Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
Pathfinder Society

Pathfinder Beginner Box

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game

Pathfinder Comics

Pathfinder Legends

How do Christians play Pathfinder without compromising their faith?


Gamer Talk

201 to 250 of 520 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

You'd call them Presbyterians, I think.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I remember even in the 90's finding people that still beleived in the Satanic Conspiracy crap. Like there was this video game rental place that was run by this really nice woman and I went in and asked her if she had Final Fantasy and she told me that she did, but the other day when returning it a kid said "Man, this is just like Dungeons and Dragons!" so she no longer rents it out because Dungeons and Dragons is satanic.

Then when I was 19 I was having troubles and so my mom thought I should try Job Corps. I forget what the recruiter woman said, but something made me ask her about Dungeons and Dragons and she was like "Oh, yes Dungeons and Dragons are NOT allowed." and it made my mom really mad that I'd asked cause she was afraid they'd not let me go just for asking. Ironically, their library had a bunch of Ravenloft novels, but those aren't Dungoens and Dragons, no those are "Ravenloft" and they are novels not evil satanic roleplaying games. LOL

The problem today is that many church leaders are older, they are FROM the generation where D&D was thought to be satanic, so even though most of the world has forgotten that nonsense, if your priest/minister/pastor/etc is old enough, they might not have.


agreed.

The older art was a bit more risqué as well, I recall several boobie shots you no longer see in the more recent stuff (I dont mean seoni, I mean full frontal stuff)

So Imagine checking out the monster manual back then, and having your mother look over your shoulder as see a lamia, or a nymph.

That;d get it banned by mom in a heart beat.

The idea of the game is we defeat evil monsters and bad guys. No different than King arthur or stories of the crusades or other stuff these people that hate DnD grew up on themselves.

Hansel and Gretel, the lady ate kids! Does it get more sinister?

Popeye smoked a pipe and had tattos. Shaggy from scoobie and the gang was a pot head, Pac Man ate pills to give him a "pick me up". Heck snow white lived with seven little hairy men!
But all that stuff was ok???

As far as Christianity goes, the character you are playing Isn't christian, they are all atheists or polytheists.
But if it really bothered you, we have neutered gods from the game, by just having clerics of light and clerics of darkness, there by, effectively making it monotheism, with 'god' and 'satan' represented.

We reverted to just normal stuff because it was easier, but, interestingly, we don't play many religious characters (clerics or paladins) anyway.


TL/DR -- c'mon, 203 posts?

I do, however, fail to recall "Thou Shalt Not Play Let's Pretend" (which is really what RPGs are, with dice added to let us all feel adult about playing Let's Pretend) being one of the Ten Commandments. Likewise, I can't remember any instances of Jesus instructing his disciples, "Play not with your imagination, for that is the path to damnation."

In short, Christians can play Pathfinder without compromising their faith in much the same way that they could play Uno, or Monopoly, or Battleship without compromising their faith.


Oladon wrote:
Unless they're required to write things down during gaming sessions, there's nothing gaming-wise that violates even the Orthodox interpretation of "work".

Do you play without writing anything down? At the very least, most players write down their current hit points if nothing else. I suppose somebody might be clever enough to find a way to keep track of such things without writing or doing other "work", but I think it would be tricky. And I am pretty sure that asking a Gentile to do "work" for you goes against the spirit of that rule.

Getting too and from the game would also be a problem for an Orthodox Jew who does not live within easy walking distance of the host's house.

Grand Lodge

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Alitan wrote:
Christians can play Pathfinder without compromising their faith in much the same way that they could play Uno, or Monopoly, or Battleship without compromising their faith.

While this is indeed true, RPGs tend to get viewed by many Christians as potential stumbling blocks to their faith because of their content (the use of magic, demons, polytheism, etc.)...

This view does not come out of nowhere. There are verses in the Bible that Christians often look to as evidence, and while these are often times misunderstood or taken out of their original context, this is where most of the struggle with playing RPGs stems from...

I'm a Christian, and I have no problem playing an RPG like D&D or Pathfinder, but then, I do not find it to be a stumbling block to my faith. Some Christians do find it to be a stumbling block...

In 1 Corinthians 8, Paul uses the illustration of eating food sacrificed to idols and false gods, but at its heart, he was saying that what is good for one person, is not good for another...

