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The Spider-God's Bride


Recruitment

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Recruitment for The Spider-God’s Bride

This game is designed around the concept of a world similar to Robert E. Howard’s Conan: The Barbarian and other tales.

The only playable races are variations on human.

Magic is very rare; those who use it are often feared. Magical creatures are generally seen as deadly and horrible rather than commonplace.

The game uses the same rules as the d20 System, with some minor adjustments which are outlined in the Player’s Handbook for the system which can be found - HERE –.

The above link outlines the various classes allowable, as well as details on races and magic which are allowed.

Players can choose Classes and Archetypes from the Core Rules as well as Advanced Players Guide and Ultimate Combat Guide.

Players may also choose from the following additional Classes:

Bounty Hunter
Corbie
Gladiator
Scholar
Spy

Players start with 2 Traits, 20 Point Buy and Level 1 and Maximum HP on Level 1 plus their Con Modifier.

From level 2 up they gain Half their HD per Level (round up) plus Con Modifier. If you have 1d8 HP you’ll have 5; if you have 1d10 HP you’d end up with 6, and so on.

Players also gain a “0 Level Class” (this does not stack for purposes of Class Level Bonuses), nor does it increase the Player’s total Ranks in skills (in other words; when you build your Level 1 Character you cannot have more than 1 Rank in any Skill, despite what you picked on “Level 0”).

This grants Players 8 HP (Plus Con Modifier) as well as 4 Skill Points.

The skills can be chosen from any of the Untrained Skills.

Any skill chosen on “0 Level” is considered a Class Skill on that Level.

Finally, Armor and Shields grants minor Damage Reduction.

Light Armor = DR 1
Medium Armor = DR 2
Heavy Armor = DR 3

Light Shield = DR 1
Heavy Shield = DR 2
Tower Shield = DR 3

Combat will likely be bloody, but despite the combat, the game will rely on heavy RP so interested players should be prepared to make at least 1 post a day.

Let me know what you think!


this sounds interesting, while I may not apply, I thought that I would say I like the rules you presented.

also would you consider the Brawler class?


Edward Sobel wrote:

this sounds interesting, while I may not apply, I thought that I would say I like the rules you presented.

also would you consider the Brawler class?

After reading it over, I will accept Brawler, too :)


Dotting for Interest.

I'll be building a Mazanian Ranger (Amazon archetype).


On second thought, I'm also adding "Handle Animal" and "Profession" to the list of skills you can take via your beginning skills.


Dotting for interest.


Note

These are the classes the formal game book allows (see above post for links on additional classes)

Alchemist (APG)
Aristocrat
Barbarian
Bard
Cavalier (APG)
Commoner
Cultist (a variant of Oracle [APG])
Druid*
Expert
Fighter
Monk
Ranger
Rogue
Warrior
Witch**
Most of the alternative class features from the APG are also available, but ask for permission.

* The Druid’s class features are modified as follows:

Wild Shape: The druid class does not gain the Wild Shape ability. The character gets a bonus feat per daily use of Wild Shape instead.
** The Witch’s class features are modified as follows:

Healing hex: “The healing hex can be used a number of times per day equal to 3 + the witch’s Intelligence modifier.”
Slumber hex: “This hex can affect a creature of any HD, but if the target has more HD or levels than the witch, he simply becomes drowsy (treat as staggered) instead of falling asleep. This effect can be removed by the same means as awakening a sleeping creature (ie. rousing the creature using a standard action, or dealing damage to the creature).“

Note on Sorcerer: This is allowed, but it's far different than the Core Sorcerer. I'll have more notes up on this if anyone wants to play the alternative Sorcerer.


*Bump*


Human Races to choose from:

Azimbanan:

Also known as the «dwellers in the cities of stone» by their tribal neighbours, the Azimbans have an old culture centered around their stone fortresses and bird-worship.

Appearance: The black warriors of Azimba are tall, strong and proud, known for their discipline in formations with shield and spear. The men are usually shaven-headed, and the wearing of brightly colored robes and feathered plumes is common.

Religion: The god of the Azimbans is Jul-Juggah, a reptilian bird-god that must be propitiated with human sacrifice. His feather-cloaked priests know the secret spells to summon lesser winged lizards, survivors of a lost age.

Culture: Azimbans are almost invariably Civilized, with only some of the more jaded or depraved members of their upper class qualifying as Decadent.

Language: Azimban, plus Shoma as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial modifier to Strength; +2 racial bonus to Intimidate and Perception skills; Azimban Spear-Mastery as a bonus feat.

Azimban Spear-Mastery [General Feat]:
Your skill with the longspear is legendary.

Prerequisite: Dex 15; must be trained by someone who already has this feat.

Benefit: You can strike adjacent foes with the longspear, not just those who are 10 feet away.

Normal: A longspear is a two-handed weapon with reach, allowing you to strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but not adjacent foes.)
===================

Bhangari:

The mysterious eastern realms of Laksha, Ghoma and Azjan are inhabited by a multitudinous people known for their fierce warrior castes, master craftsmen, skilled herbalists, and ranks of ascetic priests. The Bhangari live in great walled cities and build temples that soar to the sky.

Appearance: Of medium height, with golden skin and delicate features. The men keep their black hair cropped short and dress in simple cotton garments, while the women wear colorful silken gowns and weave their hair in long braids. The armies of Laksha, Ghoma and Azjan wear medium armor decorated with silver and gold; the officers have turbans set with feathers or gems to denote their station.

Religion: Not much is known about the cults of the east. The cult of the ape-god Simatala originated in the land of Laksha, and there are several cults that worship aspects of the elephant.

Culture: The Bhangari are a mix of Civilized and Decadent. Some mystics among them are Enlightened.

Language: Bhangari, plus Taikangian as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Heal and Stealth skills; Brutal Charge (use full attack action in same round as charging); Combat Reflexes as a bonus feat.
===================

Djaka:

The Djaka are the pygmies inhabiting the Silver Isles of the Eastern Ocean. They live in jungle caves and know the secrets of the rare lotus herbs that grow only on their islands.

Appearance: Short of stature (even adults are rarely 5 feet tall) with curly black hair and dark, wrinkled skin; dressed in loincloths and jewelry of feather and bones, and armed with hunting bows and blowpipes.

Religion: The Djaka worship as gods the monstrous slugs of colossal size that inhabit the marshes and swamps of the Silver Isles.

Culture: All known Djaka are Savages, but there might be the remote possibility that their swamps harbour small communities of Degenerates.

Language: Djaka, plus a smattering of Zadjite as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial modifier to Dexterity and -2 racial modifier to Strength; +2 racial bonus to Survival skills; Expert Poisoner and Eyes of the Cat as bonus feats; Small size (+1 bonus to attack rolls and Armor Class, a –1 penalty to their Combat Maneuver Bonus and Combat Maneuver Defense, +4 bonus to Stealth skill, -4 penalty to grapple checks); Speed 20 feet.
===================

Ghazorite:

The Ghazorites are a sub-race of the Susrahnites, who dwell in and around the great port-city of Ghazor on the coast of the eastern ocean. The Ghazorites are known both as avaricious merchants, ruthless warriors, and excellent sailors.

