General Question about things in the game


Beginner Box


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Note I did look up the questions I wanted to ask and they either didn't help or didn't exist. Plus last time I resurrected an old forum post a werewolf came after me.

So I recently got the beginner box and I'm reading through the game master guide.

1. One of them, I was reading page 50 on the magic weapons and see the item Dragon-Slaying Ammunition.

After reading about the effects, I was like "oh cool that sounds like a great item!" Now my question about it is when/if you pay 2280 GP for it, do you get 1 arrow or a set of 10 like if you bought regular arrows?

I'm guessing it's only 1 but I figure I'd ask just in case. I mean it does +50 damage against a dragon it'd make sense for ti to be 1.

2. Another question I had involves the poison and the stacking effects for failing to save. Does it stack both the penalty and the duration? That part wasn't exactly clear when I read it. The way I interpreted it is the poison penalty increases, but the time still remains(though it didn't say that).

3. Does sleeping with armour in the 'beginner box' cause the fatigued effect? I think I read it somewhere in either of the beginner box handbooks, or perhaps online from the core rule book. I tried looking for the page in the beginner box handbook and couldn't find it.

Thanks to whoever helps answer and not stack over each other. Can't wait to play the game with friends.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Class Deck, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Werewolves just want hugs, they don't bite much! (Once is usually enough anyways...)

1. That is the price for 1 arrow. It is less clear that is the case in the Beginner Box, but note that the description uses the singular "ammunition" and does not mention any quantities. Similarly, the silver arrow price later on that page is for 1 arrow.

2. I believe you are correct: the penalty increases but the duration stays the same. The full RPG ruleset has far more complicated rules on stacking poisons, which does increase the duration, but also gives the afflicted continual saves to cure themselves before the duration expires, or make things even worse should they fail said saves. Since the Beginner Box doesn't do continual saves at a set frequency, and thus no way outside of items or spells to cure yourself early, it seems like having a fixed duration is there to prevent someone from being poisoned (and therefore completely unable to do anything should enough doses be stacked) forever.

3. Yes. See page 47 of the Hero's Handbook: "Armor is hard to sleep in. Light armor is barely comfortable enough to sleep in without giving you any penalties. If you sleep in medium or heavy armor, the next day you are fatigued (–1 penalty on any roll that uses your STR Mod or DEX Mod)."

Have fun!


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How would you calculate how much a character can carry? Because in the items page it said certain items like backpack and sacks carry X Cubic meters of items. Do I actually have to calculate how much my party and character carry? And if so how do I calculate it?


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WizWar100 wrote:
How would you calculate how much a character can carry? Because in the items page it said certain items like backpack and sacks carry X Cubic meters of items. Do I actually have to calculate how much my party and character carry? And if so how do I calculate it?

With the Beginner Box, you don't. The various containers do give you a general guideline on how much they carry, but nothing gives the dimensions of other equipment. You just have to use common sense.

With the normal rules, your Strength score (and your size) tells you how much you can carry and items have a listed weight.


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Jeraa wrote:
WizWar100 wrote:
How would you calculate how much a character can carry? Because in the items page it said certain items like backpack and sacks carry X Cubic meters of items. Do I actually have to calculate how much my party and character carry? And if so how do I calculate it?

With the Beginner Box, you don't. The various containers do give you a general guideline on how much they carry, but nothing gives the dimensions of other equipment. You just have to use common sense.

With the normal rules, your Strength score (and your size) tells you how much you can carry and items have a listed weight.

Kind of wish they did dabble in that since one of my friends carried 6-10 poles on him I was like "How do you even get through a door way?"


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Ok so I got confused at one point when I was looking up how the game works in addition to other things, so please confirm for a newbie to the tabletop.

1. You don't need to take out your spellbook to cast spells right? and if you did take it out, is there anything special you could do with it?

2. When it says enemy from 5 feet away from you, do they mean 'next to you/next to your square' or actually 'five feet/one square between you and the enemy'?

