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Just for Fun: What's Your Favorite (or just fun) House Rule?


Suggestions/House Rules/Homebrew

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Osirion

I used to make use of the spell failure tables from The Dragon Tree Spellbook.

My favorite was spelling failure. It changed the spell to something with a similar sounding name.

Wall of Ice = Wall of Lice.

Fireball = FireHall

Protection vs Evil = Protection vs Weavils.

Things could get really creative.


When it was time to roll hp, you would roll and the dm would also roll but not show you the result. You could choose either, and then he would reveal his result. We stopped doing this for some reason.

Shadow Lodge

Artanthos wrote:

I used to make use of the spell failure tables from The Dragon Tree Spellbook.

My favorite was spelling failure. It changed the spell to something with a similar sounding name.

Wall of Ice = Wall of Lice.

Fireball = FireHall

Protection vs Evil = Protection vs Weavils.

Things could get really creative.

Oh that is brilliant. Where can I get this book?

Osirion

Looks like they are back in business again:

Dragon Tree Press

I'll have to buy a new copy. I lost mine during a move 15 years ago.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

My House rules:

  • All characters start at level 3 with but have zero experience points.
  • Max out your first 3 hit dice.
  • All characters (Including humans) receive an extra feat at first level.

  • THE DRAW BACK: You only receive half your starting wealth for a 3rd level character. Also, as stated earlier, you are at zero experience meaning you must work your way up to 4th level experience before advancing again.

    My reasons: I like to run games at lower levels. We tend to do more story based stuff and adventures. Maxing out the Hit dice and starting people at 3rd level gives them some versatility and longevity as opposed to starting at level 1. The problem we have at level one is that mortality rates seem to be high. I like the extra feat at first level as I feel it gives the players some additional options.

    Now I cut treasure and wealth in half because I like to run with minimal amounts of magical items, and when magical items are awarded they are usually part of some adventure or tied to the characters back ground. I'd, personally, rather be stingy with treasure and provide more options to character creation.

    That being said, I also give the monsters an extra feat, and they get close to if not maxed out hit dice, plus a few other nasty surprises if I feel like being creative.

    It works for us, my players enjoy it, and we've had no issues.


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    A natural 1 is always a failure; always.

    If the check doesn't warrant the chance of failure, don't make the player roll in the first place.

    'findel

    Shadow Lodge

    Laurefindel wrote:
    If the check doesn't warrant the chance of failure, don't make the player roll in the first place.

    I don't generally know all my players' modifiers off the top of my head, but if a DC is so low as to be able to be passed on a 1 then I agree don't bother with even rolling.

    So is a Nat 20 always a success then, even at skill checks at your table?


    Orthos wrote:
    Laurefindel wrote:
    If the check doesn't warrant the chance of failure, don't make the player roll in the first place.

    I don't generally know all my players' modifiers off the top of my head, but if a DC is so low as to be able to be passed on a 1 then I agree don't bother with even rolling.

    So is a Nat 20 always a success then, even at skill checks at your table?

    Yes, a natural 20 is always a success. If the task is impossible to succeed (like jumping over a mountain, or digging your way to another continent) then there shouldn't be any roll either.

    Skill checks should only come in situation of stress or where the character is trying to outdo himslef; otherwise he or she would be taking 10. Such conditions should imply lucky or unlucky strikes IMO.

    A 5% chance of auto-failure or auto-success might be higher than in reality, but it still is within reasonable odds within the framework of a tabletop RPG.

    'findel


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    Actually, my favourite houserule is Evil Lincoln's Alternate hit point rule:

    Strain-Wounds variant rule

    'findel


    5 people marked this as a favorite.
    Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

    Currently, my favorite house rule changes how you increase your ability scores. Instead of increasing a single ability by 1 point every four levels, I let my players use a 'continuous point buy system'. Basically, they have 20+Character Level points to spend in the point buy system. For example, you have point buy 21 at level 1, point buy 24 at level 4, and so on. You can't 'buy back' ability scores, so you have to save your points over a few levels to increase an ability that is already high.

    The end result is that if you only want to max out one ability your stats will be the same as if you were using the standard ability increase method, but if you want to spread your points out a bit you'll get more increases in the long run. It helps MAD classes a bit.