Appearance: Slightly smaller of stature than their plains-dwelling brethren, Ghazorite men and women often have some foreign blood, the result of intermingling of races. Such crossbreeding usually manifests as a flat nose, blond hair, green eyes, swarthy skin, or some other unusual feature.

Religion: The Ghazorites worship the gods of Susrah, in addition to many strange gods brought to the city by foreign sailors, mercenaries and merchants.

Culture: Like their cousins the Susrahnites, the Ghazorites are a people both Civilized and Decadent. While Decadents are more commonly found among the upper classes, they are in no way confined to it, nor are they composed uniformly of them.

Language: Susrahnite, plus Nabastissean and Zadjite as bonus languages.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Appraise and Profession (sailor) skills; Weapon Familiarity (suffer only -2 penalty when using weapons without proficiency); racial Sneak Attack (+1d6) that stacks with the rogue ability of the same name.
===================

Ikuna:

The cannibalistic tribes of the Ikuna lands are a constant plague upon the neighbouring nations. From their homeland south of the Hills of the Dead, the Ikunas wage a war of terror upon the Zadjites, Azimbans, and anyone venturing into the southern waters. Few dare go into these lands; likewise, an Ikuna raiding party on the warpath is something best avoided.

Appearance: Black-skinned with wavy hair and slightly green-tinted eyes that give them a preternatural, fearsome appearance. The Ikuna warriors are heavily muscled and move with pantherish grace, clad only in loincloths. The women, who are often shamans and tribal priestesses, adorn themselves with necklaces of bone and teeth.

Religion: The Ikunas worship several tribal gods, some of which are simply deified serpents, giant bats and great lizards from the nearby jungles of Yalotha. But also on the blood-stained altars in the witch-houses of the Ikuna are grotesque idols of older demon-gods and grinning, inhuman skulls of unnatural proportions.

Culture: Characters of Ikuna ancestry can be portrayed as either Degenerates or Savages.

Language: Ikuna, plus Azimban as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Stealth and Swim skills; +1 racial bonus to attack rolls with Ikuna knifes and clubs; natural attack with filed teeth (deals 1d4 lethal damage when grappling); Scent; Cannibalize as a bonus feat.

Cannibalize [General Feat]:
By consuming the vital organs of a fallen foe, you gain a portion of its power.
Prerequisites: Taint 1+.

Benefits: You may cannibalize a corporal creature of your own creature type that has either a heart or a brain, and must remove and eat said organ within 10 minutes of its death. After consuming the organ, which takes 1 minute, you gain a temporary enhancement bonus to your ability score equal to the highest ability score bonus of the slain creature. For example, if a barbarian eats the brain or heart of a 5th-level warrior whose highest ability score is Con 16, the barbarian gains an enhancement bonus of +3 to Constitution for 5 hours.

The effect lasts 1 hour per Hit Dice of the slain creature. You cannot cannibalize aberrations, constructs, oozes, plants, or undead or creatures immune to critical hits. You can only cannibalize one creature per day.)
===================

Jairanian:

Dwellers in the desert-cities of the west, the Jairanians are renowned as master craftsmen, breeders of fine horses, and cunning thieves. Mercenaries from the cities of Jairan are employed across the continent.

Appearance: Light brown skin, deep brown eyes, wearing loose pants and short vests.

Religion: Various grim gods are worshipped among the Jairanians, including Yadar, Othabbhon, and even Al-Tawir.

Culture: Jairanians from the desert can either be Nomads, or, more rarely, Civilized. City-dwelling Jairanians are Civilized, with part of their upper class being Decadent.

Language: Jairanian, plus Khazistani as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Craft and Diplomacy: Gather Information skills; +2 to all saving throws against magic; Stealthy as a bonus feat.
===================

Khazistani:

Conquering horsemen of the northwestern steppes, the Khazis or Khazistanis are a proud people, and justly so. From humble nomadic roots, they have established an empire with glittering cities stretching from the Eastern Sea to the deserts of Jairan, with caravans bringing tribute and loot to the proud nobles of Khazabad. The ruling warrior caste consists of mounted archers riding magnificent purebred horses.

Appearance: Tan-skinned, brown-eyed and black-haired. The Khazis are generally lithe of build, although large individuals certainly exist. The men sometimes wear turbans and grow long moustaches or beards. The women usually wear veils and robes.

Religion: The Khazis primarily worship Yadar and Nhakhramat, neither of which are native Khazistani gods, but whose cults have replaced former elemental and ancestor worship.

Culture: Almost all Khazistanis are Civilized, with the small portion clinging to a more traditional, ancestral lifestyle still being Nomads. As a still vigorous, only recently conquering people, almost none of their upper class are as of yet Decadent.

Language: Khazistani, plus Yar-Ammonite as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Ride and Perception skills; +1 racial bonus to attack rolls with all bows; Khazistani Bow-Mastery as a bonus feat; Mounted Archery as a bonus feat.

Khazistani Bow-Mastery [General Feat]:
Your skill with the composite bow is legendary.

Prerequisite: Dex 15; Point Blank Shot; must be trained by someone who already has this feat.

Benefit: You automatically gain weapon proficiency with the Khazistani shortbow. Furthermore, any hit within point blank range (30 feet) with this weapon deals an additional +2 points of damage.)
===================

Khazrajite:

The nomadic tribes of the northwestern desert are descended from Khazistani stock. Calling themselves the Khazraj, they are a free-willed, fierce and stubborn lot; a constant menace to caravans and travelers.

Appearance: The Khazrajites are physically identical to the people of Khazistan, but of a slightly darker tan due to their exposure to the desert sun. Adult men usually grow thick, black beards, and wear white khaftan robes and silver-hilted scimitars.

Religion: Chief among the gods of the desert is Al-Tawir, the Ancient One, although his name is more often used in curses than in prayer. Still, the nomads fear the Lord of the Empty Wastes and make small offerings to avoid getting lost or suffering from hunger and thirst.

Culture: These fierce desert tribesmen, the more rustic brothers of the Khazistanis, are invariably Nomads.

Language: Khazistani, plus Yar-Ammonite as a bonus language. Khazrajites and Khazistanis speak almost identical dialects.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Ride and Survival skills; +1 racial bonus to attack rolls with scimitar; Endurance as a bonus feat; Improved Critical (scimitar) as a bonus feat.
===================

Khoran:

The Isles of the Sea Reavers are inhabited by dangerous men and cunning women from many nations, and their couplings have brought forth many who are born as natives of the isles, in the fortified pirate-city of Khora. Such children usually inherit the worst traits of both parents.

Appearance: The skin-tone of Khorans range from the icy white of Tharag Thulans to the night-black of Ikunas, but is usually somewhere in-between. They dress in gaudy pantaloons and adorn themselves with gold earrings and ivory-hilted knives pilfered from burning merchant-vessels.

