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The Wormwood Mutiny (GM Reference)


Skull & Shackles

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Osirion

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
ArchAnjel wrote:

I was going over the map of the Wormwood last night and something occurred to me... how the hell do the ship's non-officer crew get back and forth between the main and middle decks?

I noticed this, too. My plan is to designate one square of cargo hatch as opened with a ladder in place. In case of a storm, that would be closed and both gratings canvassed to keep out water, and the officers quarters would have to be used for passage instead. They will also bring down the topmasts when storms approach.


Mornings and evenings the crew uses the stairs in the officers' cabin. It doesn't come out and say it (or maybe it does, I'm blanking now), but it appears that the ship anchors at night. Which makes sense in island-ladened waters, don't really wanna run into one in the dark. Even into the 1800s ships would lay to at night, maybe under light sail to keep steerage. (And I'm lead to believe that a ship not under motion wallows about rather sickening in any sort of swell, so you'd want at least some headway if you weren't anchored.)

At nights Owlbear keeps guard over the stairs.

As for relieving themselves, well, that's what chamber pots are for ... or the bilge.

"Ugh, pumping duty again. Man look at the size of that rat floating in the water."
"That's no rat."


Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber
Zaranorth wrote:
Mornings and evenings the crew uses the stairs in the officers' cabin. It doesn't come out and say it (or maybe it does, I'm blanking now), but it appears that the ship anchors at night.

Its in the description of the Boatswain on page 66.

Osirion

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Zaranorth wrote:
As for relieving themselves, well, that's what chamber pots are for ... or the bilge.

Many ships ran a set of lines from the bowsprit back to the sides of the ship, on both sides. The crew would climb out onto a line and hang on to another line and take care of business, into the ocean. This is why bathrooms on ships are called "heads", because the 'bathroom' was these lines at the head. Experienced sailors would use the lines on the downwind side of the ship...


WampaX wrote:
Zaranorth wrote:
Mornings and evenings the crew uses the stairs in the officers' cabin. It doesn't come out and say it (or maybe it does, I'm blanking now), but it appears that the ship anchors at night.
Its in the description of the Boatswain on page 66.

Ah ha! Thanks, I thought I had read that somewhere, but I was failing looking for it.


Chris P. wrote:
Zaranorth wrote:
As for relieving themselves, well, that's what chamber pots are for ... or the bilge.

Many ships ran a set of lines from the bowsprit back to the sides of the ship, on both sides. The crew would climb out onto a line and hang on to another line and take care of business, into the ocean. This is why bathrooms on ships are called "heads", because the 'bathroom' was these lines at the head. Experienced sailors would use the lines on the downwind side of the ship...

Right, but with the assumption that the crew is basically locked in the middeck at night with no access to the heads, they've got limited options.

Edit to add: The galley was also near the front of the ship so that wind would keep the smoke off the deck. I've been tempted to redraw the plans. Move the officers below the captain, galley and maybe stores forward. Then the hands would be "before the mast" and the officers aft.

Osirion

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
WampaX wrote:
Zaranorth wrote:
Mornings and evenings the crew uses the stairs in the officers' cabin. It doesn't come out and say it (or maybe it does, I'm blanking now), but it appears that the ship anchors at night.
Its in the description of the Boatswain on page 66.

The Wormwood may sail only during the day because it has such a reduced crew and is in no hurry. I'm not going to question the officers on this point... nor on why they choose to lock up the bow cabins for themselves...

If they were giving chase (or running away) then I expect they would sail around the clock.

Andoran

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

No one has posted a spreadsheet of the Wormwood's crew yet? I disbelieve.

I better get busy...


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
ArchAnjel wrote:

I was going over the map of the Wormwood last night and something occurred to me... how the hell do the ship's non-officer crew get back and forth between the main and middle decks?

There are only two sets of stairs that lead from the main to the middle deck - one in the Officer's Quarters and one in the Captain's Quarters. Both are kept locked and trapped with the Officer's Quarters having Owlbear chained to the bottom of it expressly to prevent anyone from coming up the stairs into the Officer's Quarters.