    In my campaigns I use the "double-crit": If you roll a natural 20 when confirming a critical hit, the opponent takes some form of penalty for the rest of the encounter, provided it survives the hit. If the hit kills it, any other enemy creatures suffer some minor morale-based penalty (a few might freak and run, or resort to fighting defensively, etc.). It goes both ways of course, and my players are usually great about coming up with penalties for themselves (they lose their lunch, or are suddenly filled with an overwhelming urgency to destroy that specific enemy, etc.). I feel it's a rare enough event that it warrants some cool form of recognition.

    Cheliax

    Right now here are a few of my favorites (or really, just no brainer auto house rules for my group).

    Skill checks: as Laurefindel stated - 1 is always a failure and a 20 a succeed - but the criteria for checks is the need or ability to make check, i.e. stress or adventuring situations. Using the skill system to emulate anything else (making items for commerce) fails, as does using the skill system to emulate daily living mechanics (as described by SKR - which imo is moronic). The range and ability has to exist (no jumping over mountains, etc).

    Animal Companions:
    Get the best benefit from alignment related spells (offensive or defensive). Also they all have evasion (just easier to manage). The weaker combat companions (ranger or familiar) also get the benefit of personal spells when cast on the owner (doesn't apply to Druids).

    Some spell changes:
    You only get 4 orisons or cantrips a day, but you can cast any cantrip or orison for your class unprepared. This has worked out very well as they are only used sparing but makes the casters feel like they have whatever minor utility spell they need when they need it (besides the 4 a day limit). Mending is a 1st level spell.

    Class changes:
    Fighter and Rogues get a second "good" save category. This is chosen at the first level taken in the class. So you can have a fighter with a good Fort and Will saves or a good Fort and Reflex save, picked at your 1st level of Fighter.

    Barbarian gets a good Reflex save while Cavaliers get a good Will save added to their base classes (unlike Fighters and Rogues their new good save category is fixed).

    Fighters Part II:
    The following feats can be taken with the fighter Bonus Feats: Iron Will, Lightning Reflexes and Great Fortitude (same with their improved versions).

    Feat Change:
    All light weapons (plus a few others) can be used with either the Dex or Str mod to-hit. This applies to EVERYONE. If you have the Weapon Finesse feat you can use both your Dex to hit and damage if using light weapons (plus a few others: rapier, etc)

    Basic rule changes:
    Spells generated from items (potions, wands, etc) that have a die roll component re-roll 1's (exception of magic missile wands). So if you cast a fireball from a wand (min level) it would do 10-30 points of damage (5d6, re-roll 1's).

    Potions of healing can be split based on die round down, so a 2d8+5 potion can be split (or be partially drank) as 1d8+2 two times.

    Action Speed Initiative: Difficult to implement but the reward is high. Players action choices and type of action determines speed. This creates a more dynamic game round and things happen in real time (or as close to it) as possible. This also eliminates the need for AoO and a slew of other silly 3rd edition creations. Every action, attack or spell has a speed which now requires a list...it's worth it though.

    There are a few others such as my over hall of WBL replacement system (with scaling items with item power tied to PC level) are too complicated or not fully tested to post here.


    In our groups we decided that outside of combat healing spells do a minimum of half possible since you get the opportunity to concentrate on the heal. We also had the rule of at minimum being able to roll half on hit dice.


    If you natural 1 a concentration check for a an offensive spell in close, say it is for fire, you cast it on yourself and set yourself on fire. Got the idea from magicka.

    Got rid of some quicken spell feats. If a spell is a standard action, you can cast two per round once your bab is +6/+1. Full round spellcasting in a sense, can only make a 5 though if you do that. It has worked well.


    King Stag wrote:
    This is genius. I will use this in addition to my Chase Card deck.

    Aww, you're gonna make me blush! lol

    Seriously, thanks! I'm glad you like it.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    Improved Brew Potion: allows potions to be brewed for spells 4th to 6th with a range of personal.

    Greater Brew Potion: allows potions to be brewed for spells 7th to 9th with a range of personal.


    I don't have a document with them written down, so undoubtedly I'm forgetting a bunch, but...

    Weapon Finesse is automatic, you just choose to use it - if you get the feat too, you can add Dex to damage (I much prefer the fast, agile fighter to the brute as an archetype, as does everyone I've played with recently).

    Spell school changes - a bunch of spells are moved around, especially all healing being turned to Necromancy (cause seriously...it's life energy. It'd either be necromancy, transmutation, or evocation, I have no idea how conjuration even enters into the picture).

    Polearms can be used at reach or adjacent, chosen at the beginning of your turn to last until your next.

    Minimum HP is 1/2 die - reroll until you get at least that.

