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Just for Fun: What's Your Favorite (or just fun) House Rule?


Suggestions/House Rules/Homebrew

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I always like browsing this forum and thought it'd be cool to have a thread to just share some fun ways people have modified the game. Feel free to share as many as you like. They can be simple or complex, who cares! No nit-picking others, it's their house rule, you don't have to like it.

I have a simple one I'll share:

Monks get to have enchanted fists. I want Monks to do bad ass damage with their fists and feet so instead of having to carry around an enchanted Temple Sword or waiting for Feats they can only used a limited amount of times a day. When the Monk finds an enchanted weapon he can "absorb" its power through a ritual (spending gold), destroying the weapon.


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Sorry, this one will be long.

Hm, the most fun/balancing house rule(s) I think is when our group play a Gestalt campaign:

You choose 2 classes as normal, you can use any compatible archetypes for each as normal, but you have to pick either BAB or one of the saves from the class with the slower progression of it.
Your skill per level is decided by the average skill per level of the two classes you choose, if there is just one step difference between the two you get the better one.
Your hit dice is decided by the average hit dice of the two classes you choose, if there is just one step difference between the two you get the better one.
You can't take levels in any other class that has 20 levels by advancement but you can take other ones, as example prestige classes.
You have the possibility to forfeit/trade in a class ability of both chosen classes to gain a synergy ability in their place, details have to be discussed with the GM.

To clarify here is an example of a Fighter/Sorcerer going by these rules:

The player has the idea/concept of a fiery battle mage, a warlord wielding arcane might. This background will be the most important at the last step explaining the rule.

First step was to pick the two classes (Fighter and Sorcerer) and possible archetypes, for simplicity we use no archetypes now.

Then we pick the "weakness" of the character. Sorcerer has a good Will save progression and the Fighter has a good BAB and Fort progression, the player decides to use the weaker Will progression imagining her "Flame Warrior" to be more physically strong than mentally.

Next is the average of the skill per level. Fighter has 2+Int and Sorcerer too, so there is no problem with it at the result is the same.

The hit dice is also chosen as average, the Fighter has d10 and the Sorcerer d6, this means the result of the character becomes d8.

The next on the list is a rule, doesn't matter at char creation but it is to be remembered, this helps keeping the character "clean" and without this rule there would be no reason or benefit for taking the averages of hit dice and skill per level.

The last step to finish her character is the decision if she would want to trade in some ability from the two classes for an unique synergy one. She decides that she does indeed want that. She picks the class abilities "Bonus Feats" and "Bloodline Spells" to be traded in. Now of course what to do with them is entirely up for the GM, but in my own case I will give her based on her own concept something fiery. I also take it in consideration that she gives up a bonus feat every second level and many spells which is a great sacrifice from both classes thus the result shall also be great.

Flame Strike: A weapon held by her will get an additional +1d6 fire damage against enemies every second level, she will also get 1 fire resistance on all such levels which stack. Ranged weapons add this damage to the ammunition. She will also get an additional known spell on every such level chosen from spells related to fire even if normally it would be on a spell list other than of the Sorcerer.

In addition I will create 3 Feats she can take if she wants, like being able to form a blade purely from fire and use that the same way but with -2d6 to the granted fire damage dices. ("Firesword")

If she would have chosen Battle Sorcerer instead of Sorcerer then she would have some less spells but a better hit dice.
The reason for the "take the better one if one step difference" on skill per level and hit dice is for the few cases similar classes are used for a gestalt. As example a Bard/Rogue would get the 8+Int skillpoints while both classes have a d8 hit dice so that wouldn't improve. The advantage of such gestalt concept is thus even lower here than gestalts without the Hegemony Rule.

I call these rules the "Hegemony Rule" based on the multiple games I GM-ed in the custom Hegemony setting. As you see it can be quite balanced and fun, especially with the last option for getting something unique and fitting. In such a gestalt campaign you don't just amass all the benefits from the two classes, you get and lose from them at equal level.

Sovereign Court

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game Subscriber

Allowing paladin's to be one step in alignment from their chosen god, like clerics. It makes sense to me


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My favorite is allowing a character's mundane equipment to become magical based on heroic feats (or follies). Doing so allows them to become 'attached' to something like an heirloom weapon or a ratty old backpack and gives life to the character's equipment ... rather than just throwing old stuff out when a shiny magical item appears.

Basically ... it works exactly like giving someone magic items ... just sometimes items transform from mundane to magical rather than being stuff in a treasure horde.

