Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
Pathfinder Society

Pathfinder Beginner Box

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game

Pathfinder Comics

Pathfinder Legends

RPG Superstar 2015

[Low Magic] Eliminate primary casters without unbalancing the game?


Suggestions/House Rules/Homebrew


I've been toying with the idea of running a low-magic campaign, and having read a bunch of similar threads on these forums I'm still not sure about how best to go about it. I've read about E6, and yes that could probably work but I'm wondering if it can be done without the level capping.

I was always fond of worlds where grand magic existed in the past, but has been lost to the world ages ago. There would still be magical weapons and items, but they would be far more rare and "precious" since the art of creating them is forgotten by mortals. Some of the BBEGs could still be witches and sorcerers and the like, but they gain their power through pacts with other-worldly beings, gods, devils, and the like, so although they gain immense power, they also become utterly beholden to their "makers" and a pawn in their cosmic plans.

I like Pathfinder, I don't really want to switch to a different rule system. I also don't want to get into messing with the rules since I think that is a very time consuming balancing act. I've been wondering if I could run an effective low-magic campaign without changing any rules or unbalancing the game simply by eliminating the casters as PC class choices.

So no Alchemists, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Inquisitors, Oracles, Sorcerers, Summoners, Witches, or Wizards. Technically you can build a totally valid party without them. I rather like the idea of leaving Paladins and Rangers untouched, since they're spells are capped at 4th level, but I'm wondering if they would become a requirement to any band of PCs since they CAN cast spells. I don't want to burden every group composition with a Lawful Good paladin character since that's not really my players' style. Thoughts?

Also, magical items would remain part of the game, but would be VERY rare as the art of creating them is lost to the world.

Obviously I'd have to be light-handed with monsters that posses spell-like abilities, diseases, level- and ability-drains, and basically just careful with how CRs are calculated with spellcasting PCs in mind, but other than that do you guys think this could be done?

Anyone ever run a campaign this way? How'd it go?


After further consideration, perhaps I would even limit Rangers and Paladins to their non-casting variants (Skirmisher, and Warrior of the Holy Light respectively).

I guess this would make having a Paladin in the party a necessity since at least they can heal a bit. I would also seriously consider removing the restriction on paladins to be lawful good and changing it to be any good alignment (or anti-paladins to be any evil).


1 person marked this as a favorite.

You should ask yourself what it means to be low magic in the campaign and how this affects the world. It's not just the PCs that you need to consider. It's also the creatures with spell-like abilities or built in class spells (dragons come immediately to mind). How does low magic affect them.

I don't think you really need to get rid of any classes at all. I think that you need to limit the game though.

1) Use the slow XP progression
2) Use the Heroic NPC WBL progression
3) You'll have to fiddle with the CRs. At 1st and 2nd level, you can probably leave them alone. At 3rd and 4th level, add +2. At 5th on up, probably add +3 to +4.
4) Use 25 point buy
5) Increase skill points for each class by 50%
6) Use more mundane encounters. Creatures with magic should be rare and should feel like they are more unique.
7) Use more traps and hazards
8) Consider using Words of Power. This will give the casters a little flexibility without making them powerhouses.
9) Use NPC boons instead of treasure
10) Use the rules for Piecemeal Armor, Armor as Damage Reduction, Called Shots, and Wound/Vigor

I'm still working out details but this is what I've always thought a low magic campaign could be like.


LeDM wrote:
I've been toying with the idea of running a low-magic campaign, and having read a bunch of similar threads on these forums I'm still not sure about how best to go about it. I've read about E6, and yes that could probably work but I'm wondering if it can be done without the level capping.

Not without re-inventing the wheel. Everything about high level play is balanced based on the sheer quantity of magic that is available to both magic and non-magic using classes. Many creatures are outright impossible to kill without access to certain magical options (such as fiends whose Regeneration is only bypassed by Good aligned attacks and spells, which is normally great since align weapon is an easy spell to come by, but not in a game like you're describing).

