Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
Pathfinder Society

Pathfinder Beginner Box

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game

Pathfinder Comics

Pathfinder Legends

Some Questions about Third party publishing


Compatible Products from Other Publishers

51 to 100 of 133 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>
Paizo Employee Contributor; Developer, Super Genius Games

Covent wrote:

Another question has just percolated out of my mind.

1.) I have in house play tested quite a bit of the material (90%-95%) I am about to try and offer. I have mathematically checked everything.

I was thinking about potentially offering a few copies to select individuals on the boards for play-testing and review. Is this something that is normally done by a publisher, or should I do it before approaching a publisher? Opinions very welcome.

I certainly encourage authors to playtest material as much as they have time for. I also run my own playtest process on anything I lay my "developer" chop on for SGG.

There is a vast world of difference in running a playtest for yourself, and getting feedback from playtesters who can't ask you for clarification while they playtest. The BEST playtest is if you can get a group to run the material while you are around, but say nothing. Even if they get something terribly wrong, just make a note and see where they go with it. Then go home, fix it, and give them the new material and watch what they do now.

That's difficult to arrange regularly, and time consuming. Outside playtests are a good second choice.

I don't necessarily "expect" writers to playtest material before they send it to me, but I love it when they do.

I wouldn't encourage anyone to use more than 2-3 outsider groups of people (unless they are well known and trusted friends), as much because it can be a lot of playtest reports to go through, but some outside playtesting absolutely would not make me think negatively of publishing the material.


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Covent wrote:

Another question has just percolated out of my mind.

1.) I have in house play tested quite a bit of the material (90%-95%) I am about to try and offer. I have mathematically checked everything.

I was thinking about potentially offering a few copies to select individuals on the boards for play-testing and review. Is this something that is normally done by a publisher, or should I do it before approaching a publisher? Opinions very welcome.

I certainly encourage authors to playtest material as much as they have time for. I also run my own playtest process on anything I lay my "developer" chop on for SGG.

There is a vast world of difference in running a playtest for yourself, and getting feedback from playtesters who can't ask you for clarification while they playtest. The BEST playtest is if you can get a group to run the material while you are around, but say nothing. Even if they get something terribly wrong, just make a note and see where they go with it. Then go home, fix it, and give them the new material and watch what they do now.

That's difficult to arrange regularly, and time consuming. Outside playtests are a good second choice.

I don't necessarily "expect" writers to playtest material before they send it to me, but I love it when they do.

I wouldn't encourage anyone to use more than 2-3 outsider groups of people (unless they are well known and trusted friends), as much because it can be a lot of playtest reports to go through, but some outside playtesting absolutely would not make me think negatively of publishing the material.

Mr. Stephens

Thank you for the information.

Just to be clear I have playtested most of this in the ways you describe with two groups of four people multiple times.

The reason I say 90%-95% is because after my most recent play test I have tweaked several of my planned abilities in small ways.

I think I will do one more playtest and then hire someone for layout and editing, which after completion will allow me to begin offering my product to publishers.

My thanks again.


Another question! Sorry just seem to have a lot today.

1.) Are there currently any TPP with open contests or needs?

I understand that most publishers have stables of writers/artists they use.

I am speaking of something like an open entry contest, perhaps like RPG superstar or something similar.

Yet again, *Bow* どうもありがとうございました.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Covent wrote:
Covent wrote:

Another question has just percolated out of my mind.

1.) I have in house play tested quite a bit of the material (90%-95%) I am about to try and offer. I have mathematically checked everything.

I was thinking about potentially offering a few copies to select individuals on the boards for play-testing and review. Is this something that is normally done by a publisher, or should I do it before approaching a publisher? Opinions very welcome.

Yet again, I am sure you are all getting tired of hearing it, my deepest thanks.

Does anyone have any idea on this issue?

Sorry to be a bother.

What owen said (Really anything Owen says is gold)

Having a few select people look it over is not an issue. I would leave a full open playtest up to the publisher.

There is a massive differences between having someone just read it and give you feedback and actually playing the game.

