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Why isn't this a game?!


Off-Topic Discussions


PRESIDENTIAL KNIFE FIGHT!

Lantern Lodge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If the sport were wrestling, Lincoln would beat them all hands down.

Silver Crusade

I don't think Obama would participate at all in a Presidental Wrestling match.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Rosevelt would throw a grissly bear at opponents.


General Washington FTW!


Presidential romanticism, oh you Americans.


Two men enter, one man leaves!


Leaves for a polite high society party afterwards.

RPG Superstar 2010 Top 32

3.5 Loyalist wrote:
Presidential romanticism, oh you Americans.

So where are you from?


A few places. None of which have presidents.


3.5 Loyalist wrote:
A few places. None of which have presidents.

Evasive, Party of one.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
LazarX wrote:
If the sport were wrestling, Lincoln would beat them all hands down.

Lincoln was for a time the only lawyer in town. Two farmers had a dispute over some land. So they both hired him and he arranged a settlement. Neither liked the settlement, so Lincoln took them out back and employed percussive persuasion. Their minds were changed.

He was also once challenged to a duel. He agreed on the condition that the weapons be long, heavy sledgehammers and the contest take place in a ditch dug in the ground. Lincoln's opponent decided it wasn't worth that much to him.

Though in all fairness, Washington did eat opponents brains and invent cocaine. (NSFW)


Samnell wrote:
LazarX wrote:
If the sport were wrestling, Lincoln would beat them all hands down.

Lincoln was for a time the only lawyer in town. Two farmers had a dispute over some land. So they both hired him and he arranged a settlement. Neither liked the settlement, so Lincoln took them out back and employed percussive persuasion. Their minds were changed.

He was also once challenged to a duel. He agreed on the condition that the weapons be long, heavy sledgehammers and the contest take place in a ditch dug in the ground. Lincoln's opponent decided it wasn't worth that much to him.

Though in all fairness, Washington did eat opponents brains and invent cocaine. (NSFW)

How do you find this nonsense? Lol


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:


How do you find this nonsense? Lol

The Lincoln stuff is true.

Qadira

I had heard of the Lincoln duel. If your going to have to fight to the death make sure your the only one who has a chance to survive. The details he came up with were amazing.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules Subscriber

Taft is still top tier at Presidential Sumo and Bumper Cars.

Qadira

The whole knifefighting thing is too limited in scope for a video game. I want full-on Street Fighter/Mortal Kombat Presidential powers. Lincoln needs to be able to fire cannonballs out of his stovepipe hat. Teddy Roosevelt must be able to summon a charge of Rough Riders to trample his opponents. And W. Bush should be able to drop a big banner that reads "MISSION ACCOMPLISHED" banner to confuse his opponents long enough to do the splits and karate punch them in the junk.

Qadira

this reminds me of the Presidental Wrestling game mentioned in Knights of the Dinner Table.

"Big" Ben Harrison and Teddy 'Boom-Boom" Roosevelt entering the ring led Bob to say the magical quote. "Boom-Boom's coming in?!? I face smash him with a chair!"

Lantern Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Crimson Jester wrote:
I had heard of the Lincoln duel. If your going to have to fight to the death make sure your the only one who has a chance to survive. The details he came up with were amazing.

As I understand it, it wasn't supposed to be a death duel, just a duel to the fall. Not every duel was taken to the extremes that Aaron Burr went for. Even by that time it was assumed that a duel was mainly something that someone showed up for appearances sake, so Alexander Hamilton fired up into the air. Unfortunately Hamilton badly underestimated the sheer hate his opponent had for him. Burr aimed for the heart.


From wikipedia:

"The two sides do, however, agree that there was a three-to-four second interval between the first and the second shot, raising difficult questions in evaluating the two camps' versions.[11] Historian William Weir speculates that Hamilton might have been undone by his own machinations: secretly setting his pistol's trigger to require only a half pound of pressure as opposed to the usual 10 pounds. Burr, Weir contends, most likely had no idea that the gun's trigger pressure could be reset.[12] Louisiana State University history professors Andrew Burstein and Nancy Isenberg concur in this view. They note that "Hamilton brought the pistols, which had a larger barrel than regular dueling pistols, and a secret hair-trigger, and were therefore much more deadly,"[13] and conclude that "Hamilton gave himself an unfair advantage in their duel, and got the worst of it anyway."[13]

David O. Stewart, in his biography of Burr, American Emperor, notes that the reports of Hamilton's intentionally missing Burr with his shot only began to appear in newspaper reports published in papers friendly to Hamilton in the days after his death. The two shots, witnesses reported, followed one another in close succession, and none of those witnesses could agree as to who fired first. Prior to the duel proper, Hamilton took a good deal of time getting used to the feel and weight of the pistol (which, incidentally, had been used in a duel in which his own 19-year-old son had been killed on the same Weehawken site), as well as putting on his eyeglasses in order to see his opponent more clearly. His seconds placed him so that Burr would have the rising sun behind him, giving Hamilton a better target, though during the duel itself, one witness reported, Hamilton seemed to be hindered by this placement.

In any event, Hamilton's shot missed Burr, but Burr's shot was fatal. The bullet entered Hamilton's abdomen above his right hip, piercing Hamilton's liver and spine. Hamilton was evacuated to Manhattan where he lay in the house of a friend, receiving visitors until he died the following day. Burr was charged with multiple crimes, including murder, in New York and New Jersey, but was never tried in either jurisdiction. He fled to South Carolina, where his daughter lived with her family, but soon returned to Philadelphia and then on to Washington to complete his term as Vice President. He avoided New York and New Jersey for a time, but all the charges against him were eventually dropped."

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