Religion: The gods are more feared than worshipped in the lawless port of Khora, but even the Sea Reavers occasionally offer sacrifice to the gods of the sea and the sky. Akhlathu, the god of twisted fate, is also a popular patron of many pirate crews.
Culture: The mongrel Khorans are mostly Civilized or Decadent, but encompass a small stratum of Nomads and an even smaller one of Degenerate throwbacks.

Language: Khorans don’t speak a proper language of their own, but a dialect of Susrahnian, with a few words from various languages thrown in for good measure. Roll randomly for bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Intimidate and Profession (sailor) skills; +1 racial bonus to attack rolls with all axes, crossbows and knives; Ferocity (continue fighting even while disabled and dying); always treat Profession (sailor) as class skill.
===================

Lamuran:

The men of Lamu are regarded as a degenerate and evil people by other nations, a belief that mainly springs from ignorance, but is strengthened by the fact that some Lamurans have unnaturally keen eyesight in the dark, and that they worship many weird and loathsome gods in the isolation of their remote hill kingdom.

Appearance: Gaunt of build and pale-skinned, with long flowing hair, although the priests are often shaven-headed. Decadent Lamurans dress in flowing robes and wear distinctive tall caps, often wound around with turbans, while the more wholesome Civilized men prefer simpler clothing and sturdy armor.

Religion: The cult of Yot-Kamoth is best-known, but a multitude of other deities is worshipped.

Culture: The Lamurans, corrupted by their worship of sinister Yot-Kamoth, are mostly Decadent, but retain both a significant Civilized stratum in and around their cities and of Degenerates in the more remote parts of their realm.

Language: Lamuran, plus Susrahnite as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Stealth and Sleight of Hand skills; Uncanny Luck (once per day, reroll any die roll and keep best result); Eyes of the Cat as a bonus feat.
===================

Mazanian:

Deep in the southern jungles rise the moss-grown palisade walls of the Mazanians, a matriarchal society whose female warriors raid into the surrounding lands for male slaves. The jungle kingdom is ruled by the black sorcerer-queen of Boma-Ya, the forbidden city of the amazons.

Appearance: Female Mazanians are all stunningly beautiful, since all girls with the slightest physical flaw are quickly abandoned in the jungle. These copper-skinned warriors are not shy about using their charms to distract male opponents.

Religion: The gods of the Mazanians are not well-known. Some say they worship female snake-beings, others that their queen is the thrall of a male demon-god.

Culture: Mazanians are invariably Savages, but some Civilized individuals might exist among their upper classes.

Language: Mazanian, plus Shoma as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial modifier to Charisma; +2 racial bonus to Heal and Intimidate skills; Improved Feint and Two-Weapon Fighting as bonus feats.
===================

Nabastissean:

The sun-drenched land of Nabastis consists of a collection of city-states ruled by petty kings with their own armies of bronze-armored pikemen. While the interior terrain is dominated by rolling hills and forest-covered mountains, the coast has sandy coves nestled amid jagged cliffs. The trade cities along the coast are protected by fleets of trireme galleys. The great city of Khargamum is well-known for the temple of Apsis, with its vast library-halls.

Appearance: Bronze-skinned, with gleaming white teeth and curly black hair, and short of stature. The Nabastisseans dress in brightly colored robes, and don breastplates and full helmets when going to war.

Religion: The Nabastisseans have few gods of their own, but tolerate the temples of foreign gods to be built in their cities. The coastal peoples usually make small offerings to the gods of the sea before setting out on voyages of trade or war.

Culture: Nabastisseans are usually Civilized, but a sizeable and increasing proportion of their upper classes has become Decadent.

Language: Nabastissean, plus Taraamite as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial modifier to Dexterity; +2 racial bonus to Profession (Sailor) and Swim skills; +1 circumstance bonus to attack rolls at sea; +2 circumstance bonus to AC when fighting in formation with others of the same race; always treat Profession (sailor) as class skill.
===================

Shoma:

The kingdom of Shoma is rich in gold, to the extent that even the king’s great herds of cattle wear golden ornaments. There are many skilled artisans and goldsmiths among the Shoma. Outside of the capital city of Katanga, the land is peopled by semi-nomadic tribes.

Appearance: Dark brown skin, with close-cropped curly black hair. The tribal Shoma dress in simple loincloths. City-dwellers wear more elaborate clothing, such as brightly colored robes and cloaks; even commoners are often adorned with golden jewelry.

Religion: Nataka, the ivory woman, is worshipped among the nobles and upper class, while various tribal gods are revered by commoners.

Culture: City-dwelling Shomas are a mix of Civilized and Savage people, while most of the tribal pastoralists are Nomads.

Language: Shoma, plus Azimban as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Craft and Survival skills; +1 racial bonus to attack rolls with all spears and bows; +10 racial bonus to Speed; Run as a bonus feat.
===================

Susrahnite:

The fertile plains of Susrah are home to a race renowned for their skill in war and their religious devotion.

Appearance: Broad-shouldered, with hooked noses and black, curly hair, the Susrahnites are dressed in flowing robes. The men braid their long beards. The women are lithe, wearing golden armbands and necklaces of pearl; they are prized as slaves in Taraamite seraglios.

Religion: Nowhere, except perhaps in Yar-Ammon, can there be found as many gods as in the city-states of Susrah. Above the hundreds of lesser gods arise the names of greater deities such as Baal-Khardah, Belet-Lil, Maggash, and Yammosh.

Culture: Susrahnites are a people both Civilized and Decadent, although Decadents are more commonly found among the upper classes. Some men and women of Susrah are Enlightened.

Language: Susrahnite, plus Taraamite as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Appraise and Knowledge (religion) skills; +1 racial bonus to attack rolls with all weapons; Improved Initiative as a bonus feat.
===================

Taikangian:

The realm of Taikang is near-mythical, a land of teeming yellow masses, bamboo towers, and serpentine dragons. Few westerners have ventured here, but merchants who brave the unknown can make a fortune when they return with caravans of silks, lotus flowers and painted ceramics.

Appearance: Lithe and yellow-skinned, with slanted eyes and long, black hair. Both men and women dress in silk if they can afford it, although the commoners often wear little more than a loincloth.

Religion: The chief god of the Taikangians is Wa-Ying, the so-called «Emperor of Hell».

Culture: Taikang is a legendary land, but judging by what legends are told of it in the west and by what Taikangians have ventured forth from their homeland, they seem to be a wicked and almost uniformly Decadent people. But who knows? Maybe they still retain a few more wholesome, Civilized individuals – or some utterly Degenerate ones...

Language: Taikangian, plus Bhangari as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Escape Artist and Acrobatics skills; +2 racial bonus to all grapple checks; Improved Unarmed Strike as a bonus feat.
===================

Taraamite:

The plains and highlands of Taraam are inhabited by a people known both for the sophistication of their culture and their talent for intrigue. A caste of mounted warriors is the backbone of their army, which threatens the lesser cities of Susrah and Nabastis with destruction unless tribute continues to flow into the thousand-columned palace of Achad. Taraam’s royal palace is a also a place of thousand intrigues, filled with eunuchs and astrologer-priests of the court.