3. You can melee in 8 direction right? I was confused the first time, because it said you only only attack enemies in an adjacent square, which I interpreted as left, right, up, down only and that only range weapons could hit all around. I only started questioning this when I read the actual rule for it.

4. On certain enemy attack list, it says for move&standard/full round. Do I have to do ALL the attacks it lists? I was like wow that would do a lot of damage.

Thanks for the help, don't stack now.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Class Deck, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

1. Nope. A wizard needs his spellbook to prepare his spells, but once they are prepared, the book is no longer needed to cast them. There's no real use to take it out during combat, unless the player wants to roleplay that their wizard reads out of the book to cast.

2. 5 feet away = directly adjacent. In other words, one of the 8 squares surrounding the square you are standing in (assuming you occupy exactly one square). See below for a diagram, where O represents the character, V represents 5 feet away, and X represents 10 feet away. A _ denotes 15 feet away.

(extra lines for spacing, so it doesn't break around my avatar)

_XXX_
XVVVX
XVOVX
XVVVX
_XXX_

3. Yes, see above diagram.

4. During a turn, you get one move action, one standard action, and one or more free actions (the GM can allow a character to take more than one free action if it makes sense to do so). A full round action consumes both the standard action and the move action. So, you can move (a move action) and then attack once (a standard action). Or, you can make a full attack (for example, if a creature has multiple natural weapons such as 2 claws and a bite, a full attack will let them attack with all of them at once). A full attack consumes a full round action, meaning you cannot take any move actions or standard actions that round. You can convert the standard action into a second move action if you like, as well.

The stat blocks list all possible attacks the creature can take, however the creature is still limited to one action of each type per turn. That means they won't be able to use every single attack option listed in a single turn. Let's take the Black Dragon as an example, which says the following:

Beginner's Box wrote:

Melee (standard action) bite +12 (1d10+6)

Melee (standard and move action) bite +12 (1d10+6), 2 claws +11 (1d8+4), 2 wings +6 (1d8+2)
Special Attacks breath weapon, long reach
Breath Weapon As a standard action, a black dragon can breathe a 60-foot (12-square) line of acid. Creatures in the line take 6d6 points of acid damage (DC 20 Reflex save for half damage). Once the dragon has used its breath weapon, it must wait 1d4 rounds before using that ability again.

On its turn, the dragon can make a single bite attack as a standard action (the first option), it can make all of its natural attacks as a full round action (remember that full round = standard + move), or it can use its breath weapon as a standard action.

The standalone bite would be used when the dragon needs to use its move action for something else, such as flying around. If the dragon is already within range of an enemy at the start of its turn (remember that it has long reach, so it can attack up to 10 feet away instead of 5 feet), then it can use both the standard and the move action to make a full attack.

The full attack means you use every attack listed, meaning the dragon is making 5 different attacks at once when using the second option. This can indeed add up to a lot of damage should they all hit. The attacks can all be at the same target, or they can be spread out between different targets that are also within range.


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Mmmm most informative and clear Mr. Werewolf, thank you.

Ok how about:

1.healing a stabilized character with a potion?

one of the PC was dying but managed to stabilize themselves, my character goes up to him and uses a potion of cure light wounds. I think to myself "This makes sense I'm using a healing item to HEAL him so logically it should 1. stabilize him if he was dying and 2. if brought back to 0 and above he can function again." So it worked that way for one moment.

But then I read the dying page in the beginner hero handbook and it said that magic or natural healing can give hit points back to a stabilized character. which it then lists off what counts as healing magic and natural healing. None of which says/mentions potions, unless potions count as magic, which I never actually consider them magic since I think of them as alchemy based and kind of like the modern medicine in Pathfinder, with exceptions to effects that are clearly magical.

I find that this makes no sense to me, and if it turns out that you can't use a light would cure potion to bring a character back to consciousness I'm going to house rule that part.

2. We're playing with attacks of opportunity and I tried reading up the timing of when it occurs and I think I got most of it down but still wants some clarifications.

How does withdrawing and using the 5-foot move to avoid AoO suppose to work?