Silver Crusade Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

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Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber

You only provoke an attack of opportunity with a combat manoeuvre on a failed check.


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1) You all start as level 1 Isgerian commoners. When you reach 1000xp, you can turn that level of commoner into something else, you become what you have been training for. Then you need 1000 xp to reach level 2. Or, you become a level 1 commoner level 1 something else and continue as per normal.

2) If you take three levels in an npc class, you get one free level to balance your ECL. Very good for warriors and the accumulation of a lot of bab, you are a level 4 warrior when everyone else is level 3.

3) Five foot steps provoke attacks of opportunity.


King Stag wrote:

I always like browsing this forum and thought it'd be cool to have a thread to just share some fun ways people have modified the game. Feel free to share as many as you like. They can be simple or complex, who cares! No nit-picking others, it's their house rule, you don't have to like it.

I have a simple one I'll share:

Monks get to have enchanted fists. I want Monks to do bad ass damage with their fists and feet so instead of having to carry around an enchanted Temple Sword or waiting for Feats they can only used a limited amount of times a day. When the Monk finds an enchanted weapon he can "absorb" its power through a ritual (spending gold), destroying the weapon.

Everything is a weapon, a weapon everything, and now I have magical bleeding fists! KAPOW!


A couple of my favorites in regards to HP:

Every character gets 4hp bonus at 1st, reflecting their time as a commoner before choosing a profession.

Roll your hit die at level up, divide by 2 rounded down, add 1/2 your hit die. For example if you're a fighter and roll a 5 that's 2.5 down to 2 plus 5 for 7 + con mod total.


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My favorite home house rules are:
-deadly aim gives -1/+3 to all crossbows except hand crossbows
-Roll initiative on a d12, not a d20. This gives Imp Init and all other init-based abilities a little more oomph.


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For heavy crossbows, you add your dex mod to damage. For lights, add half.

A lot of my players and gaming friends have been fans of crossbows, some have them and others have done some research. No one has ever disliked this rule.


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Borthos Brewhammer wrote:

My favorite home house rules are:

-deadly aim gives -1/+3 to all crossbows except hand crossbows
-Roll initiative on a d12, not a d20. This gives Imp Init and all other init-based abilities a little more oomph.

You also get to use d12s more! I made a simple combat system that used more d12s.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion Subscriber

If you roll a "1" on a skill check and fail it, it's a funny fumble! Instead of spotting a stealthy rogue, you stare blankly at a random seagull for a while.

If you roll a "1" on a skill check and succeed it, you succeed, but in a weird way. You spot the rogue, but why is he wearing a pink tutu?


- At 1st level, you gain a number of hit points equal to your HD (maxed), plus your Constitution score (rather than your modifier). Thus, a 1st level fighter with Con 14 has 24 hit points. At each level gained beyond 1st, you gain half your HD + 1, plus your Constitution modifier. Thus, the same fighter at 2nd level would have 32 hit points.

- Humans receive "Multitalented" as a racial trait (see Half-elf; very few players choose races other than human, and it seems a natural fit).

- Various class changes, from replacing the Necromancy-specialized Wizard's "Grave Touch" for "Corpse Companion" (see the Undead Lord archetype for the Cleric), to merging the Rogue and Ninja (so that a Rogue has an identical "Ki Pool," with "Ninja Tricks" simply becoming "Rogue Talents").

- The "Weapon Finesse" feat is removed. All weapons listed as 'finesse' can be used with Dexterity rather than Strength when making an attack roll (player's choice).

- The "Precise Shot" feat is removed. There is no longer a penalty for making a ranged attack roll against a target engaged in melee with an ally.


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Gorbacz wrote:
If you roll a "1" on a skill check and fail it, it's a funny fumble! Instead of spotting a stealthy rogue, you stare blankly at a random seagull for a while.

When playing my ninja character (oh so long ago), I attempted to climb a mountainous pass, but due to a natural 1 on the d20, my DM informed me that my character was distracted by a passing butterfly. He tumbled some distance of course, but was otherwise okay. Still makes me chuckle.


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Should have added, "I activate my fly like a butterfly ki ability!"

DM...?

Player: just kidding, I plummet down hard. But for a moment he was a butterfly.

Marathon Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014, Dedicated Voter 2015

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

"Healing, you want healing? Wave like a tree in the wind. If I don't see it, I can't heal it."

Simple but extremely silly and fun. You enter combat, you are dangerously low on health - put your hands in the air and wave like a tree in the wind.