"1 Corinthians 8:13 wrote:
"Therefore, if what I eat causes my brother to fall into sin, I will never eat meat again, so that I will not cause him to fall."

So yeah, the simple answer is no, there is nothing Biblical preventing a Christian from playing an RPG such as Pathfinder, but it is up to each Christian to decide for themselves if playing an RPG is appropriate in their personal walk with Christ...


Lots of people are scared of lots of things.....

Been more than a few scares out there.

D&D was one

Ritualistic Satanic Abuse at daycares was another one. Wiki it if you don't know about it.


You can thank Jack Chick (Dread Dungeons) for all the bad rep that D&D has gotten over the last few decades from the Christian community.

Pretty much all the unsubstantiated fears/misinformation can be traced back to that source, if not related to it.

The same guy is also responsible for literature claiming that the Roman Catholic church is satanic.

Oh, and that King James is the Only true version of the bible.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
mousestalker wrote:
Why should fiction pose a particular problem for one religion?

For the same reason that you can't like both Star Wars and Star Trek!

*ducks*

;)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
lifeisaparody wrote:

You can thank Jack Chick (Dread Dungeons) for all the bad rep that D&D has gotten over the last few decades from the Christian community.

Pretty much all the unsubstantiated fears/misinformation can be traced back to that source, if not related to it.

The same guy is also responsible for literature claiming that the Roman Catholic church is satanic.

Oh, and that King James is the Only true version of the bible.

Oh yeah, blame ME!


Slaunyeh wrote:
mousestalker wrote:
Why should fiction pose a particular problem for one religion?

For the same reason that you can't like both Star Wars and Star Trek!

*ducks*

;)

Wait, wait... the Bible has bad acting and midichlorians?!?

Shadow Lodge

I dunno, i think most poeple who take a look at Chick tracts these days, including most religious people, recognize that whoever created them was a whacked-out nut-job.

Hell, probably the best response to someone claiming D&D is satanic is to show him some Chick tracts and tell him: "You sound like this guy." IE, shame them into acceptable behavior.


lifeisaparody wrote:
...claiming that the Roman Catholic church is satanic.

It is; I have polaroids.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

I am a secular materialist, non-objectivist LaVeyan satanist (Left hand path ethics. Scientific worldview.). I play Pathfinder. The two are not related.

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Dude, what spell did he just cast?


3 people marked this as a favorite.

"I don't know, but how does he shake hands without getting poked in the eye?"


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Taliesin Hoyle wrote:
I am a secular materialist, non-objectivist LaVeyan satanist (Left hand path ethics. Scientific worldview.). I play Pathfinder. The two are not related.

One of Anton's folks?

Nice to see you! I'm a fan of board diversity.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Taliesin Hoyle wrote:
I am a secular materialist, non-objectivist LaVeyan satanist (Left hand path ethics. Scientific worldview.). I play Pathfinder. The two are not related.

Some of my best friends are, too; read the books, found them to have much less problem biting themselves in the butt than your average "scripture."

Would consider myself a fellow-traveler, but too antisocial to join...

:)


Soon you will know the truth!
Better do more chin ups.


Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.......


I'm from western Europe, in many of our churches and cathedrals we have paintings of demons and statues of gargoyles and dragons, so the representation of evil is not a problem for christians (at least for catholics).
Now christian religion doesn't accept the worship of anything else but God, as there is no actual worship in RPG I don't see any problem either.

If some people believe playing a priest of Asmodeus might turn someone good into a lost soul then it means someone bad playing an angel would become a saint...

Moreso, being an expression of heroic-fantasy the roleplaying games have the Bible in their DNA.

Zeal is not faith, you don't go to Heaven just burning witches or books.


David knott 242 wrote:
Oladon wrote:
Unless they're required to write things down during gaming sessions, there's nothing gaming-wise that violates even the Orthodox interpretation of "work".

Do you play without writing anything down? At the very least, most players write down their current hit points if nothing else. I suppose somebody might be clever enough to find a way to keep track of such things without writing or doing other "work", but I think it would be tricky. And I am pretty sure that asking a Gentile to do "work" for you goes against the spirit of that rule.

Getting too and from the game would also be a problem for an Orthodox Jew who does not live within easy walking distance of the host's house.

I once went to a convention on a Saturday, and there was a jewish player who asked another to track his hit points and such. Presumably he had been staying at the hotel that the con was in.