Kaidan was actually for sale by another publisher before Rite Publishing picked it up. Heroes of the Jade Oath was a massive long rambling message board thread before Rite picked that up.


Rite Publishing wrote:

What owen said (Really anything Owen says is gold)

Having a few select people look it over is not an issue. I would leave a full open playtest up to the publisher.

There is a massive differences between having someone just read it and give you feedback and actually playing the game.

Kaidan was actually for sale by another publisher before Rite Publishing picked it up. Heroes of the Jade Oath was a massive long rambling message board thread before Rite picked that up.

Thank you very much for your advice and information.

Posting on my kindle, sorry for the brevity.


Another thing to remember as you jump into the pool of commercial game design Covent, and I think this thread really supports this truth, there are a lot of people here willing to give advice and a helping hand. Take advantage of the community of this group to network and build relationships, trust me they come in handy later down the road, lol. Even if you never end up actually working with half the people you connect with, having them at the other end of an email or thread when you are stumped with a question is invaluable.

And Owen is very much correct in that having a control group for playtest is an excellent resource, but I would recommend that you change the bodies involved occasionally, as I believe that after a time a playgroup becomes too familiar with your writing and design style, and they run the risk of looking over the very things you need them to catch.

Also, in regards to artwork, absolutely submit material art free, as the publisher is concerned with the material, not the dressing, at the submission stage. If you have art lined up feel free to include it in a separate file perhaps.

Cheliax

You might also wish to have a look at this:

http://www.mzbworks.com/why.htm

Although it is written from the point of view of writers submitting stories to editors, there will be some relevance to what you (and I, as you know) are trying to do.

I'm not espousing one approach or the other. I'm just passing on advice.

Richard

Minister of Propaganda, Super Genius Games

richard develyn wrote:

You might also wish to have a look at this:

http://www.mzbworks.com/why.htm

Although it is written from the point of view of writers submitting stories to editors, there will be some relevance to what you (and I, as you know) are trying to do.

I'm not espousing one approach or the other. I'm just passing on advice.

Richard

Fixed your link. :)

Qadira Contributor; Publisher, Kobold Quarterly

Agreeing with KTFish7 here:

Speaking purely as a publisher, I would be less interested in a project that arrived with art and layout already done. It makes the project harder to fit into an existing catalog or to adapt it to match the house style.

And yes, Kobold Press will have an open call later this year.


Wolfgang Baur wrote:

Agreeing with KTFish7 here:

Speaking purely as a publisher, I would be less interested in a project that arrived with art and layout already done. It makes the project harder to fit into an existing catalog or to adapt it to match the house style.

And yes, Kobold Press will have an open call later this year.

First, Thank you all for the advice.

@Wolfgang Baur

I had decided that I would work with the publisher that decided to pick me up for art, however are you saying that it is better to present a document in a simpler format?

For example my document is currently in Microsoft Word format, and I was planning on providing it to a layout artist and paying for a professional layout.

Would it be better in your opinion to simply create a few rough PDF formats myself as suggestions and provide those with along with the Word document, or perhaps simply the Word document itself?

Please understand I am not trying to argue or disagree, I am simply curious due to the fact that this is as you know my first attempt at a submission, and I would like to make it as publisher friendly as possible.

Also, Thank you for the information about the open call.

@all of the people who have posted here to help, and all those who have PMed me.

I have said "Thank you" quite abit, and I do not want any of you to believe I am simply making polite sounds. I deeply appreciate all of the people who have taken the time and effort to provide me with information and advice as I take my first steps in this endeavor.

So, from me to all of you *Deep Bow* 非常に多くの先生、ありがとうございまし.

Taldor Publisher, Raging Swan Press

2 people marked this as a favorite.

If I were you, I would just send the "raw" Word document. You could send a PDF as well, but having something I could add comments into easily and send back to you is much more preferable.

Publishers have their own layout and trade dress standards that they add during the development of the project. They are going to want to have any supplement adhere to those standards (which could include fonts used, font size, text styles, page margins, number of columns etc). You'll just be throwing money away getting someone to lay it out.

