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What Levels Need More Adventures?


Product Discussion

51 to 100 of 110 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>
Liberty's Edge

I think more low level adventures would have a greater chance of attracting new players as opposed to opposed to older players who are more experienced in the system and have higher level characters. The only way a company can grow is to attract new customers and keep them.. A better question might be what can be done to attract new players to Paizo. Possibly a few short modules


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Modules Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Martin Kauffman 530 wrote:
I think more low level adventures would have a greater chance of attracting new players as opposed to opposed to older players who are more experienced in the system and have higher level characters. The only way a company can grow is to attract new customers and keep them.. A better question might be what can be done to attract new players to Paizo. Possibly a few short modules

I'm so very confused, so bear with me.

If these "new players" aren't aware of Paizo/Pathfinder, creating modules of any level won't entice them because they don't know about them. If they are aware of Paizo/Pathfinder, they're aware of the zillion low-level modules that already exist. So why don't they buy those? What about these new low-level adventurers makes them buy in?

Especially consider that these people won't have experience under their belt that might tell them it's safe to purchase from (some) 3rd-party publishers.


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Dale McCoy Jr wrote:
Dreikaiserbund wrote:
What would be useful, thus, are high-level adventures that I can basically just slip into a session or a half-session, possibly as a break from the main plot for whatever reason. Things which are an appropriate challenge for level 12+ adventurers, but which don't require me to upend the campaign.
Something like finding a treasure map, only to discover once you are inside that a dragon has taken up residence inside, yes?

Precisely! Or there's a mohrg with class levels taking up some serial killing in the PCs' city, or a small but potent demonic cult, etc.


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I'd like some cerulean seas inspired adventures. (I am planning on running some players through a cerulean seas game, where after a few levels a massive starjammer ship, not sure what type yet, crashes into their sunken planet, releasing things that had been sealed away deep in the planet. but, now there is all this tech that no one knows how to use, and maybe even survivors if they act fast enough. like within a week fast? not sure)

also things with odd starting levels; most adventures I make up in my home games start at level 3 (past that point where an unlucky roll can one shot a character).

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Alright, we've definitely established a need for more 10th+ level adventure with a great need for 15th+ level adventures.

Lets talk length and scope of the plot. For length, are you interested in adventures that take players up:

  • 1 level or less,
  • 2-3 levels, and/or
  • 4+ levels?

As far as scope goes, do you want an adventure that

  • is a 1-2 session break from the main story (finding a treasure map, killing some raiders, find a serial killer, rescue the kidnapped kid from the devils holding him in Hell),
  • you can make part of the main story by changing the names (making a bargain with an elemental lord on the plane of ash, taking down a wizards cult that can be working for your campaigns main villain, stealing the McGuffin from the vault in Hell that first requires you to break into a vault in the main realm go through a labyrinth and strike a deal with an archdevil), or
  • a campaign that start up high (you start off fighting the forces of of the lich Eskenma Pruith, hunt down all the lich's phylactories, and end 5-7 levels later with the death of the lich, darkness spreads over the countryside from several towers and you have to stop the spread of the plane of shadows into your land, kill the evil sorcerers that are making it happen, and then finally broker a peace deal between the sun and moon gods to get reality back to the way it was)

While we're at it, lets talk campaign setting. I can't use Paizo Campaign Setting (obviously). Would you rather have:

  • JBE's own campaign setting, allowing us to delve into our own lore, making the world flavorful and unique, or
  • More generic, allowing it for easier working into your own campaign setting or Paizo's campaign setting?

Here's the differences: with our own campaign setting, we can talk about the animosity that has developed over the past 1,000 years between the sun and the moon gods when the last solar eclipse occurred and the sun god was furious for such an affront so the sun god stopped shining for a night just so no one would see the brilliant full moon, which brought about the conflict that lead to the spreading of the darkness by the sorcerers, we can delve deep into the history of the Pruith liches and how Eskenma is the last surviving lich, how he worked in secret for hundreds of years making his own guardian fortresses on other planes to protect his phylactories before sending forth his minions to conquer the Dragon Claw Empire. *long audible inhale*

More generic, They're a sun and moon gods, he's a lich. Provide your own backstory for them.