This tells the healer in the group to get busy with the heal... the more vigorous the wave equates to the amount of healing requested.

Grin - it's daft, try it, you might like it.


More ninja stuff:
3.5 Loyalist wrote:

Should have added, "I activate my fly like a butterfly ki ability!"

DM...?

Player: just kidding, I plummet down hard. But for a moment he was a butterfly.

This was back before the PF Ninja and all those lovely Ki Tricks (else I may have!); we were using the 3.5 Complete Adventurer/Scoundred(?) version.

All I remember was, "Oooooo--Butterfly!" followed by gales of laughter.

Fun fact, that DM was running the iajitsu rules from the Rokugon book (allowing them to stack with precision damage caused by sneak attack). Iajitsu-sneak-attacking = Slice--dead!


roll a 1 or a 20 skills and crazy things start happening.
Once we had a knowledge check natural 1 and the character believed in a conspirary of white mice to take over the world.

simplified stealth
roll stealth vs one or a few perception checks with a modifier of whatever the GM says.


Richard Leonhart wrote:

roll a 1 or a 20 skills and crazy things start happening.

Once we had a knowledge check natural 1 and the character believed in a conspirary of white mice to take over the world.

These sort?


Detect Magic wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

3.5 ninja was one of my favourite classes. Go ethereal was so useful. There were also expanded ki feats out there, I liked more ki points, ki strike and karmic healing.


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@Detect Magic
Actually I believe it was more this.
But I'm not sure about what mice the player though. It was awesome though.


I loved that show! ^_^


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mem0ri wrote:

My favorite is allowing a character's mundane equipment to become magical based on heroic feats (or follies). Doing so allows them to become 'attached' to something like an heirloom weapon or a ratty old backpack and gives life to the character's equipment ... rather than just throwing old stuff out when a shiny magical item appears.

Basically ... it works exactly like giving someone magic items ... just sometimes items transform from mundane to magical rather than being stuff in a treasure horde.

I like this idea too. I want some of the weapons to advance, Diablo style and allow the player to be connected to it instead of just dumping their +1 blade for a +2 blade over and over.


3.5 Loyalist wrote:

For heavy crossbows, you add your dex mod to damage. For lights, add half.

A lot of my players and gaming friends have been fans of crossbows, some have them and others have done some research. No one has ever disliked this rule.

It's not bad, although I fail to see why to grant only half dex to one type. And, if I were to do so, I would reverse it so light gets full dex, heavy gets half.

But, cool.

Shadow Lodge Marathon Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Skill tricks from 3.5's Complete Scoundrel are free as long as you meet the prerequisites. (The +3 from class skill bonus is added to your ranks to meet qualifications for 3.5 feats.)

Characters who desire so may begin with a single item - magical, rare, anything - of their choice (subject to DM approval) that they cannot afford, under the stipulation that the item carries some kind of curse. The character is unaware of this curse, and the nature of the curse is at the DM's discretion. The DM will need at least a short explanation of how the item was acquired as part of the character's backstory.

Class Skills that don't make sense for the character due to backstory, locale, etc. can be exchanged on a 1-1 basis. (Example: Desert dervish Magus traded Swim for Acrobatics.)


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Over the years my group has used MANY house rules in an evolving mish-mash of what is important to us at the time. It is difficult to pick out favorites, and MY faves have mostly been theoretical because my group is less adventurous than I am.

So, I'll just list the longest standing, most used house rules from my group. Note: these mostly pertain to 3.x as Pathfinder fixed a couple for us. :)

-NO multiclassing xp penalties. Ever.

-Paladins and Monks can FREELY multiclass....back and forth..."I'm in..I'm out...I'm in...I'm out"

-When rolling HP you may "challenge" the roll and re-roll once. You ALWAYS re-roll 1's, even on the challenge roll.

---Random thought,

It occurs to me as I think of the history of our house rules and how LITTLE we deviate from the HEAVY combat rules of 3.x/Pathfinder. Oi!
I'm actually kind of ashamed that we've been such slaves to these rules.

There is much to love about these editions of our favorite pastime, but I long for a simpler approach that doesn't rely on such complex math and so much GEAR!

Shadow Lodge Marathon Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Can'tFindthePath wrote:
-NO multiclassing xp penalties. Ever.

I always forget this was ever a thing. We never enforced it either.

Quote:
-When rolling HP you may "challenge" the roll and re-roll once. You ALWAYS re-roll 1's, even on the challenge roll.

We go with "If you roll below half on your HP roll, you can choose to take half instead".


