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Are all monsters edible?


Pathfinder RPG General Discussion

101 to 150 of 153 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | next > last >>
RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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I just keep thinking of Nethack. Don't eat kobolds, they're poisonous!

Unless you're immune to poison or have a blessed tinning kit of course.

And the gods will be displeased with you if you eat your pet. Never, ever, ever eat a cockatrice. Polymorph yourself into a rock mole to eat metals.

I would create reasonable consequences for cooking and eating creatures--there may be none for some, but for example the basilisk is probably highly internally acidic, for living on stone and the blood being able to soften stone and turn it back to flesh--so eating it could make you sickened. Or make your teeth all fall out (restorable with regenerate). This kind of effect I don't think would be removed by purify food and drink--this is a basic spell and would remove true poisons and food-born disease, but I'd make the call that it does not remove other natural--or supernatural--traits of the flesh.

I can also see them getting a certain reputation for eating creatures--both from those who might follow their exploits (would they start a trend? Are they seen as barbaric?), and from other monsters. If they eat any sentient creatures, I can see them becoming the targets of other creatures of that race.

Liberty's Edge

Ahahah

What a question!

Goblins are like snakes for my Dwarw living in Sandpoint.

Being serious, animals are all edible?

Many of them, some definitively not. A lot have an horrible taste. But different cultures eats things you may think disgusting. In Sicily boiled snails are considered very good. Fried frogs are a traditional plat in Milan, once I've eaten a live kind of crab (Moleca) witch is so deliticious they costs 80$ per kilo. In Asia they eat dogs, in south-east Asia beetles, in Africa rats, and so on...
If they are not poisonous you can eat them (maybe ven poisonous one if you remove poisonous organs: such as for snakes in China or ball fishs)
I may not eat undeath. Buuuuut maybe, if you are starving and you boil zombie meat for 12 hours you can eat it.
If your players have such an habit play with it, invent something funny when they eat strange things: they have eaten a fury Draco liver, torment them with visions but maybe give them barbarian anger, they eaten centaur balls... ok, kinda red bull and vostra togheter.
Do not forget that if you eat magic creatures you eat even the magic stored in their living tissues. If they do it often, this may affect the PC descendants in many good or bad ways, or maybe it can be manifested even in the PC after some year or month, maybe he'll suffer some magical disease or acquire some kinda power.

Liberty's Edge

*vostra was viagra


Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

In Runequest, they had trolls who could digest nearly anything. They also had three separate stomachs -- one for meat, one for vegetable matter, and one for minerals. They greatly preferred meat but needed to fill all three stomachs for a balanced diet. For unknown reasons, elves that they ate went into their vegetable stomachs and dwarves into their mineral stomachs, so a typical mixed race adventuring party could fill all of their dietary needs.


That's because in Runequest, elves are sentient plants and dwarves are literally the children/creations of a mountain deity


Lady-J wrote:
UnArcaneElection wrote:
graystone wrote:

{. . .}

If that's so then how often does bat guano explode? Spell components have a thematic link, not a magic one.

I don't know of any examples stemming from bat guano in particular, but I have heard of sewer explosions, although admittedly a lot of these probably stemmed from inclusion of industrial waste and/or volatile flammable liquids that leaked into the sewers.

we blew up an entire city once just cuz some one dropped a torch down a sewer grate

Good thing methane isn't a spell component then. ;)


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

This thread reminds me of the Slayers episode where the entire plotline is about the adventuring party hunting down a lake dragon so they can cook and eat it.

I'd say:
You probably can't eat:
Outsiders (extraplanar material probably nutritionally useless as best and actively harmful at worst, assuming it even sticks around long enough)
Undead (okay, you COULD eat undead, but I feel like it would be a Bad Idea)
Fey (Do not eat the fey. Trust me.)
Constructs (unless you're this guy)
Aberrations (no no no no nonono)

You probably can eat, maybe with some...interesting effects (might take special preparation):
Magical beasts
Monstrous humanoids
Dragons
Maybe oozes? Still not recommended.

You can probably reasonably safely eat without much special knowledge besides basic cooking:
Animals
Humanoids
Plants (assuming said plants aren't poisonous)

And eating sentient creatures is probably morally questionable unless you absolutely have to (like a Donner Party situation).