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Personally, I'd like a story to fill the last 3 to 5 levels that the APs don't reach, and I'd like a story that I could relate to the main story, but that would be more an incentive to buy rather than something that I feel necessary.
I'd rather have a good story even if it's totally unrelated to everything else than a mediocre content that fits preexisting stuff.

EDIT: I think that you should use your own setting and develope the story, even if some people then changes some stuff to make it fit their campaign. Generic stuff is often boring and unattractive, and if you develope an interesting story people will probably be interested and want to see more.


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some occasional 'side quest' style adventures have their appeal, but otherwise that home stretch to 20 would be a great place to settle into.
also, your own setting could be nice. it just needs a solid draw though. (also, leave no adventuring stone unturned; underwater, unique planes if any, heck, even some info on surrounding space just in case some starjammer inspiration hits you)


Personally:

Length: 2-3 level per adventures (unless it is a side trek in which case not even a level).

Scope: Actually all 3 options would work for me.

Setting: JBE own setting works for me. Most 1st and 3rdparty stuff get's converted anyway in my case.


I find adventures that cover at least two levels to be better, unless they're part of a series and you're meant to level up between each one.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Modules Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

I'd find most value in shorter items (1-2 levels, tops), and setting-agnostic would be best.

It's more work to file off detailed serial numbers then integrate into a campaign than it is to just integrate.


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1-2 levels gained
Light touch Generic setting that can easily be adapted


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Dale McCoy Jr wrote:

Lets talk length and scope of the plot. For length, are you interested in adventures that take players up:

  • 1 level or less,
  • 2-3 levels, and/or
  • 4+ levels?

1 level or less by preference, 2-3 levels is alright, 4+ is more than I need.

Dale McCoy Jr wrote:

As far as scope goes, do you want an adventure that

  • is a 1-2 session break from the main story (finding a treasure map, killing some raiders, find a serial killer, rescue the kidnapped kid from the devils holding him in Hell),
  • you can make part of the main story by changing the names (making a bargain with an elemental lord on the plane of ash, taking down a wizards cult that can be working for your campaigns main villain, stealing the McGuffin from the vault in Hell that first requires you to break into a vault in the main realm go through a labyrinth and strike a deal with an archdevil), or
  • a campaign that start up high (you start off fighting the forces of of the lich Eskenma Pruith, hunt down all the lich's phylactories, and end 5-7 levels later with the death of the lich, darkness spreads over the countryside from several towers and you have to stop the spread of the plane of shadows into your land, kill the evil sorcerers that are making it happen, and then finally broker a peace deal between the sun and moon gods to get reality back to the way it was)

I would say the first two. Might phrase it as a simple question of demand. GMs generally only need one great-big-super-plot per campaign, and these are the plots that GMs are most likely to spend lots of time on and develop their own. On the other hand, a campaign generally needs multiple short drop-ins.

Dale McCoy Jr wrote:

While we're at it, lets talk campaign setting. I can't use Paizo Campaign Setting (obviously). Would you rather have:

  • JBE's own campaign setting, allowing us to delve into our own lore, making the world flavorful and unique, or
  • More generic, allowing it for easier working into your own campaign setting or Paizo's campaign setting?

I'm going to say use JBE's own campaign setting. As pointed out, generic campaign settings tend towards, well, being bland and generic. I'd much rather have something that engages the imagination, then have to do a bit of thought on how to fit it in (perhaps have a sidebar somewhere that talks about how to integrate it into most campaign settings?)

I will also note that I tend to buy a fair bit more adventures than I ever have a chance to use, mostly to mine for ideas. In that case, something that is fun to read is liable to make me think that it's money well spent even if I don't use it.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

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Dreikaiserbund wrote:
I will also note that I tend to buy a fair bit more adventures than I ever have a chance to use, mostly to mine for ideas. In that case, something that is fun to read is liable to make me think that it's money well spent even if I don't use it.

This right here is reason enough to develop my own setting. Reading an adventure, even if it is never used, is entertainment.


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I aggree. I avoid reading anything that I could end playing (spoilers, you know) but aside from that, I like adventures that can be enjoyed as a good read aside from good roleplaying. (I have toa say that I didn't enjoy reading Skull and Shackles a lot but it's being great to GM and that I enjoyed reading Reign of Winter but it needed a lot of adaptation to fit our group, so fun to read and fun to play are not always the same).
Making your setting have something distinctive or unique also helps to get people attracted to it.


