House Rules - What have you put together?


Homebrew

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One recently inspired by another thread ...

I'm going to make monster immunities more logical. I don't care what type something is, if it has a mind, it's susceptible to mind-affecting stuff. If it has a physical form, it's susceptible to polymorph. And so on.


DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
That is already the rule in the game.

Really? Where?

I've never actually read all the rules. I just assumed they did things like 3,5.


SilvercatMoonpaw wrote:
DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
That is already the rule in the game.

Really? Where?

I've never actually read all the rules. I just assumed they did things like 3,5.

I think it was in conversion guide...probably would have missed it too if not for that.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber
necromental wrote:
SilvercatMoonpaw wrote:
DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
That is already the rule in the game.

Really? Where?

I've never actually read all the rules. I just assumed they did things like 3,5.

I think it was in conversion guide...probably would have missed it too if not for that.
Core Rulebook pg 577 wrote:


Permanent Bonuses: Ability bonuses with a duration greater than 1 day actually increase the relevant ability score after 24 hours. Modify all skills and statistics as appropriate. This might cause you to gain skill points, hit points, and other bonuses. These bonuses should be noted separately in case they are removed.

The exception is the Headband of Vast Intelligence which always has skills associated with it, and therefore it "picks" the skill you gain ranks in for you (and doesn't stack if you already have ranks in said skill).


DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:


Core Rulebook pg 577 wrote:


Permanent Bonuses: Ability bonuses with a duration greater than 1 day actually increase the relevant ability score after 24 hours. Modify all skills and statistics as appropriate. This might cause you to gain skill points, hit points, and other bonuses. These bonuses should be noted separately in case they are removed.

I could see myself having read that and not understood it meant "these are restroactive". I've been known to misinterpret things that aren't beaten into my head by obviousness.

Thanks!

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber
SilvercatMoonpaw wrote:
DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:


Core Rulebook pg 577 wrote:


Permanent Bonuses: Ability bonuses with a duration greater than 1 day actually increase the relevant ability score after 24 hours. Modify all skills and statistics as appropriate. This might cause you to gain skill points, hit points, and other bonuses. These bonuses should be noted separately in case they are removed.

I could see myself having read that and not understood it meant "these are restroactive". I've been known to misinterpret things that aren't beaten into my head by obviousness.

Thanks!

No worries, it actually took me a little bit of searching to find the relevant text. I remembered it being a big deal in the transition from 3.5 to Pathfinder and then was slowly starting to panic as I couldn't find it explicitly stated anywhere in the PRD.

It took some googling to find the above.


Bjørn Røyrvik wrote:
Except that Regenerate doesn't remove insanity or other such things that Heal does.

True enough! Knock yourself out. I still like the fast healing flavor.


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Quixote: ...doesn't changing to a flat cost preclude putting flaming burst on an Amulet of Mighty Fists or with various features that let you temporarily put +N's worth of bonuses on your weapon?

An interesting point, and one that hasn't come up much. When it comes to an item like the Amulet, I'm sure we could work out something reasonable. Maybe a 50% price hike. Or none at all, if the situation is tame enough.

For abilities like the Paladin's, I'd be cool with letting them treat it as an additional +1 on top of the enchantment, if they really wanted it.
The problem is, it's so crap that no one ever wants it.

Can'tFindthePath wrote:
Reading the discussion on elemental burst weapons it occurs to me; why not just make the burst quality the default at +1...And elemental damage becomes pretty useless at higher level...Also, the bane weapon special ability, which grants +2 enhancement and +2d6 damage vs one type, is +1 equivalent.

I've always felt that the standard "+1d6 fire damage/hit" was the staple example of a fair +1 equivalent, so I'd be hesitant to mess with that too much.

I've also felt like energy resistance isn't so incredibly common, even at higher levels, to merit a little fire and lightning worthless. It's not useful against every opponent, but that's the whole point of elemental damage anyway.
I think the Bane enchantment is much more restrictive; the odds of running into something that's vulnerable to cold damage are much, much higher than running into something that...just isn't a specific creature type.
But yeah, they're not great. Maybe even 10,000gp is too much. If you just have the bare minimum +1 flaming weapon, it's the same price as before. Maybe 7,500 or 5,000gp...


Quixote wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Quixote: ...doesn't changing to a flat cost preclude putting flaming burst on an Amulet of Mighty Fists or with various features that let you temporarily put +N's worth of bonuses on your weapon?

An interesting point, and one that hasn't come up much. When it comes to an item like the Amulet, I'm sure we could work out something reasonable. Maybe a 50% price hike. Or none at all, if the situation is tame enough.

For abilities like the Paladin's, I'd be cool with letting them treat it as an additional +1 on top of the enchantment, if they really wanted it.
The problem is, it's so crap that no one ever wants it.

Can'tFindthePath wrote:
Reading the discussion on elemental burst weapons it occurs to me; why not just make the burst quality the default at +1...And elemental damage becomes pretty useless at higher level...Also, the bane weapon special ability, which grants +2 enhancement and +2d6 damage vs one type, is +1 equivalent.

I've always felt that the standard "+1d6 fire damage/hit" was the staple example of a fair +1 equivalent, so I'd be hesitant to mess with that too much.