On this subject, I'd also argue that most layout is done in Word anyway. The later editions of Word are incredibly powerful. All of Raging Swan's products are laid out in Word and it's amazing what you can do with it if you poke about some of the more advanced functions.


I also say word document only for the manuscript. I agree that a fully laid out product just makes me tell you to self-publish it. All our PDF only stuff is done in word, while the stuff that gets a print run is done using Indesign.

But the bigger bit is going to be your pitch (Wolfgang has a whole book on doing this,and every game designer should own it), that's what is going to sell the idea to a publisher.

Andoran

Owen, Wolfgang, Creighton and others all give great advice (you are getting info from some top shelf folks in this thread!)

A simple Word manuscript is the way to go. Bold headers, italics where needed etc are fine but don't try to do any formatting beyond that. As others have said, the publisher will want the actual layout to match their trade dress as well as a host of other specs.

As most professionals will take your raw text into an actual page layout application like InDesign, any excessive formatting you attempt in Word will be lost anyway. Concentrate on a good, clean, well-written manuscript done in Word and let the publisher handle things like art and layout.

Good luck!


The most commonly requested format I've seen (rpg publisher or otherwise, they're pretty similar) is a plain Word document. Minimal formatting, just enough to make it easily readable. Don't try to make it look finished, it just means you're giving the publisher more work to do stripping it all out again.

Some publishers have stricter guidelines, others are more relaxed. Many have a preferred font they like submissions to be in, and if you ask nicely they'll tell you. If they don't, pick something simple, standard across most computers, and easily readable. The publisher is looking at the submission's content, not how good a layout you can do. The easier you make it for them to get to the content, and the less work they'll have to do on it, the better your chances.


Marc Radle wrote:
As most professionals will take your raw text into an actual page layout application like InDesign, any excessive formatting you attempt in Word will be lost anyway. Concentrate on a good, clean, well-written manuscript done in Word and let the publisher handle things like art and layout.

This is really the crux of it. If you want to just do the writing: Be a writer; If you want to do all the layout, formatting and hunting down artists: Be a publisher.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
LMPjr007 wrote:


This is really the crux of it. If you want to just do the writing: Be a writer; If you want to do all the layout, formatting and hunting down artists: Be a publisher.

If you want to enjoy your hobby don't be a gamer (joke!)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Quick thread steal.

LMPjr007 wrote:
hunting down artists: Be a publisher.

It's amazing how many artist we have talked to that say they want to do it for a living, but when you throw money at them they turn into a deer in headlights. Never to be seen again. (mind you this is after sending them a PO with the agreed amount, but before we actually pay them)

/end thread steal.

Andoran

Amora Game wrote:

Quick thread steal.

LMPjr007 wrote:
hunting down artists: Be a publisher.

It's amazing how many artist we have talked to that say they want to do it for a living, but when you throw money at them they turn into a deer in headlights. Never to be seen again. (mind you this is after sending them a PO with the agreed amount, but before we actually pay them)

/end thread steal.

Yeah, I think folks like that think it would be cool to get paid to do it, but when the reality hits (i.e, the prospect of actual money, deadlines etc) folks get nervous and back away.

One of the most important things I've learned is that, no matter if you are a writer, an artist or even a graphic designer/layout person, you have to be professional, you have to efficient and hit the deadlines you agree on, and you have to be reliable.

Publisher, Frog God Games

Yup. I have had maybe 300 people pitch me books. About 20 have delivered. I never even consider a submission before I read a completed draft manuscript. Unless its a proven writer. I think I have worked with maybe five artists who meet deadlines every time, and four cartographers.

Ability to make deadlines is everything.


Bill Webb wrote:

Yup. I have had maybe 300 people pitch me books. About 20 have delivered. I never even consider a submission before I read a completed draft manuscript. Unless its a proven writer. I think I have worked with maybe five artists who meet deadlines every time, and four cartographers.

Ability to make deadlines is everything.

Wow...

I did not know that deadlines were such a problem.

I am currently working in a job in Japan were such things are completely normal, missing a deadline would be a major deal for the company. I work as an engineer and communicator/document translator between our Japanese and English offices, and deadlines are a necessary part of my life.