All characters get the benefit of the vital strike chain anytime they cannot take their extra attacks for a high BAB. If you have BAB +6/+1 and you charge, you roll double weapon damage, all modifiers still only apply once. +11/+6/+1 roll triple weapon damage. This extra damage is multiplied on a critical.


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Currently, my house rules are:

- When you go below 0 HP, roll a Con check. If the result is above 10 + the damage you have below 0, you remain conscious but staggered and prone. You can crawl away or chug a potion or whatnot. Ferocity allows you to postpone the check for one turn. I felt that it gets a little boring when you are unconscious, especially when no one is around to heal you. At least this gives you a chance.

- I allow Bluff to be used to play dead, adding a +1 to your roll for every quarter of your HP you are down as well as an addition +1 for every point of damage you are below 0.


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This one I lifted from the Green Ronin pirate book:

For low magic worlds, each character starts with 1d4+1 'lives'

Every time the character would be killed, he or she instead loses a 'life' and somehow survives, miraculously. However, the character is still out for the rest of the fight.
There was some table for lasting wounds that went with it, but as I recall, one could roll, or DM would choose.

I remember one character in a game I ran was hit, nat 20, by a Vorpal blade, she survived, but he vocal cords had been destroyed. It was actually a pretty cool development.

Players don't know how many lives they have, the GM keeps track. Also, there was either a feat or a trait "Nine Lives" that changed the number of lives to 2d4+1 (or the full 9 if you felt generous).


When rolling HD at level-up, both the GM and the player roll a die, the player keeps the higher roll.


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My first DM does this, and I do too, which is that we don't confirm criticals. While having the chance to get an improved critical on the case of a double Nat 20, we feel like if you roll a Nat 20 on an attack, you get your critical. Especially in a hard battle where you might not be able to hit with most of your rolls, it sucks to get a Nat 20 and be denied your crit.

We also only allow half or better rolls on Health.

We also roll for ability scores, and re-roll 1's.

Our campaigns usually aren't too focused on whether or not we win combat. It's more about story, and having characters who can't survive basic fights kinda sucks.


Some of the ones we use currently...

6. The Acrobatics skill allows someone with at least 1 rank in the skill to attempt to leap to their feet as a swift action (DC 15), although this still provokes attacks of opportunity. Normally standing up is a move action that provokes attacks of opportunity.

7. The rogue talent Stand Up is modified to allow the rogue to leap to their feet as a free action without provoking attacks of opportunity. Normally this talent allows standing up as a free action but provokes attacks of opportunity.

8. The monk ability Wholeness of Body only requires a swift action to use. Normally it requires a standard action.

13. The spell Breath of Life is renamed Cure Deadly Wounds so that it can be considered one of the "cure" spell line. Normally this spell does not allow any of the abilities that apply to "cure" spells to apply.

14. When a rogue uses the rogue talent Trap Spotter (i.e., is passively searching for traps rather than actively searching) they are automatically considered to be "taking 10" on the roll. Normally this would be a random d20 roll.

And one that we used for the looooooongest time (ever since 1e) was all divine casters did not need to prepare spells. They were "prayers" that they could use at will. All of this changed with the Oracle, and we have removed that houserule. It wasn't easy to let it go, let me tell you. *grin*

RPG Superstar 2010 Top 32

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Gorbacz wrote:

If you roll a "1" on a skill check and fail it, it's a funny fumble! Instead of spotting a stealthy rogue, you stare blankly at a random seagull for a while.

If you roll a "1" on a skill check and succeed it, you succeed, but in a weird way. You spot the rogue, but why is he wearing a pink tutu?

That's a neat rule. It also reminds me of a combat rule I saw somewhere and liked:

For PCs only, a 1 on a combat roll with a weapon is a miss or a critical hit that breaks the weapon. Player's choice.

Star Voter 2013

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I've seen this house rule argued against, but I still like it...

Characters add both Cha AND Str to Intimidate checks, kind of as if the Intimidating Prowess feat was free to all. I just think that no matter how creepy or domineering a person is, a bigger person will always be scarier.


Can'tFindthePath wrote:
3.5 Loyalist wrote:

For heavy crossbows, you add your dex mod to damage. For lights, add half.

A lot of my players and gaming friends have been fans of crossbows, some have them and others have done some research. No one has ever disliked this rule.

It's not bad, although I fail to see why to grant only half dex to one type. And, if I were to do so, I would reverse it so light gets full dex, heavy gets half.

But, cool.