I've also felt like energy resistance isn't so incredibly common, even at higher levels, to merit a little fire and lightning worthless. It's not useful against every opponent, but that's the whole point of elemental damage anyway.
I think the Bane enchantment is much more restrictive; the odds of running into something that's vulnerable to cold damage are much, much higher than running into something that...just isn't a specific creature type.
But yeah, they're not great. Maybe even 10,000gp is too much. If you just have the bare minimum +1 flaming weapon, it's the same price as before. Maybe 7,500 or 5,000gp...

personally i find the enchantments that add elemental damage to not be worth it, so many things at mid and late game have energy resist 10 to at least 2 elements if not flat out immunity to it


Quixote wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Quixote: ...doesn't changing to a flat cost preclude putting flaming burst on an Amulet of Mighty Fists or with various features that let you temporarily put +N's worth of bonuses on your weapon?

An interesting point, and one that hasn't come up much. When it comes to an item like the Amulet, I'm sure we could work out something reasonable. Maybe a 50% price hike. Or none at all, if the situation is tame enough.

For abilities like the Paladin's, I'd be cool with letting them treat it as an additional +1 on top of the enchantment, if they really wanted it.
The problem is, it's so crap that no one ever wants it.

Can'tFindthePath wrote:
Reading the discussion on elemental burst weapons it occurs to me; why not just make the burst quality the default at +1...And elemental damage becomes pretty useless at higher level...Also, the bane weapon special ability, which grants +2 enhancement and +2d6 damage vs one type, is +1 equivalent.

I've always felt that the standard "+1d6 fire damage/hit" was the staple example of a fair +1 equivalent, so I'd be hesitant to mess with that too much.

I've also felt like energy resistance isn't so incredibly common, even at higher levels, to merit a little fire and lightning worthless. It's not useful against every opponent, but that's the whole point of elemental damage anyway.
I think the Bane enchantment is much more restrictive; the odds of running into something that's vulnerable to cold damage are much, much higher than running into something that...just isn't a specific creature type.
But yeah, they're not great. Maybe even 10,000gp is too much. If you just have the bare minimum +1 flaming weapon, it's the same price as before. Maybe 7,500 or 5,000gp...

You could also make its bonus-equivalence fractional. While Paizo sticks strictly to integers, nothing in the formulae breaks for fractions. E.g. if 'burst' is a +0.5 bonus then a +1 flaming burst weapon's price is 2000 gp * (2.5 * 2.5) = 12,500 gp. (This is something I've been thinking about for a while; your comments on the low worth of bursting have pushed me over the edge to actually try it.)


A few of the more prominent ones that we tend to use in my groups include:

+ Passive perception: utilizing the flat bonus unmodified by a d20 roll for noticing basic things about the area/detecting moderately discrete actions before actively looking for them.

+ Heighten Spell as a given: If you choose to cast a spell utilizing a higher-level spell slot, it increases the spell level and thus the save DC accordingly. There's little sense in requiring a feat to pour more effort into a spell when you already possess the extra energy to expend, as far as we see it. And thus a few homebrew feats such as utilizing Heighten Spell to instead increase the CL of the spell being cast.

+ Allowing material from 3.5e: There's just so much of it it's a shame to just ignore it. And so long as the DM can look it over and give approval, it's fair game, so long as it's first-party published and there aren't updated versions for Pathfinder already. The exception being a few spells that were save-or-die that were reduced to save or take massive damage, such as Slay Living. The DM specifically is allowed to grant these to players as a form of "ancient magic" that is not typically obtainable through independent research. Also the ability to reference the 3.5e gods as "old gods" or forgotten deities can be nice flavor.


Angry Wiggles wrote:

I typically run under these rules. After a while, there came to be enough of them that my players wanted indexes and a table of contents so they could find the specific rules faster. They change slightly depending on the sort of campaign being run, especially in the character options section, but these are the boilerplate rules.

I've only ever used these in person, so I'm not 100% on how well they would work in a PBP environment, although I don't see any glaring issues. I may start an interest check thread soon to see if anyone would be interested.

Nice rules set! Just wanted to mention that "Weapon Training - This ability now applies to all weapons in a weapon group" is redundant with the actual rules. That's why the weapon groups were defined in the first place....

Do you have any problems with people spamming Cure Minor Wounds between encounters? Or is that the point?


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I have weapon specific feats and abilities apply to all weapons in the appropriate weapon group.


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Oh, nothing much.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
Oh, nothing much.

Great Gozreh's Gonads!

I don't suppose it's available in a non-Windows-only format?


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
I don't suppose it's available in a non-Windows-only format?

Click "download" for each document.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
I don't suppose it's available in a non-Windows-only format?
Click "download" for each document.

Yeah, that gets me Microsoft Word docs. :-( Oh, well.


What format do you want/need them in?


Java Man wrote:
What format do you want/need them in?

Ideally PDF, but Postscript or plain text would be fine. Anything non-proprietary, really. (I'm on a Linux box.)