Appearance: Male Taraamites usually favor short, trimmed beards. Warriors carry straight short swords and lances, and dress in robes decorated according to their status, with the king’s personal guard wearing gold-trimmed robes and circlets of gold, in the fashion of princes.

Religion: Ahyada, the «High God», is the chief god of the Taraamites, served by an influential priesthood of astrologers and omen-readers.

Culture: Taraamite commoners are almost invariably Civilized, just as the upper classes of this people are almost invariably Decadent. Exceptions to this generalisation do exist, but are very rare.

Language: Taraamite, plus Susrahnite as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Diplomacy and Knowledge (all) skills; Ride-By Attack as a bonus feat; +4 racial bonus to saving throws against poison.
===================

Tharag Thulan:

Also known as Tharagians, these northern tribesmen inhabit the cold wastes at the edge of the world. In each generation, there are always some northerners who leave their ancestral lands to escape the ancient blood-feuds of their clans and explore the decadent empires of the south.

Appearance: Dressed in wolf-skin cloaks and tall boots of wolverine-fur, these barbarians of the north have long, yellow beards, white skin, and piercing blue eyes.

Religion: The Tharag Thulans revere the Moon-God, the Wolf-God, and the Skull-God.

Culture: These remote northern barbarians are mostly Savages. Some clans and individuals are Nomads, and as well as rare Civilized half-breeds.

Language: Tharag Thulan, plus Lamuran as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial modifier to Strength; +2 racial bonus to Climb and Survival skills; +2 racial bonus to saving throws against poison and disease.
===================

Yar-Ammonite:

Also known as the «kingdom of tombs», Yar-Ammon is a land covered with desert and haunted by ancient sorceries. The silent streets and broad ceremonial avenues of black-templed Amenti is an awesome sight to behold. The papyrus used by the scribes and sorcerers of Yar-Ammon is harvested from the inland marshes of Fakhuum.

Appearance: Tall and slender, with bronze skin, dark hair and black eyes. The nobles and priests wear golden pectorals and masks carved with beastly visages, while commoners dress in simple garments of white linen.

Religion: Yar-Ammon is well known for its large pantheon of beast-headed were-gods. The land is littered with giant statues and weathered sphinxes carved in their image. But the ancient practices of the beast-cults were outlawed a generation ago, when the royal house of Amenti established the cult of Zothur, the First One. Yet, there are many among the common folk who still follow the old ways.

Culture: Children of an old culture steeped deeply in sorcerous mysteries, Yar-Ammonites are a mixture of Civilized, Decadent and Enlightened people.

Language: Yar-Ammonite, plus Khazistani as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial modifier to Intelligence; +2 racial bonus to Knowledge (arcana) and Perception skills; Stonecunning (+2 racial bonus on Perception checks to notice unusual stonework, detect unusual stonework within 10 feet with Perception check even if not actively searching, use the Perception skill to find stonework traps as a rogue can, and intuit depth underground).
===================

Zadjite:

The turbaned fire-worshippers of Zadj are an offshoot of the Jairanian race in the west. They have exploited the riches of their new homeland well, and grown rich as spice merchants and slave-traders. Having brought with them a high level of culture from Jairan, the Zadjites are skilled artisans and Iraab, the marble capital by the sea, is a center of learning as well as rich trade and exquisite craftmanship. The interior plains and forests of Zadj are dominated by the fortress-city of Al-Qazir, also known as the City of Slave Sultans, for it is held by a council of slavelords who only pay lip service to the emir of Iraab.

Appearance: Swarthy, turbaned, wearing colorful robes and gold-hilted curved daggers. The raven-haired Zadjite women are famed for their sensual beauty; they are often scantily clad and adorned with glittering jewelry.

Religion: The Zadjites hold «the Sacred Flame», a nameless elemental god, above all others.

Culture: This wealthy and callous people of tradesmen is mostly Decadent, with only a smattering of Civilized individuals remaining, virtually none of them among the upper classes.

Language: Zadjite, plus Old Jairanian as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial bonus to Craft and Knowledge (geography) skills; +1 racial bonus to all saving throws; Zadjite Whip-Mastery as a bonus feat.

Zadjite Whip-Mastery [General Feat]:
Your skill with the lash is legendary.

Prerequisite: Dex 15; must be trained by someone who already has this feat.

Benefit: You automatically gain weapon proficiency with the whip. Furthermore, you deal normal (lethal) damage with the weapon, and can deal damage to any creature regardless of its armor bonus. You do not provoke attacks of opportunity when fighting with the whip.

Normal: The whip is an exotic weapon which requires Exotic Weapon Proficiency (whip). A whip deals nonlethal damage. It deals no damage to any creature with an armor bonus of +1 or higher or a natural armor bonus of +3 or higher. The whip is treated as a melee weapon with 15-foot reach, though you don’t threaten the area into which you can make an attack. Using a whip provokes an attack of opportunity, just as if you had used a ranged weapon.)
===================

Zorabi:

These tribesmen inhabit the Zorab mountains that jut up between Lamu and Khazistan. The southernmost tribes have accepted the overlordship of the Khazistanis, at least in name, while the rest are opportunistic raiders who feud incessantly among themselves.

Appearance: These mountain wolves wear white turbans and heavy cloaks, and are armed with scimitars and shortbows. They have long black beards, and their brown skin is wrinkled by the sun and mountain winds.

Religion: There are few priests among the Zorabi, but worship of certain Lamuran gods is probable.

Culture: Zorabi are invariably Nomads.

Language: Susrahnite, plus Lamuran as a bonus language.

Racial Traits: +2 racial modifier to Constitution; +2 racial bonus to Climb and Survival skills; Track as a bonus feat.

The Exchange

This is interesting and odd.
Am I to understand that I could make a character thusly?

Level 0: Fighter - 8 HP, 4 skill ranks/class skills, 1 bonus feat, 1 BAB, +2 Fort save, weapon/armor/shield proficiency
Level 1: Druid - 8 HP + CON, 4 + Int skill ranks, class skills, +2 Fort/Will save, Nature Bond, Nature Sense, Wild Empathy, Spells


I'm going ahead and dotting this ;)

On the fence between either a Fighter (yep, a Fighter :D), though in light of the Tripod classes he may be slightly underwhelming. From skills to class abilities... Dain GM, will you allow Advanced Weapon and Armor Training, or..?

Or an Invulnerable Rager Barbarian (multiclassed slightly with Unbreakable Fighter if allowed) - in a land based on Robert E. Howard's work, what can be better than actually BEING Conan? I am kinda leaning on this one obviously.

EDIT: Dain, I was looking at the Tharag Thulan - their +2 racial modifier to Strength, is on top of the human normal bonus, or it IS the human normal bonus? :D


Albion, The Eye wrote:
EDIT: Dain, I was looking at the Tharag Thulan - their +2 racial modifier to Strength, is on top of the human normal bonus, or it IS the human normal bonus? :D

Since most of my stat block is done, I'll go ahead and answer this, if that's okay. :)

If you choose the Tharagians, then you get the +2 racial trait to STR (and it is in lieu of the normal human +2 to any stat ability). Then you choose your cultural archetype. If you choose 'Savage' for example, then you get +2 cultural trait to STR, so all in all, your guy gets +4 to STR.

