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Starting a middle-school Pathfinder club!


Beginner Box

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RedEric wrote:
"Lord Crabbington has generously agreed to spare your miserable life bandit, but he warns you not to test his patience further. Yes, sir. I'm sure he gets the point, sir. Maiming him with your magnificent pincers is probably not necessary, sir."

That's some great roleplaying! Although I love having a lot of students, with so many people I'm hard-pressed to "incubate" a game so as to raise the experience far above just pure hack-and-slash. Still, they are already more than satisfied with hack-and-slash and are having a huge amount of fun.

We now have well over ten students. Just last Wednesday our club had EIGHTEEN students at once! Twelve of them are sixth graders, the rest are seventh graders. On top of that, two of my GMs weren't ready, and three of the students wanted to focus on Hero Lab so they could challenge me in a 3v3 PvP, and two of them went off and started a duel! Good times!


Sounds like fun. As an educator I would remind you never to be alone with kids, always try to have another adult in there with you. Also,make sure you have background checks and all of that taken care of.


It's great to see that this is going so well. Congratulations on getting so many students interested in this wonderful hobby. I wish there had been a RPG club at my school... Sadly when you're in a small country town in rurual Australia, the gamers are definitely in the minority.

Now that I've moved up to Canberra it's much easier, I've gotten to the point where I'm actually having to consider cutting down on the number of games I'm involved in (which in itself is a heart wrenching decision to have to make).

I've started following your site (depending on how it displays followers I'll either show up as The Grassy Gnoll or tinkergoth), particularly for the Shattered Star logs that appear to be popping up now and then. I've just started running Shards of Sin for one of my groups, and I think it'll be fun to see how your club's experiences with it compare to my groups.


Tinkergoth wrote:

It's great to see that this is going so well. Congratulations on getting so many students interested in this wonderful hobby. I wish there had been a RPG club at my school... Sadly when you're in a small country town in rurual Australia, the gamers are definitely in the minority.

Now that I've moved up to Canberra it's much easier, I've gotten to the point where I'm actually having to consider cutting down on the number of games I'm involved in (which in itself is a heart wrenching decision to have to make).

I've started following your site (depending on how it displays followers I'll either show up as The Grassy Gnoll or tinkergoth), particularly for the Shattered Star logs that appear to be popping up now and then. I've just started running Shards of Sin for one of my groups, and I think it'll be fun to see how your club's experiences with it compare to my groups.

Very cool. I set up a category to isolate the Shattered Star posts.

If you're interested, you may have noticed that I made up my own little intro to Rise of the Runelords, with a "we are kids in school" theme!


The Rot Grub wrote:

Very cool. I set up a category to isolate the Shattered Star posts.

If you're interested, you may have noticed that I made up my own little intro to Rise of the Runelords, with a "we are kids in school" theme!

I'll check it out. I've yet to run RotRL, but it looks like a lot of fun. I've heard that some of it gets a little disturbing though, particulary Hook Mountain Massacre. What are your thoughts on running that for a group of students? Are you likely to tone it down, or is it something you think they can handle?


Tinkergoth wrote:
The Rot Grub wrote:

Very cool. I set up a category to isolate the Shattered Star posts.

If you're interested, you may have noticed that I made up my own little intro to Rise of the Runelords, with a "we are kids in school" theme!

I'll check it out. I've yet to run RotRL, but it looks like a lot of fun. I've heard that some of it gets a little disturbing though, particulary Hook Mountain Massacre. What are your thoughts on running that for a group of students? Are you likely to tone it down, or is it something you think they can handle?

I'm finding RotRL a huge amount of fun for my group of students, and the encounters are simultaneously flavorful, appropriate to the setting, and varied. This group is more story-oriented and are loving the idea of living in a town that has regular NPCs. I'll probably make some adjustments for HMM though:

Spoiler:
They might get a hoot from the "trailer trash" elements of it, but anything suggesting rape or male-male incest I'm thinking of leaving out. The group (unfortunately) is all boys and I'm guessing they might not handle it appropriately.

Silver Crusade

I would recommend differentiating for age level and interest. I find that younger teenagers can be initially enthusiastic but may be turned off by varying levels of difficulty, action and committment. It might be an idea to keep it more combat-orientated initially and then move into the roleplaying aspect slowly.