Open office is a shareware office suite that can open microsoft office files. I would be shocked if there is not a linux compatible version available. Openoffice.org


Java Man wrote:
Open office is a shareware office suite that can open microsoft office files. I would be shocked if there is not a linux compatible version available. Openoffice.org

*facepalm*

I even knew about that, I'd just never had occasion to want it before... work, brain, work!
Thanks :)


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Most of my house rules have been covered, so I'll just mention the more niche ones.

Strike Back is not a feat. It is a combat option. Anyone can do this.

Reach weapons do not use the ranged weapon cover rules. Polearms are designed to attack past other people. No one should not have to go for Improved Precise Shot just to be able to use reach weapons the way they are intended.

Shield users can still use their shield hand to hold objects. (hold, not wield)

Scarred Witchdoctor uses it's original version.


For ease of use (not that we reference this document much anymore)

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1RsujJTuLW4Y2KRGyD8bs1kAHXjvJDWCIM9QfK594F d4


Question for those of you who use the popular "feats that apply to a specific weapon instead apply to a weapon group" rule: Do you make an exception for natural attacks? It seems to be way more of a power-up for natural attack builds than for manufactured weapon builds.


A common houserule I've seen is trading out both a gun's touch attack ability and their misfire chance.


A lot of good ideas here. Power Attack/Deadly Aim and Combat Expertise being built into the mechanics of the Attack action rather than feats...definitely a strong concept to consider.

Weapon-specific Feats applying to weapon groups...I like it that for similar reasons: giving primary combatants more options.

Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
...for..."feats that apply to a specific weapon instead apply to a weapon group" rule: Do you make an exception for natural attacks?

--I agree. What if you had to pick primary and secondary natural attacks as two separate groups?

In reference to previous comments/questions about weapon enchantments, Thundering is pretty awful too. I always thought "deafened permanently" was a cool potential effect, but for the whole of the weapon's abilities to only occur on criticals is just sad.
I've just let my players use it as the sonic equivalent of Flaming. It seems like a more powerful option at first, since very few opponents are going to have Sonic resistance or immunity, but considering that it is nullified by Silence and is...not the ideal enchantment when you're trying to defeat your opponents quickly and quietly to avoid altering every blood-hungry monster that may be napping on a pile of bones around the next corner...quite a few players opted for another element. Acid is the one that's harder to find a balance for.


Quixote wrote:

In reference to previous comments/questions about weapon enchantments, Thundering is pretty awful too. I always thought "deafened permanently" was a cool potential effect, but for the whole of the weapon's abilities to only occur on criticals is just sad.

I've just let my players use it as the sonic equivalent of Flaming. It seems like a more powerful option at first, since very few opponents are going to have Sonic resistance or immunity, but considering that it is nullified by Silence and is...not the ideal enchantment when you're trying to defeat your opponents quickly and quietly to avoid altering every blood-hungry monster that may be napping on a pile of bones around the next corner...quite a few players opted for another element. Acid is the one that's harder to find a balance for.

It has some really niche uses. A hunter with the butterfly's sting feat and a purring bundle of death wearing a thundering amulet of mighty fists works. Not commonly useful though no.


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One I just thought about reading another thread ..

Sacred and Profane bonuses do not stack, they negate one another. So, a +2 Profane Bonus and a +1 Sacred bonus ends up being a +1 profane bonus. These are opposite energies and, IMHO, should not combine or accumulate.


avr wrote:
...hunter...butterfly's sting feat...purring bundle of death...thundering amulet of mighty fists works...

--those terms are unknown to me.

My group has always tended to steer away from supplemental material. If we can't find something that we like in the core books, I usually end up adjusting one of the basic classes/feats/items/whatever or making it from scratch.
The problem with the supplemental stuff, as I see it, is that the more you heap onto the pile, the more likely it becomes that you end up with some weird synergy between two random and obscure things that were never really intended to go together.
But then again, if anything threatens the balance of the game or would make one player outshine the others, we end up adjusting it anyway. So it really doesn't matter.


purring bundle of death = big cat animal companion, which you can find in the PF core rulebook. Likewise the amulet of mighty fists. A ranger could do so nearly as well as a hunter, so the only necessary element from outside core would be the feat, which has appeared in Inner sea gods, Faiths of purity and the Weapon master's handbook.

It seems to me that making something up would be more work than just stealing Paizo's, but whatever works for you.


This info will take awhile to collate! For those who have tried the Unchained action economy as part of your house rules, what is your feedback on them?


I'm going to swipe Starfinder's rule that your caster level is equal to your character level. Oracle 2/Sorcerer 3 has a CL of 5 for both classes (but gets no spells per day/spells known/etc).

For the sake of my sanity, I'm going to rule that you can only have one summon spell in effect at a time; casting a second one immediately ends the first.


avr wrote:
...It seems to me that making something up would be more work than just stealing Paizo's, but whatever works for you.

I sort of guessed you were referring to a cat companion. Especially after I realized that the item was a common one with an uncommon specific enchantment added to it. But...yeah. I'm still not seeing it. So your cat has Thundering attacks, and you can give your cat your critical hits,for 1d8 sonic damage on up to 20% of its attacks. You know what would be better than that? +1d6 fire damage on 100% of its attacks.