The Tharagians' cultural archetypes:

Remote northern barbarians are mostly Savages (+2 cultural trait to STR). Some clans and individuals are Nomads (+2 cultural trait to DEX), and as well as rare Civilized (+2 cultural trait to any ability score of your choosing) half-breeds.

So depending on what you choose, your guy could be:

Tharagian Savage: +4 STR,
Tharagian Nomad: +2 STR & +2 DEX, or,
Civilised Tharagian half-breed: +2 STR & +2 to any other ability of your choosing.

I hope that helps. :)


D-Kal wrote:

This is interesting and odd.

Am I to understand that I could make a character thusly?

Level 0: Fighter - 8 HP, 4 skill ranks/class skills, 1 bonus feat, 1 BAB, +2 Fort save, weapon/armor/shield proficiency
Level 1: Druid - 8 HP + CON, 4 + Int skill ranks, class skills, +2 Fort/Will save, Nature Bond, Nature Sense, Wild Empathy, Spells

All you get at Level 0 is the 4 skill points and the 8 HP. Think of the skills much like background skills, although the skills must all be Untrained and are now all class skills. This captures the essence of your character in their daily village/city life before they become adventurers. Because the combat in this game is quite bloody/deadly (when you die, you're dead and done), the GM gave us some additional HP to help make us less 'soft and squishy' in the beginning.

So, level 0 you get 4 skill points and 8 HP depending on who and what your guy is in his every day life, and then at level 1 you get all your chosen class bonuses, HP, skills, stat increases, feats, abilities etc.

The Exchange

Oh I got it. So it's really not a class level, but more like a racial HD. Thanks for the help.

I've seen that houserule on the Heal Hex before, and it usually comes from ignorance of how the hex works. Since you can only use it once/day/person, limiting uses/day is only relevant when healing NPCs or, heaven forbid, when the witch is fighting undead in melee. Both of which are really odd scenarios to restrict.
But I don't really care, I'm just remarking.

I'm considering a Khazrajite desert druid, but I'll have to think about it.


So correct me if I'm wrong, but for Herolab users, we could just add a modification giving those 4 skill points and 8hp and go straight into level 1.


GrinningJest3r wrote:
So correct me if I'm wrong, but for Herolab users, we could just add a modification giving those 4 skill points and 8hp and go straight into level 1.

Yes, I believe so.


You should be able to use Hero Lab with extra Skill Points and HP.

There are different races, though; and Archetypes for the races which add modifiers to them.

As for classes, there are some modifications via the power of magic. Unfortunately, many of the modifications for the game world are done through a specific book entitled "The Spider God's Bride" and it is not always easy to find. However, it is published by a company called "Xoth".

More details on it can be found at the link - Here -.

Once you go there you should be able to download the things you need to find more details.

Also, as an aside, I've gamed with Ariarh Kane for some time. If Ariarh has the chance to answer your questions before I have the chance then it's very likely that their answer will be accurate as I've had the chance to speak to them personally about a lot of these same questions and Ariarh will likely have heard my answers already :)


A full description for Races and Archetypes can be found on the Profile Page...


Rolls - GM eyes only:

Craft, Herbalism (DC 25): 1d20 + 5 ⇒ (20) + 5 = 25
Spends 25gp on crafting healing slaves/tinctures

Craft, Short Bow (DC 12): 1d20 + 5 ⇒ (16) + 5 = 21
Spends 15gp on crafting supplies.

Know. Nature re identifying non-poisonous leaves/plants: 1d20 + 5 ⇒ (12) + 5 = 17


Dotting for interest

The Exchange

Is there a player's guide or something to understand what classes, favored terrains, etc, might fit better into this particular campaign?

Also, have you considered allowing skald or shaman?

And finally, do you have a link to the revised sorcerer?


D-Kal wrote:

Is there a player's guide or something to understand what classes, favored terrains, etc, might fit better into this particular campaign?

Also, have you considered allowing skald or shaman?

And finally, do you have a link to the revised sorcerer?

- Link to Players Guide -: This includes notes on all the races, racial archetypes, classes/class restrictions and so on.

I'll have to re-read the Skald and Shaman class, but the book is pretty lean on how little magic types can be used; give me a little time to check up on them and I should have an answer up tonight.


D-Kal, under the descriptions of each Human Race (in GM's post above and in the player's guide), it gives you a paragraph/brief blurb on the terrain of the area/region. Plus the map in the guide gives you a visual overview that may help.

Sorcerer Stats in this game (I'm sure GM Dain will go over this with you if he's decided to amend/change anything on this.)

The Exchange

Re: player's guide, I'm not so much asking about the world as this campaign in particular. Not that I'm digging for spoilers, but as a for-instance, a player might be disappointed to play a desert druid in a jungle campaign, an urban ranger in a wild campaign, a barbarian in a stealthy/investigation campaign, a storm druid in an indoors campaign, etc.


Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Tales Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Color me intrigued. I'll look at the material a bit closer when I'm not at work. :)


D-Kal wrote:
Re: player's guide, I'm not so much asking about the world as this campaign in particular. Not that I'm digging for spoilers, but as a for-instance, a player might be disappointed to play a desert druid in a jungle campaign, an urban ranger in a wild campaign, a barbarian in a stealthy/investigation campaign, a storm druid in an indoors campaign, etc.

Ah, no worries!

Basically the various quests are connected primarily to City types, with Dungeons in the form of tombs, catacombs and dark places below the city.

Also, keep an eye out how the book does skills and skill points. The book is fairly old, so you’ll notice it comes from 3.5 Edition so it has the “x4” for skill points for level 1, instead of just a flat set of skill points and the +3 for skills you’re proficient in. In this game you do not have the x4 Skill Points on Level 1, though you do gain an additional +4 Skill Points on Level 1 via the House Rule.

Also, some of the skills changed (Decipher Script and Speak Language as opposed to Literacy). If you have any questions on converting the skills, just let me know.

Meanwhile, you currently you start in the city of “Belthaar” located at the crossroads leading to Khazistan, Lamu, Susrah and the eastern sea. A map can be found here - Link –

Belthaar and other cities are generally surrounded by Desert and Mountain terrain and you will find villages, oasis, and other similar things to help survive. You’ll find out that you’ll like travel from city to city through wild badlands and sand-filled wastes, with occasional ruins (basically Dungeons) to explore as well as villages to find supplies or clues at.

Beyond the Desert terrains you can find either Mountains or Jungles to explore; but that depends on which direction you travel.

I think that ultimately almost all character types should be able to shine. Being a rogue or bard who leaps from buildings and assassinates enemies in dark alleys works well in the city; being a battle-hardened warrior who can endure the harsh world beyond the city will have its place when facing raiders and barbarians in the wastelands.