The Rot Grub wrote:
I'll check it out. I've yet to run RotRL, but it looks like a lot of fun. I've heard that some of it gets a little disturbing though, particulary Hook Mountain Massacre. What are your thoughts on running that for a group of students? Are you likely to tone it down, or is it something you think they can handle?

I'm finding RotRL a huge amount of fun for my group of students, and the encounters are simultaneously flavorful, appropriate to the setting, and varied. This group is more story-oriented and are loving the idea of living in a town that has regular NPCs. I'll probably make some adjustments for HMM though:

** spoiler omitted **

Aye, I had heard it gets pretty full on in that regard. It certainly won't be one I plan on running for any younger groups without some careful reading and modification.


Chubbs McGee wrote:
I would recommend differentiating for age level and interest. I find that younger teenagers can be initially enthusiastic but may be turned off by varying levels of difficulty, action and committment. It might be an idea to keep it more combat-orientated initially and then move into the roleplaying aspect slowly.

Yes, that was definitely a lesson I learned early on: I was trying to get them to GM the stories and NPC interactions much more, until I saw that the players lost interest (and some GMs overcompensated by being heavyhanded or inflicting HP damage if players didn't pay attention lol). Now, I usually recommend to the GMs that they just put the players in front of the door to the dungeon and give them the background that led them there. For RotRL, I picked out individual students who I noticed were more interested in more story and more NPC interaction.


The Rot Grub wrote:
Chubbs McGee wrote:
I would recommend differentiating for age level and interest. I find that younger teenagers can be initially enthusiastic but may be turned off by varying levels of difficulty, action and committment. It might be an idea to keep it more combat-orientated initially and then move into the roleplaying aspect slowly.
Yes, that was definitely a lesson I learned early on: I was trying to get them to GM the stories and NPC interactions much more, until I saw that the players lost interest (and some GMs overcompensated by being heavyhanded or inflicting HP damage if players didn't pay attention lol). Now, I usually recommend to the GMs that they just put the players in front of the door to the dungeon and give them the background that led them there. For RotRL, I picked out individual students who I noticed were more interested in more story and more NPC interaction.

That seems like a pretty good way of handling it. I must say I'm finding this whole thread pretty informative, it should come in handy since some of my cousins have just hit the age where I'm going to try them out on some Pathfinder. I was thinking just a few simple modules to start with, nothing too difficult, but plenty of combat and puzzles to give them a chance to try out their different abilities.

I know that at least one of them is going to be keen on the story stuff, she's always making up characters for fiction she's writing (and some of it's actually pretty good), so I'm interested to see where she takes it. I think I'll definitely start them off on Pathfinder, but I suspect it won't be long before this one cousin in particular is asking me about World of Darkness (she's currently pretty into the whole vampire/werewolf/teen paranormal romance thing that's going on at the moment)... Still, I think I'd have to hold off on that one for a while at least though, and definitely run it past my aunt and uncle first. World of Darkness isn't exactly friendly for the young'uns without some pretty severe scaling back.

Grand Lodge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm a high school teacher and have been playing around with the idea of running an after school club for Pathfinder for a while. Your posts and your website have inspired me. It sounds like your club has been a great success. I hope you stick with it and continue to grow. I hope this thread continues and you provide more feedback on how things work. I would love to hear some more game summaries.

Sczarni

Wow,this is fantastic. I'm so amazed by how well you managed to get the students interested in this club. I'm extremely interested in how you pitch it to the kids, and how you have the kids pitch it to their friends. Also, how are you pitching it to parents?

I guess the big thing that always scares me with these kinds of things is the adult and graphic nature of the titles and gameplay. It seems like you've done a good job of toning it to an acceptable level. Have you received any complaints from parents about any of the text found on your page?

Words being thrown around like "evil, blood, death" etc can be a bit harsh to someone who doesn't understand the game. How do you deal with this?


Tinkergoth wrote:
I know that at least one of them is going to be keen on the story stuff, she's always making up characters for fiction she's writing (and some of it's actually pretty good), so I'm interested to see where she takes it. I think I'll definitely start them off on Pathfinder, but I suspect it won't be long before this one cousin in particular is asking me about World of Darkness (she's currently pretty into the whole vampire/werewolf/teen paranormal romance thing that's going on at the moment)... Still, I think I'd have to hold off on that one for a while at least though, and definitely run it past my aunt and uncle first. World of Darkness isn't exactly friendly for the young'uns without...