I know withdrawing takes a full action, which then on the current square you are on cannot trigger an AoO when you run, however if I was playing poorly and decided to move to say into the NW direction of the enemy I'm running away from, then they can use AoO. Is that right?

Also if you're being flanked and you withdrawn is the current square you're on not affect by the one you're running from or both?

Then there's the 5-foot step to avoid(I'm going to assume it's either free action or move action but only 5 foot step). So is the only difference between 'withdrawing' and the '5 foot step' just distance and no full action?

Like I move 5 foot to get out(assuming it's the free action), no AoO and, then I use my move to say go somewhere else where I am needed. Or is my move turn just used up to move 5 foot out of the way?

I get that withdrawing is intended to run away which is why it doubles your speed.

Alright thanks to those who help clarify the questions, no stacking as usual.

Liberty's Edge

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WizWar100 wrote:

Mmmm most informative and clear Mr. Werewolf, thank you.

Ok how about:

1.healing a stabilized character with a potion?

Potions are magic, and as such they stabilize characters.

WizWar100 wrote:

2. We're playing with attacks of opportunity and I tried reading up the timing of when it occurs and I think I got most of it down but still wants some clarifications.

How does withdrawing and using the 5-foot move to avoid AoO suppose to work?

The first square you move from (starting square) does not count as being threatened, so no AoOs. With withdraw, every square after will still draw AoOs from enemies that threaten.

WizWar100 wrote:

I know withdrawing takes a full action, which then on the current square you are on cannot trigger an AoO when you run, however if I was playing poorly and decided to move to say into the NW direction of the enemy I'm running away from, then they can use AoO. Is that right?

Also if you're being flanked and you withdrawn is the current square you're on not affect by the one you're running from or both?

To be honest, I'm not 100% sure what you're asking with that second question, but again, leaving the first square doesn't provoke but every square after it will. It makes withdrawing while flanked less worth it, since you will still have to move to one square that at least one of the targets threatens (provided no reach or other extended circumstances).

WizWar100 wrote:

Then there's the 5-foot step to avoid(I'm going to assume it's either free action or move action but only 5 foot step). So is the only difference between 'withdrawing' and the '5 foot step' just distance and no full action?

Like I move 5 foot to get out(assuming it's the free action), no AoO and, then I use my move to say go somewhere else where I am needed. Or is my move turn just used up to move 5 foot out of the way?

The 5 foot step is actually listed as no action, it's just considered the shuffling and repositioning that happens in combat. It can't be combined with any other movement though, so you can use a move for something like drawing a weapon, but once you've taken the 5 foot step, you're stuck where you are. Moving this way doesn't provoke AoOs.

Also, withdrawing doesn't really double your speed, it just combines a double move with the non provoking aspect of a 5 foot step.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Class Deck, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

1. Potions duplicate spells, so a potion of cure light wounds is equivalent to casting the spell cure light wounds on the imbiber. As such, it counts as magical healing. In addition, you will notice that all potion names are italicized, which indicates that they are magic items.

2. Withdraw only prevents an AoO for moving out of the first square. If you would provoke an AoO for moving out of anything other than that square, those attacks still happen. See the below diagrams for two examples. O represents your location, E represents the enemy's location, and numbers represent movement (so 1 represents the first square of the movement path, 2 the second square, and so on). The enemy is assumed to threaten everyone 5 feet away (so one of the 8 adjacent squares).

2
1
OE

In this example, if you Withdraw, you do not take an AoO by moving from your current square to square 1, but you do take an AoO by moving from square 1 to square 2. AoOs happen immediately before the action that triggered them, so you are still in square 1 when you provoke the attack due to moving to square 2. The enemy can only attack 5 feet away, so it is important in this case. Another important instance of why AoO happen immediately before the triggering event is due to tripping. Standing up from prone provokes an attack of opportunity, but the attack happens while you are still prone so the attacker cannot trip you again (you're already prone). This means you can't be trip-locked.

Another example is as follows:

21OE

In this example, the character if Withdrawing does not provoke when moving to square 1, and again does not provoke when moving to square 2, because by that point in time they are out of range (the enemy can only attack 5 feet away, and you are 10 feet away if standing in square 1).

