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Can an adventurer support a family?


Advice


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I realized recently that I wanted a character to have a backstory that wasn't tragic, wasn't too unfortunate, or too goofy. I wanted to create a character who has a family, kids included and adventures specifically to provide for their family (and ensure that they are set for generations to come).
But, then it was pointed out that in order for that to work, the character would have to return home often in order to actually deliver the gold and actually bond with their family.
I sort of imagine it like real life military deployments (which can take months or possibly longer sometimes) but more self-planned and without the convenience of modern banking technology.
Anybody have thoughts on how this could (or couldn't) work? Especially at lower levels?


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Unfortunately, that's not allowed. All characters in Pathfinder must be orphans and have backstories involving everyone in their entire family killed. :P


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The Bank of Abadar (it's a real thing) would actually accept your money and your spouse would be able to withdraw it at the nearest branch. It might take a bit of time to get access to it, but your initial deposit should be sufficient to tide them over once they get it. Adventures have much higher income than needed to support a family.

Outside of that, adventurers can level and acquire wealth rapidly. Most APs take less than a year worth of time to complete and see you level from 1 to at least 14. So it's shorter than many military deployments, and with some of your wealth you could eventually acquire the means to teleport home.

So yeah...overall it's pretty easy to have a family in my opinion.


Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Almost all of my players go the "orphan" route, and I admit that I've done it far too often too. But one player in my current RotRL game has established a wife, and it's led to some great character development. His character is a member of the city watch and is often out on assignment (away for weeks at a time), so both the PC and the NPC wife know temporary separation is just a painful part of the deal. He sends her letters (paying the Core Rulebook fee for messengers by mile travelled) while out adventuring. I have, of course, intentionally avoided the cliche of having the wife kidnapped or otherwise placed in danger. I want my players to feel that they can establish NPCs in their backstories that I won't (always) exploit for plot reasons.


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You can support a family for years with the amount of money that you accidentally over tip the barmaid with once you get a few levels on you.

You do not go into high level adventuring to just to support your family... unless you are supporting a major noble household (complete with butlers, maids, serfs, small army... really, what you get as spare change from the leadership feat).

It is better to have a concrete goal that you are working towards, even if the methods of doing so are not concrete. Mysterious, incurable diseases and curses tend to be rather good reasons for a family man to go out even when his family is safe in their home. (I wonder if you could do wrath of the righteous, and have 'demon hearts' as a medical ingredient?)

Political strife can also work- where a political opponent drives you out, and your wife goes back to live under the protection of her family's house. You are adventuring to gather resources to counter this opponent, whether is is wealth, influence, or just raw strength (all three will be at your fingertips given time).


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Standard advice: Talk to your GM. What's the campaign like?

Some games are all short self-contained missions from a home base with plenty of downtime. These would work well.

Others have more time pressure and more travel, but still might work with such concepts as the Bank of Abadar to transfer money home.

Yet others might snatch the characters away from their homes unexpectedly and strand them in distant hostile lands (or even worlds) with no way to contact home.

Or the set up may just be incompatible - some APs are like that - Strange Aeons, perhaps?

There's also the question of how relations back home go. Plenty of rp opportunities as you try to decide whether to buy that next magic item that might keep you alive or move your family out of the hut they're living in and into a mansion.


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1000 gold to a fantasy-medieval family is HUGE. 10k, something that is quickly burned through on magic and healing will keep them comfortable for years. Until they die in their 40s due to lack of health care. ;p


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Air0r wrote:

I realized recently that I wanted a character to have a backstory that wasn't tragic, wasn't too unfortunate, or too goofy. I wanted to create a character who has a family, kids included and adventures specifically to provide for their family (and ensure that they are set for generations to come).

But, then it was pointed out that in order for that to work, the character would have to return home often in order to actually deliver the gold and actually bond with their family.
I sort of imagine it like real life military deployments (which can take months or possibly longer sometimes) but more self-planned and without the convenience of modern banking technology.
Anybody have thoughts on how this could (or couldn't) work? Especially at lower levels?

It totally works. Just don't spend too much time focusing on them if you want them to live. Seriously, the more deadbeat you are, the better for their safety. Some GMs can be sadistic if you don't specifically work out that you don't want your family's deaths to become a story point.

Despite this, I usually give my character surviving family members. Brothers, sisters, parents. Even played a married Vampire once, his husband was a Paladin.