Do they get hauled up and down through the cargo hatches? That seems a bit unusual.

Am I missing something obvious? Should this be hand-waved? Do the captain and/or officers let the entire crew come traipsing through their quarters every time a crew member needs to relieve themselves?

The Stairs to the left of the A6 and A10 don't match up either! The A10 stairs go the wrong way.

Qadira

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Rexx wrote:

No one has posted a spreadsheet of the Wormwood's crew yet? I disbelieve.

I better get busy...

Please do. I really would like to borrow it. I started one but it's not that complicated or detailed, not much time to work on it.


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I've come up with some additional punishments; for those GM's who want to use it: The Boo Box, and the Gauntlet! (Based off the movie Hook, and real life pirate punishments, respectively)

The Boo Box is an appropriate punishment for the 2nd or third time a character falls asleep on duty, or if they are caught lying to an officer of the ship.
Running the Gauntlet could serve as a punishment for crew members fighting, or for selling or spilling your ration of rum (after the first time you're caught).

Boo Box - This oversized wooden chest can fit all but the largest Medium creatures. Crew members are typically bound before being placed in the boo box. The boo box contains a small opening (it looks similar to a chimney) that crew members use to put vermin (bilge spiders, bilge rats, sea snakes) or foul substances (rotten fish heads, bird crap, snot, and worse) in the box with the crew member. Crew members in the boo box must first make a DC 15 Will Save to avoid becoming shaken for the rest of the day. This is a mind affecting fear effect. Crew members in the boo box must make a DC 15 Fortitude save to avoid becoming sickened, throwing up all over themselves (taking the standard penalty to their saving throws if they failed the first save). This punishment is very humiliating.

Running the Gauntlet: Crew members line up in two rows, and administer 1-2 rope bashes as the offending crew member proceeds down the "gauntlet". With all hands participating, this is a sort of democratic deterrent and an encouragement to work as a team.


WampaX wrote:

The PRD has everything you need on the rum ration effects.

DonalGraeme wrote:

The Fortitude save only affects the possibility of addiction, correct?

It has no impact on the damage or effects of the rum ration at all?

"When a character takes a drug, he immediately gains the effects, an amount of ability damage, and must make a Fortitude save to resist becoming addicted to that drug"

So the fort save is just for the addiction part.

Quote:
Also, the 1d3 Con damage, is that only a temporary effect or does that persist? Because the way I read it it would seem pretty easy for a PC to die from alcohol poisoning well before Day 21. Or does it assume that a PC would spill or dispose of the rum before that happens? Its a relatively easy check, but the penalty for failing is fairly significant, I can easily see six lashes from the cat and a damaged Con score pretty much guaranteeing that a PC enters a spiral of destruction with no easy way out. Especially given how many tasks require DC 10 Con checks.
Reading on in that same paragraph above, the d3 Con heals like normal ability damage, so 1 point should heal a day later, but 2 or 3 points would stick around and force a character drinking their ration to make their fort saves vs addiction at increasing DCs. The PCs should probably watch the rest of the crew and get cues on how they handle the rations, or have an example made of one of the other new recruits so they understand the danger presented by drinking the rum ration each night. On the other hand, they may plan to gain the system and use the CHA boost to help with influence rolls, but they will run the risk of addition and take the CON damage for the next day's task.

That's insanely harsh. No wonder the captain's looking for more crew. They're required to drink a poison that will likely kill them in a couple of weeks. (Average of 2 Con/drink, heal 1/day => -7Con/week)

Or do repeated doses not stack the Con damage?
PRD wrote:
While taking multiple doses of a drug at once rarely has any benefit, taking additional doses as the effects wear off renew those effects but increase the ability damage and potential for addiction.

That implies the benefits don't stack but the ability damage does.