Attacks of opportunity from movement trigger due to the movement itself. Everyone that has the ability to attack you due to you moving can do so. Similarly, if you avoid an AoO due to withdraw or making a 5-foot step, you do so from everyone. You do not declare that you are withdrawing from a specific enemy, you simply declare that you are withdrawing.

For 5-foot step, re-read the Hero's Handbook on page 54 (emphasis mine):

Hero's Handbook wrote:
You can move 5 feet (1 square) in any direction, but only if you don’t use your move action or standard action to move (in other words, you can’t use this to get another 5 feet of movement on your turn). If you take this action, it is the only movement you can do this round. You cannot take a 5-foot step if your movement is slowed or you are moving into terrain that slows you down (like mud or bushes).

You cannot 5-foot step and then move again. This is why Withdraw is a thing, because it is otherwise not allowed by the rules.

(Aside: in the full RPG, 5-foot step is not an action at all -- it's just something you're allowed to do once per turn. In the Beginner's Box, it is classified as a free action)


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Whoops that part got skimped by me with the free action, also d'oh forgot that as long as a item has a relation with a magic spell and whatnot it counts as a spell.


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WizWar100 wrote:

2. Another question I had involves the poison and the stacking effects for failing to save. Does it stack both the penalty and the duration? That part wasn't exactly clear when I read it. The way I interpreted it is the poison penalty increases, but the time still remains(though it didn't say that).

If you're referring to stacking instances of the same poison (say, getting bit by the same spider multiple times), then no, the penalties do not stack.

Stacking multiple instances of the same poison increases the save DC by 2 and increases the duration by 50% of its base duration for each new application while the target is already poisoned.

Using the spider example above, let's say you have a spider whose poison does 1d2 Strength damage, has a DC of 12, and a duration of 4 rounds.
- Round 1: The spider bites a PC, and they fail their save. They're now poisoned and take 1d2 Str damage.
- Round 2: The spider bites the PC, and they fail their save again. The poison's duration increases by 2 rounds (half the base duration). The next time they have to roll against the poison's effect, the DC is increased to 14, but they still only take 1d2 Str damage if they fail.
- Round 3: Spider bites again, the DC is now 16 and the poison lasts for 2 more rounds, but the PC still only takes 1d2 Str damage if they fail.


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Diachronos wrote:
WizWar100 wrote:

2. Another question I had involves the poison and the stacking effects for failing to save. Does it stack both the penalty and the duration? That part wasn't exactly clear when I read it. The way I interpreted it is the poison penalty increases, but the time still remains(though it didn't say that).

If you're referring to stacking instances of the same poison (say, getting bit by the same spider multiple times), then no, the penalties do not stack.

Stacking multiple instances of the same poison increases the save DC by 2 and increases the duration by 50% of its base duration for each new application while the target is already poisoned.

Using the spider example above, let's say you have a spider whose poison does 1d2 Strength damage, has a DC of 12, and a duration of 4 rounds.
- Round 1: The spider bites a PC, and they fail their save. They're now poisoned and take 1d2 Str damage.
- Round 2: The spider bites the PC, and they fail their save again. The poison's duration increases by 2 rounds (half the base duration). The next time they have to roll against the poison's effect, the DC is increased to 14, but they still only take 1d2 Str damage if they fail.
- Round 3: Spider bites again, the DC is now 16 and the poison lasts for 2 more rounds, but the PC still only takes 1d2 Str damage if they fail.

Oh I understood the corerule book poison stacking rules. It was a question for the beginner box(which is why I posted in the Beginner Box section) which says to increase the penalty of what afflictions the PCs get. But it never clear said if it stacks on just one or two, until Skizzer cleared it up saying it's only the effect and not the time just to keep it simple for the beginner box.


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What's the stats for the horse? The beginner box mentions mounted combat but I didn't find any stats for the horse to determine when it'd fall in combat.