    Depending on campaign and number of players, often 2 skill points extra per level and 2 extra class skills (I tend to play with smaller groups, it helps to cover the bases).

    Crossbows can be bought at increased strength the same as bows. They can be bought higher than your own, and take no penalty to fire for being made that way (since it's a...crossbow... <_<) but do increase their reload time by 1 step for each point of strength past yours (free>move>standard>full>full+move>etc.)

    As someone mentioned above, Heighten Spell just happens when you use a higher level slot than needed.

    TWF tree is condensed down to 1 feat that does the same as TWF, ITWF, and GTWF on its own.

    Mindless creatures, even undead/demons/etc., are always Neutral. Sentient creatures may or may not be, depending on the individual, but there are definitely trends (basically, undead/outsiders/etc. work the same way alignment-wise as humanoids and the like, though it's admittedly rarer to find things like nonevil demons).


    3 people marked this as a favorite.

    My favorite house rule was adopted to entice players to play clerics.

    Clerics don't cast spells they preform miracles. So no memorization required. While limited to the number of spells per day as normal a cleric can cast any spell they have access to at any time.

    Yet still no one plays clerics in our games.


    Logan 247365 wrote:

    Clerics don't cast spells they preform miracles. So no memorization required. While limited to the number of spells per day as normal a cleric can cast any spell they have access to at any time.

    Yet still no one plays clerics in our games.

    Clerics have a massive spell list. To be able to pull anything off it at anytime with no prep at all seems a bit much... its probably better for you that no one wants to play one anyway.


    Logan 247365 wrote:

    My favorite house rule was adopted to entice players to play clerics.

    Clerics don't cast spells they preform miracles. So no memorization required. While limited to the number of spells per day as normal a cleric can cast any spell they have access to at any time.

    Yet still no one plays clerics in our games.

    We do the same thing ... with the same result. I guess that goes to show that a class no one wants to play will never be attractive just because of stat changes.


    Since it is too much to post, a link instead:
    The 'patch changes' for my huge overhaul. I basically made a new 3.75.


    Some clerics in my games, they are usually really into the religious roleplaying and have a great spell list.

    One cleric of Groetus would summon giant anvils to kill someone about three rounds later. Lot of spells out there.


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    Diagonal movement is 1 inch = 5 ft.

    Yes, I understand Pythagoras. No, I don't consider the square root of two a better game experience. Square is a square saves time.

    RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    Matrixryu wrote:

    Currently, my favorite house rule changes how you increase your ability scores. Instead of increasing a single ability by 1 point every four levels, I let my players use a 'continuous point buy system'. Basically, they have 20+Character Level points to spend in the point buy system. For example, you have point buy 21 at level 1, point buy 24 at level 4, and so on. You can't 'buy back' ability scores, so you have to save your points over a few levels to increase an ability that is already high.

    The end result is that if you only want to max out one ability your stats will be the same as if you were using the standard ability increase method, but if you want to spread your points out a bit you'll get more increases in the long run. It helps MAD classes a bit.

    Wow! This is an awesome rule set! It reminds me of the Hackmaster system, where each ability score was like old school 2nd Edition Warrior 18/01-00 Strength, like Str 10/13%, Dex 14/03%, Con 9/88%, etc. etc. Each level, each ability went up a certain percentage (1d4-1d12, depending on a whole bunch of factors).

    But much, much better!!!


    Gorbacz wrote:

    If you roll a "1" on a skill check and fail it, it's a funny fumble! Instead of spotting a stealthy rogue, you stare blankly at a random seagull for a while.

    If you roll a "1" on a skill check and succeed it, you succeed, but in a weird way. You spot the rogue, but why is he wearing a pink tutu?

    My group does this, too.

    One instance that springs to mind is an Inquisitor character trying to make a sudden Perform (Sing) check (I don't even remember what was going on at the time), and the result of the Natural 1 was a fish spontaneously jumping into her mouth.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    Logan 247365 wrote:

    My favorite house rule was adopted to entice players to play clerics.

    Clerics don't cast spells they preform miracles. So no memorization required. While limited to the number of spells per day as normal a cleric can cast any spell they have access to at any time.

    Yet still no one plays clerics in our games.

    Good Lord, and you still cannot get people to lay Clerics? Still amazes me people still think in terms of a "heal bot". In my last game I had to limit the classes to only 3 clerics in a 6 person party.

    Now, trying to convince someone to play a cleric that does not have the travel domain? That's a different problem.