As for what's more work, that's true of course. But I often end up reskinning or tweaking something from the core books. The concept of archetypes was well-known around my table before we ever played Pathfinder. "You want a cleric that has more skill points? Okay. Want to give up some armor proficiency?" --that sort of thing.
I mean, I've made a ton of new material for players as well. But it's worth it to maintain the tone of the game. There's just *so much* material out there. The concept behind a lot of prestige classes, spells and items gets...a little corny. It starts to feel more like a game and less like a story.

All that said, I've got no issues with that Feat. It's interesting, fun, potent-but-not-stupid. Encourages teamwork.
...but even that can't make me think that Thundering is *ever* a good idea.

Dark Archive

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Zhayne wrote:

One I just thought about reading another thread ..

Sacred and Profane bonuses do not stack, they negate one another. So, a +2 Profane Bonus and a +1 Sacred bonus ends up being a +1 profane bonus. These are opposite energies and, IMHO, should not combine or accumulate.

True, being able to stack a profane and a sacred bonus seems counter-intuitive, and yet, I think the issue goes deeper. A 'profane' bonus isn't profane in any way. It's just sacred to a non-good god. And then there's the half-hearted kludge of clerics of neutral gods choosing to give a sacred or profane bonus, because there's no neutral (or chaotic, or lawful) bonus type.

Profane would be more of an anti-theistic thing, like some sort of bonus based on defying the gods.

I'd prefer if there was only one 'divine' bonus that applied to bonuses given by good, neutral or evil gods, instead of some sort of weird mix between sacred and profane, holy and unholy descriptors.


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Question for those of you who use the popular "feats that apply to a specific weapon instead apply to a weapon group" rule: Do you make an exception for natural attacks? It seems to be way more of a power-up for natural attack builds than for manufactured weapon builds.

nope it applies to all natural attacks, while they are great early game they fall off late game unless you can some how pull 8-10 natural attacks in your build some how


Set wrote:
Zhayne wrote:

One I just thought about reading another thread ..

Sacred and Profane bonuses do not stack, they negate one another. So, a +2 Profane Bonus and a +1 Sacred bonus ends up being a +1 profane bonus. These are opposite energies and, IMHO, should not combine or accumulate.

True, being able to stack a profane and a sacred bonus seems counter-intuitive, and yet, I think the issue goes deeper. A 'profane' bonus isn't profane in any way. It's just sacred to a non-good god. And then there's the half-hearted kludge of clerics of neutral gods choosing to give a sacred or profane bonus, because there's no neutral (or chaotic, or lawful) bonus type.

Profane would be more of an anti-theistic thing, like some sort of bonus based on defying the gods.

I'd prefer if there was only one 'divine' bonus that applied to bonuses given by good, neutral or evil gods, instead of some sort of weird mix between sacred and profane, holy and unholy descriptors.

I just think of it as positive and negative energy, basically, especially since my setting has no gods (though most people think otherwise).


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Copied from my own page of house rules.

Rule Zero
The following are NOT used in my games.
Massive Damage
Fortitude save to avoid death from Coup de Grace.
Resurrection.

Abilities
Incorporeal An incorporeal creature takes full damage from force and positive energy attacks, such as positive channeled energy and searing light.

Low-Light Vision This allows the creature to see in dim light as if it was normal light. Outdoors at night, it sees as on a cloudy day.

Increasing Abilities by Level
As long as you use your level-granted ability increase (normally gained at levels 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20) for an ability increase resulting in a score of 15 or less, you get two ability improvements, neither of which can give you an attribute score exceeding 15. You can apply both improvements to the same ability score, as long as your final score ends up at 15 or less.

Racial and inherent attribute modifiers are considered part of the ability score for this rule; it does not matter if you arrived at the score trough a racial or inherent modifier.

Alignment Proximity
In addition to normal alignment proximity, the neutral alignment is considered one step away from all other alignments. This gives additional alignment options to divine casters with alignment restrictions. A neutral divine caster can worship a deity of any alignment, and a neutral deity can have worshipers of any alignment.

Metamagic
Forget the original metamagic rules except when creating magic items.

All classes apply metamagic as the spell is cast, not when it is prepared. A spellcaster can apply metamagic that brings the effective spell level of a spell up to the highest level of spell he can cast, without using a higher-level spell slot. The caster can apply the same metamagic feat several times to the same spell, with additive effects. Applying metamagic does not affect casting time. Heighten Spell, Persistent Spell, and other metamagic save DC modifiers applies only to the initial saving throw—any later saving throws use the basic save DC.

Crafting Magic Items
Magic items are crafted at the rate of Caster Level times 5 gold pieces per hour or cl times 200 per week. This means a higher-level character crafts magic items faster. The break-even point is at level 5. To participate in a crafting project, a character must spend at least 4 hours a week or one hour per day on it. This time is sufficient to provide the prerequisites for the project. Anyone with a caster level can contribute time (and thus value) to the project, making this good work for low-level apprentices.

Combat Rules
First Combat Round
If both sides are aware of each other before the start of a combat, neither side is flat-footed. The mutual flatfooted condition that is the default applies when two sides encounter each other without being prepared, such as after opening a dungeon door, moving around a bend in a forest, or when one side suddenly turns hostile. At any time when initiative could reasonably have been rolled beforehand and it was only by convenience that combat was started at this time, creatures are not flat-footed.
This is generally the case in boarding actions.