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I'm another one in the camp that enjoys reading an adventure. I retired from GMing a long time ago and previous groups had a strong stigma against modules (we all liked to read them, I guess?). Even now in a Skull & Shackles PbP, I have no problems with them. I tend to find them to be good reads. And at higher levels, they get more entertaining, because higher level characters can do things that their lower level compatriots cannot. At least without breaking immersion.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

You know, I actually remember some criticisms of Paizo's early APs, saying how their formatting made them great to read but difficult to run, but they said they did it because they felt that more GMs read them than ran them. I guess I see their point of view now.


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Length: 1 level or less.
Scope: If possible I'd like an integratabtle story with its own hooks (if we don't have something that quite fits).
Setting: Make your own or at least let one grow organically. It's easy for me to strip flavor out, but adding it in can take a lot of legwork.

Cheers!
Landon


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But you cannot forget that the main function of a module is being gaming material. You can try to make it an interesting read to catch people, but if they don't enjoy playing it and there is too much work to do to make it work (like my GM had with RoW) there is an issue.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Kileanna wrote:
But you cannot forget that the main function of a module is being gaming material. You can try to make it an interesting read to catch people, but if they don't enjoy playing it and there is too much work to do to make it work (like my GM had with RoW) there is an issue.

Solid point.


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I'm now thinking of classic WoD modules.
They were a great read and provided great stories but as gaming material they were awful. They were completely railroady, full of what seemed like the developer's Mary Sues and sometimes you lost all you have done in the breaktime between adventures without being able to avoid it.
They were the perfect example of what could have been a good novel but turned to be a bad gaming material.


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I think the audience for this is people who want to continue playing with existing characters who have finished an AP. It's a pity that IP restrictions on the campaign setting prevent 3rd-party types from simply writing "book 7" of an AP, as that would be a logical market niche.

Since that's not an option, I'll just second what others have said: 1-2 levels, and something easily integrated with an existing campaign.

Consider tiered adventures. That is, maybe write a 2 level adventure for levels 16-17, but stick in notes on adapting the encounters to be played at 18-19. PFS scenarios do this, though of course they're much lower level. Drop Dead Studio's Wizard's Academy adventure similarly sets up multiple tiers of difficulty, though it's a bit more ambitious in that the adventure can be played starting at any level from 1-20 (also note that this title is a showcase for the same publisher's Spheres of Power magic system, so if you haven't read that the stat blocks may be unfamiliar).


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Tinalles wrote:
I think the audience for this is people who want to continue playing with existing characters who have finished an AP. It's a pity that IP restrictions on the campaign setting prevent 3rd-party types from simply writing "book 7" of an AP, as that would be a logical market niche.

I don't think it's impossible since Legendary Games have plug-in adventures for several APs. They just have to file-off the names and stuff that is trademarked or copyrighted by Paizo.


Kileanna wrote:

I'm now thinking of classic WoD modules.

They were a great read and provided great stories but as gaming material they were awful. They were completely railroady, full of what seemed like the developer's Mary Sues and sometimes you lost all you have done in the breaktime between adventures without being able to avoid it.
They were the perfect example of what could have been a good novel but turned to be a bad gaming material.

If they're full of Mary Sues and bait-and-switch endings, I'm not so sure I'd call them 'great stories' (I tease)

Anyway, I'm sure it's possible to find a solid middle-ground. You don't want to lose track of the idea that your adventures are adventures, with the PCs as the protagonists -- a lot of the issues you mention stem from developers who become too in love with their own stories (this is a perennial White Wolf problem, but hardly unique to them). On the other hand, a lot of 3.5-era WotC material basically reads like textbooks. I would use it as a reference source, but I'd basically never look at it otherwise.

I'd also note that there are degrees of generic-to-unique-setting. You can have something that is super-generic, uses only non-setting-specific names, and is a sort of skeleton for an adventure that you dress up in clothes at one extreme, while some hyper-weird setting like Dark Sun is at the other extreme. But there are plenty of ways to develop a setting that has character but is still maneuverable -- most often by sticking to a more constrained scale.