Shadow Lodge

Java Man wrote:
Weirdo wrote:
LordKailas wrote:
Otherwise, you could rule that they have to make a survival check DC 10 + the monster's CR.
This sounds like a good houserule, with a few modifications for creature type (eg animals should be easier, especially if not poisonous; aberrations are probably more difficult to cook). And I'd allow Profession(cook) as well - or a synergy bonus if you have both.
Even among normal animals and plants there are surprising things that can injure/kill you. European explorers became extremely ill or died from consumption of polarbear liver.

That's why I said that eating animals should be easier, not automatic. You might get a massive Vitamin A overdose from eating polar bear liver, but given the choice of eating a random animal from the Bestiary and a random aberration, I'd pick the animal.

graystone wrote:

The survival skill finds things THAT ARE ALREADY EDIBLE. You can chew on a fish without gutting/cooking it or peeled a cattail and eat the heart raw. NONE of that requires processing the food found.

So you have survival, and you find already edible berries, nuts, small game ect. It might not be palatable but it's edible and you aren't going to starve.

That is different than having a naturally dangerous/inedible item and making it edible food.

So with survival, you might catch a trout and eat it. Profession cook would let you take a fish you'd normally throw back, like a puffer fish, and make it safe to eat. Different ways to get to the same place.

This is why I suggested using either - with a bonus for both. Survival lets you figure out what parts of the monster are edible, if any (eg that you shouldn't eat polar bear liver). It should also cover the basics of being able to cut apart the edible parts of a polar bear and put it on a spit, because cooking is an important part of getting proper nutritional content out of many edible things. Profession (Cook) lets you prepare the polar bear meat in a tasty enough way that you can make a living from selling polar bear stew.

There's an argument for some specialty foods like puffer fish requiring Profession (Cook) to prepare. On the other hand hunter-gatherer societies can develop methods for safely preparing hazardous forage (see Cunjevoi and Burrawangs. I would describe these people as having a high Survival skill rather than all being trained in Profession (cook).


Meraki wrote:

This thread reminds me of the Slayers episode where the entire plotline is about the adventuring party hunting down a lake dragon so they can cook and eat it.

I'd say:
You probably can't eat:
Outsiders (extraplanar material probably nutritionally useless as best and actively harmful at worst, assuming it even sticks around long enough)
Undead (okay, you COULD eat undead, but I feel like it would be a Bad Idea)
Fey (Do not eat the fey. Trust me.)
Constructs (unless you're this guy)
Aberrations (no no no no nonono)

You probably can eat, maybe with some...interesting effects (might take special preparation):
Magical beasts
Monstrous humanoids
Dragons
Maybe oozes? Still not recommended.

You can probably reasonably safely eat without much special knowledge besides basic cooking:
Animals
Humanoids
Plants (assuming said plants aren't poisonous)

And eating sentient creatures is probably morally questionable unless you absolutely have to (like a Donner Party situation).

Firstly, the main Lizardfolk are N, despite cainnibalism.

Secondly, what is preventing eating fey, besides DR?


The Sideromancer wrote:
Secondly, what is preventing eating fey, besides DR?

for some reason this is making me think

fey = jawbreaker

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

All I’ll say is, just because you CAN, doesn’t mean that you SHOULD. TwT


if we count pre-Pathfinder Paizo content, there is a bit in Age of Worms where PCs are presented with a dish containing basilisk which is described as gritty and foul.


Saldiven wrote:
My Life Is In Ruins wrote:

everything organic in the real world is made up of DNA and your digestive system can break most of it down. Some critters produce toxins that are inconvenient, repulsive, to lethal. Some creatures harbor bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites and symbiotes that you do not want to host.

Um. No.

...

sorry, I wasn't being factually literal.

Replace 'everything organic' with 'organic living creatures on earth' and 'is made up of' with 'contain'. That's better.

sometimes 'organic' can mean carbon based molecules or substances found in living things. English is flexible.

you left out the Yes and No part of my original statement, that was an important part!


this is a thread showing "Table variation"


LeMoineNoir wrote:

There's a few large wolves, but you're probably thinking of Fenrir. Both those horses are the same horse; Sleipnir.

Fafnir was a dwarf cursed to become a dragon, and was slain by his nephew Sigurd, who later cooked and ate his heart. Drinking Fafnir's blood granted the ability to speak with birds, including Odin's own ravens.

I don't know why I can never remember the damn horse's name.