Attacks of Opportunity
Combat in three dimensions is fast and fluid
Creatures that are not standing stable on the ground - such as when standing on a slippery or tight surface, prone, flying, or swimming, or climbing - do not get to make any attacks of opportunity triggered by movement.

Charge
Charging is a special standard action that allows you to move your speed and attack during the action. Charging, however, carries tight restrictions on how you can move.

Movement During a Charge You must move before your attack, not after. You must move at least 10 feet (2 squares) and may move up to your speed directly toward the designated opponent. Your turn ends after a completed charge.
You must have a clear path toward the opponent, and nothing can hinder your movement (such as difficult terrain or obstacles). You must move to the closest space from which you can attack the opponent. If this space is occupied or otherwise blocked, you can’t charge. If any line from your starting space to the ending space passes through a square that blocks movement, slows movement, or contains a creature (even an ally), you can’t charge. Helpless creatures don’t stop a charge. You can’t take a 5-foot step in the same round as a charge.

Attacking on a Charge After moving, you may make a single melee attack. You get a +2 bonus on the attack roll and take a –2 penalty to your AC until the start of your next turn. A charging character gets a +2 bonus on combat maneuver attack rolls made to bull rush or overrun an opponent. Other combat maneuvers do not gain a bonus from charging.
Lances and Charge Attacks: A lance deals double damage if employed by a mounted character in a charge. Note that the lance has been house-ruled to not have reach.
Weapons Readied against a Charge: Spears, tridents, and other weapons with the brace feature deal double damage when readied (set) and used against a charging character.
Swinging Charge from Ropes or Vines: As a standard, you can swing using a rope, vine, or similar aid within reach toward an opponent and make a single melee attack. You must move at least 20 feet (4 squares) and you must start on elevation that is equal or higher than that of your opponent. Your movement provokes attacks of opportunity as normal. Your turn does not end at the end of a swinging charge.
Pounce: It is a full-round action to make a charge and make a full attack at the end (including rake attacks if the creature also has the rake ability). All attacks must be against the same target. Only creatures with a special ability like pounce are allowed to do this.

Readied Actions
Readying an action (and subsequently performing a readied action) does not affect initiative in upcoming rounds.

Trip vs. Fliers
A flying creature that it tripped becomes disoriented and immediately plummets downward a distance equal to it's flying speed. This movement does not trigger attacks of opportunity. If this causes the creature to touch down, it lands prone. A creature cannot take off and fly while prone.

Giants Throwing Rocks
Humanoids of the giant subtype with the racial ability to throw rocks make such attacks as touch attacks.

Size in Combat and Movement
You can move into the space of a smaller creature, triggering an attack of opportunity as usual. If you end your move in the space of a smaller creature, that creature can choose between trying to block you (which turns this into an overrun). If the overrun succeeds or the smaller creature chooses to move aside, it is moved out of your space. If the overrun fails, you end your move in the last space where there is room for you. This forced movement does not trigger attacks of opportunity.

Coup de Grace
A coup de grace does not involve a death save, but can be done against objects.

Critical Stacking
Effects that improve critical hits do stack, except spells and weapon abilities that double the threat range of a weapon. So the keen weapon property and Improved Critical feat do stack, and both stack with bless weapon, but the keen weapon property and the spell keen edge do not stack.

Damage to Objects
Objects can suffer critical hits and coup-de-grace, but the critical multiple is always x2. Weapon damage to unattended objects is halved, except if the object is judged to be particularly susceptible to this kind of attack - which generally only applies to a few weapons.
Cutting blades and are good against grass, brush, cloth, rope, and other very soft materials (Hardness 0), notably the cutlass, dagger, scythe, and sickle.
Picks are good against soft materials such as wood or earth (Hardness 1-5): heavy pick, light pick, and pickaxe.
Hammers work against stone and metal (Hardness 5+): earth breaker, light hammer, and warhammer.
Axes are good for working with wood; shaping, building, and felling, but not the brute destruction needed here.
These two rules tend to cancel out, as you usually do coup-de-grace to objects. It does not apply to constructs, even if they have hardness they are not objects. Neither do weapons you are trying to sunder take half damage.

Falling Damage
An elephant takes much more damage falling than a squirrel does. The normal falling damage increment is 1d6 for a creature of medium size, but falling damage scales with size at twice the usual rate; each size category change halves or doubles falling damage.
Acrobatics can reduce damage by more than one increment; each multiple of 15 on the Acrobatics roll removes another increment of falling damage.
Size
Diminutive
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Gargantuan
Colossal
Falling damage die
nil
1
1d3
1d6
2d6
4d6
8d6
16d6

Hit Points & Healing
Hit point damage does not really represent wounds. A character is only wounded once he has taken 50% of his total hit points in damage (also known as being Bloodied), and even then the damage is not serious. Only at negative hit points does damage represent actual wounds.