That said, while the following links don’t have to do with plot/spoilers, I’m using some of the visuals when designing the settings of this world (apologizing in advance; some of the clips are for movies that weren’t that good, but I still feel like they do a good job of portraying the “look” of the world).

Clip 1 for City and Desert - Link –

Clip 2 for Jungle and City – - Link –

Clip 3 for City and Mountains – - Link –

Clip 4 for City and Coastlands - Link –

And finally, this one, because – why the hell not? :) - Link –


Dotting for interest. Thinking of a Mazanian Bounty Hunter.


Albion, The Eye wrote:

Dain GM, will you allow Advanced Weapon and Armor Training, or..?

Or an Invulnerable Rager Barbarian (multiclassed slightly with Unbreakable Fighter if allowed) - in a land based on Robert E. Howard's work, what can be better than actually BEING Conan? I am kinda leaning on this one obviously.

You could get advanced Weapon and Armor Training if you're able to; but it will take some time as you only start on level 1.

Of course, if you're ruthless, cunning and lucky enough to level up, then no worries ;)


D-Kal wrote:
Also, have you considered allowing skald or shaman?

I don't think so on Shaman; only because they seem so empowered by a spirit that - while the class might be possible - I thin it would be tricky to have that in the party (especially while investigating towns/cities) without drawing undue attention.

If you're able to disguise that power and where you draw your power that could be something; but it won't be easy, and if you get caught drawing power from some hidden spirit beyond the realms of mortal men... well, I guess we'll see how it plays out, but I wouldn't advise it unless you're really skilled.

Also, casters typically have to chose a "cult" from where they learned their power. If you want to pick a casting class, consider which cult you'd follow; they have their own unique advantages and disadvantages...

Skald is more likely; but it looks like where you gain your powers might be complicated. I'm guessing the lore of your people, but try to keep in mind that the spell options you have as a Bard will be limited; though having the lore could be very handy, though I'm having trouble imagining how you'd scribe a scroll as a barbaric warrior.

That said, if you're really interested in the class, build a concept and we'll go from there :)

The Exchange

Actually now I'm thinking about an Ikuna alchemist, but I don't love the bombs. Would you allow vivisectionist? I think it would fit with the cannibal concept. Especially if I went full Degenerate.
Cannibal magic! Killing, cutting up, and eating my opponents to gain power (extracts, mutagen, cannibalize feat).
I'd probably add Internal Alchemist as well, if allowed.


Ioneyse Patronius wrote:
Dotting for interest. Thinking of a Mazanian Bounty Hunter.

Well, currently we have another player looking for a Mazanian Ranger; having a Manzain Bounty Hunter seems like a little overkill.

However, I think the Bounty Hunter aspect could work if it was tailored more for city exploration as most of the players who have tossed up ideas seem to be leaning more to wilderness exploration (think kind of like an Urban Bounty Hunter, rather than a wilderness sort), but even if you adjust your class for city building you could run into trouble as Manzians don't generally get along with most patriarchal societies/cultures and that could impact on things like Diplomacy for gathering information and bargaining for your lives... and merchandise, of course :)


D-Kal wrote:

Actually now I'm thinking about an Ikuna alchemist, but I don't love the bombs. Would you allow vivisectionist? I think it would fit with the cannibal concept. Especially if I went full Degenerate.

Cannibal magic! Killing, cutting up, and eating my opponents to gain power (extracts, mutagen, cannibalize feat).
I'd probably add Internal Alchemist as well, if allowed.

It's definitely interesting, though you do realize that Degenerate is typically shunned by society on sight? And that casters are generally equally shunned/feared? And that cannibals are generally feared/disliked, too? I mean, if you play that sort of character it could work, but it will definitely bring up some... challenges for the people traveling with you :)


Ioneyse Patronius wrote:
Dotting for interest. Thinking of a Mazanian Bounty Hunter.

Well, currently we have another player looking for a Mazanian Ranger; having a Manzain Bounty Hunter may be a bit overkill.

However, I think the Bounty Hunter aspect could work if it was tailored more for city exploration (as most of the players who have tossed up ideas seem to be leaning more to wilderness exploration), but adjusting your class for city building as a Manzian might be a bit tricky as Manzian's don't generally get along with most patriarchal societies/cultures and that could impact on things like Diplomacy for gathering information.

As of now the suggestions I've formally heard have been:

Ariarh - Manzian Ranger
Albion, The Eye - Invulnerable Barbarian Rager
D-Kal - Kazjirite Desert Druid or Ikuna alchemist
Ioneyse - Manzian Bounty Hunter

As of now having someone who can handle traps would be helpful; as well as someone good at stealth (basically a rogue class) especially when you start exploring the barren and deadly tombs/crypts.

Having someone who can handle Diplomacy and Sense Motive could be helpful when dealing with certain people in cities/towns.

If D-Kal doesn't go with Desert Druid then having someone who can heal would be really handy, too.

Finally, someone skilled in Lore and the knowledge of ancient things, dark secrets, dark cults/gods and arcane powers could be useful, too (though this could easily be coupled with certain pre-existing classes).

Everyone: If you're still interested but haven't decided what to toss up as an idea, there's still time to come up with some suggestions :)

The Exchange

Well, that's a fair point. I'm not sure a Savage would get me along much better, but an alchemist does have the advantage of less obvious magic at least. If I'm walking around with Bull's Strength or something, it's a lot different than, say, Mage Armor. Plus I don't have to eat anyone in public. So maybe I *could* get away with Savage.
I'll give that a shot.


I will take another look at the available classes.


D-Kal wrote:
Well, that's a fair point. I'm not sure a Savage would get me along much better, but an alchemist does have the advantage of less obvious magic at least. If I'm walking around with Bull's Strength or something, it's a lot different than, say, Mage Armor. Plus I don't have to eat anyone in public. So maybe I *could* get away with Savage.

I agree; the less obvious magic would definitely be helpful to the group.

Now, as for eating anyone in public? Well, that could work - but just remember the kuru symptoms (basically a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy). A link on the disease/symptoms can be found - Here - and those symptoms do manifest themselves in cannibals. That being the case, some folk may recognize those symptoms, so taking ranks in Disguise couldn't hurt your chances ;)


Ioneyse Patronius wrote:
I will take another look at the available classes.

Sounds good - I'm curious to see what you come up with :)


D-Kal, it will be interesting if you are a male Ikuna as my girl's favoured enemy is Human-Ikuna, Males. ;)

The Exchange

Ariarh Kane wrote:
D-Kal, it will be interesting if you are a male Ikuna as my girl's favoured enemy is Human-Ikuna, Males. ;)

Haha! Well, that could create some... tension.

Dain GM wrote:
Now, as for eating anyone in public? Well, that could work - but just remember the kuru symptoms (basically a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy). ...those symptoms do manifest themselves in cannibals.

Sure, but I'm building up an immunity to disease (and poison). Besides, that sounds like a problem of compounded cannibalism. I should be fine when eating healthy people. And it has a long incubation period anyway.