A bit extreme and possibly problematic, I'd say, but I guess that's what orthodoxy is about.


nick pater wrote:

I am a big fan of d&d and pathfinder but some in my church find that RPGs are dangerous. How do other Christians respond to this or are these two issues non compatible? I would love to hear the community's thoughts on the matter!

Also happy thanksgiving to the USA !

Thanks
Nick

I don't know if you're Catholic or Protestant, but either way, this article (by Jimmy Akin, a former Evangelical, Catholic apologist and geek who back in the day did write RPG supplements) might help you :)

http://jimmyakin.com/2005/06/dd_the_knights.html

The takeaway graf from that one is: "In sum, though: There is nothing intrinsically sinful with RPGs, though they can definitely be run in a way that has a corrosive effect on the morals of the players. This is particularly true of D&D as it is commonly played. It all depends on who you’re playing with, how the GM or DM runs the game, and how you respond."

By "commonly played", I'm assuming he's talking about campaigns that are "chaotic neutral by default solely because the GM explicitly banned chaotic evil."

http://jimmyakin.com/2005/04/roleplaying_gam.html

Here he makes the same point that there is nothing wrong with D&D in general, but that campaigns that veer so heavily (reading between the lines) towards little more than mindless hack-n-slash can be problematic, and quotes Steve Jackson about how many parties THINK they're LG but are actually CN or worse in actual fact.

To be fair though, in the Catholic Church, there is no unified opinion (or really any official opinion at all) on D&D. I'd bet if you were to ask Pope Benedict XVI about it you'd get a "was ist das? Ich habe keine ahnung was Sie sagen" from him. There are apologists out there who do believe it is of the devil and those who say it's perfectly fine, There are those who have barely heard of it and have no opinion, and those like Mr. Akin (whom I respect) who says "It's OK, just be careful on how you play the game."

Personally, I say "game on".


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
lifeisaparody wrote:

You can thank Jack Chick (Dread Dungeons) for all the bad rep that D&D has gotten over the last few decades from the Christian community.

Pretty much all the unsubstantiated fears/misinformation can be traced back to that source, if not related to it.

The same guy is also responsible for literature claiming that the Roman Catholic church is satanic.

Oh, and that King James is the Only true version of the bible.

Mr. Chick is indeed a nutcase IMAO, but he's usually reactive, not proactive. The 1984 "Dark Dungeons" tract was in reaction to/support of the anti-D&D hysteria that had already reached the media in the mid-1980s.

I would pose that the pop culture event that did the most damage to D&D's reputation has to have been the 1981 Rona Jaffe novel Mazes and Monsters, and the 1982 made-for-TV movie that was based on the novel (and starring a very young Tom Hanks!)

The novel was based on the public understanding and media accounts (but not the real story) of a real-world incident involving Dallas Egbert, a student at Michigan State who disappeared from his dorm in 1979. To make a long story short, Egbert's parents hired a private investigator named William Dear to find out what happened. After a very cursory investigation, Dear started making statements to the press about his theories connecting Egbert's disappearance to D&D and Satanic cults.

Dear actually never got anywhere close to the truth, but the media reported his wild speculations as fact.

In reality, Egbert never played D&D at Michigan State. He was also suffering from untreated bipolar disorder and had become addicted to heroin-- two details that never entered the public discussion. He had done some "urban exploration" of the steam tunnels beneath campus, and it was there that he attempted suicide by an intentional drug overdose. He was unsuccessful, and after he woke up, he decided to simply walk away from campus without telling anyone. He was missing for several months before he contacted Dear and told him the real story. He asked Dear not to reveal what happened (which the detective was happy to agree to, as he never got anything close to the real story on his own!), and left Egbert in the care of Egber's uncle. Egbert attempted suicide twice more, and succeeded on his third attempt in August, 1980. He was 18 years old.

It wasn't until 1984 that Dear published his own account of the case, correcting much of the speculation and detailing his own incorrect theory (and why he had jumped to that conclusion). Of course, by then the anti-D&D hysteria was at its height, and the damage was done.

Silver Crusade

Darkorin wrote:

The real question is to try to understand why do they think it is dangerous, and then explain why it is not.

It's not a problem for christians in other countries, why is it in the USA?

Because someone told them it was? Well just explain them that the ones who explained that game to them, did not know/read it and did not even try to understand it.