I think Green Ronin's Freeport books do this well. It's a very character-filled setting, very unique, very memorable, but at the same time it's just a single city and a few islands, very easy to dump into Golarion, or Faerun, or Eberron.


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The first module I've ever GMed was The Key of Destiny, of Dragonlance. Before I used to avoid pre-written stuff because, as you said, felt either like a novel where the PCs couldn't change a thing or very generic and uninspiring stuff.
This was the very first module I really liked. I'm talking about it because it has really memorable NPCs and they never steal the spotlight of the PCs, but they aren't forgettable at all.
Most of the last book, Price of Courage, is centered on Gilthanas, the last survivor of the original characters from the novels. And he holds the key to defeat the final boss. He is a perfect candidate to steal the PCs spotlight and become the protagonist. But he doesn't. He keeps the story moving and he has an important role to play, but he's never the protagonist.
I really like how they did it there, so you really felt like you were playing a Dragonlance story, knowing relevant characters, living the story of a lot of relevant events for the setting, but never like playing a story that was already told, where PCs are just witnesses.


(Just throwing out there, for those looking for more high level, there's Coliseum Morphueon and its side adventure, as well as it's collection of high CR NPCs of unusual backgrounds)

Please, continue to discuss.

-Ben.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Modules Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
terraleon wrote:

(Just throwing out there, for those looking for more high level, there's Coliseum Morphueon and its side adventure, as well as it's collection of high CR NPCs of unusual backgrounds)

Please, continue to discuss.

-Ben.

True. As it happens, I own that, in print (demonstrating my willingness to put money to this stuff). I'll have to revisit it, but I recall it being a great example of "too much work to strip the setting out".

Jon Brazer Enterprises

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New Poll

Ok so, we've heard quite a bit of "Adventure Path Cap Stone Adventure, Please," and "Side Quest Adventures, Please." So the question then becomes, "Which adventure paths?" Vote in our poll.

And please tell us which one's you want to see cap stone adventures to.


Voted! Some of the ones I'd choose (for completely selfish reasons) are not there, but there are many cool options.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Kileanna wrote:
Voted! Some of the ones I'd choose (for completely selfish reasons) are not there, but there are many cool options.

I just choose all the ones released in the last 3 years; if you'd rather have something else, share.


As I said, it would be a completely selfish election, I'd rather be a bit more objective. And chances are, that when you publish your content we have already developed something in my group by our own.

I'm GMing Skull and Shackles right now to a group who is really liking to play it so I'd like to continue their story after I finish the AP.

And we are coming to and end with Reign of Winter, mostly with the same situation. My character has become one of myfavorite characters ever and I'd really want to take it to lvl 20. But as this is a very specific story I don't think that could be the best choice for you. Also, we have made many changes on the oficial AP (to start, we have taken it to a Dragonlance setting).

I have voted for Hell's Rebels because I really think it could be a great option and easier to fit. I haven't played it (but I'd like to), and being objective I think it's a better option than the two I mentioned above.


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I did not vote in your poll, because I don't really know anything about any of the adventure paths listed there. I haven't played or GM'ed any of them. Comments on ones I do know about:

spoilerificality:
Rise of the Runelords: I've been GM'ing this one. In terms of narrative structure, it has a very logical continuation: there are, after all, six other Runelords out there after Karzoug is defeated. If you separate out the world lore, the adventure is finding and fighting six high level specialist wizards: an illusionist, an evoker, a necromancer, a conjurer, an abjurer, and an enchanter.

Carrion Crown: The big bad of Book 6 is actually just a flunky. The REAL big bad is The Whispering Tyrant, currently imprisoned in Gallowspire. So the adventure (sans world lore) would be a large, multi-level dungeon full of high-level undead, culminating in a fight with a level 20 mythic lich.

I thought about discussing Kingmaker, but honestly, I don't know how it comes out very clearly -- after seven years of gaming, we've only just finished book 5. I am hopeful that we may be able to finish the AP this year, if we're lucky.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Tinalles wrote:
after seven years of gaming, we've only just finished book 5. I am hopeful that we may be able to finish the AP this year, if we're lucky.