Sure you can probably come up with ways to avoid it, but that breaks genre: Pirate ships full of pirates desperately trying to avoid drinking doesn't match either literature or reality.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Hmmm...I would suggest maybe use the GMG stats for alcohol on a per-drink basis rather than the 'night of drinking' that entry actually represents. Probably more realistic as well as actually survivable by a dwarf barbarian.


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Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber
thejeff wrote:

That's insanely harsh. No wonder the captain's looking for more crew. They're required to drink a poison that will likely kill them in a couple of weeks. (Average of 2 Con/drink, heal 1/day => -7Con/week)

Or do repeated doses not stack the Con damage?
PRD wrote:
While taking multiple doses of a drug at once rarely has any benefit, taking additional doses as the effects wear off renew those effects but increase the ability damage and potential for addiction.

That implies the benefits don't stack but the ability damage does.

Sure you can probably come up with ways to avoid it, but that breaks genre: Pirate ships full of pirates desperately trying to avoid drinking doesn't match either literature or reality.

Without breaking the genre, you might want to take the second sentence from the rum ration description and let the pirates water down the ration to grog. This could possibly remove or limit the block as a drug.

I'm probably going to say that if watered down to grog, the Fort save is reduced to 2, a +1 CHA bonus lasts for an hour, it does 1 CON damage, but the fatigue still sets in for d8. This way the pirates remain docile and controllable per the description, but won't run into the cumulative CON damage issue of drinking the ration straight up every evening.


Would someone from Paizo be able to chime in on this? I've done the math and frankly the only way for most PCs to survive the rations for 20 days is to dump their rum. Is that what is intended?

Sure the PCs could have Sandara use a lesser restoration or two to fix people up, but that seems an odd mechanic to fix an issue like this. Especially since she doesn't have that spell prepared, and no mention is made of it in the AP.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Yeah, the rules for addiction definitely seem to make alcohol into a highly lethal toxin. One drink of alcohol per night is likely to kill the average person in about 10 days.

I will probably adopt the changes suggested by WampaX even without watering it down.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Also raises an eyebrow at how Fishguts has lived so long as he's always smashed.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Cards, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
ArchAnjel wrote:

Yeah, the rules for addiction definitely seem to make alcohol into a highly lethal toxin. One drink of alcohol per night is likely to kill the average person in about 10 days.

I will probably adopt the changes suggested by WampaX even without watering it down.

So just how much rum would be "historically accurate"?

The British Navy introduced the rum ration somewhere in the 17th century (drinking rum from the colonies was more patriotic than drinking French brandy), at which time the ration was half a pint a day! (Imperial pints, of course, issued half at noon and half in the evening). That works out to around two quarts a week. Over the years the ration was reduced, at first to 1/4 pint/day, and eventually to 1/8 pint a day (until it was finally eliminated in 1970). That would generally be rum of around 100 proof, not the 80 proof typically served in bars today.

Junior ratings (which is probably how most 1st-level party members would be ranked) would often get their rum watered down (one part rum, two parts water - a.k.a. grog), and lime juice and spices were frequently added. That's still a significant rate of alcohol consumption - about equivalent to a bottle a week of 21st-century spirits. Senior ranks (such as the named officers) would be closer to half a bottle a day if they drank their entitlement. And, of course, before an anticipated battle a double ration would be issued.

Physical effort does burn off alcohol faster than just trying to sleep it off, but even so that's a lot of alcohol to get out of the system.

Andoran

Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Sandara might be able to provide long-term care to the PCs, allowing them to burn off 2 points per night, and if needed, she could cast a lesser restoration for a particularly bad binge. (She probably does the same to herself every couple of days.) That would keep the PCs pretty stable, for the most part.

I too agree, though, that it's a rather ridiculous mechanic.

Paizo Employee Senior Developer

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The rum ration is designed to be pretty hard-core - it should be something the PCs probably try to avoid, as soon as they realize its negative effects (either with the relatively easy Stealth check to pour it out or by choosing to take more easily-healed lashes instead). In addition, it provides yet another reason to hate the Wormwood and its officers. The rum ration also gives PCs a difficult choice to make: if they drink the rum, they get the Charisma bonus that can help them influence other crew members, but they'll suffer the negative effects of the rum.