Honestly, you can totally say that you're sending back a bit of gold to your family every so often, and it shouldn't set you back too far treasure-wise. After all, even low-level adventurers are typically making bank.


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Pathfinder Card Game, Class Deck Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

The Vigilante class can help in keeping a powerful separation between the family and the adventurer, so long as he keeps his Vigilante powers away from his Social persona.

Nothing can help against a sadistic GM though.


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Varisian family travelling via merchant wagon caravan, roving adventures from watching for bandits, recovering lost items/supplies, finding alternate routs when storms wash out roads/bridge or a forest fire threatens. Short down times for wagon repairs, trading, week to a month for local celebrations/carnivals/Tournaments. Could also work at sea/river ways.


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Another Idea "Your not an orphan any more!" a lost sibling is found having escaped weeks earlier with tell that the raid that killed family and childhood friends was a slavers raid. Travelling with family as you rescue the next member.


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MannyGoblin wrote:
1000 gold to a fantasy-medieval family is HUGE. 10k, something that is quickly burned through on magic and healing will keep them comfortable for years. Until they die in their 40s due to lack of health care. ;p

Nah, if you make it to adulthood (and survive childbirth if you're a woman), you've got a pretty good chance of living a decent lifespan.

As far as money goes, are you keeping them "comfortable" while spending hundreds of thousands of gold on yourself or are you setting them up properly as befits your new (and rapidly growing) wealth? What do they think of you spending piles of gold on gear while they live on a (relative) pittance?


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You can deliver money back home, for a fee.

Edit: Offer not valid when caravaning to Tian Xia, traveling through time, or stuck in the Demiplane of Duck Feathers.

Scarab Sages

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OP wrote:
Can an adventurer support a family?

Not if they dumped strength.

ba-dum

Liberty's Edge

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An adventurer would easily be able to make enough gold to support a family. Assuming, of course, that s(he) survives.


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thejeff wrote:
MannyGoblin wrote:
1000 gold to a fantasy-medieval family is HUGE. 10k, something that is quickly burned through on magic and healing will keep them comfortable for years. Until they die in their 40s due to lack of health care. ;p

Nah, if you make it to adulthood (and survive childbirth if you're a woman), you've got a pretty good chance of living a decent lifespan.

As far as money goes, are you keeping them "comfortable" while spending hundreds of thousands of gold on yourself or are you setting them up properly as befits your new (and rapidly growing) wealth? What do they think of you spending piles of gold on gear while they live on a (relative) pittance?

As I said, even sending over money in 1k chunks will keep a fantasy family of wife and 2 kids warm and fed for a long time, and if you die at say 10th level even at half price your +2 armor and weapons will keep them secure.


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MannyGoblin wrote:
thejeff wrote:
MannyGoblin wrote:
1000 gold to a fantasy-medieval family is HUGE. 10k, something that is quickly burned through on magic and healing will keep them comfortable for years. Until they die in their 40s due to lack of health care. ;p

Nah, if you make it to adulthood (and survive childbirth if you're a woman), you've got a pretty good chance of living a decent lifespan.

As far as money goes, are you keeping them "comfortable" while spending hundreds of thousands of gold on yourself or are you setting them up properly as befits your new (and rapidly growing) wealth? What do they think of you spending piles of gold on gear while they live on a (relative) pittance?

As I said, even sending over money in 1k chunks will keep a fantasy family of wife and 2 kids warm and fed for a long time, and if you die at say 10th level even at half price your +2 armor and weapons will keep them secure.

Yeah. Remember- SKILLED workers get 1 SILVER per day (I am going to assume that this is the kind of wage you could expect from a middle class person on earth). So 1k is 10,000 days or over 27 years.

Even if you expect a lot more than that for your family... one payment should cover at least a handful of years.


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Yeah easy peasy and you don't have to the Orphan route with back stories, a lot of my characters didn't.

Of the characters I've made (21 I believe) roughly 7 have tragedy in their back story and only about 4 of those are family related. xD

thejeff wrote:
MannyGoblin wrote:
1000 gold to a fantasy-medieval family is HUGE. 10k, something that is quickly burned through on magic and healing will keep them comfortable for years. Until they die in their 40s due to lack of health care. ;p

Nah, if you make it to adulthood (and survive childbirth if you're a woman), you've got a pretty good chance of living a decent lifespan.