It's pretty easy to incorporate vampires and werewolves in Pathfinder. (There are templates for them in the Bestiary... perhaps you can figure out the stats for them and if they change shape have alternate character sheets or stats.) This is what you might end up having to do anyway, so as not to break up the playing group.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Mitch and Abadar, your interest has inspired me to try to put my thoughts together on my blog! I'll let you know when I post, and I'll share some of what I write here, too.

Abadar, perhaps to begin answering your questions, here is the class description I included in the afterschool program guide:

Tabletop Roleplaying Games

Do you love tales of heroic fantasy like Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings? Pathfinder Roleplaying Game (similar to D&D) lets you create your own hero and enter perilous worlds fraught with monsters and magic. What better way to make friends than to cooperate to escape a trap-filled dungeon, or foil the evil wizard’s elaborate plan? Roll dice, fight monsters—play out your own thrilling story. Ambitious students can be “game masters,” crafting the worlds and devious traps and villains the heroes have to overcome. You’ll be having too much fun to realize you’re learning creativity, logic, problem-solving, probability, and teamwork. Join "The Guild" today!

I have not encountered any issues from parents regarding the violent themes in the game. I would imagine that if any of them are concerned about such influences, it would be from video games -- Pathfinder is so mentally rewarding and challenging (and, as one of the parents mentioned, can "light a fire" in the kids) that the parents see the benefits far outweighing any of the potential negatives. A number of them have very definite ideas about childhood development and see tabletop RPGs as a way to develop imagination and confidence. Finally, by the time their kids come to me they have already approved of their participation.


The Rot Grub wrote:
It's pretty easy to incorporate vampires and werewolves in Pathfinder. (There are templates for them in the Bestiary... perhaps you can figure out the stats for them and if they change shape have alternate character sheets or stats.) This is what you might end up having to do anyway, so as not to break up the playing group.

That's definitely a possibility. I think I'll try to run them through some vanilla Pathfinder first though. The question is what to start with. I can either get them going on Rise of the Runelords (and deal with the excising of the more disturbing elements of certain sections as needed), or start running them through Reign of Winter.

Either way, it looks like this is a done deal given a conversation I had with my cousin today.

Me: "Hey, are you interested in learning to play Dungeons & Dragons?" (My cousin isn't aware of Pathfinder yet, so I thought I better stick with a name she would know).
Her: "OH MY GOD YES THAT WOULD BE AMAZING I'LL GO GET MY FRIENDS RIGHT NOW!"

So, I can't fault her enthusiasm at least. First session will be during the school holidays in a few weeks time.


Ahhh lol. Yes, sounds like my middle-school students. Now you can see why I love doing what I do. :)

An Adventure Path might not make sense, given the long time commitment: on the boards here most people have said they can be anywhere from 150 to 250 hours of actual play. I've found that I've gotten a MUCH better sense of what I'm good at and what the players are interested in, only after actually playing with them. Also, the strengths of the Adventure Paths are the long-running story arcs they provide, and the settings and NPCs they provide. I would be concerned first with young children that there is an immediate story and action that are compelling and exciting. Once that is accomplished, their imagination knows no bounds!

You might want to try a good beginner module, and then see where you and the players want to go from there.

I think the Price of Immortality series (Crypt of the Everflame, Mask of the Living God, and City of Golden Death) is pretty good for new players. The first is designed to be a good intro for beginning players. The second intimidated me as a new GM because it involves roleplaying and being able to deal with player actions I didn't expect:

Spoiler:
It involves infiltrating a religious cult of organized thieves.

Still, Masks of the Living God can be an excellent early opportunity to roleplay and be creative and see what the potential of "The Game" is. If you consider this one, make sure to listen to the excellent podcast by Steel_Wind where he points out some useful modifications to make. Though this module intimidated me as a beginner GM, I now think I'll run through it with some of my middle-school students after pre-prepping them for the scenario. Should be fun!

Another good set of beginning modules is Hollow's Last Hope, followed by Crown of the Kobold King:

Spoiler:
As I mentioned early in this thread, the latter involves rescuing a bunch of children. I thought one thing to do was to have the PCs meet the children early on as "meanies" who are in over their heads and "have a secret" they won't tell the PCs. Then they get themselves into trouble and need to be rescued! I still haven't tried this with my kids though.