    Couple of house rules:

    Hit Point Rolls - Players choice to roll a single dice until they have at least 1/2 may or rol 2 dice and take the best

    Paladins - Not necessarly limited to LG but rather their gawds alignment but they are held to even more strict requirements and are "the living enbodyment of their gawd's faith".

    (my gm's, not mine) You can wear 2 Rings of Protection and the effects stack. Reasoning being is someine is willing to sacrafice that second ring slot for a couple more points of armor class, more power to them.

    (my gm's, not mine) Shields have +1 AC above their listed value. This is a carry over from 3.5 when TWF was far superior to a shield.

    Combine those 2 and you get some crazy AC. As the Wizard of the group I am not a fan but it is not affecting balance a whole ton.


    My players run their clerics like combat machines. With some healing if you are really lucky.


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    If a player adequately describes what their character is doing such that everyone at the table is entertained, they gain a +1 on the d20 roll--be it combat, skill check, spell resistance, etc.

    They must sufficiently answer the question "How exactly are you doing this?"

    The goal here is to be descriptive and to raise the level of fun for everyone involved. Players are not required to do this; if they merely say "I roll to hit," they don't get the +1.

    Osirion

    "Wish" and any other "wish-like" spells simply do not exist. Period. Because I said so, that's why. If you really need a justification, fine. How about "Knowledge of such magic is lost in the current day and age."

    0-level spells do not exist. Replacing them are a Charisma-based skill called "Cantrip" that allows the user to create minor magical effects similar to the ones created by the 0-level spells. Only those characters who could otherwise cast 0-level spells get the skill, and they get it as a bonus.

    Depending on the starting point of the campaign, equipment choices must be justified. If you cannot figure out a good reason for your peasant-farmer-turned-fighter to own a suit of plate mail at the beginning of the campaign, then he's not going to own plate mail.

    Unless justified within the game world (and justifications are usually restricted to being nobleborn, being a wizard, or being a cleric), all characters are assumed to be functionally illiterate at the beginning of the game. (Meaning you might be able to write your name and recognize a handful of words, but you're not going to be sitting down and reading any novels any time soon).

    Up until a couple of hundred years ago, the world was ruled by a vast human Empire that conquered and tamed many of the other races. After thousands of years of rule, most of those other people have taken on and assumed Imperial customs and attitudes. Only the "barbarians", those people not brought into the Empire, still act and think like you're used to seeing them act and think. Barbarians, remember, are seen as dangerous unpredictable marauders and not trusted at all, whereas Imperials at least are civilized if not always neighborly. The upshot of this is that that orcs and goblins, while not popular, are widely accepted, but elves are seen as bloodthirsty uncultured savages (they live in caves and wear skins, after all, and rumors say they're cannibals) and are mistrusted on sight.

    Other than potions and spell scrolls, there are no such thing as "generic" magic items. Every single item is a unique artifact. Also, other than potions and spell scrolls, you will never find a magic item on sale in a shop. Ever. Even if functionally your magic sword is only a +1 longsword, it will have a name, a history, an exacting description, and will thus be utterly unlike any other magic item you ever encounter.


    TarionsCousin wrote:

    If a player adequately describes what their character is doing such that everyone at the table is entertained, they gain a +1 on the d20 roll--be it combat, skill check, spell resistance, etc.

    They must sufficiently answer the question "How exactly are you doing this?"

    The goal here is to be descriptive and to raise the level of fun for everyone involved. Players are not required to do this; if they merely say "I roll to hit," they don't get the +1.

    I like that a lot and will be forwarding the suggestion to my DM.


    It really sounds like melee characters are screwed in your games as they're largely gear dependent, especially on gear with shiny plusses and other effects. Do you at least use one of the alternate rules for low magic that just automatically gives characters a plus to hit/damage/AC based on their level?


    chaoseffect wrote:
    It really sounds like melee characters are screwed in your games as they're largely gear dependent, especially on gear with shiny plusses and other effects. Do you at least use one of the alternate rules for low magic that just automatically gives characters a plus to hit/damage/AC based on their level?

    **Waves hand dismissively**

    "Baahh, Let the sword jockeys squabble over minor magics in the gutter where they belong. "

    ;-)


    Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:

    **Waves hand dismissively**

    "Baahh, Let the sword jockeys squabble over minor magics in the gutter where they belong. "

    ;-)

    Oh look, they're trying to use a torch. How quaint.