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Everything is edible as long as you pay homage to the Beef Taco first and add in sharp cheddar cheese! Lactose intolerant? Smells like heresy to me! *Detect Evil*


Nodrog wrote:
LeMoineNoir wrote:

There's a few large wolves, but you're probably thinking of Fenrir. Both those horses are the same horse; Sleipnir.

Fafnir was a dwarf cursed to become a dragon, and was slain by his nephew Sigurd, who later cooked and ate his heart. Drinking Fafnir's blood granted the ability to speak with birds, including Odin's own ravens.

I don't know why I can never remember the damn horse's name.

He's also got 8 legs, not 6


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Interesting viewpoints. In our version of this game, eating any sentient creature is not just an evil act, but a despicable one. Other than that, game on.


taks wrote:
Interesting viewpoints. In our version of this game, eating any sentient creature is not just an evil act, but a despicable one. Other than that, game on.

Monster codex:

"Though lizardfolk are not evil, their practicality can sometimes seem abhorrent to other races, especially when it manifests in practices like cannibalism. To a lizardfolk, meat is meat, and during times of scarcity it would be an insult to those fallen in battle to let them rot rather than use their flesh to feed the tribe."

"In times of extreme starvation, a clutch could even become sustenance for a tribe rather than being allowed to hatch and become more mouths to feed."

Bestiary:

"LIZARDFOLK CR 1
XP 400
N Medium humanoid (reptilian)"

So, pathfinder AND Golarion don't see it as evil. it's neutral.


Cannibalism happens in situations of starvation, or in societies with different religious views. It is not necessarily a moral issue. See, there is no victim. Those lizardmen would agree that wasting meat is the height of stupidity and would expect their tribe to eat them. A lizardman being exiled could be a terrible punishment not just because he would likely quickly die, but also because the tribe wouldn't be able to eat him.


The Fore people of Papua New Guinea considered eating their dead to be an act of respect. However, this turned out to be an extremely bad idea (as are similar practices in Twentieth Century Western factory farm animal husbandry), although note that apparently some of the Fore population developed a resistance mutation in the PRNP protein-coding gene that conferred "strong" (not clear if this is complete) resistance to the disease, but it has not yet had the chance to spread through the population, and now that the Fore people have stopped this custom, it is unlikely to be selected for any further.

In the D&D/Pathfinder campaign settings, conceivably, Lizardfolk (and others with similar practices) could have developed the same mutation long enough ago for their whole populations to become effectively immune to such diseases.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
The Sideromancer wrote:

Firstly, the main Lizardfolk are N, despite cainnibalism.

Secondly, what is preventing eating fey, besides DR?

Literally preventing you, nothing. It was a joke, meaning that some fey will probably take issue with the idea of mortals going around eating them. Fey are notoriously touchy and capricious, after all.

I meant killing sentient creatures TO eat them, rather than having to eat them in tough circumstances (after they died from other causes). Could have phrased that better.

The monster codex entry on the lizardfolk quoted above uses the phrases "during times of scarcity" and "in times of extreme starvation," which makes me think it isn't their first choice. Though it's true that different races would have different taboos/cultural practices.


Yeah don't eat kobolds that is just cannibalism.

Shadow Lodge

I told the half-orc sin eater inquisitor that you didn't literally have to eat your slain foes, but he didn't listen.

Also, if you eat undead, be prepared to become undead yourself. If the undead in question is a ghoul, then it probably won't become a problem from your perspective. Though the ghoul might find this to be a case of insulting irony.

What I want to know, though, is the story of how and why that guy in posts #46 & 47 ate a wooden door. In PFS of all places. Edit: Like, the entire door?


Check out the manga 'Delicious Dungeon/Dungeon Meshi' where broke PCs forage by killing and eating monsters

Don't eat too much though, or you might attract the attention of Mr.Eaten


Meraki wrote:
The Sideromancer wrote:

Firstly, the main Lizardfolk are N, despite cainnibalism.

Secondly, what is preventing eating fey, besides DR?

Literally preventing you, nothing. It was a joke, meaning that some fey will probably take issue with the idea of mortals going around eating them. Fey are notoriously touchy and capricious, after all.

I meant killing sentient creatures TO eat them, rather than having to eat them in tough circumstances (after they died from other causes). Could have phrased that better.

The monster codex entry on the lizardfolk quoted above uses the phrases "during times of scarcity" and "in times of extreme starvation," which makes me think it isn't their first choice. Though it's true that different races would have different taboos/cultural practices.