If there is nothing in the beginner book, I'll just use the official horse stats from the corebook.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I present: the official stats for a horse.

Note, as well, the links on the right: advanced horse, heavy horse, fiendish combat trained heavy horse, pony, and summoned creature. Those are all the various stats for horses.

Here are the prices for horses (and, towards the bottom, specialized gear) and other creatures and mounts.

How animals are trained for combat.

Otherwise, you probably just want to use armor rules for barding (i.e. the stuff listed under "non-humanoid creatures").

In case you need help visualizing an unusual term, like "barding" - totally reasonable - here are some images by Google.

Hope that helps!


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In the Beginner Box, only the PCs and the NPCs take damage. There isn't any damage for items or any way to get a horse, except by role-playing having a horse. But that horse doesn't have hit points or barding or anything else that would make it a companion for a PC.

Your GM can certainly look up rules for how to do it, but it's much more complicated and isn't something that's included in Beginner Box adventures


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Sweet! I don't know the Beginner's Box, so thank you, CS!


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CrystalSeas wrote:

In the Beginner Box, only the PCs and the NPCs take damage. There isn't any damage for items or any way to get a horse, except by role-playing having a horse. But that horse doesn't have hit points or barding or anything else that would make it a companion for a PC.

Your GM can certainly look up rules for how to do it, but it's much more complicated and isn't something that's included in Beginner Box adventures

Actually in the hero's handbook on the item page there's a 'horse' you can buy. also later in the handbook there's mounted riding and combat. In an expansion on the beginner box the wizard can summon a horse using the spell 'mount'. I ask because in the page about mounted combat it says your mount can fall in battle, hence the question; "How much hp does it have?"


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Tacticslion wrote:
Sweet! I don't know the Beginner's Box, so thank you, CS!

Well the post is in the beginner box part of the forms.

But thanks for trying to get me info on the horse. It seems the horse in the beginner box is a light horse since it cost 75gp.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Hah! You know, I hadn't noticed? I found it by the stream to the right, so I never went through the subforum. Oops! XD


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WizWar100 wrote:
CrystalSeas wrote:

In the Beginner Box, only the PCs and the NPCs take damage. There isn't any damage for items or any way to get a horse, except by role-playing having a horse. But that horse doesn't have hit points or barding or anything else that would make it a companion for a PC.

Your GM can certainly look up rules for how to do it, but it's much more complicated and isn't something that's included in Beginner Box adventures

Actually in the hero's handbook on the item page there's a 'horse' you can buy. also later in the handbook there's mounted riding and combat. In an expansion on the beginner box the wizard can summon a horse using the spell 'mount'. I ask because in the page about mounted combat it says your mount can fall in battle, hence the question; "How much hp does it have?"

I missed the horse on the items page. Thanks for pointing that out. However, the rest of the information stays the same.

If you want to give the horse hit points, you'll need to consult the Core Rule Book. The 'horse' item in the Hero's Handbook is most likely equivalent to a Light Horse

There's a previous thread in this forum that goes into how to use a horse during BB encounters here
A Few Questions
You will quickly run into questions that the Beginner Box will not be able to answer. That's when you can start to research the full Pathfinder game at the Paizo site or the excellent d20pfsrd fan site.

Stats for a horse. These may not exactly translate to the easier Beginner Box rules, but it should give you a start.

The horse for sale in the hero's guide is likely a light riding horse and can easily carry 250 pounds, but it likely will run before fighting.

Now a heavy horse might have a +5 (1d4+5) bite attack and 2 hooves +0 (1d6+2). It could regulary carry 300-400 pounds.

Exceeding carrying capacity would slow the horse down and eventually fatigue it.


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Ok a new question that I've tried searching on the paizo/pathfinder forums and other online sources but could not find a clear answer that is accepted.

The spell 'Sleep' when I cast it on an enemy and put them to sleep. Is using a standard action to wake them up the only way for them to wake up?(Aside from the spell duration being over).

I ask because in the corebook and the searches I've done online. It says wounding a creature that's asleep from the spell(It didn't specifically say from a spell but it was written along side it) would wake up.