As far as money goes, are you keeping them "comfortable" while spending hundreds of thousands of gold on yourself or are you setting them up properly as befits your new (and rapidly growing) wealth? What do they think of you spending piles of gold on gear while they live on a (relative) pittance?

They probably think its fine since you're sending them more money than they could possibly need. Better than the alternative.

Little tim - hey mah when's pops comin home?
Jane - *sobs* never little tim, he died in battle because he was significantly below wealth by level from sending us back so much money *sobs*
Little tim - what are we going to do with all the money mah?
Jane - I don't know little tim, there literally isn't enough food and clothing in the village to spend it on. And we definitely don't need a 5th farm
Little tim - jee mah I wish pops had kept enough money to keep himself safe
Jane - me too little Tim but apparently he thought I was an insanely jealous psycho who would hire spies to watch his spending across the continent and equate how much of it he should be sending home to me. Regardless of whether we needed it at all.
Little tim - Jee where did he get that idea from mah?
Jane - they say he was have nightmares about something he called four-rooms before his last battle, maybe he got it from there..


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This character in this Skull & Shackles PbP (awesome rework of Skull & Shackles, by the way; unfortunately defunct).


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lemeres wrote:
Remember- SKILLED workers get 1 SILVER per day (I am going to assume that this is the kind of wage you could expect from a middle class person on earth). So 1k is 10,000 days or over 27 years.

Unskilled labor gets 1 silver a day. I reckon that's about $10 a day in our world, the sort of thing people in poor countries on Earth have to live off.

Someone making Profession checks (even without lots of ranks) is going to earn maybe ten times that much. Call it 1gp a day, around $100. If you're working 5 days a week, that comes to around $25,000 a year.

At that level, 1000gp is four years' wages.


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One thing I did with my current character was ask my party members to sell my stuff and give the money to his wife should he pass. I absolutely love having characters with living family. Not seeing them but every few sessions can be a drag if it goes on to long but that remains true of most any reccuring/backstory NPC. The point is that family is really fun to RP and gives a very easy way for the DM to add plot/RP encounters. Also as already mentioned it is cheap. Probably less than the consumables used between seeing them


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MannyGoblin wrote:
thejeff wrote:
MannyGoblin wrote:
1000 gold to a fantasy-medieval family is HUGE. 10k, something that is quickly burned through on magic and healing will keep them comfortable for years. Until they die in their 40s due to lack of health care. ;p

Nah, if you make it to adulthood (and survive childbirth if you're a woman), you've got a pretty good chance of living a decent lifespan.

As far as money goes, are you keeping them "comfortable" while spending hundreds of thousands of gold on yourself or are you setting them up properly as befits your new (and rapidly growing) wealth? What do they think of you spending piles of gold on gear while they live on a (relative) pittance?

As I said, even sending over money in 1k chunks will keep a fantasy family of wife and 2 kids warm and fed for a long time, and if you die at say 10th level even at half price your +2 armor and weapons will keep them secure.

Assuming you don't die in a TPK where your gear can't be recovered. Which probably isn't the case, since otherwise you just get raised.


In situations where you don't get raised, it's pretty common for adventurers to send all your wealth back home to your family, for reasons of game balance.

The replacement PC usually starts out with full WBL, so if the rest of the party gets to sell off the dead PC's loot, the GM will get annoyed. "You're supposed to get rich through heroic efforts, not by incompetently getting your friends killed."


Chromantic Durgon <3 wrote:


thejeff wrote:
MannyGoblin wrote:
1000 gold to a fantasy-medieval family is HUGE. 10k, something that is quickly burned through on magic and healing will keep them comfortable for years. Until they die in their 40s due to lack of health care. ;p

Nah, if you make it to adulthood (and survive childbirth if you're a woman), you've got a pretty good chance of living a decent lifespan.

As far as money goes, are you keeping them "comfortable" while spending hundreds of thousands of gold on yourself or are you setting them up properly as befits your new (and rapidly growing) wealth? What do they think of you spending piles of gold on gear while they live on a (relative) pittance?

They probably think its fine since you're sending them more money than they could possibly need. Better than the alternative.