Quote:
I was always fond of worlds where grand magic existed in the past, but has been lost to the world ages ago. There would still be magical weapons and items, but they would be far more rare and "precious" since the art of creating them is forgotten by mortals. Some of the BBEGs could still be witches and sorcerers and the like, but they gain their power through pacts with other-worldly beings, gods, devils, and the like, so although they gain immense power, they also become utterly beholden to their "makers" and a pawn in their cosmic plans.

A little voice inside my head screams out "now we see the truth, BBEGs can be magic but the party can't!", but I'm going to assume you wouldn't actually do that; because only lame DMs do that; and I'm sure you are LeDM and not LameDM.

Incidentally, my homebrew campaign has this very setup. The world was basically destroyed. Apocalypse yesturday, basically. Adventurers are seen as some sort of daredevil archaeologists, because they often traverse the ruins and dangers of the old world to find ancient mysteries. The old world had many floating cities, incredible magic-technology, and so forth. The new world is merely recollecting these things. Some enjoy magical conveniences such as everburning street lights, and some grand cities have sewer systems and water recycling systems in place; but overall the world is a giant rural place with various cultivated settlements dotting its landscape; almost always within sight of some ancient spire from a ruin of the old world.

Incidentally, there's nothing actually changed about the core classes at all. Wizards of course begin at 1st level, possessing only the rudimentary magics appropriate for the level. Part of the journey is rediscovering lost lore, really. Many wizards specifically seek out the old world ruins specifically because it's a shortcut to gaining greater knowledge and understanding.

But I digress; back to addressing your commentary. If you aren't going to allow your party to even have spellcasters, it's likely that acquiring meaningful magic items (particularly those that are supposed to be cheap and common like consumable items) is slim to none. If you drop a BBEG that's a caster, the party is dead. End of story. Dead party. A 5th level wizard can kill a party of 10th level non-casters with no magical support. Anything about that is just cruel and unusual. Normally not a big concern in a normal game where a few potions and/or some nice magic armor would tip the scale; but your post makes that seem unlikely.

Quote:
I like Pathfinder, I don't really want to switch to a different rule system. I also don't want to get into messing with the rules since I think that is a very time consuming balancing act. I've been wondering if I could run an effective low-magic campaign without changing any rules or unbalancing the game simply by eliminating the casters as PC class choices.

There are not enough ways for me to say no. It requires re-examining the entire system. You can literally throw out half of the bestiary. Anything that's base CR is higher than 5 (and a lot of stuff that's not) is generally going to be incredibly powerful to completely unbeatable. Especially outsiders like fiends (demons, devils, daemons, rakshasa, kytons, whatever); as virtually all of those will result in TPKs unless they're intentionally trying to lose.

Quote:
So no Alchemists, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Inquisitors, Oracles, Sorcerers, Summoners, Witches, or Wizards. Technically you can build a totally valid party without them. I rather like the idea of leaving Paladins and Rangers untouched, since they're spells are capped at 4th level, but I'm wondering if they would become a requirement to any band of PCs since they CAN cast spells. I don't want to burden every group composition with a Lawful Good paladin character since that's not really my players' style. Thoughts?

You can't build totally valid parties without spellcasters, at least without access to a bounteous supply of magical goodies that you can purchase; especially things like potions and consumables. Without access to those things, then it's over.

Rangers and Paladins would be the ONLY classes that would be worth playing in a game that removes virtually all casters and access to magic items but left the rest of the game mostly untouched. They would be the party's only hope of getting effects like restoration, cure, delay poison, resist energy and freedom of movement. They would also rule the school in terms of martial classes, because Paladins and Rangers would just be flat out superior as the only casting classes. I'd be surprised if you didn't see more parties composed of: Ranger, Ranger, Ranger, Ranger.

I mean, after you strip the game of casters, you basically are left with Fighter, Rogue, Monk. A disgustingly boring prospect, that. Heck, in a game that otherwise has no magic, the NPC class Adept begins to look frighteningly attractive. Heck, in an otherwise mundane world, Adepts would take over.

Quote:
Also, magical items would remain part of the game, but would be VERY rare as the art of creating them is lost to the world.