I know if you attack a creature that's sleeping naturally, it will wake up if you attack them.

In the Beginner Box and probably for simplicity sake it doesn't mention creatures who are hit by sleep will wake up from being attacked, outside of using a standard action to wake them.

So officially which is it? Does attacking a creature that's turned helpless from the sleep spell wake up? Or can we keep hitting it until it dies or the sleep duration runs out or someone wakes them up with a standard action?

I'll probably house rule how it works but I still want to know officially how it works.

Thanks to those answering this question, don't stack now.


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Here's the entire spell from the Hero's Handbook

Beginner Box wrote:

Sleep

RANGE 100 feet
DURATION 1 minute/wizard level
Living creatures in a 10-foot radius fall asleep. The spell can affect
up to 4 Hit Dice, starting with the lowest Hit Dice and ignoring
unconscious, mindless, or construct creatures. Creatures can make
a Will save (DC 11 + your INT Mod) to resist. Waking a sleeping
creature is a standard action. Noise isn’t enough to wake them.

They can be awakened, but noise isn't enough. However, they are asleep, not unconscious.

If shaking them is sufficient to wake them (taking enough time to complete a standard action), why do you think that injuring them wouldn't? IF they don't die before their initiative round happens, then they are lying down (prone condition) and injured, but certainly awake.


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CrystalSeas wrote:


They can be awakened, but noise isn't enough. However, they are asleep, not unconscious.

If shaking them is sufficient to wake them (taking enough time to complete a standard action), why do you think that injuring them wouldn't? IF they don't die before their initiative round happens, then they are lying down (prone condition) and injured, but certainly awake.

Yeah I read that part in the beginner box, the way I interpreted it, is you have to use a standard action to purposely wake said creature up. Which from the description, it didn't sound like attacking would wake them up(Even though I can agree to a degree that you'd wake up from getting hit) because I'm not using my standard action to wake them, I'm using it to injure them.

Anyways the confusion came when I was listening to this story about a DM who put 2/3 of a party to sleep, and had his creatures go and kill two of the PCs. From the sounds of that it sounds like they didn't wake up from being attacked unless the creature one hit killed the PCs. But that might be from an older edition of DnD and it would work differently.

Then one thing lead to another where I'm looking up how Sleep works, and online some say because it's magic they don't wake up from being injured, then the other half says otherwise, referring to the rule about it.

Then there's being put to sleep, hitting the ground, and then waking up which is like what's the point of sleep if they'll just wake up from face plant on the ground as soon as it happened?

The way I interpreted it is, if you managed to put a creature to sleep they go prone, are helpless and knocked out from being put to sleep(And in the beginner box you're considered unconscious if helpless and knocked out), which based on that you can't do anything unless someone deliberately wakes you up by using a standard action to do it, but says nothing about being awaken from being injured.

Also this link from the creative director.


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Well, if we go to the Core Rule book here's what it says

CRB wrote:
Sleeping creatures are helpless. Slapping or wounding awakens an affected creature but normal noise does not. Awakening a creature is a standard action (an application of the aid another action).

So while you can't continue your actions (like Rage), being wounded does awaken you. The Beginner Box is not going to have a spell that is more deadly than the same spell in the Core Rule Book.


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CrystalSeas wrote:

Well, if we go to the Core Rule book here's what it says

CRB wrote:
Sleeping creatures are helpless. Slapping or wounding awakens an affected creature but normal noise does not. Awakening a creature is a standard action (an application of the aid another action).
So while you can't continue your actions (like Rage), being wounded does awaken you. The Beginner Box is not going to have a spell that is more deadly than the same spell in the Core Rule Book.

Yes I'm aware of the core rule book description of it from the online searches.

*Sigh Whelp I guess it's not THAT magical of a slumber that you'd be sleeping through being hit. It's just the beginner box didn't write that pertinent piece of info in the spell section about the wounding. which in my defense of interpreting it is that you just need a standard action to wake someone up.

I suppose it's just to make your auto crits/coup de grace count.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Or just to prevent them from taking action for a few minutes...