Little tim - hey mah when's pops comin home?
Jane - *sobs* never little tim, he died in battle because he was significantly below wealth by level from sending us back so much money *sobs*
Little tim - what are we going to do with all the money mah?
Jane - I don't know little tim, there literally isn't enough food and clothing in the village to spend it on. And we definitely don't need a 5th farm
Little tim - jee mah I wish pops had kept enough money to keep himself safe
Jane - me too little Tim but apparently he thought I was an insanely jealous psycho who would hire spies to watch his spending across the continent and equate how much of it he should be sending home to me. Regardless of whether we needed it at all.
Little tim - Jee where did he get that idea from mah?
Jane - they say he was have nightmares about something he called four-rooms before his last battle, maybe he got it from there..

Or

little Timmy's wondering why his dad died on some risky adventure when he'd already made more money than they could ever possibly spend.
Adventuring never made any real economic sense - quit when you've got the money to lie comfortably the rest of your life.

And Jane doesn't have to be an insanely jealous psycho, just upwardly mobile. A few thousand gold may be a fortune to a small town farm wife, but if you move to the city and start interacting with even lower nobility, it goes really fast.

Beyond that, you do need a 5th farm - assuming there's land you can buy and it's not already all held by the nobility. Land is long term wealth. Rent from land is how you keep your kids from falling back to impoverished peasant in a generation or two.


Matthew Downie wrote:

In situations where you don't get raised, it's pretty common for adventurers to send all your wealth back home to your family, for reasons of game balance.

The replacement PC usually starts out with full WBL, so if the rest of the party gets to sell off the dead PC's loot, the GM will get annoyed. "You're supposed to get rich through heroic efforts, not by incompetently getting your friends killed."

"Assuming you don't die in a TPK". Or in some other case where your body can't be retrieved.

Which are the most common cases where you wouldn't be raised. (Leaving aside "player wants a different character", which is a purely metagame motivation.)


Sure, "TPK" or "swallowed by a purple worm and never seen again" are possibilities, but "player wants to play a different character" and "party are too low level to afford resurrection" are quite common too, and in those cases sending all their wealth back to their family is standard in a lot of games. Even if it was never established that they had a family.


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My character in kingmaker had a family in each town. When one of the towns was sacked and his wife there was killed, he brought the children to live in the capital.

Dark Archive

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lemeres wrote:
You do not go into high level adventuring to just to support your family... unless you are supporting a major noble household (complete with butlers, maids, serfs, small army... really, what you get as spare change from the leadership feat).

That would be a neat backstory for a Taldan adventurer.

S/he considers it a low sort of thing, totally beneath them, but the family has fallen on hard times, after some bad investments, and they need to go out there and get some gold to pay for upkeep on the manor and the staff and such-like. The family back home doesn't talk about where the money is coming from for the expensive soirees they are throwing to quash rumors that they might be down on their luck, but spend that money all the same, while never mentioning the name of the black sheep that went off adventuring, which is simply not done for someone of their station...

Liberty's Edge

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

My character in RotRL, through a "The Hangover"-style sidequest set in Magnimar, got a wife and soon a kid. Being all Erastilian, he took her with him on safe parts of adventures and settled them in that fortress when it was safe to do so. Since he got appointed as lord of said fortress, his wife took charge of its reconstruction in accordance to the latest fashions.

Between this and needed military upgrades to the fortress, gold flowed like water, even though the GM was kind enough to not impact the character's WBL


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Set wrote:
lemeres wrote:
You do not go into high level adventuring to just to support your family... unless you are supporting a major noble household (complete with butlers, maids, serfs, small army... really, what you get as spare change from the leadership feat).

That would be a neat backstory for a Taldan adventurer.

S/he considers it a low sort of thing, totally beneath them, but the family has fallen on hard times, after some bad investments, and they need to go out there and get some gold to pay for upkeep on the manor and the staff and such-like. The family back home doesn't talk about where the money is coming from for the expensive soirees they are throwing to quash rumors that they might be down on their luck, but spend that money all the same, while never mentioning the name of the black sheep that went off adventuring, which is simply not done for someone of their station...

Problem is, that only works if you start at high level. Going out adventuring at low level isn't a reasonable route to ensure bringing back enough gold to even touch expenses for a manor, etc.

Mostly it doesn't work even at moderately high levels, unless your GM is willing to throw extra gold at you without affecting WBL as The Raven Black's was.
At any given moment, it makes more sense to return, sell your gear and settle down or keep plowing your loot into more gear so you don't die before getting enough money. Sending back a small fraction, while decreasing your chance of surviving to earn more doesn't pay off.


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thejeff wrote:

Or

little Timmy's wondering why his dad died on some risky adventure when he'd already made more money than they could ever possibly spend.
Adventuring never made any real economic sense - quit when you've got the money to lie comfortably the rest of your life.