I would have expected nothing less than the denial of such options in the light of the rest of your goals.

Quote:
Obviously I'd have to be light-handed with monsters that posses spell-like abilities, diseases, level- and ability-drains, and basically just careful with how CRs are calculated with spellcasting PCs in mind, but other than that do you guys think this could be done?

Light-handed is an understatement. Like I said before, you'll need to scrap half the bestiary and start over. It's not even about spell-like abilities anymore. Just lacking access to certain things makes a crazy amount of NPCs TPK machines. For example, the Medusa monster is dangerous in a normal D&D game. In a low-magic game, it's basically perma-death, and to rub salt in the wound, the PCs generally will have far worse saving throws.

Quote:
Anyone ever run a campaign this way? How'd it go?

Yes, most GMs have attempted at least something similar to this before, and then they learn better.

=====================================================

Criticisms aside, I will attempt to aid you in your quest, should you insist on going down this treacherous path.

1) You can ignore the majority of the Pathfinder rulebook (this includes most of the classes, the magic, spells, magic items, a solid amount of feats, and so forth). You are now playing Pathfinder-lighter-than-lite. Prepare for combats to basically be slugfests, as attack rolls are about the only thing that's going to go around. IMHO, this makes combats rather boring on both sides of the field after a while.

2) You can and should ignore the majority of the Bestiary. Animals, giant vermin, and maybe a very select few monsters can be used as is; but generally only the brutish ones. Most undead are out, most outsiders are out, most constructs are out, most magical beasts, fey, plants, and even humanoids (including lycanthropes and gaints) are out.

3) Your class options amount to Fighter, Rogue, Monk. Ranger and Paladin are optional, but if you go with Ranger and Paladin, after a while, expect people to play nothing but Rangers and Paladins.

4) Learn to love NPC classes. Warriors and experts. Adepts may be used for BBEGs, since they might not overpower the party in most cases, but at higher levels they are vicious threats all their own.

5) Armor class will be lower. You don't have magical buffs to keep it up. I'd recommend setting AC to 10 + 1/2 level + usual modifiers (since you will not have lots of +stat magic items, you'll never get particularly good dex mods, so you'll tap out around AC 30 with this method.

6) Money is effectively useless beyond a plot device. If there are no magic items to purchase, then you will cap out at masterwork gear. Your typical adventurer can be decked out in masterwork tools (cloak, boots, belt, backpack, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc) and sporting masterwork full plate easily, and early. After these are purchased, money stops being something that improves your power. It sinks into the realm of plot device, and thus is only as useful as it is to bribe others or buy lands and titles which ultimately mean very little in terms of gameplay.

7) Hit point growth tends to get very noticeable. Without access to effects like haste, enhancement bonuses, and other buffs, overall party damage will be lower. In turn, HP drops slower. As levels rise, HP grows faster (if you have a d8 HD and a +2 Con, you gain 6.5 HP per level, while the damage from a d8 sword and a +2 Strength stays at 6.5 period, which means the more HD the enemy gains, the less and less damage you are effectively dealing to them). Fighters (the class) may be able to keep up with specialization and weapon training, but they'll be fighting an up-hill battle. Rangers wouldn't hurt so much since they would get enough utility magic to make up for it, and Paladins would feel like the Kings of the World when they got holy sword.

8) There is a soft level cap in place, which ruins the anti-E6 sentiments in your post. Non-magical enemies tend to be low-CR. Without producing custom enemies, and lots of them, the party will basically revolve around fighting low-CR enemies in various quantities; which means that levels will assuredly slow down before the teens. You can advance said enemies, but you basically just end up with more of the same, with bigger numbers to track. There's very little difference between a pair of 3rd level Fighters with no magic duking it out and a pair of 13th level fighters with no magic duking it out.


There is/was a 3.0/5 setting called Midnight. It was expressely a low magic campaign that did its best to both boost the martials to make up for it and nerf the casters while not just flat out removing them.