But yeah, disguise does seem prudent either way.


D-Kal wrote:
Sure, but I'm building up an immunity to disease (and poison).

So long as you carry some iocane power ;)

D-Kal wrote:

Besides, that sounds like a problem of compounded cannibalism. I should be fine when eating healthy people. And it has a long incubation period anyway.

But yeah, disguise does seem prudent either way.

Sounds good!

The Exchange

I just read about the ban on shape-shifting. I guess I don't know enough about Xoth to understand why this is a thing. Can someone enlighten me?


Hello Dain GM.

This campaign looks intriguing and different. I want to get a character together, but have a couple of questions. I nearly always play spellcasters, which leaves me with a more restricted choice.

First choice is a Druid. I have been wanting to play a Saurian Druid for some time and they seem to fit the campaign and world. I think the players guide you provided a link to said the Animal shaman druids were allowed, which should mean the Saurian Druid is OK. But they come from Ultimate Magic, which isn't among the options you listed. So is a Saurian Shaman OK?

My other idea is a Witch. Do witches get to add a spell from other lists in place of patron spells as per the players guide? It isn't mentioned in your class changes.


D-Kal wrote:
I just read about the ban on shape-shifting. I guess I don't know enough about Xoth to understand why this is a thing. Can someone enlighten me?

In older times, it appears that the ability to shafeshift was linked to the reverence and power of the ancient nature goddess, Xu-Neb_Ur-Hat, and only accessible to the Primal Druids (aka Ur-Druids). It also appears that in this current age, there are no more Primal Druids and they've become something of myth and legend. As such the powers and ability of shape-shifting granted by the ancient nature goddess have been lost to this world. (Presently, druids get a bonus feat per daily use of Wild Shape instead.)

It doesn't say (or infer) much more than that. Xoth is new to me as well.


Joynt Jezebel wrote:

So is a Saurian Shaman OK?

My other idea is a Witch. Do witches get to add a spell from other lists in place of patron spells as per the players guide? It isn't mentioned in your class changes.

Suarian Shaman gives you a dinosaur as an Animal Companion; it can be done in the wild, but much of your quest will lead you to the city and civilization. It may be dangerous to have a dinosaur with you in such circumstances, but if you'd really like to do it, I'll allow it; just know it will risky in cities.

As for witches, they're considered to be the most powerful casting class in the game. Right now the party has no primary healers, and in a world where combat is bloody and healers are rare, that could be problematic. Having a witch could be useful.

I believe that Witches gain patrons, but as a Witch you do not know the true identity of your patrons. Regarding a Witch from the link to the "Players Handbook" above, it says -

Special Rules: The witches of Xoth do not know the real identity of their patrons. Instead of selecting a bonus patron spell from a theme-based list, the witch can choose any level appropriate spell (chosen from the cleric, druid or wizard spell lists, and subject to the game master’s approval) whenever she is due to gain a new patron spell.

So essentially, come up with a "theme" for what you think your patron would be about and then choose the most appropriate spells. Just be advised that because there is a "mystery" to the nature of the patron, many fear witches in general, and fear where they gain their power as the true nature of the patron doesn't always turn out to be pleasant.

D-Kal wrote:
I just read about the ban on shape-shifting. I guess I don't know enough about Xoth to understand why this is a thing. Can someone enlighten me?

What Ariarh wrote is correct, but in my opinion, there's something else other than that piece of in-game history.

Specifically, a concern that shape-shifting compromises the "feel" of a low-level magic world. A human that can change shape would generally be seen as a god or a demon - but in this game world there are no "gods" in the literal sense, only powerful beings/creatures from beyond the realms of man who are worshiped at man's risk. Think kind of like the "gods" in Game of Thrones; there are certainly powerful casters in that show, but I'm not ever seeing something like Greek mythology when the gods co-mingle with mortals - in this world they're not "real" - just powerful beings who grant powers to their followers in exchange for offerings.

That said; here's a more detailed explanation of how magic is supposed to be treated from the Core Book -

From the Book

Magic in the World of Xoth is darker and more subtle than in typical high fantasy novels and game worlds of recent decades. The core magic rules of the Pathfinder system are based on the assumption that magic pervades the world and is used almost as a substitute for technology. But, ironically, having too much magic takes away much of the wonder and awe of magic.

At the same time, taking away too much magic or making the magic rules overly restrictive and harsh tends to alienate players, who might consider it unfair that only non-player character should have access to powerful magic. Plus, tampering with the magic rules puts an additional burden on the players, who have to learn the new rules.

Thus, the philosophy of this book is to change as little as possible of the actual magic rules. The sword and sorcery feel can be achieved in a campaign by restricting or changing a few key elements of the core rules which interfere with the lowmagic paradigm, without totally abandoning the fantasy that players expect and enjoy.

Restricting Spell Lists

First of all, certain spells from the core rules simply do not fit well in a sword and sorcery world. Any class with access to spells must have a spell list customized for the proper atmosphere. The following general categories are excluded:

Artillery Spells: Spells that turn the spellcaster into a walking piece of artillery, able to wipe out a small army of opponents with a single spell. Fireball and its derivatives (delayed blast fireball, meteor swarm, flame strike, etc.) fall into this category, as do magic missile, lightning bolt and disintegrate.

Convenience Spells: Rope trick is only a 2nd-level spell, yet it creates an extradimensional space where an entire party can hide from the rest of the world; hardly a staple of sword and sorcery. The spell create water is certainly convenient, but the wilderness becomes a more dangerous (and interesting) place without such spells. Similarly, characters should rely on their swimming skills and their Constitution scores instead of depending on water breathing and so on.

Instant Transportation: Teleport and its varieties make a mockery of long wilderness treks and quests into uncharted waters. Neither should dimension door and other short-range teleportation spells be allowed, because they make it too easy to circumvent defenses and penetrate castle and city walls. In a low-magic world, there are simply no adequate countermeasures against such spells.

This part is very important for those who want to heal -

Life-Restoring Magic: Healing and curative spells do not exist unless they drain the life force from some unwilling victim (this is why Vampiric Touch is acceptable, but not Cure Light Wounds or Cure Disease.

Healing Checks as well as making curing potions for certain herbs will be the best way to survive.

Death is final, and characters cannot count on being raised or resurrected. In the extremely rare cases where someone is brought back from the dead, it will always be through black magic (probably requiring blood sacrifice), and always as some hideous mockery of their former selves, whether a soulless zombie, wizened mummy, or restless, mad spirit.

Powerful Low-Level Divinations: Detect magic might seem innocent enough, but in the hands of power-gamers it tends to be used as a “radar” to scan areas for anything interesting (such as magical items or traps). The game plays better if there is no such clear distinction of what is magical and what is not. Detect evil does not apply to a world without alignments. Comprehend languages is a mere 1st-level spell, but allows you to understand all written languages. That might not seem very important when dungeon-crawling, but if such a spell exists, there is little point in learning ancient and forgotten languages, and the role-playing aspects of trying to decipher ancient grimoires are lost.