Then ask them about movies and actors. Is an actor going to hell because he was an evil character in X movie? No, well it's the same with D&D(if you play evil characters).

Is playing a Paladin who lives his live for his god, to help innocent and protect them from evil creatures, something that would compromise your faith? No.

Honestly... I just can't understand all of this, but I'm not from the USA, so...

Alot of people can't understand the USA.

Including me, and I live in it.


ArianDynas wrote:
Darkorin wrote:

The real question is to try to understand why do they think it is dangerous, and then explain why it is not.

It's not a problem for christians in other countries, why is it in the USA?

Because someone told them it was? Well just explain them that the ones who explained that game to them, did not know/read it and did not even try to understand it.

Then ask them about movies and actors. Is an actor going to hell because he was an evil character in X movie? No, well it's the same with D&D(if you play evil characters).

Is playing a Paladin who lives his live for his god, to help innocent and protect them from evil creatures, something that would compromise your faith? No.

Honestly... I just can't understand all of this, but I'm not from the USA, so...

Alot of people can't understand the USA.

Including me, and I live in it.

I suggest studying the history of the evangelism movement that began in the 1800s and going from there.


Haladir wrote:
lifeisaparody wrote:

You can thank Jack Chick (Dread Dungeons) for all the bad rep that D&D has gotten over the last few decades from the Christian community.

Pretty much all the unsubstantiated fears/misinformation can be traced back to that source, if not related to it.

The same guy is also responsible for literature claiming that the Roman Catholic church is satanic.

Oh, and that King James is the Only true version of the bible.

Mr. Chick is indeed a nutcase IMAO, but he's usually reactive, not proactive. The 1984 "Dark Dungeons" tract was in reaction to/support of the anti-D&D hysteria that had already reached the media in the mid-1980s.

That's a blatant ad hominem. Flagged.

Paizo Employee Webstore Gninja Minion

While I haven't had to remove any posts, let's veer this back on topic and tone down the joke posts. Thanks!


Quote:

I am a big fan of d&d and pathfinder but some in my church find that RPGs are dangerous. How do other Christians respond to this or are these two issues non compatible? I would love to hear the community's thoughts on the matter!

Also happy thanksgiving to the USA !

Thanks
Nick

First off, I'm a Christian. Just to clear that up.

Now then, the key is that PF/D&D are just like watching Harry Potter or reading Lord of the Rings. Just like having a bed time story about evil witches and Hanzel and Gretel being read to you (but with dice!), and it is just like playing Risk or Monopoly (but with more rules!).

It's all in good fun, Pathfinder is just a game, not a "way of life" or "cult." If you do join a cult, or become a satanist, etc., PLEASE do not associate PF with it. And then please don't write tracts about it. Because D&D is just another game, another hobby, another way to have fun.

It is {insert swear words here} like Jack Chick who give it a bad name. It is unbalanced, mentally disordered people who play D&D and then do silly things, and then blame it/have it blamed on D&D who give it a bad name. All these people see D&D as something more than it really is.

It is a game. Treat it as such, and you'll be just fine.


If these people question DnD you should question their faith.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
gutnedawg wrote:
If these people question DnD you should question their faith.

A Christian's personal walk with Christ is just that, personal. Some Christian's drink alcohol, some are smokers; and their walk with Christ is unaffected by it. Paul (in 1 Corinthians 6:12) tells us: "Everything is permissible for me" - but not everything is beneficial. "Everything is permissible for me" - but I will not be mastered by anything."

Ultimately it is up to each Christian to read the Word of God for themselves, then listen and be receptive to Him for what is and is not personally permissible for them in their own walk with Christ Jesus (be that drinking alcohol or playing a game such as Dungeons & Dragons)...


To those non-Christians who think this whole thing is ridiculous, an example:

When you, a Christian, explain to another Christian that you are playing Way of the Wicked: The Devil My Only Master, it is a pretty natural response for that other person to have some doubts about the activity.

As I'm a Christian and an RPGer, I have reconciled both. But I certainly understand why not everybody has.


Delthyn wrote:
It is unbalanced, mentally disordered people who play D&D and then do silly things, and then blame it/have it blamed on D&D who give it a bad name. All these people see D&D as something more than it really is.

Or mentally unbalanced people do silly or tragic things and then someone else picking up the pieces makes a false causal link to the fact that said person played D&D/FRPGs, even if only a handful of times, such as in the case of "Bink" Pulling.


