity should scale with the size of the ship.

Also given the way the manufacturing works most cargo players are carrying would likely be of the low volume high value category. It would rarely make sense to transport bulk goods in the tramp freighters like what the players would be using. I would assume most bulk transport is basically hauld by giant tugs through space.


Expansion slots probably *should* scale with ship size. I suspect that will be a rules change/addition in the inevitable ship supplement. Right now, its not a priority because PCs will seldom be operating ships much bigger than Medium, for practical reasons.

My own kitbashed rule of thumb would be, standard capacity of an expansion slot is for a Small ship ( Tiny ships don't have them anyway ). Each size larger doubles their capacity. In the case of cargo, this means tonnage. In the case of most other expansion options, it means doubling the number of people they can handle ( number of escape pods, number of passenger seats, etc ). For stuff like Tech Workshops and Labs, it doubles the number of people who can meaningfully use the facility at the same time; the baseline can only be used for one task at a time, while larger ones could support multiple people repairing multiple different devices simultaneously, for example. For stuff like hangars, it doubles their craft capacity. . . but note, the doubling is only for each size beyond the minimum.


I don't know how much bulk transport trade there would really be. Technology would seem able to provide for the basic needs of most worlds, so interplanetary / interstellar trade is probably focused more on some mixture of UPB's and of rarities and luxuries that can't be synthesised. Cargo holds probably should scale with the ship's size but cargo is likely not necessary to the basic infrastructure, so big-volume haulers might be relatively rare.


CeeJay wrote:
I don't know how much bulk transport trade there would really be. Technology would seem able to provide for the basic needs of most worlds, so interplanetary / interstellar trade is probably focused more on some mixture of UPB's and of rarities and luxuries that can't be synthesised. Cargo holds probably should scale with the ship's size but cargo is likely not necessary to the basic infrastructure, so big-volume haulers might be relatively rare.

That was sort of my thought as well. With UPB most manufacturing stuff is not getting shipped around. You ship around the UPB if anything so easier to contain and pretty lightweight and less bulky than finished products.

Other stuff you would be transporting would basically be stuff you can't make with UPB for some reason or rare art's and resources.

The only real major bulk thing to transport may be food/air/water for space stations but this is unlikely to be a trade player adventurers do much with.


Really in thinking about this probably the most common thing you will wind up shipping as a player would be information. Given that it generally is not much faster to try to transmit information to far flung solar systems than it is to bring in person a lot of small scale courier work is probably available.

Taking an adventure out to some star system check to see if there is mail that needs to get hiked over there and pick up some extra cash on the way out and on the way back with any message replies.


Do keep in mind that while using UPB's is a fast and simple way to build things, I don't think it's been stated that it's the most efficiënt. I wouldn't be too surprised if it turned out that it's far cheaper to build things in a more 'conventional' way than by using UPB's, but that it's just not feasable to do so outside of large-scale manufacturing operations. This'd also handilly explain why it's impossible for players to make a profit turning UPB's into consumer goods at all. It's just an inherently inefficiënt process.

Not saying that's how it is, but it's something that sprang to mind and makes a lot of sense to me personally. YMMV.


I am guessing large factories making their UPB's to begin are making them at a discount so they are not spending full retail costs of UPB. So they could use them to make items at a profit whereas boutique hobbyists really can't since they have to pay full price on the UPB so there basically is no profit there to be had. But you do gain the convenience of making exactly what you want when you want it.


I tend to assume that bulk shipping does occur, simply because bulk shipping existing makes for a better adventure setting. It means freighters subject to interdiction and piracy, which PCs can be involved in by either stopping it or performing it. It also means there are valuable resources people would want to move around, thus giving grounds for conflict and warfare.


Food/drink/materials for such get transported a lot in RL. 375 tons is a ridiculously small amount to/from an agricultural settlement with a million+ people. Towing extra pods or containers is almost necessary, and if NPCs can do it some PC somewhere will want to, though maybe not for trade purposes.


Metaphysician wrote:
I tend to assume that bulk shipping does occur, simply because bulk shipping existing makes for a better adventure setting. It means freighters subject to interdiction and piracy, which PCs can be involved in by either stopping it or performing it. It also means there are valuable resources people would want to move around, thus giving grounds for conflict and warfare.

Well, you can do all that with shipping at a great many scales. Pirate stories of the Spanish Main revolve around it without needing bulk shipping comparable to present-day Earth. What matters is the value of the goods. It can be something as simple as one crucial hostage, which is the McGuffin in The Usual Suspects.

What you'd want extremely large-scale bulk shipping for is stories that revolve around interdicts that threaten the fabric of civilisation itself. I don't know that the Starfinder setting is particularly built for it, but you could probably find an angle.

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