Yeah, but if you do while on the first world, the fey respawn, making it one of the most sustainable food options available!


UnArcaneElection wrote:

The Fore people of Papua New Guinea considered eating their dead to be an act of respect. However, this turned out to be an extremely bad idea (as are similar practices in Twentieth Century Western factory farm animal husbandry), although note that apparently some of the Fore population developed a resistance mutation in the PRNP protein-coding gene that conferred "strong" (not clear if this is complete) resistance to the disease, but it has not yet had the chance to spread through the population, and now that the Fore people have stopped this custom, it is unlikely to be selected for any further.

In the D&D/Pathfinder campaign settings, conceivably, Lizardfolk (and others with similar practices) could have developed the same mutation long enough ago for their whole populations to become effectively immune to such diseases.

luckily for us prion related diseases are not part of RAW. The game just forms common experience and fantasy into RAW, maybe a tiny bit of science in there.

The biggest biological argument against doing this kinda thing is the disease vector is direct if you consume biomass from a sick individual of the same species or genus. That will kill you far faster than a few prions.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
The Sideromancer wrote:
Meraki wrote:
The Sideromancer wrote:

Firstly, the main Lizardfolk are N, despite cainnibalism.

Secondly, what is preventing eating fey, besides DR?

Literally preventing you, nothing. It was a joke, meaning that some fey will probably take issue with the idea of mortals going around eating them. Fey are notoriously touchy and capricious, after all.

I meant killing sentient creatures TO eat them, rather than having to eat them in tough circumstances (after they died from other causes). Could have phrased that better.

The monster codex entry on the lizardfolk quoted above uses the phrases "during times of scarcity" and "in times of extreme starvation," which makes me think it isn't their first choice. Though it's true that different races would have different taboos/cultural practices.

Yeah, but if you do while on the first world, the fey respawn, making it one of the most sustainable food options available!

True, but then you risk annoyed fey coming after you with a grudge for eating them when they were IN THE MIDDLE OF IMPORTANT FEY BUSINESS DANGIT.

(Or, conversely, fey who think getting eaten is a cool new experience and won't leave you alone until you try some of their tasty flesh.)


Sissyl wrote:
Cannibalism happens in situations of starvation, or in societies with different religious views. It is not necessarily a moral issue. See, there is no victim. Those lizardmen would agree that wasting meat is the height of stupidity and would expect their tribe to eat them. A lizardman being exiled could be a terrible punishment not just because he would likely quickly die, but also because the tribe wouldn't be able to eat him.

Sure, it’s a waste of meat to not eat that guy that just happened to have died or been killed but it’s a slippery slope to killing that guy for the express purpose of eating him. It’s a similar conundrum to eugenics or euthanasia: those people are mostly dead or going to have a miserable, diseased or crippled life anyway so ‘putting them out of their misery’ seems like a benevolent act but it’s a slippery slope to ‘sorry, you’re too old, no matter how healthy you are’ and ‘you, baby, are not the correct gender so that’s it for you.’


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
graystone wrote:
taks wrote:
Interesting viewpoints. In our version of this game, eating any sentient creature is not just an evil act, but a despicable one. Other than that, game on.

Monster codex:

"Though lizardfolk are not evil, their practicality can sometimes seem abhorrent to other races, especially when it manifests in practices like cannibalism. To a lizardfolk, meat is meat, and during times of scarcity it would be an insult to those fallen in battle to let them rot rather than use their flesh to feed the tribe."

"In times of extreme starvation, a clutch could even become sustenance for a tribe rather than being allowed to hatch and become more mouths to feed."

Bestiary:

"LIZARDFOLK CR 1
XP 400
N Medium humanoid (reptilian)"

So, pathfinder AND Golarion don't see it as evil. it's neutral.

See bolded text.


taks wrote:
graystone wrote:
taks wrote:
Interesting viewpoints. In our version of this game, eating any sentient creature is not just an evil act, but a despicable one. Other than that, game on.

Monster codex:

"Though lizardfolk are not evil, their practicality can sometimes seem abhorrent to other races, especially when it manifests in practices like cannibalism. To a lizardfolk, meat is meat, and during times of scarcity it would be an insult to those fallen in battle to let them rot rather than use their flesh to feed the tribe."

"In times of extreme starvation, a clutch could even become sustenance for a tribe rather than being allowed to hatch and become more mouths to feed."