In response to the OP. In our reguler gaming group we have or had in no particular order, devout christians, a pastor, folk who identify as christian but do little in terms of practice, a wickan, and a few folk who may believe in nothing for all I know.

At the end of the day we are sitting at a table playing a fun game of make beleive where you are the good guys conquering evil. I dont think anyones real life beliefs ever enter into the equation. Even something as controversial as the poly-theist pantheon of dieties, is really no big deal as your playing a character. Its not as though by acting in a play where a character is Jewish for example, you are turning your back on being Chrisian. Why should a game be any different?


Pat Payne wrote:
Delthyn wrote:
It is unbalanced, mentally disordered people who play D&D and then do silly things, and then blame it/have it blamed on D&D who give it a bad name. All these people see D&D as something more than it really is.
Or mentally unbalanced people do silly or tragic things and then someone else picking up the pieces makes a false causal link to the fact that said person played D&D/FRPGs, even if only a handful of times, such as in the case of "Bink" Pulling.

Exactly. Most recent example of something similar is the elementary school shooting a few days ago.

People find the BROTHER'S Facebook profile, berate him for a while because they're morons, and because he "Liked" Mass Effect they go over and make even bigger (if that's even possible) fools of themselves by blaming Mass Effect for killing a bunch of children.


Jesus taught in parables- stories. Because he was wise enough to know that humans learn better from stories than from simply being told "this is right and this is wrong."

The Chronicles of Narnia are probably the best Christian parables of the modern age.

Don't know if Carl Jung and Joseph Campbell are good people for you to name as resources, but essentially they said the same thing-- human beings learn and grow and create and discover through experiencing stories.

Roleplaying games are the best outlet for this I've ever found. I've gotten to experience dozens of lives in-depth that are far outside the scope of my own. I've been a battle-scarred warrior, a powerful priestess, the last survivor of a lost tribe, a healer, a betrayer, I've found redemption, and on and on and on... I've had the chance to grow and discover things far beyond the reach of my one little life.

Role-playing gives us that chance.

Grand Lodge

4 people marked this as a favorite.

I grew up in a mainstream Protestant church, with fundie tendencies. One church would be really progressive, and the next would be all hellfire and brimstone. We moved, and landed at one that tried to feed us the "D&D is Satanic, causes suicide, blah blah blah." My mother didn't ban us from playing it, but at youth group they drove it into our heads that we were worshiping SATAN (in best SNL Church Lady voice). They told us that we couldn't listen to heavy metal, rock, or pop. Dragged us to a Petra concert (parTAY!) and you know what? Half the people in my youth group ended up goth and one guy went down a really bad road and is on trial for killing his yoga instructor.

Common denominator? Not D&D, it was hellfire and brimstone teaching us that any kind of imagination leads to depression. So when we grew up, thinking any kind of fantasy was EVIL leads to depression. Seriously? I am still Christian, and learned that if your faith is so weak that a game can shake it, then your faith is the issue, not the game. I have found that the games have helped my depression because I get out of the house and meet with intelligent, funny people who aren't smug and self-righteous.

Taldor

Man, am i happy to be an Atheist, and also that my parents, now my mother since i have disowned my father were very understanding of my hobbies.


Swordborn wrote:
Speaking of Catholicism. This is slightly off-topic but well worth the read.

AAARRRRGGUH, the article was deleted before I could read it! Gah...

Anyhow, I don't refer to myself as Catholic anymore (too much of a philosophical rift, going to try out the Episcopal church), growing my local Catholic monsignor delivered 2 sermons that I can remember which included Harry Potter.

I would posit that not even most, let alone all, Christians have a problem with stories that contain magic. For those that do, if they weren't religious the paranoia would find something else to fixate on: Communism, terrorists, people with left hands...

Side Note: I remember reading somewhere years ago (so I can't cite a source, but would appreciate if anyone knows definitively on this topic) that the original passage from the Dead Sea Scrolls had a word for "sorcery" that specifically meant magic that was used to harm or commune with the dead, but the King James-era scholars had no such word, and were already paranoid about witches, so their translation was more general.

Silver Crusade

How do atheists play Pathfinder without compromising their unbelief?

In our fantasy worlds gods exist, directly (and provably) intervene (rendering that definition of 'faith' moot), and go round to the houses of atheists in the night and break their windows.