(Which can be phenomenally useful...)


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WizWar100 wrote:
I suppose it's just to make your auto crits/coup de grace count.

Where are you finding "auto crits" and "coup de grace" in the Beginner Box?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

It also makes them fall prone and drop their weapons, causing them to have to use actions to pick up weapons and get up again.

(Was going to point out that getting up from prone provokes attacks of opportunity ... but I don't think there are any AoOs in Beginner Box rules. So in that sense, sleep is less useful than in the core game.)


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A 'Sleep' spell makes them unconscious, and being unconscious makes them 'helpless'. If you are helpless you have a -9 to your AC against melee attacts, and a -5 to your AC against ranged attacks. (Hero's Handbook, page 60). But there aren't any auto-crits or coup de grace attacks. (or AoO, either).

Being "Prone" is a condition though, with penalties (Game Master's Guide, pg 95). When you awaken after being injured, you still have to deal with being prone


CrystalSeas wrote:

A 'Sleep' spell makes them unconscious, and being unconscious makes them 'helpless'. If you are helpless you have a -9 to your AC against melee attacts, and a -5 to your AC against ranged attacks. (Hero's Handbook, page 60). But there aren't any auto-crits or coup de grace attacks. (or AoO, either).

Being "Prone" is a condition though, with penalties (Game Master's Guide, pg 95). When you awaken after being injured, you still have to deal with being prone

Actually if you read the conditions in the Game Master guide near the end.

In the helpless condition it says you can use a full round action to crit your helpless opponent which I believe like in the core book is a coup de grace.

Joana wrote:


It also makes them fall prone and drop their weapons, causing them to have to use actions to pick up weapons and get up again.

(Was going to point out that getting up from prone provokes attacks of opportunity ... but I don't think there are any AoOs in Beginner Box rules. So in that sense, sleep is less useful than in the core game.)

Yes there is no mention of it in the hero or game master handbook, UNLESS you look at the transition guide which mentions AoO and says you CAN include them in the game. Which we did.

Interesting note, I should consider having the enemies drop the weapon now shouldn't I so they'd waste time picking it up? I just assumed that when hit by the sleep spell they drifted slowly prone onto the ground with the weapons clutched in their hands. But that's just my interpretation of how it worked as oppose to immediately face slamming into the ground.


The transition guide changes the Beginner Box rules so that your characters and games follow the Core rules.

If you use the transition information, you're now running a Core campaign, not a Beginner Box campaign. You have transitioned to a different rule set.


Ok new question that once again, a search on the internet and the paizo forums did not lead to very much success.

Does a wizard have a limit on how many spells he can have in his spellbook?

What do I mean by this?

Ok, we have a level 2 wizard who can prepare 3 lv1 spells(20 INT) a day in the morning. So for that day he has 3 spells to use. If he doesn't use the spells he keeps them right? So if he didn't use the spells, the next day can he prepares another 3 spells to which now he has 6 spells to use? Or is there a limit to how many spells of certain levels can they have? Or if he takes a week off from adventure he can have 21 spells prepared?

I looked through my own corerule book(May have missed or forgotten a particular rule somewhere) But all I saw is that a wizard can prepare a certain number of spells and bonus spells based on his stats, but didn't find where it would say the wizard can only have a set number of spells, outside of them being only able to prepare a set number of spells based on their level and whatnot.

Thanks to those who are able to answer the question, no stacking now.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
WizWar100 wrote:
Does a wizard have a limit on how many spells he can have in his spellbook?

It's in the Magic chapter of the CRB, under Arcane Magical Writings:

Quote:
Space in the Spellbook: A spell takes up one page of the spellbook per spell level. Even a 0-level spell (cantrip) takes one page. A spellbook has 100 pages.

Note that you can always get another spellbook when you fill one up.