Bestiary:

"LIZARDFOLK CR 1
XP 400
N Medium humanoid (reptilian)"

So, pathfinder AND Golarion don't see it as evil. it's neutral.

See bolded text.

Yes, and I pointed out how that varies from the general expectations of the game as a whole and the specific setting of Golarion. I wasn't saying your game is wrong, but that it doesn't match with the 'standard' setting.


Anything's edible if you're brave enough.

Shadow Lodge

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Best tasting recipee for otyugh

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Place otyugh on cardboard

Place otyugh and cardboard in oven for 6 hours

Remove otyugh and cardboard

Discard otyugh

Eat the cardboard.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

^Whoa . . . So that's what they did in the cafeteria at Valdosta State College in Georgia when I was there in the summer of 1980 . . . .


2 people marked this as a favorite.
UnArcaneElection wrote:

^Whoa . . . So that's what they did in the cafeteria at Valdosta State College in Georgia when I was there in the summer of 1980 . . . .

No that would have been better... We got grade E 'meat': Edible but not fit for sale... Only the best for students, prisoners and mental patients...


born_of_fire wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
Cannibalism happens in situations of starvation, or in societies with different religious views. It is not necessarily a moral issue. See, there is no victim. Those lizardmen would agree that wasting meat is the height of stupidity and would expect their tribe to eat them. A lizardman being exiled could be a terrible punishment not just because he would likely quickly die, but also because the tribe wouldn't be able to eat him.
Sure, it’s a waste of meat to not eat that guy that just happened to have died or been killed but it’s a slippery slope to killing that guy for the express purpose of eating him. It’s a similar conundrum to eugenics or euthanasia: those people are mostly dead or going to have a miserable, diseased or crippled life anyway so ‘putting them out of their misery’ seems like a benevolent act but it’s a slippery slope to ‘sorry, you’re too old, no matter how healthy you are’ and ‘you, baby, are not the correct gender so that’s it for you.’

Well, slippery slopes are in the eye of the beholder. The burden is on you to show that it really is one. Usually, you have religious tenets to prevent slippery slopes.


BigNorseWolf wrote:


Best tasting recipee for otyugh

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Place otyugh on cardboard

Place otyugh and cardboard in oven for 6 hours

Remove otyugh and cardboard

Discard otyugh

Eat the cardboard.

I CAN HAS GLOFFY MEATS?


graystone wrote:
UnArcaneElection wrote:

^Whoa . . . So that's what they did in the cafeteria at Valdosta State College in Georgia when I was there in the summer of 1980 . . . .

No that would have been better... We got grade E 'meat': Edible but not fit for sale... Only the best for students, prisoners and mental patients...

When I was in high school (bracketing 1980), I saw a document, purportedly a photocopy of a US government official document, detailing what the uses for food deemed unfit for human consumption: foreign aid, animal feed, something else I can't remember (maybe for prisoners and mental patients like you say), and the school lunch program. Sounds like we saw just slightly different versions of the same thing.


My Life Is In Ruins wrote:


luckily for us prion related diseases are not part of RAW.

Indeed there's nothing in RAW to specify that the germ theory of disease is actually true, or that most life has a cellular structure; you can get interestingly weird RAW-compatible worlds if you assume otherwise and mull on the implications.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
graystone wrote:
taks wrote:
graystone wrote:
taks wrote:
Interesting viewpoints. In our version of this game, eating any sentient creature is not just an evil act, but a despicable one. Other than that, game on.

Monster codex:

"Though lizardfolk are not evil, their practicality can sometimes seem abhorrent to other races, especially when it manifests in practices like cannibalism. To a lizardfolk, meat is meat, and during times of scarcity it would be an insult to those fallen in battle to let them rot rather than use their flesh to feed the tribe."

"In times of extreme starvation, a clutch could even become sustenance for a tribe rather than being allowed to hatch and become more mouths to feed."

Bestiary:

"LIZARDFOLK CR 1
XP 400
N Medium humanoid (reptilian)"

So, pathfinder AND Golarion don't see it as evil. it's neutral.

See bolded text.
Yes, and I pointed out how that varies from the general expectations of the game as a whole and the specific setting of Golarion. I wasn't saying your game is wrong, but that it doesn't match with the 'standard' setting.

The fact that I specifically referred to "our version of the game" should have been sufficient information to infer that I knew that.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
taks wrote:
The fact that I specifically referred to "our version of the game" should have been sufficient information to infer that I knew that.