I am sorry, I do not mean to be insulting. I understand that projects are living things but I agree deadlines are important.

Anyway I will stop boring you all. Sorry the above is semi-train of thought.

I am wondering though, since I am not doing layout or art, should I pay a professional editor to review my work before presenting it to a publisher, or will that be done in house? I am not talking about simple spelling errors of course, but using an editor to give a final polish pass to a document.

Thanks all again.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Personally, I wouldn't pay an editor. For one thing the publisher probably wants to see your work as you would normally turn it. Secondly, if you are doing it to be paid, then paying someone else to do the job the publisher is already going to pay someone else to do seems like an unnecessary financial burden on your pocketbook.

Layout and Design, Frog God Games

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Yes, do not lay it out, have it edited, nothing. That's not the way writers turn in their finished manuscripts.

Manuscript -> editorial pass -> layout -> second editorial pass -> press

That's not including ordering art and cartography (rough sketches of maps are all that's needed, for the most part... and the project manager will usually work out an art order).

Layout and Design, Frog God Games

And yes, there are many people who simply can't keep a deadline.


Chuck Wright wrote:

Yes, do not lay it out, have it edited, nothing. That's not the way writers turn in their finished manuscripts.

Manuscript -> editorial pass -> layout -> second editorial pass -> press

That's not including ordering art and cartography (rough sketches of maps are all that's needed, for the most part... and the project manager will usually work out an art order).

Absolutely agree.


Chuck Wright wrote:

Yes, do not lay it out, have it edited, nothing. That's not the way writers turn in their finished manuscripts.

Manuscript -> editorial pass -> layout -> second editorial pass -> press

That's not including ordering art and cartography (rough sketches of maps are all that's needed, for the most part... and the project manager will usually work out an art order).

@Wicht, Chuck Wright, Purple Duck Games

Thank you for your answers to my most recent question.

@everyone

Thank you all again for your advice. I think if I am not going to have an editor look over my manuscript before submission, then I am going to start with the knocking on doors, hat in hand.

I guess today is the start of something beautiful!

Edit: Edited to include Purple Duck Games in my thank you, as they were sneaky and posted while I was writing this post. ;-)

Taldor Publisher, Raging Swan Press

Bill Webb wrote:

Yup. I have had maybe 300 people pitch me books. About 20 have delivered. I never even consider a submission before I read a completed draft manuscript. Unless its a proven writer. I think I have worked with maybe five artists who meet deadlines every time, and four cartographers.

Ability to make deadlines is everything.

At Raging Swan, our failure rate for new, contracted designers runs at about 20% - which is better than the 50% it was in late 2010. It's not something I really understand! That's why I value proven freelancers. Dave Posener, John Bennett, Julian Neale, Richard Green and Ben Kent (for example) never let me down. If they were late on a project, I'd know there was a jolly good reason.


Creighton Broadhurst wrote:
Bill Webb wrote:

Yup. I have had maybe 300 people pitch me books. About 20 have delivered. I never even consider a submission before I read a completed draft manuscript. Unless its a proven writer. I think I have worked with maybe five artists who meet deadlines every time, and four cartographers.

Ability to make deadlines is everything.

At Raging Swan, our failure rate for new, contracted designers runs at about 20% - which is better than the 50% it was in late 2010. It's not something I really understand! That's why I value proven freelancers. Dave Posener, John Bennett, Julian Neale, Richard Green and Ben Kent (for example) never let me down. If they were late on a project, I'd know there was a jolly good reason.

Now please feel free to tell me it is none of my business, however for the sake of curiosity I do want to ask.

What is the usual pace that a publisher requires from a writer in terms of producing a product? Is it 5,000 words a day, 10,000, something more or less? This is of course for words that are ready for your editorial first pass.

For example if you needed a 10,000 word short would you expect the writer to be done in a day, 2 days, a week, what pace is generally industry standard?

I would assume it is different for mechanics and fluff, however what is the general ratio for each?

Just trying to get a feel for what I will have to live up to in this industry.

My thanks again.