    *casts daylight everywhere*


    chaoseffect wrote:
    Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:

    **Waves hand dismissively**

    "Baahh, Let the sword jockeys squabble over minor magics in the gutter where they belong. "

    ;-)

    Oh look, they're trying to use a torch. How quaint.

    *casts daylight everywhere*

    **laughs**

    "Muggles."


    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    Logan 247365 wrote:

    Clerics don't cast spells they preform miracles. So no memorization required. While limited to the number of spells per day as normal a cleric can cast any spell they have access to at any time.

    Yet still no one plays clerics in our games.

    I played in a game where the GM allowed that. It was pretty awful. The player with the cleric basically stole the entire game. It was so boring for the rest of the casters who were restricted to the spells they had chosen. Clerics are already quite good. Players just need to realize how good they are. If you're a GM and would like your players to come to that realization, try throwing some clerics of Lamashtu at 'em is my suggestion :P

    A houserule I like to allow when I GM is the option to either roll for HP or take the average rounded up when leveling. Some players still like to roll anyways.

    Grand Lodge

    Frog of War wrote:
    Logan 247365 wrote:

    Clerics don't cast spells they preform miracles. So no memorization required. While limited to the number of spells per day as normal a cleric can cast any spell they have access to at any time.

    Yet still no one plays clerics in our games.

    I played in a game where the GM allowed that. It was pretty awful. The player with the cleric basically stole the entire game. It was so boring for the rest of the casters who were restricted to the spells they had chosen. Clerics are already quite good. Players just need to realize how good they are. If you're a GM and would like your players to come to that realization, try throwing some clerics of Lamashtu at 'em is my suggestion :P

    A houserule I like to allow when I GM is the option to either roll for HP or take the average rounded up when leveling. Some players still like to roll anyways.

    Another great way to get players to play clerics that has worked for me in the past is this:

    Next time you have a group with no cleric, run an NPC cleric that travels with the group. Make a really solid character and play it to the hilt. I've done this a few times, and I always had players wanting to play clerics in the next game. :)

    In our group currently, we use the Hero Points optional rule from the APG. You can use a hero point to reroll a hit die, as many times as you have hero points.


    Frog of War wrote:
    Logan 247365 wrote:

    Clerics don't cast spells they preform miracles. So no memorization required. While limited to the number of spells per day as normal a cleric can cast any spell they have access to at any time.

    Yet still no one plays clerics in our games.

    I played in a game where the GM allowed that. It was pretty awful. The player with the cleric basically stole the entire game. It was so boring for the rest of the casters who were restricted to the spells they had chosen. Clerics are already quite good. Players just need to realize how good they are. If you're a GM and would like your players to come to that realization, try throwing some clerics of Lamashtu at 'em is my suggestion :P

    A houserule I like to allow when I GM is the option to either roll for HP or take the average rounded up when leveling. Some players still like to roll anyways.

    Indeed. Clerics of rovagug can also cast mini-earthquakes at low level, crush people with buildings or cave in ruins.

    Clerics are deadly, if you approach them with an idea of what you want, then you go and find what you need. They have a lot of book-keeping though, so I don't like them so much, but my next char might be one.

    Lamashtu is fantastic, Groetus is a favourite. Got to pick the really weird spells for clerics of Groetus.

    RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

    I like using d20 Modern action points. They're really useful in challenging situations. We also let you use 1 action point to gain a virtual feat for 1 round; you must meet the requirements of the selected feat.

    Of course, some players hoard action points, so next time I run a campaign, I might not let them carry over to the next level. Or I might just give out fewer, but every session. Like 3 per session, regardless of level.


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    Honestly, Clerics aren't necessary to a complete party.

    People who are dumb enough to avoid playing them because of some reputation rather than seeing an awesome class for what it is... well, they don't really deserve to play one.


    JrK wrote:

    Since it is too much to post, a link instead:

    The 'patch changes' for my huge overhaul. I basically made a new 3.75.

    Wow, that's an impressive list. I need to get organized.


    Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
    TarionsCousin wrote:

    If a player adequately describes what their character is doing such that everyone at the table is entertained, they gain a +1 on the d20 roll--be it combat, skill check, spell resistance, etc.

    They must sufficiently answer the question "How exactly are you doing this?"

    The goal here is to be descriptive and to raise the level of fun for everyone involved. Players are not required to do this; if they merely say "I roll to hit," they don't get the +1.

    I like that a lot and will be forwarding the suggestion to my DM.