Yes, but my point wasn't to you. It was to let people know what the base line stance was. It gives context as to HOW your way differs from the norm.

UnArcaneElection wrote:
graystone wrote:
UnArcaneElection wrote:

^Whoa . . . So that's what they did in the cafeteria at Valdosta State College in Georgia when I was there in the summer of 1980 . . . .

No that would have been better... We got grade E 'meat': Edible but not fit for sale... Only the best for students, prisoners and mental patients...

When I was in high school (bracketing 1980), I saw a document, purportedly a photocopy of a US government official document, detailing what the uses for food deemed unfit for human consumption: foreign aid, animal feed, something else I can't remember (maybe for prisoners and mental patients like you say), and the school lunch program. Sounds like we saw just slightly different versions of the same thing.

I saw a label on the side of a box that was headed for the cafeteria. What wasn't listed on it wasn't hard to find with a little research. it's a grade that the producer can't sell, meaning they can use it themselves, give it away or the government could compensate them for it and they'd use it for government facilities: schools, prisons and state hospitals.


Sissyl wrote:
born_of_fire wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
Cannibalism happens in situations of starvation, or in societies with different religious views. It is not necessarily a moral issue. See, there is no victim. Those lizardmen would agree that wasting meat is the height of stupidity and would expect their tribe to eat them. A lizardman being exiled could be a terrible punishment not just because he would likely quickly die, but also because the tribe wouldn't be able to eat him.
Sure, it’s a waste of meat to not eat that guy that just happened to have died or been killed but it’s a slippery slope to killing that guy for the express purpose of eating him. It’s a similar conundrum to eugenics or euthanasia: those people are mostly dead or going to have a miserable, diseased or crippled life anyway so ‘putting them out of their misery’ seems like a benevolent act but it’s a slippery slope to ‘sorry, you’re too old, no matter how healthy you are’ and ‘you, baby, are not the correct gender so that’s it for you.’
Well, slippery slopes are in the eye of the beholder. The burden is on you to show that it really is one. Usually, you have religious tenets to prevent slippery slopes.

Don’t you know that Soylent Green is people? PEEEEEEEPULLLLLLL

:D


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laughingly the food service at the college I went to (FIT) was called "PFS". Our motto was, "flush twice, it's a long way to the cafeteria"... engineers ya know.


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As a strong believer in the background skills mechanic, I have a standing house rule that it's a DC 10+CR profession(chef) to know how to prepare something so that it is delicious or at least edible, with circumstantial modifiers for things that are extremely poisonous, made of fire, are incorporeal, etc.

It may not be the practical to cook and eat something (e.g. Basilisks become edible if you bury them under the sand of a polar beach for a period of several months to leech out the poison through natural fermentation; they will never taste good however, but you can convince tourists to eat them) but I will allow dedicated players to try to cook and eat anything (the best use culinary use for ghosts is in foams, FWIW.)


graystone wrote:
UnArcaneElection wrote:
graystone wrote:
UnArcaneElection wrote:

^Whoa . . . So that's what they did in the cafeteria at Valdosta State College in Georgia when I was there in the summer of 1980 . . . .

No that would have been better... We got grade E 'meat': Edible but not fit for sale... Only the best for students, prisoners and mental patients...

When I was in high school (bracketing 1980), I saw a document, purportedly a photocopy of a US government official document, detailing what the uses for food deemed unfit for human consumption: foreign aid, animal feed, something else I can't remember (maybe for prisoners and mental patients like you say), and the school lunch program. Sounds like we saw just slightly different versions of the same thing.

I saw a label on the side of a box that was headed for the cafeteria. What wasn't listed on it wasn't hard to find with a little research. it's a grade that the producer can't sell, meaning they can use it themselves, give it away or the government could compensate them for it and they'd use it for government facilities: schools, prisons and state hospitals.

Yep. Now I definitely think we saw the same stuff. Soylent Green comes later . . . .

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 16

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Can I just say that the fact that there's currently one thread asking if all monsters are edible, and another debating whether you can knock up a summoned creature is entertaining to no end.


Huh I would say no on the summoned creature. Afterall they don't let demons summon more demons.

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Ultimate Cooking hardcover? Iron chef base class...


1 person marked this as a favorite.
BigNorseWolf wrote:
Ultimate Cooking hardcover? Iron chef base class...

I would buy it, just cause I would find it entertaining.

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