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Relatively new to Pathfinder. Should I even bother?


Scenario Submission Talk

Andoran

I've been introduced to Pathfinder fairly recently after a few failed attempts at getting games of 3.5 games going in high school. I've been eagerly learning the game and eating up the setting. However, when comparing myself to some of my friends, it's clear I still have a lot of catching up to do before I know what I'm talking about.

Now, the open call page has been very intriguing to me, and in spite of myself I'm already brewing a few ideas that I think would play very nicely with the Pathfinder Society conceit. I consider myself a talented writer and a good GM, and figure there would be no harm in giving a submission a shot.

My main weaknesses are still not having a solid grasp on game mechanics and balance (being more used to freeform games in which story and roleplay take precedence over challenge and number-crunching), and having not yet gotten around to looking up things that some consider fairly basic (like what, precisely, the difference between Devils and Demons is).

So my question is: I realize that I would be at a disadvantage compared to DnD/Pathfinder veterans, but would it be enough of an obstacle to be a dealbreaker?


The more knowledge, the more power. Do some research, expand your knowledge of the whole game. It will only benefit you more in the end. The learner must become the master.


Fredison wrote:

So my question is: I realize that I would be at a disadvantage compared to DnD/Pathfinder veterans, but would it be enough of an obstacle to be a dealbreaker?

The idea is to get fun not to compete against the rest of the party. Just play, do your best and enjoy the game.

Andoran

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I might work with one of your friends who is more familiar with the rules, and make sure you are on track there. Paizo is pretty focused on story, but if they have to redo all the mechanics, you may be passed over.


Of course not! You can always ask for help, whether here on the boards or of the people you play with. You're eager about playing, so why let inexperience hold you back?


Welcome to the Boards, Fredison.

for your question it depends on the GM,

as most are likely to help others into the game system,
while a few might be butt munches in teaching or not teaching the game to others.

You pretty much just need the basic foundation of the rules,
and take your time on the much more advanced stuff.

*****

When it comes to writing a scenario, while I've never written one nor been brave enough to submit my idea, my understanding (writers/devs correct me if I'm wrong), is that you submit a general idea and if they can work with it, the developers will work with you to flesh it out more within the guidelines of the pathfinder rules.


Nobody knows how to play a game straight out of the box. The fun comes in by making that character, running around a bit and testing the material. Don't worry about crunching the numbers and such just yet. Letyour DM do that.

Andoran

Thanks for the encouraging comments, everyone. To clarify, this isn't about playing or GMing the game, but about trying my hand at writing scenarios. I'm currently playing in two weekly games along with the occasional Society scenario, though I haven't GMed Pathfinder yet. A few of my experiences have been frustrating (one player seems convinced that everyone is born with the books memorized) but otherwise it's been good fun and my GMs have been rather helpful.

Purple Fluffy CatBunnyGnome wrote:
When it comes to writing a scenario, while I've never written one nor been brave enough to submit my idea, my understanding (writers/devs correct me if I'm wrong), is that you submit a general idea and if they can work with it, the developers will work with you to flesh it out more within the guidelines of the pathfinder rules.

I'm hoping something along these lines is the case. Luckily I've also got some friends more familiar with the rules (not to mention an alarmingly extensive library for me to peruse) who I could also consult.

I guess a better way to phrase my question would be: About how much experience with the nuts and bolts of the game rules and the Inner Sea setting are expected from Society scenario writers? Could originality and strength of writing possibly compensate for weaknesses in that department?

Andoran *

Fredison wrote:
About how much experience with the nuts and bolts of the game rules and the Inner Sea setting are expected from Society scenario writers? Could originality and strength of writing possibly compensate for weaknesses in that department?

As with ANY kind of writing, write what you know. If you know a certain fragment corner of Golarion and have a certain bit of the rules down, then write about that. As your knowledge expands, so will your writing.

Andoran *

Basically, yes, bother.

Qadira ****

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Fredison wrote:

Thanks for the encouraging comments, everyone. To clarify, this isn't about playing or GMing the game, but about trying my hand at writing scenarios. I'm currently playing in two weekly games along with the occasional Society scenario, though I haven't GMed Pathfinder yet. A few of my experiences have been frustrating (one player seems convinced that everyone is born with the books memorized) but otherwise it's been good fun and my GMs have been rather helpful.

Purple Fluffy CatBunnyGnome wrote:
When it comes to writing a scenario, while I've never written one nor been brave enough to submit my idea, my understanding (writers/devs correct me if I'm wrong), is that you submit a general idea and if they can work with it, the developers will work with you to flesh it out more within the guidelines of the pathfinder rules.