EDIT: But, hm, this question --

WizWar100 wrote:
Ok, we have a level 2 wizard who can prepare 3 lv1 spells(20 INT) a day in the morning. So for that day he has 3 spells to use. If he doesn't use the spells he keeps them right? So if he didn't use the spells, the next day can he prepares another 3 spells to which now he has 6 spells to use? Or is there a limit to how many spells of certain levels can they have? Or if he takes a week off from adventure he can have 21 spells prepared?

isn't the same thing. You're not asking how many he can have in his spellbook but how many he can have prepared at a time.

The number you can prepare is also the limit on how many you can have prepared at a time. That's in the same section, a little higher up:

Quote:
Until he prepares spells from his spellbook, the only spells a wizard has available to cast are the ones that he already had prepared from the previous day and has not yet used. During the study period, he chooses which spells to prepare. If a wizard already has spells prepared (from the previous day) that he has not cast, she can abandon some or all of them to make room for new spells.

That is, you can keep the spells you have prepared; you can abandon all of them and prepare three new ones; or you can keep one or two and top off however many slots you have left with new spells.

[Note that these quotes are from the CRB. I don't know if the Beginner's Box Hero Handbook has the same text.]


WizWar100 wrote:

Ok new question that once again, a search on the internet and the paizo forums did not lead to very much success.

Does a wizard have a limit on how many spells he can have in his spellbook?

What do I mean by this?

Ok, we have a level 2 wizard who can prepare 3 lv1 spells(20 INT) a day in the morning. So for that day he has 3 spells to use. If he doesn't use the spells he keeps them right? So if he didn't use the spells, the next day can he prepares another 3 spells to which now he has 6 spells to use? Or is there a limit to how many spells of certain levels can they have? Or if he takes a week off from adventure he can have 21 spells prepared?

I looked through my own corerule book(May have missed or forgotten a particular rule somewhere) But all I saw is that a wizard can prepare a certain number of spells and bonus spells based on his stats, but didn't find where it would say the wizard can only have a set number of spells, outside of them being only able to prepare a set number of spells based on their level and whatnot.

Thanks to those who are able to answer the question, no stacking now.

You are talking about 2 different things. Spells in your spellbook and the spells you have prepared to cast aren't the same thing. A spellbook can have any number of spells in it (up to the limit of 100 pages, naturally), while the maximum number of spells you can have prepared at any one time is given by your class (plus any bonus from a high ability score).

You level 2 wizard has 3 1st level spells per day. Theoretically, he can have any number of 1st level spells in one or more spellbooks, but each day he can only have 3 of those prepared.


No, you cannot create a hoard of spells by adding more and more each day. You cannot prepare more spells than you have spell slots.

So, each day you can either empty your mind of the left-over spells from the day before (if there are any) and refill your spell slots with all new spells from your spell book.
OR
You can simply refill the slots that you emptied the day before, retaining the previously prepared spells that weren't expended
============================================================
Beginner Box Wizard Spells
============================================================

The Level 2 Wizard can have 3 + Int mod* + 2 first level spells in their spell book.

They can prepare 1 + 1 +(one more if their INT ability score is higher than 12) per day.

Hero's Handbook, page29 wrote:


1st level Wizard Spells
Pick a number of spells from this page equal to 3 + INT*. These are the spells in your spellbook.

This is what your spellbook contains

Hero's Handbook, page29 wrote:
You can prepare 1 1st-level wizard spell per day from the list of spells in your spell book. If your intelligence ability score is 12 or higher you can prepare an extra spell each day

This is what you can prepare each day.

When you level up to wizard level 2

Hero's Handbook, page 30 wrote:
Add two new first level spells to your spell book! You can prepare another 1st-level wizard spell each day!

Exclamation points and bolding in the original

*

Hero's Handbook, page 13 wrote:
When you see an abbreviation like STR, DEX, CON, WIS, or CHA, that means your Ability Mod (-5 to +5), not your Ability Score

Bold in the original.


Alright alright I worded my question wrong :P. But thanks to all for clearing it up and putting up with my questions.

Just wanted to know if you could have hoarded your prepared spells. Thought it'd be weird to have a stockpile of spells to use.

So the spell limit is based on how many spells I can have prepared. Ok check.

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