While I don't necessarily suggest just taking their entire rule set and supplanting Pathfinder with it, i'd consider checking smoe local booksores for 2nd hand copies of the book. They knock the teeth out of spell casters very effectively while still keeping them somewhat relevant and do some other things to keep it all in line. A very good read, campaign setting aside.
(not that I'm against the campaign setting itself- its just not necessary to enjoy the low magic rules the book has in it).

-S


I actually run a low-magic campaign. However i do allow the players to play spell casters - the players are in fact special beings, and therefor should be allowed to have special powers not common to most people.

Magic Items and magic encounters are rare. To account for this i have made a set of house rules to make combat more interesting and make money viable.

1) Hit points is greater at first level, but progress more slowly. I use the following formula: [con + (HD*lvl + con mod)/2

2) Armor as damage reduction

3) ½ BaB as bonus AC

4) Since there will not be much magical healing, the heal skills is suddenly very important. After an encounter you may use the heal skill to patch a character up. The amount heal is equal to ½*heal check. This may only be done once per encounter and can maximum heal a number of hit points equal to hit points lost in last encounter.

5) And finally the most important one, every spell caster have to make a concentration check to see if a spell gets cast. The concentration check DC is equal to 10+2*spell level. Stuff like combat casting increase this DC. You may however prolong the casting time by one step (standard -> full round, full round -> 2 full round and so on) and gain a +2 concentration.
This will make magic more chaotic.

In addition to those rules, i also allow for some special maneuvers and have made some extra feats.

While the campaign has just begun it seems that my players really enjoy it, and the houserules work pretty well. Magic does at leas seem special now. Overall this low-magic campaign is very successful


Kriskras wrote:
4) Since there will not be much magical healing, the heal skills is suddenly very important. After an encounter you may use the heal skill to patch a character up. The amount heal is equal to ½*heal check. This may only be done once per encounter and can maximum heal a number of hit points equal to hit points lost in last encounter.

Reminds me a lot of Neverwinter Nights, the old 3.0 based PC game from the early 2000s (I love this game actually, and still pull it out to play occasionally with my brother). The Heal skill in that game was legitimately awesome. To use it, you had to use a healer's kit (which stacked in groups of 10). When you used a healer's kit on a target, they recovered HP equal to your Heal check result + the bonus provided from the Healer's kit (beginning at +1 and rising). If you were outside of combat, it was assumed you take 20 for best healing possible. In addition, this could also remove diseases and poisons (but not heal any ability damage already done).

It went from being marginally useful in tabletop to being an awesome method for healing. Most clerics and classes that could buy full ranks in heal had a reason to do so. It was arguably the most efficient form of consumable healing (since it did require a healer's kit to use in NWN), and was invaluable for patching up your party or saving spell slots after encounters (in the early NWN, resting is as easy as not having any visible enemies nearby, but resting was nerfed in later patches, which was entirely reasonable :P).


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

With no casters at all, the game would not really work as is. The ability to heal magically is a base assumption in the system. At higher levels the ability to solve problems magically is a base assumption. You would definately have to make alot of changes if you were to eliminate all casters. Now if you just eliminate 9level casters, you can probably proceed normally (though without signficant amounts of magic items you would again run into trouble at higher levels).

The reason E6 is such a common suggestion is the E6 is still within that realm of rational behavior. After 6th level the characters even non-magic ones are outside of actual human ability. They can do things that mortal men and women cannot do. You just cant get that gritty down to earth feel people looking for a low magic game are usually looking for.


I suppose it depends in part what you consider a 'low magic' setting. There are worlds like Conan's or George Martin's 'Game of Thrones' where any magic at all is on the periphery, kept mysterious and awe-inspiring and usually only in the purview of great figures in history... then there are settings like Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time where magic is an intrinsic part of life, but not every day life. Magic wielders are held in awe, fear or suspicion and the majority of folks go their whole lives without even witnessing magic, but it is still a major part of the world with well understood rules (if not well-understood by all). All of that of course contrasts with the Monty-Hall, trade magic like playing cards campaign worlds most D&D or Pathfinder games are played in.

We run what we consider to be a 'low magic' campaign, but for us what that means is something closer to Robert Jordan's world than George Martin's.