    I agree, that is a really cool and simple way to encourage people to get into the game and be ready for their turn. I run a group after school (I am a teacher)and this will really help my students I think.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    King Stag wrote:
    JrK wrote:

    Since it is too much to post, a link instead:

    The 'patch changes' for my huge overhaul. I basically made a new 3.75.
    Wow, that's an impressive list. I need to get organized.

    I spent about a year working on that, I rewrote pretty much every chapter in the book because I made so many changes I wanted to make it complete. I spent time making every change presentable as if it was a brand new book. So yeah I'm quite organized. :)

    Qadira

    2 people marked this as a favorite.

    We allow you to have other class abilities as bonus feats. So if you really want an archetype build, but really like the core class abilities, you can actually have both.


    DraconicBlessing wrote:
    In our groups we decided that outside of combat healing spells do a minimum of half possible since you get the opportunity to concentrate on the heal. We also had the rule of at minimum being able to roll half on hit dice.

    One of my DMs actually allowed CdG with cure spells, since they are touch spells, and you can CdG with damaging ones.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    Our house rules:

    1) we don't keep up with arrow/bullet supplies
    2) we don't keep up with spell components
    3) we don't waste time trudging thru the countryside... we just call "cut" and advance the scene to some time later (unless a wandering monster appears)
    4)when a PC is dying... he need only roll under his con stat on a percentile roll (rather than 10 for everyone)
    6) whoever kills a monster(the last hp)... gets a Headhunter bonus xp of 10% of the full monster.
    7) we don't allow mixed evil/good alignments in a party
    8) the Host doesn't have to buy the snacks
    9) No DM running PCs when players are absent
    10) No NPCs can be party members
    11) No "teleporting" to loot (guys that miraculously appear at every chest - even though their character was not near there just moments before)
    12) Leave your character sheet with the DM after every session - so... if you are absent - someone can play your character.
    13) no stealing from other party members
    14) if you are getting bored with the DM's campaign... your character is allowed to go out in the forest and "bang pots together" (which hopefully attracts some monsters to kill)
    15) we don't keep up with rations.... or ANYTHING else that slows the game down...


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    @ Dirk Tyrant: Why give bonus xp to whatever character happens to land the killing bow? Aren't the characters working together towards their goal? Why let someone gather much more xp than the others (presumably the fighter or other high-damage melee character who mops up kills)? Is this supposed to reward such characters? What if a wizard throws a well placed fireball when monsters are heavily damaged? In this case, he'd get a ton of extra xp only to contribute at the last second (negating the hard work of said fighter).


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    I don't allow AoO's against untrained combat maneuvers unless the combat maneuver fails. Anyone can trip, bullrush, or grapple. You only suffer if you mess up.


    One thing that my players have been enjoying is a slight change to healing and the Heal skill.

    Above 50% your character is just getting worn down by attacks, not actually getting hit. You're parrying, blocking, dodging, getting minor scrapes or cuts, maybe even just getting kicked (we don't treat "I swing with greataxe" as the character always literally swinging a greataxe; combat is much more complex than that). So at the end of a fight if you're above 50% you can roll a Heal check. For every point above 15 your character gets a hit point back.

    However, once you get below 50% your character is starting to get stabbed, bones are being broken, serious damage is occurring because you're either worn down, your armor is starting to feel heavy, or the enemy is just a better fighter/caster than you. Below 50% you can't heal above that until you've received magical healing or rested up to or above 50% hp.

    Doing this, I've found that I can reduce the number of healing potions the players have on hand (5, maximum, per character) and it makes the game a little faster, but also removes the need for PCs to just lug around bags of cure wands and potions, which I think is silly.


    I've similarly altered how the Heal skill works, making non-magical, out-of-combat healing more viable:

    When using the Heal skill to treat deadly wounds (DC 15), your target heals a number of hit points equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum 1), plus 1d4 for every 5 by which you exceed the DC. A creature can benefit from its deadly wounds being treated a number of times per day equal to its Constitution modifier (minimum 1). Treating deadly wounds takes 10 minutes, and expends 2 uses from a healing kit.


    JrK wrote:
    King Stag wrote:
    JrK wrote:

    Since it is too much to post, a link instead:

    The 'patch changes' for my huge overhaul. I basically made a new 3.75.
    Wow, that's an impressive list. I need to get organized.
    I spent about a year working on that, I rewrote pretty much every chapter in the book because I made so many changes I wanted to make it complete. I spent time making every change presentable as if it was a brand new book. So yeah I'm quite organized. :)

    Any chance you would be willing to share your completed work? It sounds very impressive.

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