The Rot Grub wrote:

You might want to try a good beginner module, and then see where you and the players want to go from there.

I think the Price of Immortality series (Crypt of the Everflame, Mask of the Living God, and City of Golden Death) is pretty good for new players. The first is designed to be a good intro for beginning players. The second intimidated me as a new GM because it involves roleplaying and being able to deal with player actions I didn't expect:

** spoiler omitted **

Still, Masks of the Living God can be an excellent early opportunity to roleplay and be creative and see what the potential of "The Game" is. If you consider this one, make sure to listen to the excellent podcast by Steel_Wind where he points out some useful modifications to make. Though this module intimidated me as a beginner GM, I now think I'll run through it with some of my middle-school students after pre-prepping them for the scenario. Should be fun!

I've just had a look at The Price of Immortality adventures. I think they could be just the thing. I've got no real concerns about the role-playing from my cousin, her friends are of course an unknown element that could throw a spanner in the works, but that's a risk with any gaming group you aren't familiar with. Thanks for the heads up, I really appreciate it :)

Now it's just a matter of letting her get the group together, then I figure I should probably have a chat with their parents just to explain what it's all about. Though my aunt may take care of that bit for me, since she knows them already and had a bunch of brothers who were all gamers.

I imagine I'll be running this on Sunday afternoons, since it's one of the few days I don't have to prep for another game. I do have a game in the evening, but thankfully it's one that my housemate runs, so I only have to worry about my own character.


Sounds like you're on top of this. I'm glad to be of help. Good luck!


I put up my first post about my experience running the Pathfinder club at the middle school!

Here's my conception for the blog:

This is the first of what likely will be many more posts on my musings as the adult “Grandmaster” of a successful middle-school Pathfinder RPG club (now 18 students strong!) that the kids and I affectionately call “The Guild.” These posts likely will interest others who are introducing tabletop RPGs to young people. Read, comment, and enjoy!

ARTICLE

Silver Crusade

I enjoyed reading about your experiences teaching Pathfinder to middle school students. I am a middle school teacher, and I think that what you're doing is a good way to make learning fun AND recruit new players to the game. Keep up the great work!

Lantern Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber, Campaign Setting, Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber

I am a secondary school teacher in a similar position. Along with another staff member we started a Pathfinder club running once a week for about 2 hours. Four students signed up (luckily the magic number) ranging from 11-16 years old. We jumped straight into the Beginners Box using Hero Lab to do the maths and speed up the character creation process. It took a few weeks to run through the bash demos and then we moved on to First Steps, playing each scenario over two weeks. This tied nicely into a convention that I ran at the school over the Easter holidays and the kids teamed up with veterans to play the Quest for Perfection series.

Apart from being careful with some of the adult content in the scenarios the difficult we have had is not being able to complete a whole scenario in one two hour sitting. If anyone has any ideas for overcoming this hurdle (apart from two days per week) I would love to hear about it!


Adriaan van Wijk wrote:

I am a secondary school teacher in a similar position. Along with another staff member we started a Pathfinder club running once a week for about 2 hours. Four students signed up (luckily the magic number) ranging from 11-16 years old. We jumped straight into the Beginners Box using Hero Lab to do the maths and speed up the character creation process. It took a few weeks to run through the bash demos and then we moved on to First Steps, playing each scenario over two weeks. This tied nicely into a convention that I ran at the school over the Easter holidays and the kids teamed up with veterans to play the Quest for Perfection series.

Apart from being careful with some of the adult content in the scenarios the difficult we have had is not being able to complete a whole scenario in one two hour sitting. If anyone has any ideas for overcoming this hurdle (apart from two days per week) I would love to hear about it!

Awesome! I don't think there is a real way to fit a whole PFS scenario into a two-hour session. But has it hurt the experience? I've found that sometimes in The Guild we have one adventure run over 5, 6 school days, and the kids don't seem to mind much. And many regular meeting groups don't meet more than once a week, and it's normal for there to be gaps of time within an adventure -- it kinda goes with tabletop gaming.

Also, are the students willing to stay at school longer, and would their parents let them? Perhaps if it were Friday (not a homework night), they would be willing to stay longer?

Lantern Lodge

Maybe you can help speed up the scenarios, by having the students describe what their characters do during the "break".

Or by "pre-loading" the scenario by giving the students a printout of the mission before the game. That way when they sit down to play, they already understand what the mission is and what they have to do, so they can jump straight into the story.