Basic rules:
- We've replaced Clerics with a home-brew class we call 'Priests' who are more primarily caster than combatant. They tend to populate only the higher hierarchies of a particular faith.
- Divine Magic can not be used to make Scrolls, Wands, etc.
- Powerful magic items are unique, rare and all have a purpose and a history. They often progress with the character, 'unlocking' abilities and bonuses as the wielder levels up.
- Very minor generic magical items can be bought and sold as charms or potions, but only in certain places and by certain people or organizations. They are expensive and having a person who can get you even limited access to such things is often a campaign reward or achievement.
- There are a few magical organizations, one even rules a kingdom, but for the most part arcane casters are rare and viewed with suspicion.
- We use the slow XP progression.
- Paladins can be of any alignment so long as they follow the 'code' of their deity. they are viewed as champions of a particular faith, not necessarily champions of good.

You may want to keep casters as they are, but do a 'line-item veto' of what spells are available to them, particularly when it comes to Paladins and Rangers. That might be the easiest way to tone down the magic without dramatically re=writing the rules.

We haven't had to mess with our encounter CR's, mainly because the characters tend to be well-built and well-played, but since we home-brew everything anyway, encounters tend to be tailor made to the party's strength. I will say that generally the lower-magic your campaign is, the easier it is to GM and adjudicate.


Kolokotroni wrote:
The reason E6 is such a common suggestion is the E6 is still within that realm of rational behavior. After 6th level the characters even non-magic ones are outside of actual human ability. They can do things that mortal men and women cannot do. You just cant get that gritty down to earth feel people looking for a low magic game are usually looking for.

Unfortunately, most arcane casters flat-out suck until 7th level or higher. I would have no interest in playing one knowing that I'd always have such a limited selection of spells in addition to basically being defenseless.

Now a thought might be to simply limit spell-casting classes to 6th level or higher but not the characters themselves... i.e. you could get as high as a 6th level wizard but then you'd have to multi-class. Knowing that, many would likely include multi-classing in their character builds from the get-go.


Mercurial wrote:
Kolokotroni wrote:
The reason E6 is such a common suggestion is the E6 is still within that realm of rational behavior. After 6th level the characters even non-magic ones are outside of actual human ability. They can do things that mortal men and women cannot do. You just cant get that gritty down to earth feel people looking for a low magic game are usually looking for.

Unfortunately, most arcane casters flat-out suck until 7th level or higher. I would have no interest in playing one knowing that I'd always have such a limited selection of spells in addition to basically being defenseless.

Now a thought might be to simply limit spell-casting classes to 6th level or higher but not the characters themselves... i.e. you could get as high as a 6th level wizard but then you'd have to multi-class. Knowing that, many would likely include multi-classing in their character builds from the get-go.

I'm actually fine playing in E6 games as casters, since they get a nice feat option in E6 to get additional spells per day and spells known and such. Once you've hit 6th level, you have the ability to blast efficiently, and have a variety of useful save or suck or battlefield control (hideous laughter, sleet storm, stinking cloud, etc), stuff like fly and invisibility, etc, etc, etc. Now you just get more of it.


This alternative hit point system has gone a long way to alleviate the constant need for healing and has made for a much more dramatic and enjoyable game for us:

Alternate Hit Points & Healing:

Damage from critical hits, sneak attacks, bleed effects and failed saving throws are considered Lethal damage. All else is considered Non-Lethal.

Lethal damage heals at a rate of 1 HP/extended rest or 1+Con modifier (minimum 1)/full day of rest. Non-Lethal damage heals at a rate of 50% after a short rest and 100% after an extended rest.

Characters who have suffered more than 50% of their HP in Non-Lethal damage are Fatigued.
Characters who have suffered more than 50% of their HP in Lethal damage are Exhausted. Spell casters Exhausted in this way must make Concentration checks to cast spells.

Characters who go below 0 hit points from purely Non-Lethal damage fall unconscious for a number of rounds equal to their negative number of hit points, waking with 1.
Characters who go below 0 hit points and have taken lethal damage fall unconscious and begin to die. They must make a Fortitude save every round with the DC = to their number of negative hit points to stay alive. They can be stabilized through True Healing or with a successful Healing skill check.