Taldor Publisher, Raging Swan Press

Quote:


Now please feel free to tell me it is none of my business, however for the sake of curiosity I do want to ask.

What is the usual pace that a publisher requires from a writer in terms of producing a product? Is it 5,000 words a day, 10,000, something more or less? This is of course for words that are ready for your editorial first pass.

For example if you needed a 10,000 word short would you expect the writer to be done in a day, 2 days, a week, what pace is generally industry standard?

I would assume it is different for mechanics and fluff, however what is the general ratio for each?

Just trying to get a feel for what I will have to live up to in this industry.

My thanks again.

For first time designers I look for 4,000 in between 4 and 6 weeks. I normally have a mid-point turnover of about 1/3 material to ascertain style, content and so on. For established designers who have worked on the relevant line before I'd look to get 4,000 words in about 3 weeks and I wouldn't bother with a mid-way turnover. These rates may seem very low, but normally a designer is writing at the evening or over the weekend.

When I freelance or am writing something for Raging Swan I aim to complete 1000 - 2000 words a day. However, I know exactly what I want and I normally spend a couple of days to a week making notes an thinking about a project before starting.

Hope that helps!


Covent wrote:

Now please feel free to tell me it is none of my business, however for the sake of curiosity I do want to ask.

What is the usual pace that a publisher requires from a writer in terms of producing a product? Is it 5,000 words a day, 10,000, something more or less? This is of course for words that are ready for your editorial first pass.

For example if you needed a 10,000 word short would you expect the writer to be done in a day, 2 days, a week, what pace is generally industry standard?

I would assume it is different for mechanics and fluff, however what is the general ratio for each?

Just trying to get a feel for what I will have to live up to in this industry.

The three fastest writers I know are Matt Forbeck, Shane Hensley and Steve Long who write at a rate of 1,000 words an hour. Yes, they are freakishly fast with incredible quality.


Oh Matt Forbeck is one of my favorites!


Creighton Broadhurst wrote:
Quote:


Now please feel free to tell me it is none of my business, however for the sake of curiosity I do want to ask.

What is the usual pace that a publisher requires from a writer in terms of producing a product? Is it 5,000 words a day, 10,000, something more or less? This is of course for words that are ready for your editorial first pass.

For example if you needed a 10,000 word short would you expect the writer to be done in a day, 2 days, a week, what pace is generally industry standard?

I would assume it is different for mechanics and fluff, however what is the general ratio for each?

Just trying to get a feel for what I will have to live up to in this industry.

My thanks again.

For first time designers I look for 4,000 in between 4 and 6 weeks. I normally have a mid-point turnover of about 1/3 material to ascertain style, content and so on. For established designers who have worked on the relevant line before I'd look to get 4,000 words in about 3 weeks and I wouldn't bother with a mid-way turnover. These rates may seem very low, but normally a designer is writing at the evening or over the weekend.

When I freelance or am writing something for Raging Swan I aim to complete 1000 - 2000 words a day. However, I know exactly what I want and I normally spend a couple of days to a week making notes an thinking about a project before starting.

Hope that helps!

@ Creighton Broadhurst, LMPjr007

Thank you for the answer to my question, that gives me an idea of normal expectations.

@everyone

I am submitting my manuscript starting today! Someone said that they would take a look and at least give me feedback! Sorry for the excessive exclamation points, I am just excited.

Yet again, thank you to everyone for your large mountains of advice and help with all of this.

Andoran

Good luck!


Hi Covent, I also want to say good luck! The thread you started here has been quite enlightening. I'm also considering attempting to get some adventures published, but really have just started looking into it. Thanks for doing so much of the question-asking legwork for me!

Again, best of luck with your pursuit. I'll be keeping up to see how it turns out.

Andoran

Anyone in this thread thinking about trying to get an adventure published should absolutely check out Kobold Press's adventure contest!


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Marc Radle wrote:
Anyone in this thread thinking about trying to get an adventure published should absolutely check out Kobold Press's adventure contest!

Here the LINK to the Valhalla Calling contest over at Kobold Press...