That's some real dedication on the part of your players. I don't know of any single campaign that has gone on that long.


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thenovalord wrote:

1-2 levels gained

Light touch Generic setting that can easily be adapted

Rather than invent a new list of gods, use something like a neutral good god/goddess with the domains of fire, good, glory, healing and sun. This allows us to insert the name of our campaign's god or goddess.

I voted for the two highest tiers.


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Dale McCoy Jr wrote:
That's some real dedication on the part of your players. I don't know of any single campaign that has gone on that long.

Really? I've got three ongoing campaigns of five years' or greater duration.

The details, in case anyone cares:
I'm a player in the Kingmaker, and that one actually fizzled after year 4 when the GM just couldn't devote the time to it any more. One of the other players wanted closure, so he went off and started running Kingmaker for a new group, starting from Book 1. I heard about it, and asked to join up at the end of Book 1. So I've been patiently playing Kingmaker since 2010, including two full playthroughs of books 2 and 3, and BY ALL THAT IS HOLY I WILL FINISH, DO YOU HEAR ME? I just want to finish. Is that so much task? ;_;

One of the other players in the original Kingmaker campaign left at the end of Book 1 because the player had to move, and I've been GM'ing a campaign for that PC as a soloist, remotely, since May 2012. Homebrew campaign set in Golarion. It's still going strong: the PC started at 4 and is now level 16, mythic tier 7. We're going to take it to 20.

Meanwhile, I've been GM'ing Runelords, also since May 2012. That group can only meet once every 5-6 weeks. So it's slow. The only other really notable thing about it is that we're playing this bizarre hybrid of 3.5 and Pathfinder, in that I switched to 100% Pathfinder behind the GM screen after almost TPK'ing the party with 3.5 Xanesha, while the players are running almost entirely under 3.5 rules.

But maybe my groups are unusual that way. I don't have a good sense for how long these things last.

Sorry for the threadjack. >.>

Liberty's Edge

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With regard to attracting new players , I've always felt that Paizo should try to organize game days and/or game demonstrations at local colleges or other promising venues.


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We started Kingmaker not long after book 1 was released. Just now getting to the end of book six. So if you can get 'book 7' out by September that would be great :-)

For other information - modules with a level 1 or 2 increase. A good read but easy to run. Interesting background but easy to plug into an existing campaign. Available in print form through normal bricks and mortar shops. I'm sure that doesn't sound too hard to do....

Cheers
Mark

Silver Crusade

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Dale McCoy Jr wrote:

For length, are you interested in adventures that take players up:

  • 1 level or less,
  • 2-3 levels, and/or
  • 4+ levels?

Multiple, short, 1 level or less adventures are better. If they can tie together that's great, but mostly I just need small bits to plug and play into a bigger campaign.

Dale McCoy Jr wrote:

As far as scope goes, do you want an adventure that

  • is a 1-2 session break from the main story
  • you can make part of the main story by changing the names, or
  • a campaign that start up high

I'm usually looking for a piece to drop into a homebrew game when the creative juices/effort just aren't there that week, so I'd say a 1-2 session break from the main story. Little one-off self-contained stories.

Dale McCoy Jr wrote:

While we're at it, lets talk campaign setting. I can't use Paizo Campaign Setting (obviously). Would you rather have:

  • JBE's own campaign setting, allowing us to delve into our own lore, making the world flavorful and unique, or
  • More generic, allowing it for easier working into your own campaign setting or Paizo's campaign setting?

As others have stated, using your own setting can give inspiration, and removing setting flavor is easier than adding some that was never there.


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My group doesn't react too well to sidequests. They don't like a lot detaching from the main story to do an unrelated quest (when I add sidequests I always try to make them loosely tied to the main story so they can feel relevant), so short unrelated quests would probably not work for me.
Not that it's a bad idea at all, but not for my group.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Modules Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

I'd rather not see adventures designed to slot into specific adventure paths, personally. To us, an AP becomes more about the characters than about the plot. So after say... Hell's Rebels, it's totally legit to take the existing PCs out of Chelliax and throw them at interesting challenges that have nothing to do with the prior plot.