Bloodied
A character that has taken 50% or more of his full hit points in damage is considered bloodied. This has no game effect, but is generally clearly visible - the character receives his first actual wound. A duel fought to "first blood" is fought until one side is bloodied in this way. It is generally considered honorable to retreat or surrender once you have been bloodied. It is also a kind of a rite of passage - a character who has been bloodied in combat at least once is considered a veteran and may receive a honor similar to the purple heart.

Dying
A character taking damage resulting in negative hit points gains the dying condition and may bleed to death unless stabilized.
A character on negative hit points exceeding its Constitution + Hit Dice is dead.
An creature that is helpless and prone always succeeds at saving throws against damaging area attacks.
The optional rules for Massive Damage are not used.

Rest & Healing
A creature at positive hit points recovers all hit points from daily rest. As long as any of these conditions are fulfilled, daily rest restores all hit point damage:
Has over 50% hit points remaining (not bloodied)
Succeeds at a DC 15 Fortitude saving throw
A successful Heal check (DC 15) for Long Time Care
If the character is unconscious or none of the above options succeed, healing proceeds normally.

Equipment
Double Weapons
Both ends of a double weapon counts as a single weapon for spells and enchanting. Minor variations can be enchanted into each end, such as a weapon that is flaming in one end and frost in the other.

Armor
The times to don armor should be read in rounds (full-round actions) rather than minutes.

Drugs
All drugs cost 1/10 normal. Strong persecution can drive drug prices up, to a maximum of the normal price. Even so, drugs are usually cut down to 1/10 to get a recreational effect. A recreational dose gives only mood effects and has its save DC reduced by 10.
Against any drug a successful save negates any penalties imposed. A save that fails by less than 10 has the normal negative effects. A save that fails by 10 or more indicates addiction. In addition, a die result of 1 indicates a risk of addiction; roll the save again, and if the second check fails, addiction has occurred.

Traps
The base cost of a mechanical trap is CR^2 x 10 gp.

Genral Rules
Feats of Endurance
A character may use his Fortitude saving throw in lieu of Contitution bonus for checks to pass stunts like Constitution checks made to continue running; Constitution checks made to avoid nonlethal damage from a forced march; Constitution checks made to hold your breath; Constitution checks made to avoid nonlethal damage from starvation or thirst.
This is basically the same tasks the Endurance feat applies to, and the bonus from Endurance applies to such checks.


Starfox wrote:
All classes apply metamagic as the spell is cast, not when it is prepared. A spellcaster can apply metamagic that brings the effective spell level of a spell up to the highest level of spell he can cast, without using a higher-level spell slot. The caster can apply the same metamagic feat several times to the same spell, with additive effects. Applying metamagic does not affect casting time. Heighten Spell, Persistent Spell, and other metamagic save DC modifiers applies only to the initial saving throw—any later saving throws use the basic save DC.

so quadruple empowered fireball as a 3rd level spell slot if your an 18th level sorcerer?


Lady-J wrote:
so quadruple empowered fireball as a 3rd level spell slot if your an 18th level sorcerer?

Not quite. Applying Empower Spell 3 times to a Fireball gives you 3x (+50%), so you end up with 10d6 x 2.5. Approximately 87 hp.

If you instead take Intensify Spell twice and the Empower Spell twice, you end up with 18d6 x2, which is more bang for the buck but also costs you 2 feats. 126 pts of average damage.

In both cases, the save DC is 13 + caster attribute, which is not great at level 18.

Its not been a problem to us. It might not work on other tables. Our experience is that magic is rarely used for direct damage because it cannot compete, especially at higher levels. Its been a while since we had a high-damage caster, so it might not stand a stress test.

Edit: The main combat metamagic I see is Heighten Spell, to get save DCs up. Overall the most popular metamagic is Silent Spell (to not ruin surprise) and Extend Spell (for buffs).

Liberty's Edge

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My House Rules have become quite expansive over the years.

Most of those aren't necessary per se, though. The necessary ones IME are as follows (though I feel like these are more like advice than House Rules in many ways):

-Everyone in the party gets the same XP...or just level people when the GM feels like it. Either works.
- Have any and all House Rules codified pre-game so people can examine them if they wish.
-Very few people object to powered up characters, many object to powered down ones. House Rules to power up weaker options will almost always be better received and more fun than those that power down options that are very powerful already...so only power something down or remove it if it's really egregious.
-Always think how your House Rules will interact with each other. Some House Rules that are each excellent in isolation do not work well together at all.

And that's all that's absolutely necessary (and none are even in the document above, though all inform it).

In terms of ones I've found really useful:

-Allowing either Cha or Wis to Will Saves at the player's option is a huge quality of life increase for social characters.
-Letting people swap around up to two Class Skills (Knowledges for Knowledges only, Perform, Profession, and Craft can only be traded for each other, no getting UMD or Perception this way) is also a huge quality of life increase and concept enabler.
-Making all non full casters (except maybe Summoner) have at least 4+Int skills, and allowing Sorcerers the same is, again, just a huge fun increaser.
-On that note, mobility and skill improvements for Martial Classes in general are super nice and make the game more fun. Skill Unlocks (from Unchained) are pretty great for this, especially if you reduce their prerequisites by 5 ranks (to a minimum of 1).

Those are the ones that leap to mind, anyway.