Lights don't have quite the power and penetration of heavy crossbows. In a sense if you are a damn good shot, you get more from the heavy than the light. We have comp bows and their damage bonus, but I wanted to make crossbows a bit more nasty, and then a difference between the two. Lights not so long to load, but they don't get the best advantage, that goes to the fat heavy.


Wildebob wrote:

I've seen this house rule argued against, but I still like it...

Characters add both Cha AND Str to Intimidate checks, kind of as if the Intimidating Prowess feat was free to all. I just think that no matter how creepy or domineering a person is, a bigger person will always be scarier.

Naaa, don't quite agree. Sometimes large people aren't scary, doesn't matter what their str stat is. At times you just know you can take them, they are often predictable in a fight, swing hard but aren't used to taking hits back, used to not facing much trouble. If they aren't vicious, dangerous and mean, and a smaller person is those three, the smaller is scarier. Surely we know big dopey friends, weighty and strong that just aren't scary.

What is more frightening, a strong butcher without a vicious bone in his body, or some lean hardened short criminal, who has knifed up a lot of people, been scrapping and brawling for years and his eyes promise that he will kill you horribly in short-order?


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Removal of alignment. Characters and creatures do not need to list alignments. Only undead, deathless, aligned outsiders, and dragons have their appropriate alignment. Characters with the aura ability (such as clerics and paladins) are treated as the alignment of their diety for purposes of spells and effects. Smite evil smites any intelligent creature (or unintelligent creature if it is actually evil; see the creature types above).


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House Rule (HR) #1
Half-elves do not exists. Elves reproduce like the Drak from Enemy Mine. Their personalities still tend towards a gender, but as for reproduction, they do it asexually (agamogenesis).

HR #2
Male dwarves are full of hair.
Female dwarves are hairless like Star Trek Deltans.
Both are small sized.

HR #3
Gnomes are tiny.
Reproduction may involve fungi.
No one besides gnomes really knows.
No one besides gnomes really wants to know.

HR #4
Confirm fumbles same as confirming criticals. Re-roll attack and if it misses, its a fumble (roll on chart); if it hits, then you just missed.

HR #5
If you roll a 20 on a skill check, you do not automatically succeed. Roll a new d20.
Skill check = 20 + skill mod + new d20 (repeat if that's a 20 too).
If you roll a 1 on a skill check, you do not automatically fail. Roll a new d20.
Skill check = skill mod - new d20 roll.

HR #6
Blackguards are Lawful Evil, not CE.

HR #7
Any player playing a character that must memorize spells at the beginning of the day will submit a 'default' spell list to the DM. This is the list of spells a character has memorized at any given time. They can, of course, be changed if sufficient rest is taken and a new list is given to the DM.

I don't like having to use this rule, but I have found it necessary. Now, in fact, my players enjoy the sense of realism that it provides.

Star Voter 2013

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3.5 Loyalist wrote:

Naaa, don't quite agree. Sometimes large people aren't scary, doesn't matter what their str stat is. At times you just know you can take them, they are often predictable in a fight, swing hard but aren't used to taking hits back, used to not facing much trouble. If they aren't vicious, dangerous and mean, and a smaller person is those three, the smaller is scarier. Surely we know big dopey friends, weighty and strong that just aren't scary.

What is more frightening, a strong butcher without a vicious bone in his body, or some lean hardened short criminal, who has knifed up a lot of people, been scrapping and brawling for years and his eyes promise that he will kill you horribly in short-order?

While I have no problem whatsoever with you disagreeing, you are comparing apples to oranges. You're absolutely correct that a nasty, sadistic serial killer would be much more intimidating than a dopey butcher. That's because the killer would likely have a higher Cha than the butcher and probably ranks in Intimidate representing his practice being a creeper. The butcher has a high Str, but very low Cha and no ranks.

Now, if you take 2 thugs, equally charismatic and equally sadistic/creepy/vicious, but one is 6'8", 300 lbs, and ripped and the other is 5'6", 140 lbs, and scrawny...I'll choose to fight the little guy every day of the week. That's why I add both Cha AND Str. But hey, I respect your opinion and appreciate your feedback.


Hmmm, choosing to fight the rogue instead of the barbarian. Tough call.

There is probably some sensible mechanic we can put in, melee classes getting bonuses and resistances to intimidate. I have always found it funny, when a high level fighter can't intimidate you so well if they went low charisma, but a low level rogue is terrifying. He said something about horse heads in beds.


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We role initiative every single round of combat - keeps it more interesting and removes some tactical/predictable actions.