Meta reason? so as to not randomly derail the campaign by jumping ship. In character reason, not randomly abandoning your friends who fought with your and risked their lives for you and you for them, because you got the magic number of money that equates to enough. OR for the greater good, to save some kingdom or some such from an evil overlord or terrible cabal of wizards.

Quote:


And Jane doesn't have to be an insanely jealous psycho, just upwardly mobile. A few thousand gold may be a fortune to a small town farm wife, but if you move to the city and start interacting with even lower nobility, it goes really fast.

lol nobility wouldn't willfully interact with new money, but aside from that Jane would make the most money by letting mid level adventurer #74 send back a safe amount of money rather than draining them of too much income so that they die.

also my premise was they are in a village. Don't move the goal posts.

Quote:


Beyond that, you do need a 5th farm - assuming there's land you can buy and it's not already all held by the nobility. Land is long term wealth. Rent from land is how you keep your kids from falling back to impoverished peasant in a generation or two.

They have exactly 1 living descendant and 4 land holdings. They're fine.


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thejeff wrote:
Set wrote:
lemeres wrote:
You do not go into high level adventuring to just to support your family... unless you are supporting a major noble household (complete with butlers, maids, serfs, small army... really, what you get as spare change from the leadership feat).

That would be a neat backstory for a Taldan adventurer.

S/he considers it a low sort of thing, totally beneath them, but the family has fallen on hard times, after some bad investments, and they need to go out there and get some gold to pay for upkeep on the manor and the staff and such-like. The family back home doesn't talk about where the money is coming from for the expensive soirees they are throwing to quash rumors that they might be down on their luck, but spend that money all the same, while never mentioning the name of the black sheep that went off adventuring, which is simply not done for someone of their station...

Problem is, that only works if you start at high level. Going out adventuring at low level isn't a reasonable route to ensure bringing back enough gold to even touch expenses for a manor, etc.

Mostly it doesn't work even at moderately high levels, unless your GM is willing to throw extra gold at you without affecting WBL as The Raven Black's was.
At any given moment, it makes more sense to return, sell your gear and settle down or keep plowing your loot into more gear so you don't die before getting enough money. Sending back a small fraction, while decreasing your chance of surviving to earn more doesn't pay off.

You could write the early levels off as 'we can make do for now- the creditors aren't getting insistent yet'.

The extra cash does require an RP element. A good way is to have the character be the only one with diplomacy, and have them be the only ones negotiating prices. With no one there to verify what you agreed to.

"Well guys, I got us a new job. We just have to take care of the town's werewolf problem, and 6..... I mean 3000 gold is ours. Yes. lets do it."

....I am sure you can get why he made that 'mistake'.

Chromantic Durgon <3 wrote:
Quote:


Beyond that, you do need a 5th farm - assuming there's land you can buy and it's not already all held by the nobility. Land is long term wealth. Rent from land is how you keep your kids from falling back to impoverished peasant in a generation or two.
They have exactly 1 living descendant and 4 land holdings. They're fine.

Until the new head of the area decided he needed a new personal army to take care of his personal grudges. Then, large holdings start getting squeezed for cash. You might want to send back some money so they don't face any problems.


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I am liking a lot of what I am seeing. on the DM side of things none of my players have tried this angle. and from the player side of things I am excited to problem solve a way to make it work (or watch as it spectacularly backfires story-wise).


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It varies a lot by campaign.

To take some adventure paths I've played (minor spoilers):

Carrion Crown:

Spoiler:
"I know I said I was just going to the funeral of an old friend, but I wound up staying for six weeks. Yeah, one damn thing after another. No, I was not having a fun holiday without you. It was a pretty miserable time, to be honest. Oh, but remember how I said I was thinking about learning magic? I'm now a 15th level wizard."

Jade Regent:

Spoiler:
"I know I said I was going to explore the local swamp, but things developed, and now I'm going to cross the North Pole in bid to seize the throne of a kingdom on the other side of the world on behalf of the local innkeeper. We've probably got room on the caravan for the kids but they'll have to wrap up warm."

Kingmaker:

Spoiler:
"Hey, sorry I was gone a couple of years. Remember I said I was going off to seek my fortune? Well, I found it and now I'm a king. Would you mind relocating to the city I've built and ruling as regent in my stead on my adventuring days?"