Here's a resource for BB.
http://guildmlk.wordpress.com/resources/beginner-box-resources/


The Rot Grub wrote:
arioreo wrote:
Are you really going to ruin the game by forcing them to study statistics or write novels?

You used the term "ain't" and started a sentence "I they wander ..." Please tell me more about how formal education is not needed.


Alejandro Acosta wrote:

Here's a resource for BB.

http://guildmlk.wordpress.com/resources/beginner-box-resources/

What an awesome resource! Hey it looks kinda familiar... :)

If any of you want to tune in, the biannual Guild Tournament will be taking place over this next month! I have borrowed a number of rules from Gladius. Will BakeSale overcome Trashi? Will Nightflame best Bossness? Stay tuned to see!!


I am just gearing up to run murders mark with grade six kids, but i think i will back up a littleand use the beginner box bashes first. Last two years i ran a flex class where students played starwars rpg and documented to fulfill their own curricular outcomes. My hidden agenda was to hand pick the group to enhance their discernment and social skills. These were kids with borderline asbergers and a couple of unparented seasons tickets to the office.
By letting them test drive different solutions they could discover likely outcomes, and by using quaker styled queries and advices (thank you jedi monomyth meme) they began to think. It took about four months of daily sessions, including having them come up with queries and advices in character before i heard students use them in the halls to be engaged bystanders with a friend who was trying to intimidate another kid.

I did lose functional use of two expensive books to enthusiasm plus a badly placed super big gulp, worried this was totally ineffective for sebveral months before slight results began to show, and gave up coaching basketball for one of the years to give it enough time. It was also what you would expect of seven higher needs students in a small space, exhausting, lots of real world conflicts and social roller coasters. I also ended up watching speilburgs barmitzvah video with a student group at their request, was this some sort of test? At the midpoint i wish i,d had a "if you are not you, click here" button, and be somewhere else. Thank goodness they were still not picking up on social clues.

I have now a younger brother and friends coming into grade seven and on the tour of our school they pulled me aside and asked if we could do it but like jack sparrow from pirates of the carribean.

I took their interest and went to game knight here in winnipeg, they set me up with pathfinder skull and shackles and told me about true dungeon as something to work towards. Thanks ben and others there! It is serendipity to see this conversation as i begin in pathfinders. Thank you keen cultural workers! Should we set up a resource site for working with administrators and selling the idea, meeting current life needs of students etc?

The Exchange

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Great to come back to this thread to see all the great ideas for running school Pathfinder groups.

In the 6 months or so since I last posted, the activity has rapidly blossomed at our school (Australian International School Singapore). My colleague and I divided the players into a younger group of 10-14 year olds and an older 15-18 year old group. Numbers have rapidly increased and we now have 28 students altogether. The good folks at Hero Lab have very kindly given us a set of licenses to use and all character portfolios are audited between games. I managed to squeeze in two afternoon sessions per week (2 hours each) and now the time issue has been solved with one scenario being run over these two sessions. A number of the older players have very successfully stepped into the GM role and now the group is self-run. A token activities fee has covered the purchase of rulebooks and other gaming accessories.

I am now very optimistic about the continued growth of our club (AIS PFS) and will be offering demo sessions and workshops for other schools starting next year. It is particularly pleasing to see kids getting away from their computers and enjoying the social aspect of this hobby.


Adriaan van Wijk wrote:

Great to come back to this thread to see all the great ideas for running school Pathfinder groups.

In the 6 months or so since I last posted, the activity has rapidly blossomed at our school (Australian International School Singapore). My colleague and I divided the players into a younger group of 10-14 year olds and an older 15-18 year old group. Numbers have rapidly increased and we now have 28 students altogether. The good folks at Hero Lab have very kindly given us a set of licenses to use and all character portfolios are audited between games. I managed to squeeze in two afternoon sessions per week (2 hours each) and now the time issue has been solved with one scenario being run over these two sessions. A number of the older players have very successfully stepped into the GM role and now the group is self-run. A token activities fee has covered the purchase of rulebooks and other gaming accessories.

I am now very optimistic about the continued growth of our club (AIS PFS) and will be offering demo sessions and workshops for other schools starting next year. It is particularly pleasing to see kids getting away from their computers and enjoying the social aspect of this hobby.