Ruyan.

Silver Crusade Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

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Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber
RuyanVe wrote:

We role initiative every single round of combat - keeps it more interesting and removes some tactical/predictable actions.

Ruyan.

That must eat up a lot of time at the table.

I know in my group I try to minimize the initiatives rolled.


Not really. Since we're used to it since D&D3.0 it takes up virtually no additional time at all.
It does make fights longer though, and as GM you need to keep that in mind, since usually more resources are spent per encounter as not to overwhelm your party with two many encounters on the one hand, while on the other hand ensuring, they do not have the easy 15min work day.

Ruyan.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

#1: LE Antipaladins. 'nuff said.

#2: HP at level-up. Players get to choose one of two possibilities, every time:
- Roll your die. Keep the result, or re-roll. In this case, keep the second result, even if it's worse.
- Roll your die. Keep either the result, or 1/2 the max value.
(Oh, and announce your choice before you roll, otherwise I'll default to the first method)

#3: If attempting a combat maneuver that requires you to establish contact (i.e. grab someone, but not mantain the grapple), roll vs. CMD or Touch AC, whichever higher.


The "Heighten Spell" feat is removed. If a spell is prepared in a higher level spell slot, the DC is set according to its new spell level.


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Some of the ones mentioned so far are fantastic!

I came up with a way (at least it works for my group) to speed up chases (heh..speed up chases), anyway, rather than use the RAW version, we just take a character's movement rate (30, for example) and divide it by 5. This gives you a modifier of +6, which you add to a d20 roll. Whoever you're chasing does the same, and then it's simply an opposed roll. I have all my players record their modifier next to the Speed listing on the character sheets so we don't have to do the math on the fly.


WARNING: What might be considered a house "rule" and what's house fluff is blurred in the following.

* Charisma is added to Will instead of Wisdom. Wisdom instead adds to ranged attack rolls (but not thrown weapons).
(Reason: Originally I was trying to balance ability scores. Then I decided I just liked the image of confidence being what protects your mind. Wisdom for ranged attack rolls was a resulting rebalance, but I also like its image.)

* Gold for magic items is eliminated and replaced with a "universe influence currency" [better name pending]. In addition you do not have to buy an "item" you just buy the effect and always have it to use (subject to recharge limitations on stuff that "runs out" like potions) so any weapon you use gains flaming or whatever. Craft Magic Item feats (I'd probably make the whole thing just one) are so you can give items to other to use.
(Reason: I just think it's cooler this way. I haven't really thought the Craft feat thing very well simply because I find magic items so boring.)

* Daily abilities are regained at sunrise regardless of rest. Anything else relying on rest happens normally.
(Reason: As strange as it may sound "resting" is hard for me to imagine in the middle of an adventure. Perhaps chalk it up to "you only rest in inn" video-games, or maybe it's because I have a lousy sense of what real-world time measures mean. Since I figure most "rests" pretty much happen at night-time anyway sunrise seems like an okay renewal point, plus it has nice mystical significance.
The exact time of day is, however, under review pending thinking about things like military tactics.)

* No alignment.
(Reason: I hate big mystical forces warring over the universe. Lots of tiny factions would be okay, but I'm not sure any alignment-based effects would be universal-enough to be mechanically worth it.)

* Not inherent culture/alignment.
(Reason: I prefer enemies based on who they are as people rather than what kind of monster they are. I prefer characters being reluctant to kill anyway. Plus if I can't make enemies kill-worthy by their jerkishness alone then I'm not doing it right.)

* No humans.
(Reason: They've been done to death. I'm not really capable of caring about culture so they are always going to be the boring generic version no matter what. And I like "humans in funny suits", it's how stories work for me, so I don't need them.)


RuyanVe wrote:

We role initiative every single round of combat - keeps it more interesting and removes some tactical/predictable actions.

Ruyan.

I use Combat Manager and this would be really easy to do on there. Super easy.

I will give it a try next session!


DungeonmasterCal wrote:

Some of the ones mentioned so far are fantastic!

I came up with a way (at least it works for my group) to speed up chases (heh..speed up chases), anyway, rather than use the RAW version, we just take a character's movement rate (30, for example) and divide it by 5. This gives you a modifier of +6, which you add to a d20 roll. Whoever you're chasing does the same, and then it's simply an opposed roll. I have all my players record their modifier next to the Speed listing on the character sheets so we don't have to do the math on the fly.

This is genius. I will use this in addition to my Chase Card deck.

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