Instead, if there were a bunch of different types, I could dip into. Investigation, like Murder on the Orient Express. Negotiation, where PCs need to mediate some high-level agreements between two key foes/countries, while the war continues. Rescue, where players are encouraged to slam through fortifications and extract a hostage. Infiltration, where you need to do the above, only quietly.

I'd like to see several different adventures with those (and other) general plot designs. Obviously, designing for high-level means taking into account heavy magics, but that's where the challenge comes from. Sure, you could just scry, buff, teleport to rescue the hostage, but the hostage-takers have warded against that particular technique, so the location will have to be found and accessed via slightly more conventional means, still allowing powerful magic, but blocking single-spell "win button" spells.

Shrug.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Anguish wrote:
I'd rather not see adventures designed to slot into specific adventure paths, personally.

I will admit that I am surprised that so many people voted for: adventures not connected to an adventure path. Mind you I was surprised that so many people voted for levels 17-20. I would have expected more votes for levels 13-16 or even 9-12. But it does make sense.


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That'sounds the beauty of a poll. Everyone voice their idea


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Class Deck, Maps, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I don't have any interest in high level modules, however the answer to your question is probably "high level modules" (since low level adventures are all over the place). Personally I'd peg that at levels 10+ as that's where my adventure shelf seems to start to get skimpy.

If I were going to buy any, it would only be if they were part of some larger campaign (like and AP that starts at level 11 and goes through to level 20 or something). I find that adapting a high level, one-off adventure into a campaign is almost as much work as creating my own and we just don't do one-shot adventures any more.

I also don't like using 3PP supporting material when running a paizo campaign - my preference would be to see something standalone rather than trying to match it up to a paizo AP.

Looking at my purchasing patterns, I'm much more likely to buy from companies with their own world that everything is set in than those who follow the generic route, although I don't really have any rational explanation for that (I suspect it's the 'at least I can read it for entertainment value, even though I'm not going to run it' concept you made reference to above.

Also, although it's pretty idiosyncratic, I don't buy anything in electronic format, so POD is essential in my case or it's not even an option to be considered.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Like I said, I was surprised that so many people voted for high level adventures. I actually commissioned a few adventures for the mid-levels a while ago, and the first of them comes out next month. We just released the cover image for that adventure. I have hired people to work on the high level adventures; those adventures will take a bit to publish.


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Mid-level adventure? Sold!!!

I do love those.

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Andre Roy wrote:
Mid-level adventure? Sold!!!

Yep, 11th level. I wish your players well in surviving it.


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Death is the unavoidable conclusion of one's life. It's simply a matter of: "Will it be memorable and worth retelling in Sagas or will you be forgotten by all?"


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Modules Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Dale McCoy Jr wrote:
I have hired people to work on the high level adventures; those adventures will take a bit to publish.

Feel free to PM me if I don't notice (seem to) notice your announcement when these high-level adventures start to release. Even if it's a year or more from now.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'd love to see a 17th-19th level adventure that is setting neutral, advances characters 2 levels and, if your bravery truly knows no bounds, has an appendix for using mythic rules with the adventure...

Jon Brazer Enterprises

Anguish wrote:
From a reputable company I'd accept Kickstarter if that's what it takes. Paizo charges $18 for their current PDFs. I'd be willing to pay say... $15 for a 32-page and $10 for a 16-page adventure, again assuming I'm dealing with a reputable company. I'd probably be willing to do that regularly.

Just curious, but does everyone else share this sentiment? Using this as a baseline, here's the basic pricing structure I'm thinking:

Low Level adventures (levels 1-7)
<32 pages: $4.99
<64 pages: $10

Mid Level adventures (levels 8-14)
16 pages: $4.99
32 pages: $10
64 pages: $14.95

High Level adventures (levels 15-20)
32 pages: $10
64 pages: $14.95
128 pages (I can dream, right): $19.99

Mythic: +some additional cost (I don't know what yet)

How does this sound?


I'm not putting a fixed price there.
I could pay more if the content was exceptional or I loved it, but if it didn't sound specially appealing I might not even buy.
With my economic position, I am kinda picky with what I buy, but I don't care paying a fair price for things that I really want.
The reputation of a company is not an issue for me. If I'm not sure of whether the content is good or not, I'll wait to check some critiques to see what other's people's opinions are.

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