Won't playing in these games 'infect' an atheist with the concept of religion?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ellis Mirari wrote:


Side Note: I remember reading somewhere years ago (so I can't cite a source, but would appreciate if anyone knows definitively on this topic) that the original passage from the Dead Sea Scrolls had a word for "sorcery" that specifically meant magic that was used to harm or commune with the dead, but the King James-era scholars had no such word, and were already paranoid about witches, so their translation was more general.

That sounds a little ... garbled.

The quote isn't from the Dead Sea Scrolls -- indeed, since the DSS were discovered in 1946, it's unlikely that the Jacobean translators would be familiar with them.

The word in the original Hebrew version of Exodus is "chasapah", which was translated into the Vulgate (c. 400 CE) as "maleficos," a worker of evil magic.

A more common modern translation is "sorceress," not "witch." The difference there is subtle enough that the KJV translators can probably be absolved....

ETA: I may be slightly confused about my references. Ex 22:18 is, of course, the famous "thou shalt not suffer a witch to live," but there are other references to witchcraft. It's also referred to in Galatians 5:20, among the list of "works of the flesh." The original Greek is the work "pharmakeia," poisoner, which is a much worse translation but again doesn't have anything to do with necromancy.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Unholy magic is afoot, see the resurrection of this thread as proof of the devils hand!

Flee! Flee this place and the fell magic and influence of the devil and his hordes!

Shadow Lodge

Ellis Mirari wrote:
Side Note: I remember reading somewhere years ago (so I can't cite a source, but would appreciate if anyone knows definitively on this topic) that the original passage from the Dead Sea Scrolls had a word for "sorcery" that specifically meant magic that was used to harm or commune with the dead, but the King James-era scholars had no such word, and were already paranoid about witches, so their translation was more general.

Have you read The Dresden Files? Because that's kind of word-for-word what Harry tells the daughter of his Catholic Paladin friend when she mentions the "suffer not a witch to live" thing.

Grand Lodge

I have a friend who is a devout Christian and he enjoys playing d&d. There are some things he's squeamish about, and he finds arcane spellcasting a bit...much. But you know the bright side? He's the best paladin player I've ever seen. Nails it down pat, every time. And his roleplay of faith is simply beautiful (probably because he's already a faithful guy). That said, not everything about D&D is unviersally liked, nor should you have to like them. Heck, the most "classic" D&D plot is a bunch of good people saving the world from destruction by evil forces. You don't have toplay up the bad or the vile if you don't have to, nor do you have to explore the facets of the game you aren't entirely comfortable with. You're still left with a plethora of options.

Role-play isn't evil. It is, in and of itself, about as harmless as acting (from the mature perspective) or just what kids do (from the other end of the spectrum) when they make up games. There isn't anything inherently wrong, as far as I can tell, with this sort of thing. I mean, your milage may vary, of course. But as far as I can tell there's no evil to it...inherently, anyway.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Malachi Silverclaw wrote:

How do atheists play Pathfinder without compromising their unbelief?

In our fantasy worlds gods exist, directly (and provably) intervene (rendering that definition of 'faith' moot), and go round to the houses of atheists in the night and break their windows.

Won't playing in these games 'infect' an atheist with the concept of religion?

While I appreciate (and agree with) your point, as an atheist I feel compelled to point out that the Gods of Golarion aren't really gods in the modern western sense. They aren't omnipotent or omniscient, can and do die, and generally aren't considered to be the the "first cause" of the universe. They're really just extremely powerful beings.

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
bugleyman wrote:
While I appreciate (and agree with) your point, as an atheist I feel compelled to point out that the Gods of Golarion aren't really gods in the modern western sense. They aren't omnipotent or omniscient, can and do die, and generally aren't considered to be the the "first cause" of the universe. They're really just extremely powerful beings.

If you use that definition of gods, then most of the gods that have been worshiped throughout history aren't really gods.

Silver Crusade

I was watching a recovered Anton LeVey Church of Satan member. He too, had something to say about Dungeons and Dragons, but what he does not realize that although the DM/GM does set forth the rules of the game it's a form of interactive storytelling. He says that playing with the imagination can cause problems.