Congrats, that sounds amazing! Our club now has about 28 students, with attendance averaging 24 now. We usually have 4 games going on simultaneously, and they're all middle school students so it's a bear to handle! We also have Hero Lab on a computer which helps make sure the character sheets are in order.


Just a quick word of thanks to all contributors to this thread. I have established a club (Ten 14/15 year olds) at an academy (state school) in the UK. The advice posted here has been really useful. Just a few things to add to the mix (apologies if some have already been mentioned - but this will make it a bit more comprehensive).

1) Inform: I put together a little literature with FAQs etc. about the hobby in general and Pathfinder specifically (as much for the parents as anyone). This also pointed out the educational value of RPG gaming. The pack also came with a parental approval slip that had to be returned before anyone was allowed to join. Senior Leadership Team were also informed.

2) Beginners Box is a fantastic (and relatively cheap resource). Having not thrown dice since the mid 80's - it was also an easy way for me to get up to speed with the core rules. The pre-gens and tutorial scenario were also a great way for the whole group to quickly access the game.

3)You might need to throw a few quid at setting up resources - but if you spend wisely it will go a long way. A large battle mat (£25) can be reused for multiple scenarios. Google images and a bit of photoshop has provided all the tokens needed that are not in the beginners box (running scenarios other than the tutorial one).Free pregen PDF's are also available from Paizo.

4)Herolab was a tad pricy - but really takes the sting out of character creation. We plug a laptop into a OHP, beam it up on a large screen, and work on building characters together. Much more engaging. Everyone has an opinion as to where ability/skill points should go for example. You can also print out character specific skills/spells etc that the kids can refer to in game (and take home to get acquainted with)

5)I have a copy of the core book - but spend most of my time reading it at home for fun. There's a mobile app called PFRPG which covers almost all the core books (rules, bestiary's, spells etc)and costs about £3. Its a superfast database - and works brilliantly for in game clarification without loosing pace. No illustrations - so doesn't really replace the books wholesale (not that I'd want to) - but works great as an in game resource.

The kids love it. It's amazing to see them starting to get drawn into the game and start working together as a team. There was a moment when we first stated - when a lad showed me a dice rolling app - that my heart sank. Part of the fun is the tactile nature of pen/paper gaming. However - without any prompting, he ditched it in favour of the real thing as soon as he threw a few real dice. Brilliant!

Again - thanks to all contributors to this post. Really helpful. For anyone in two minds as to whether to bother - with a little sensible planning - I thoroughly recommend it!


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Necroing this thread to report that on my first day for the new school year we had 32 kids! And there are about 12 additional kids signed up for the Wednesday class as well!

I've set up a binder in which I've put full-color pictures of the (now 31) classes in plastic sleeves, with short descriptions. For a while, I'd have new visitors look through the binder and pick a class and start from there. Now, I'm using the Beginner Box intro to give people a "birds-eye" view of the game and the different kinds of characters that exist. Also, I am requiring everyone who makes a new character to do it with pencil and paper because it forces them to learn how everything connects and to make a plan for their character. I assign "journeymen" to earn class XP for helping the "apprentices" with their characters. And then they journey on a first adventure together!

We've also phased in the Kingdom Rules from Ultimate Campaign to create a kingdom (Gildhaven) in which all the adventures take place. Some of the older kids now make up the "High Council" and pass edicts and spend the kingdom's budget on expansion. They send other adventurers out on expeditions, and go on adventures themselves of course. They have imposed taxes that have caused some resentment, and some of the lower-level students are conspiring to overturn the High Council. The kids have loved the kingdom idea! Some of them have worked on their own projects: one group is clearing out a cave and want to convert it into a dance club -- I'll be using the Ultimate Campaign rules for buildings to manage their profit making! One day we had a "bar-off" in which everyone created their fantasy bars and I was a pompous reviewer who sampled their varied entertainments. One bar had a fighting ring where people fought dinosaurs and other creatures, and a cleric at a nearby table healed them afterwards.

The class website has changed URLs and is now here. For a while, I'd been running Pathfinder Adventure Paths with the kids on the weekends for a fee, so there are a lot of writeups from the kids about their adventures in Wrath of the Righteous, Kingmaker and Razor Coast. But unfortunately I have now had to phase that out as I focus more on lawyering. But now I'm helping the kids organize their own weekend self-run groups and participate in local PFS games.

Much awesomeness all around...

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