I'm hoping something along these lines is the case. Luckily I've also got some friends more familiar with the rules (not to mention an alarmingly extensive library for me to peruse) who I could also consult.

I guess a better way to phrase my question would be: About how much experience with the nuts and bolts of the game rules and the Inner Sea setting are expected from Society scenario writers? Could originality and strength of writing possibly compensate for weaknesses in that department?

make your big bad evil guy an elf. take that rangers and witches. immune to sleep and not a human. big tricks!

seriously though, write you adventure, plan for 4-5 encounters. usually it's 1-3 social encounters and 2-3 combat encounters, social encounters tend to resolve faster, so you can certainly add more leeway in with that.

I'm sure having a good idea of what your faction missions will be will help, remember less work for paizo staff the more likely they are to accept your submission.

Story first though, always story first :D

Qadira **** Venture-Captain, Texas—Dallas & Ft. Worth aka Thorkull

Purple Fluffy CatBunnyGnome wrote:
When it comes to writing a scenario, while I've never written one nor been brave enough to submit my idea, my understanding (writers/devs correct me if I'm wrong), is that you submit a general idea and if they can work with it, the developers will work with you to flesh it out more within the guidelines of the pathfinder rules.

The new open call for Quests is looking for complete submissions, essentially ready for layout and editing.

Grand Lodge ***

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Fredison wrote:


I guess a better way to phrase my question would be: About how much experience with the nuts and bolts of the game rules and the Inner Sea setting are expected from Society scenario writers? Could originality and strength of writing possibly compensate for weaknesses in that department?

Quite frankly, no. You're competing for attention in a field with limited opportunity. A good writer with a weakness in one is going to lose out to a good writer who's taken the time to learn the details. Thing is you don't have to swallow the entire setting in one gulp. Read intensively in at least one area and make it alive in your mind.

If you're in this for the long haul as opposed to indulging a casual whim, look up the past Superstar contests, read the published material in the free Wayfinder magazines you can download here at this site. Keep asking yourself, what makes these people better than me? and work at applying that knowledge.

The writing field is a vast graveyard filled with the corpses of those who think they could skate through on one area by boning up in others.

The fact is that there's a whole bunch of wannabes trying to compete for attention in a very niche market. Slackers need not apply.

Quite frankly, if you come into this with an attitude of "Should I Even Bother?", A true writer would have already answered the question for him or herself. If you're a writer, you have the passion to write. If you don't have that passion, no one on this planet can give it to you.

Andoran *

Way to rock the positive there, dude. -.-

Cheliax ****

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Maps, Modules Subscriber
LazarX wrote:
Quite frankly, if you come into this with an attitude of "Should I Even Bother?", A true writer would have already answered the question for him or herself. If you're a writer, you have the passion to write. If you don't have that passion, no one on this planet can give it to you.

QFT. If you have to ask, you're not ready yet.


That reminds me of something I heard a number of years back. Possibly on the radio? Just a random convo with a stand-up comedian that I'd never heard of. He was asked about what he told newbies trying to break into the biz, and he said that he told them they sucked. Because 1) they were his competition; and 2) if that was enough to discourage them, then they'd never hack it. So it was cruel, but rational.

Cheliax ****

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Maps, Modules Subscriber
Fredrik wrote:
That reminds me of something I heard a number of years back. Possibly on the radio? Just a random convo with a stand-up comedian that I'd never heard of. He was asked about what he told newbies trying to break into the biz, and he said that he told them they sucked. Because 1) they were his competition; and 2) if that was enough to discourage them, then they'd never hack it. So it was cruel, but rational.

Recalled wisdom of a high-level Magic: the Gathering player (not me, but I don't recall which one): We all suck. The one who makes the least mistakes is the one who wins.

Andoran *****

For whatever its worth, when I was coordinating and developing modules for Living Dragonstar, my best writers were the ones who didn’t play the game.

***** Venture-Lieutenant, Arizona—Tucson aka Sir_Wulf

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Fredison wrote:
So my question is: I realize that I would be at a disadvantage compared to DnD/Pathfinder veterans, but would it be enough of an obstacle to be a dealbreaker?

I once read that for every worthwhile endeavor, you will run into obstacles at least three times, daunting barriers that make you worried that you can't go on. You'll be told not to waste your time and energy. People will insult your best efforts.

Having said that, I'll answer your question: Your inexperience with the system will be a dealbreaker... The first time. It may still prove insurmountable the second time you submit something.

If you refuse to be discouraged, not only will you eventually succeed, but you'll learn techniques that will serve you well in other endeavors.

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