Well, he's right and wrong at the same time. Like I said in the earlier post we are responsible for what we put into our games. But that doesn't mean that we Christians should always have games that are about happy and rainbows, it does the players a disservice. The average -G- rated film from Disney is capable of doing as much spiritual damage as the average -XXX- rated film out of the Porn Film capital of the world. This is because it's a lie.

The scriptures are full of stories that are Rated R. Case in point, Yahweh orders the Israelites to go to battle and wipe out a people (the Canaanites) from the land of Canaan. They aren't very successful in doing so, and some Canaanites escaped to contribute to Greek culture (a whole tribe of Israel, however, had the greatest impact on Greek culture).

There is the account of the Exodus, when the Israelites forsook Yahweh (when they promised not too before and they all saw the wonders of the mount) and worshiped the Golden Calf. The Israelites did things that would make the average homosexual man blush (the movie isn't an accurate portrayal) because they did it out in the open. Everyone can see it.

The story of David and Bathsheba is a whole other R rated account. In the later years of Solomon's reign over the Israelites, he was putting babies in the hands of a red hot bull idol named Molech and roasting them alive. If that's not -R- rated, I don't know what is. Although to some people in America, they'd cheer Solomon for roasting babies (I'd tell you who they are, but the thread will become deeply political).

Then you have Nebuchadnezzar's invasion of Jerusalem. There were people who practiced cannibalism who were Israelites during the siege. The scene was repeated on an even greater scale when Rome invaded Jerusalem in 70 A.D.
--------------
I gave up rpgs once, but again my creative mind demanded the outlet. My parents complain that they don't do a thing for me, but they don't realize that I'm easily distracted from work. :)

The point is clear, as Christians who play RPGs, it is our duty to tell stories that do not tell lies. That basically means PG or -R- rated, as the PG-13 rating is the worst rating a movie can get (the typical PG-13 movie is worse than the G-rated lie.) It is through the -R- rated movies that Hollywood actually teaches the consequences of our deeds, while a PG-13 movie teaches that there are no consequences for our deeds. The Godfather and Other People's Money are very moral films. I suggest you watch them. (that and we are manipulated by Hollywood. Where I live, 15 nice men said we shouldn't watch R-rated movies, but they should have said: don't watch PG-13 movies. Ugh.)

D&D, Pathfinder, and the others are tools. You can use it for Good or Evil, and it's all up to you.
That sounds preachy, but it's true. D&D, Pathfinder, and the others are powerful tools. It's up to us how we use them, no one else can use them for us. Certainly, the good people at Paizo aren't responsible for us, that's for sure.

Shadow Lodge

Quote:
The point is clear, as Christians who play RPGs, it is our duty to tell stories that do not tell lies. That basically means PG or -R- rated, as the PG-13 rating is the worst rating a movie can get (the typical PG-13 movie is worse than the G-rated lie.) It is through the -R- rated movies that Hollywood actually teaches the consequences of our deeds, while a PG-13 movie teaches that there are no consequences for our deeds. The Godfather and Other People's Money are very moral films. I suggest you watch them. (that and we are manipulated by Hollywood. Where I live, 15 nice men said we shouldn't watch R-rated movies, but they should have said: don't watch PG-13 movies. Ugh.)

.... what?

Sczarni

Kthulhu wrote:
bugleyman wrote:
While I appreciate (and agree with) your point, as an atheist I feel compelled to point out that the Gods of Golarion aren't really gods in the modern western sense. They aren't omnipotent or omniscient, can and do die, and generally aren't considered to be the the "first cause" of the universe. They're really just extremely powerful beings.
If you use that definition of gods, then most of the gods that have been worshiped throughout history aren't really gods.

That's true -- and in fact that was quite an important point of theology in early Judaism. A lot of the Judges and Prophets were primarily trying to teach the tribes of Israel that the various pantheons of "gods" weren't worthy of worship, since they were not comparable to YHWH. Incidentally, this carried through to the Christian era; Christians were often accused of "atheism" because they refused to worship the Roman gods.

As I mentioned in a comment *way* up-thread, later Medieval Christians reappropriated the pagan gods as artistic symbols. This can be a good guide to how Christians might contemplate the gods of Golarion.

Andoran

The same way a muslim woman can wear something other than a burka and not compromise her faith, by not being an extremist.

201 to 250 of 520 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Community / Gamer Life / Gamer Talk / How do Christians play Pathfinder without compromising their faith? All Messageboards

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.