Shapeshifting: No spellcasters are able to change shape (via alter self, polymorph, elemental body, beast shape, shapechange, enlarge person, etc.) in the World of Xoth.

It is said that the Ur-Druids, priests of the ancient goddess Xu-Neb-Ur-Hat, were able to take on a variety of shapes, but modern druids do not have the wild shape ability.

“Superhero” Spells: Flying (through the levitate, fly or wind walk spells) and turning invisible (through invisibility and improved invisibility) or gaseous (via gaseous form) are examples of powers rarely seen in sword and sorcery stories. These abilities are especially powerful (and therefore unbalancing) in low-magic settings, where there are few countermeasures available.

Magical items that duplicate these types of spells should also be removed from the game, of course. Though in rare situations they may be permitted.

Note that skills become more important for characters when magic spells are restricted. Skills such as Climb, Heal, Sense Motive, Swim, Survival, and the various Knowledge skills are good substitutes for many of the spells listed above.

Restricting Magical Items

Characters should rely on their abilities, not their equipment, which could be destroyed, lost or stolen at any time. In stark contrast to a high fantasy campaign, magical weapons, armor and wondrous items in a sword and sorcery setting should be extremely rare. The very concept that these items can be created through a mechanistically simple process seriously undermines the wondrousness of magic. In a typical campaign using the core rules, the rulebook is nothing more than a shopping catalog of items, since everything has a price and can be bought or manufactured by the player characters.

In the World of Xoth, most permanent magical items are unique, many being left-overs from earlier ages when spellcasters were presumably more powerful. All such items should have evocative names and detailed background stories. For example, a gem of brightness might be called the Jewel of Lar-Karakshat; it will probably be the only gem of its kind in the campaign world and finding it will be an adventure in itself. In short, treat permanent magic items as if they were artifacts or relics in high fantasy campaigns. Such items will never be for sale.

As a consequence, item creation feats are not available to characters. The only exception is Craft Potion and Scribe Scroll.

Summoning Spells

Summoning spells are modified as follows in the World of Xoth:
The only creature types that can be summoned with summon monster or summon nature’s ally are animals, vermin, and elementals.
Summoned animals must always be appropriate to the current environment and climate (for example, summoning a tiger in an arctic climate is not possible), and no animals can be summoned inside a wholly «artificial» (man-made) structure.

Vermin can be summoned anywhere.

Summoning elementals requires the presence of a certain amount of elemental material: For air elementals, there must be at least a Moderate wind force in the area. For earth elementals, there must be natural soil, sand or dust, not rocks or worked stone or metal. For fire elementals, there must be a fire larger than a torch, such as a brazier or a bonfire. For water elementals, there must be a pool, river or lake.

Outsiders can be summoned via the planar ally and planar binding spells. In the World of Xoth, outsiders are not demons and devils as described in the core rules, but abominations from the black gulfs of the cosmos.

The Sign of Xoth

Since there is no alignment system in the World of Xoth, protection from evil is called protection from witchcraft, and is also known as the sign of Xoth.

The spell is identical to the description in the rulebook, except replace all instances of «evil creatures» with «magicusing creatures and supernatural creatures». Note that any spellcaster is a «magic-using creature» under this definition. A «supernatural creature» is a creature that has one or more supernatural (Su) or spell-like (Sp) abilities.

Magic circle against evil is called magic circle against witchcraft (or simply magic circle or circle of Xoth).


As an Arnie fan, I will submit a savage Tharag Thulan Beast fighter Gladiator.
Bjorn, son of Beorg, called the Ghostbear, captured as boy and brought to the slave pits to die for the joy of the masses. But Bjorn endured and used a broken bone to kill his first enemy. Impressed the slave master Prodmis took him into the ludus and trained him.
And Bjorn did not disappoint.


Can we use unchained rogue?


Helikon wrote:

As an Arnie fan, I will submit a savage Tharag Thulan Beast fighter Gladiator.

Bjorn, son of Beorg, called the Ghostbear, captured as boy and brought to the slave pits to die for the joy of the masses. But Bjorn endured and used a broken bone to kill his first enemy. Impressed the slave master Prodmis took him into the ludus and trained him.
And Bjorn did not disappoint.

Sounds good. I'm looking forward to seeing the write up :)

Etienne de Guerlin wrote:
Can we use unchained rogue?

Well, I guess that depends. What did you have in mind, specifically?

The Exchange

Is Craft(herbalism) a thing in this game, or are we just using Craft(alchemy)? If it is, are there other new skills I should know about?
And what about pre-crafting?


D-Kal wrote:

Is Craft(herbalism) a thing in this game, or are we just using Craft(alchemy)? If it is, are there other new skills I should know about?

And what about pre-crafting?

Craft Herbalism (though I guess formally it should be title "Craft: Herbal Poultices") is a type of Crafting; but it's not in the book, it's merely something someone asked if they could have as it fit their concept. It is different than something like "Craft: Alchemy" but only via its more narrow specialization.

So basically Craft: Alchemy allows you to craft things like Healing Kits or Acids or Flash Powder, as normal with a certain DC. However, Craft: Herbal Poultices wouldn't let you craft things like acids, alchemical traps/remedies - and so on. It would only let you create things with herbs found in the wild, not chemicals. Essentially it's just a "flavor thing" - but I don't want anyone to think that they can't try to create new variations on things like Craft, Perform or Profession.

In the case of crafting, if you're prepared to take something (and feel free to be creative with what you make up; I'm not picky if you want to make up a narrow focus, but it may not be as useful as a skill that covers a wider ground) - but if you take something like Craft: Poison, or Craft: Acids, or even Craft: Healing Salves - then your Craft DC will be lower for those specific things - but you wouldn't be able to take something like Craft: Poison and make Acid, for example.

Again; feel free to be creative with this idea, if you'd like. I'm not picky so long as it fits your character concept and the game world.

Pre-Crafting: If you want to have some gear you have crafted yourself you can do that. You need to have the appropriate Craft Skill and spend half the gold on Crafting Components and have the Crafting tools. If you do that, and you want to craft something, then let me know and make the roll. I had gone back and forth on this, but given how little healing there is in this world, allowing you to have more flexibility in your non-magical gear which you start with seems reasonable.

Question for you all about Profession Skills

What do you guys think about getting Synergy bonuses for certain Skills if you have a high enough rank in a particular Profession skill?

So, for example, if you took Profession: Sailor, and had 5 ranks in it, then - arguably - it seems likely you might gain a +1 Synergy bonus to Acrobatics and Swim just because you've spent so much time sailing.

Again; I haven't read any set rules on this subject, but if someone took "Profession: Bodyguard" it wouldn't surprise me that they might get a bonus to Intimidate and Perception - or a person who had 5 ranks in "Profession: Temple Acolyte" (I just made those Professions up, they're not formally in the book as far as I know, but they seem like something you could do to make a living, so why not?) - that they may have a +1 bonus to something like Knowledge: Religion and maybe Linguistics or something like that...

This is just a thought, though. What do you guys think?

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