I'm curious as to how many of the 3PPs are actually doing this as their day job? I know Rite Publishing and Owen are. Anyone else out there?


Lord I wish I was.

I do game development about 15-20 hours a week in addition to a day job. The 3pp stuff nets me beer money and seed money for other projects. Not cost effective for the hours I put into it.

Little Red also does casual/mobile game development with the other branch of our company. That nets more money. I oversee both sides but most of my income comes from my day job. (I'd say 75% of my monthly salary is from my day job)

-Scott

Minister of Propaganda, Super Genius Games

I was doing it as my day job until late spring when I went to work for a mobile game developer. I still do it at night though, about what you'd expect from a part-time job.

Paizo Employee Contributor; Developer, Super Genius Games

LPJ, I summon you!

Contributor

The info is for me, actually--didn't realize I had the hubby's account open at the time I posted. I'm considering giving up the long day job commute to publish and freelance full time, but I was looking for some folks who are actually doing it to talk to for various perspectives.

Owen, mind if I drop you a line one day?

Contributor

Little Red Goblin Games wrote:

Lord I wish I was.

I do game development about 15-20 hours a week in addition to a day job. The 3pp stuff nets me beer money and seed money for other projects. Not cost effective for the hours I put into it.

-Scott

Thanks, Scott. I put in about that much time, as well, but I wanted to know if today's market was good enough to make a living on--not a lavish one, of course.


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
LPJ, I summon you!

I hear and I am here. What are we talking about?

Contributor

LMPjr007 wrote:
Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
LPJ, I summon you!
I hear and I am here. What are we talking about?

I think he summoned you to respond to the post asking about which 3PP companies are doing this as the day job? Are you?


Well my day job is running my own graphic design/digital print studio, but when I can (on slow days) I work on maps, do some page layout or illustrations for various RPG projects I am working on. So I have the luxury of sometimes doing both at the same time. When a customer shows up, I stop and get back to work, however. I reserve any writing/design in my off time only. But then I'm only really a freelancer, not a publisher, yet.


Oceanshieldwolf wrote:
Marc Radle wrote:
Anyone in this thread thinking about trying to get an adventure published should absolutely check out Kobold Press's adventure contest!
Here the LINK to the Valhalla Calling contest over at Kobold Press...

To Mark Radle, and Oceanshieldwolf,

My thanks for the heads up on the contest. I have submitted my entry, and to tell you the truth I am excited.

To Everyone,

I am taking my first steps in this exciting field and have already been met with open arms. The first publisher I spoke with was nice enough to review my work and give me some tips, and is even taking time from their busy schedule to give me advice about some rewriting. The openness and kindness I have experienced is very refreshing and honestly a little humbling. I will try to return the courtesy if I am ever able.

For that and everything else I say thank you to all of you.


My day job? Definitely not.

Taldor Publisher, Raging Swan Press

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Tracy Stiles wrote:

I'm curious as to how many of the 3PPs are actually doing this as their day job? I know Rite Publishing and Owen are. Anyone else out there?

Raging Swan Press is my only job. (Which is rather marvellous!)


ChristinaStiles wrote:
I think he summoned you to respond to the post asking about which 3PP companies are doing this as the day job? Are you?

I am a graphic designer and web designer it my "real" life, which also helps out in my "business" life.


ChristinaStiles wrote:
Little Red Goblin Games wrote:

Lord I wish I was.

I do game development about 15-20 hours a week in addition to a day job. The 3pp stuff nets me beer money and seed money for other projects. Not cost effective for the hours I put into it.

-Scott

Thanks, Scott. I put in about that much time, as well, but I wanted to know if today's market was good enough to make a living on--not a lavish one, of course.

It also helps that my day job is in marketing.

Andoran

Yep - my full-time job is a graphic designer; my freelance work is essentially a second, part-time gig (although lately, I think I put in enough hours per week on freelance writing, illustration and graphic design work to equal a second full-time job! :)

51 to 100 of 133 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>
Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Publishing / Pathfinder® / Pathfinder RPG / Compatible Products from Other Publishers / Some Questions about Third party publishing All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.