Starfox wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
so quadruple empowered fireball as a 3rd level spell slot if your an 18th level sorcerer?

Not quite. Applying Empower Spell 3 times to a Fireball gives you 3x (+50%), so you end up with 10d6 x 2.5. Approximately 87 hp.

If you instead take Intensify Spell twice and the Empower Spell twice, you end up with 18d6 x2, which is more bang for the buck but also costs you 2 feats. 126 pts of average damage.

In both cases, the save DC is 13 + caster attribute, which is not great at level 18.

Its not been a problem to us. It might not work on other tables. Our experience is that magic is rarely used for direct damage because it cannot compete, especially at higher levels. Its been a while since we had a high-damage caster, so it might not stand a stress test.

Edit: The main combat metamagic I see is Heighten Spell, to get save DCs up. Overall the most popular metamagic is Silent Spell (to not ruin surprise) and Extend Spell (for buffs).

This is interesting. My initial gut reaction was that it is way too much free power. However, I have recently completed two campaigns in which we began at 1st level, and ascended all the way to 19th or 20th. I definitely noticed that damaging spells lose their luster around 13th or so. And most other spells have little effect on BBEGs due to low DC's.

One idea seen on these boards, that I have contemplated is granting Heighten Spell for free. So, basically you can cast any spell you have in a higher slot for more DC. But then you won't be casting your biggest spells. Your idea also addresses the relative weakness of lower level spells, particularly damaging ones. But, the cool part is that you have to choose between DC and expanding damage or targets, etc.; and you have to have the feats.

Now, I wouldn't allow stacking of the same feat, as it easily gets out of hand, and super combos are too easy to acquire. But otherwise, I think this may work well.


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You know, I just did some math, exploring the possibilities of all those free metamagics. Although I would still be conservative in granting unlimited combinations of feat stacking, you really can't break elemental damage spells. Balancing DC against damage output, with the reality of Saving Throws of challenging encounters and resistance and protection from energy spells...have at it.

I worry though, that a super spell metamagic combo is hiding out there somewhere...Caution.


Our group is currently playing Wrath of Righteous and we use many of the alternative mythic rules proposed in Legendary Games' Mythic Solutions pdf. So far (we're halfway through book 4) they seem to be working and encounters are still challenging.

http://paizo.com/products/btpy9ehv/reviews?Mythic-Solutions#tabs

Other than that we use only one house rule, which we've be using for several years:

We use fixed hit points.

As per the normal rules a creature gains maximum hit points if its first Hit Die is for a PC class level.

Beyond that monsters and NPCs have average hit points (as per Bestiaries and Adventure Paths), as do animal companions, bonded mounts, cohorts and eidolons etc.

However beyond first level PCs receive fixed hit points as determined by Hit Die.

D12 = 7 hp
D10 = 6 hp
D8 = 5 hp
D6 = 4 hp

This gives PCs a slight edge (1/2 extra hp per level) and removes dumb luck from the equation.


Starfox wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
so quadruple empowered fireball as a 3rd level spell slot if your an 18th level sorcerer?

Not quite. Applying Empower Spell 3 times to a Fireball gives you 3x (+50%), so you end up with 10d6 x 2.5. Approximately 87 hp.

If you instead take Intensify Spell twice and the Empower Spell twice, you end up with 18d6 x2, which is more bang for the buck but also costs you 2 feats. 126 pts of average damage.

In both cases, the save DC is 13 + caster attribute, which is not great at level 18.

Its not been a problem to us. It might not work on other tables. Our experience is that magic is rarely used for direct damage because it cannot compete, especially at higher levels. Its been a while since we had a high-damage caster, so it might not stand a stress test.

Edit: The main combat metamagic I see is Heighten Spell, to get save DCs up. Overall the most popular metamagic is Silent Spell (to not ruin surprise) and Extend Spell (for buffs).

a blaster sorc will get magical lineage and metamagic master for fire ball allowing for a 4th empower and bloodline mutations net you intensify for free granting extra dice equal to your cha mod so your cap is already at least 20d6 so any more metamagics on intensify would be pointless, or you could run 3 empowers and throw in a persistent spell metamagic to force them to save 2 times, or make it 2 empowers and 2 persists for x2 damage and them needing to same 3 times at a dc of around 21 and for only a 3rd level spell slot that's a pretty good deal


Moonclanger wrote:

Our group is currently playing Wrath of Righteous and we use many of the alternative mythic rules proposed in Legendary Games' Mythic Solutions pdf. So far (we're halfway through book 4) they seem to be working and encounters are still challenging.

http://paizo.com/products/btpy9ehv/reviews?Mythic-Solutions#tabs

Other than that we use only one house rule, which we've be using for several years:

We use fixed hit points.

As per the normal rules a creature gains maximum hit points if its first Hit Die is for a PC class level.

Beyond that monsters and NPCs have average hit points (as per Bestiaries and Adventure Paths), as do animal companions, bonded mounts, cohorts and eidolons etc.

However beyond first level PCs receive fixed hit points as determined by Hit Die.