Liberty's Edge

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Chromantic Durgon <3 wrote:


They have exactly 1 living descendant and 4 land holdings. They're fine.

Almost all human beings do not display this level of wisdom and restraint. She is truly an exceptional woman


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Mid level adventurer #74 knows how to pick em.


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lemeres wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Set wrote:
lemeres wrote:
You do not go into high level adventuring to just to support your family... unless you are supporting a major noble household (complete with butlers, maids, serfs, small army... really, what you get as spare change from the leadership feat).

That would be a neat backstory for a Taldan adventurer.

S/he considers it a low sort of thing, totally beneath them, but the family has fallen on hard times, after some bad investments, and they need to go out there and get some gold to pay for upkeep on the manor and the staff and such-like. The family back home doesn't talk about where the money is coming from for the expensive soirees they are throwing to quash rumors that they might be down on their luck, but spend that money all the same, while never mentioning the name of the black sheep that went off adventuring, which is simply not done for someone of their station...

Problem is, that only works if you start at high level. Going out adventuring at low level isn't a reasonable route to ensure bringing back enough gold to even touch expenses for a manor, etc.

Mostly it doesn't work even at moderately high levels, unless your GM is willing to throw extra gold at you without affecting WBL as The Raven Black's was.
At any given moment, it makes more sense to return, sell your gear and settle down or keep plowing your loot into more gear so you don't die before getting enough money. Sending back a small fraction, while decreasing your chance of surviving to earn more doesn't pay off.

You could write the early levels off as 'we can make do for now- the creditors aren't getting insistent yet'.

{. . .}

Just thought of a variation on this: The creditors have lent you money that isn't theirs, that they got as part of a scam from some other creditors who weren't paying enough attention to the admittedly tricky aspect of the bundled credit instruments they were investing in. (Doesn't this sound awfully familiar?) The ones that lent you they money may have even figured out a way to bank and bet on your failure (for one thing, they may have bought the rights to foreclose on your family's estate). In that case, they are sure going to be upset when you succeed . . . .

Shadow Lodge

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I did this in PFS, and bought the appropriate vanities (squire, herold) to represent the kids "going on educational expeditions/family outings". It also helps that

Spoiler:
character is a Summoner and Mum's his Eidolon
.

Same concept might work for a spiritualist even better.

Also, something like Kingmaker where the family lives in the settlement and supplies replacement PCs/leadership cohorts might be fun.

Dark Archive

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Have you considered an urban campaign such as Curse of the Crimson Throne? Not only would it be possible to provide for your family, it would also be a good motivation to make the city a better place to live in. The downside is that your family could be in danger from time to time.
Now you probably could retire after your first adventure, but that doesn't make a very good story.


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This awesome Council of Thieves PbP had many of the PCs have day jobs, so supporting a family would have been possible in this campaign.


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While it can be a pain at lower levels unless you adventure around a single location, it's perfectly doable. Once you have access to Teleport it's not a problem.

First of all, you have to realize that adventuring as a profession (and it is a taxable profession in certain countries in Mystara, where my game is set) does not mean you have to do it constantly. It is perfectly possible to have adventures come along at fairly slow rate, meaning adventurer parents can go out for a bit, probably no more than a couple of weeks at a time, and come home with a ton of cash that will keep the family for several months. Plenty of time for a person to spend with family.

Second, not all adventures take tons of time. Some of them, like your average dungeon crawl, can be over rather quickly (successfully as well as unsuccessfully). This can offset long travel times.

Adventuring can be very risky, probably more risky than joining the military, so I can imagine most responsible people don't want to support a family with this profession, and I'm sure a lot people don't want their S.O. to have such a dangerous job, even if it can be quite lucrative.

All my current players have characters with family, and a couple support children, though these came about at higher levels. The idea that all PCs are orphans was something I never came across with my various groups. We've always had mostly characters with family, even if that family was somewhere distant and never showed up in game.


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Well, now that you mention it -- APs that have you adventure (at least mostly in 1 place):

  • Curse of the Crimson Throne (sort of)
  • Council of Thieves (only a couple of fairly brief trips out of Westcrown, apart from the short soujourns into other-dimensional space)
  • Hell's Rebels (at least for the most part)
Of course, in some of the other APs, you could justify a PC having a family, and then all of a sudden has to join the adventure to defend and possibly relocate their family.


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Shackled city, if you want to go back a bit.

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