True healing takes energy from the person healed to function, leaving them Exhausted for a number of rounds equal to the amount of Lethal damage healed (healing Non-Lethal damage has no negative effects). Lethal damage is always healed first with any overflow affecting Non-Lethal damage next. Lay on Hands and Cure spells are considered True Healing while Channeled Energy affects only Non-Lethal damage.

Heal potions are rare and expensive. They heal 100% of Lethal damage and also Neutralize all poisons and diseases. They may be half-drunk to heal 50% of Lethal damage and provide an additional saving throw against poison or disease with a +4 circumstance bonus. Characters are not Fatigued after using healing potions. There are no such things as wands, potions or scrolls that duplicate divine magic, including Cure spells.

The Healing skill - the way we work it is if you're 'under the care' of someone with the Healing skill, you can use their Wisdom modifier instead of your Constitution modifier or you can choose take a +1 bonus when determining how many lethal damage points you heal naturally after each extended rest or each full day of rest. A character with the Healing skill can also either make a roll to stabilize you (against the same DC), eliminating the need for continued Fort saves that day, or can add their Wisdom mod to your Fort saves every round as you fight to stay alive. It makes the healing skill both useful and at times quite dramatic.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
LeDM wrote:

After further consideration, perhaps I would even limit Rangers and Paladins to their non-casting variants (Skirmisher, and Warrior of the Holy Light respectively).

I guess this would make having a Paladin in the party a necessity since at least they can heal a bit. I would also seriously consider removing the restriction on paladins to be lawful good and changing it to be any good alignment (or anti-paladins to be any evil).

Or you really think this through. The thing is if you want to do this right, Paladins themselves are an expression of high magic.

Take a tip from the Conan and Red Sonja modules TSR put out. All you need to do is put in a system of rapid hit point recovery so that characters can survive more than one fight, and simply don't pick monsters that require the magic you're removing to combat.


Ashiel wrote:


A little voice inside my head screams out "now we see the truth, BBEGs can be magic but the party can't!", but I'm going to assume you wouldn't actually do that; because only lame DMs do that; and I'm sure you are LeDM and not LameDM.

Hahaha. Awesome. :) I don't know if I totally agree with you (I was thinking more along the lines of mortals of Middle Earth vs. Sauron sort of thing, which I think would be totally awesome and not-lame) but I see your point. BBEG casters would have to be very rare indeed in a low-magic setting... otherwise it would get old fast.

Seriously though, thanks for the responses everyone. There's some really awesome ideas here, but I'm beginning to see why other such discussions seem to tend towards "use a different game system".

I especially like the alternate healing rules, and the alternate HP systems, but I don't know if this is the best time for me to introduce such things into my game. All my players are new to pen&paper, and Pathefinder is hellaciosly complicated as is.


look at the black company roleplaying supplement.
(its dark, and low magic)
(3.5 though)


LeDM wrote:


Seriously though, thanks for the responses everyone. There's some really awesome ideas here, but I'm beginning to see why other such discussions seem to tend towards "use a different game system".

I especially like the alternate healing rules, and the alternate HP systems, but I don't know if this is the best time for me to introduce such things into my game. All my players are new to pen&paper, and Pathefinder is hellaciosly complicated as is.

Might actually be the best time, before they get too used to any one thing and then have to re-learn.

Definitely recommend the alternate hit point system. Also, I've found in low magic campaigns, the BBEG's primary henchman is the best place to tuck 'the' caster. In fact, we did an entire campaign around the idea that there was this dark and shadowy organization of spellcasters who put themselves in position to serve various nefarious characters, secretly manipulating them all to their own greater ends.


The Grittier Rules PDF is what I would use for a low-magic game, with someof the suggestions other people have posted.

Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Publishing / Pathfinder® / Pathfinder RPG / Suggestions/House Rules/Homebrew / [Low Magic] Eliminate primary casters without unbalancing the game? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.