D12 = 7 hp
D10 = 6 hp
D8 = 5 hp
D6 = 4 hp

This gives PCs a slight edge (1/2 extra hp per level) and removes dumb luck from the equation.

pretty sure that's not a house rule you can just take average roll instead of rolling for hp and average roll is half hd+1 so its not really fixing hp issues for pcs. now if it were everyone gets max hp that would be different and would actually be a boon for most martial classes as they tend to have the higher hd


Lady-J wrote:
Moonclanger wrote:

Our group is currently playing Wrath of Righteous and we use many of the alternative mythic rules proposed in Legendary Games' Mythic Solutions pdf. So far (we're halfway through book 4) they seem to be working and encounters are still challenging.

http://paizo.com/products/btpy9ehv/reviews?Mythic-Solutions#tabs

Other than that we use only one house rule, which we've be using for several years:

We use fixed hit points.

As per the normal rules a creature gains maximum hit points if its first Hit Die is for a PC class level.

Beyond that monsters and NPCs have average hit points (as per Bestiaries and Adventure Paths), as do animal companions, bonded mounts, cohorts and eidolons etc.

However beyond first level PCs receive fixed hit points as determined by Hit Die.

D12 = 7 hp
D10 = 6 hp
D8 = 5 hp
D6 = 4 hp

This gives PCs a slight edge (1/2 extra hp per level) and removes dumb luck from the equation.

pretty sure that's not a house rule you can just take average roll instead of rolling for hp and average roll is half hd+1 so its not really fixing hp issues for pcs. now if it were everyone gets max hp that would be different and would actually be a boon for most martial classes as they tend to have the higher hd

Nope. This is not an official option = house rule.


Can'tFindthePath wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
Moonclanger wrote:

Our group is currently playing Wrath of Righteous and we use many of the alternative mythic rules proposed in Legendary Games' Mythic Solutions pdf. So far (we're halfway through book 4) they seem to be working and encounters are still challenging.

http://paizo.com/products/btpy9ehv/reviews?Mythic-Solutions#tabs

Other than that we use only one house rule, which we've be using for several years:

We use fixed hit points.

As per the normal rules a creature gains maximum hit points if its first Hit Die is for a PC class level.

Beyond that monsters and NPCs have average hit points (as per Bestiaries and Adventure Paths), as do animal companions, bonded mounts, cohorts and eidolons etc.

However beyond first level PCs receive fixed hit points as determined by Hit Die.

D12 = 7 hp
D10 = 6 hp
D8 = 5 hp
D6 = 4 hp

This gives PCs a slight edge (1/2 extra hp per level) and removes dumb luck from the equation.

pretty sure that's not a house rule you can just take average roll instead of rolling for hp and average roll is half hd+1 so its not really fixing hp issues for pcs. now if it were everyone gets max hp that would be different and would actually be a boon for most martial classes as they tend to have the higher hd
Nope. This is not an official option = house rule.

really? coulda sworn it was cuz pfs uses it and its also in 5E which took stuff from 3.5 and what not figured it was standard practice for all D&D stuff either risk the roll or take the average

Liberty's Edge

It's a common House Rule, including in the PFS campaign (which also has several others such as removing Magic Item Crafting) but not an official Pathfinder rule in any rulebook.


DMTFY wrote:

Nothing earthshattering here but these work for our group

With spells that heal, the dice that are rolled are the average HD of the target, rounded to the nearest die. Cure-like spells on a barb would be xd12+x. Fighter 3 Wizard 3 would be xd8+x. Channel is also affected. Cleric 3 channeling would heal the wizard 2d6 and the barb 2d12. Of course, pre-calculate your "healing die" when you level to speed play
Clerics may choose any two domains they wish so long as they are appropriate for their god.

Spells(and abilities duplicating the effects of spells) with the [scrying] or [teleportation] descriptor cannot penetrate to an area that is entirely enclosed by more than 1 ft. of solid stone, 3 ft. of earth, an inch of metal, and/or a thin coating of lead. This guideline, provides a rationale for both castles and dungeons.

Looking over your house rules I noticed several that addressed similar issues to ones which came up at my table too. While I'd gone different directions with some of them, other I was definitely impressed with the creativity of your design.

Two of which really stood out to me: Your healing dice rule above perfectly answers to age old question of how to justify the issue that a cure light wounds could sew back on a severed limb of a downed low level wizard but was barely good enough to mend a fat lip of a barbarian. Your answer here fills that void without being overly complex and is an excellent house rule which I'll be looking very closely at using in my own campaign!

Scry & Teleport have long been game breaking abilities which allows both PC's and Villians the opportunity to know far more than they should, and to circumvent too much of the adventure (actually getting to the location) that I've long struggled with how to address these points without issuing blanket bans on the spells.

That said: Well done. I really liked the simplicity and creative use of this mechanic.


PodTrooper wrote:

Quick note regarding CantFindthePath & Set's responses.

The divine caster in my rule, only changes the 'available' spells he has to prepare from. Nothing else changes. He still has to pray and prepare as normal.

Essentially, I just nerfed the AMOUNT of spells he can choose from.
Through various methods (mirroring the wizard), the caster can expand that list to be pretty large, but it's going to take good playing, and time/resources for his character.

@ PodTrooper I really liked where you went with this idea. It is very solid and well thought out.

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