That said, if you want to keep the rum ration but reduce its negative effects, WampaX provides a good alternative with his "watered down" rum. Alternatively, you could reduce the rum's Con damage to 1d2, thereby making it easier for a PC to heal the Con damage overnight, but still be dangerous. You could further reduce the compounding effects by allowing the PCs to heal 1 point of Con damage overnight, and an additional point of Con damage during the day while they work. A PC can drink the rum ration some nights, but he might want to "sit out" the rum ration occasionally to heal some accumulated damage.

In our office campaign, as soon as the PCs realized the danger, they tried to avoid drinking the rum at all costs - except for when they wanted that Charisma bonus, that is! :)


Rob McCreary wrote:

The rum ration is designed to be pretty hard-core - it should be something the PCs probably try to avoid, as soon as they realize its negative effects (either with the relatively easy Stealth check to pour it out or by choosing to take more easily-healed lashes instead). In addition, it provides yet another reason to hate the Wormwood and its officers. The rum ration also gives PCs a difficult choice to make: if they drink the rum, they get the Charisma bonus that can help them influence other crew members, but they'll suffer the negative effects of the rum.

That said, if you want to keep the rum ration but reduce its negative effects, WampaX provides a good alternative with his "watered down" rum. Alternatively, you could reduce the rum's Con damage to 1d2, thereby making it easier for a PC to heal the Con damage overnight, but still be dangerous. You could further reduce the compounding effects by allowing the PCs to heal 1 point of Con damage overnight, and an additional point of Con damage during the day while they work. A PC can drink the rum ration some nights, but he might want to "sit out" the rum ration occasionally to heal some accumulated damage.

In our office campaign, as soon as the PCs realized the danger, they tried to avoid drinking the rum at all costs - except for when they wanted that Charisma bonus, that is! :)

It's not so much that the PCs can't avoid it, there are plenty of ways to do so and I can see that it's a fun little addition to the game. It's that everyone else in the crew has to be avoiding it too. All of the other pirates, newly press-ganged or long-term, friendly to the PCs or hostile, must be avoiding the rum at least half the time or they'll die of alcohol poisoning before the 20 days are up.

It could be kind of a funny scene, all the pirates trying to ditch their drinks and, at the same time, rat on everyone else who's ditching their drink, but it really clashes with the usual image of pirates as loving their rum if they have to be forced to drink it and die like flies if they can't avoid it.
Bottom line: The captain's plan to force every one to drink the rum would result in killing off his crew. That doesn't make sense. He wants docile crew, not dead ones.


Rob McCreary wrote:

The rum ration is designed to be pretty hard-core - it should be something the PCs probably try to avoid, as soon as they realize its negative effects (either with the relatively easy Stealth check to pour it out or by choosing to take more easily-healed lashes instead). In addition, it provides yet another reason to hate the Wormwood and its officers. The rum ration also gives PCs a difficult choice to make: if they drink the rum, they get the Charisma bonus that can help them influence other crew members, but they'll suffer the negative effects of the rum.

That said, if you want to keep the rum ration but reduce its negative effects, WampaX provides a good alternative with his "watered down" rum. Alternatively, you could reduce the rum's Con damage to 1d2, thereby making it easier for a PC to heal the Con damage overnight, but still be dangerous. You could further reduce the compounding effects by allowing the PCs to heal 1 point of Con damage overnight, and an additional point of Con damage during the day while they work. A PC can drink the rum ration some nights, but he might want to "sit out" the rum ration occasionally to heal some accumulated damage.

In our office campaign, as soon as the PCs realized the danger, they tried to avoid drinking the rum at all costs - except for when they wanted that Charisma bonus, that is! :)

I understand why you have it in, I just think the tuning is a bit off. Not so much for the PCs, but for the NPCs especially. I will probably just do it as 1 Con damage and keep the other effects. Becoming addicted, with its attendant -2 Con penalty should be reason enough to avoid it, in addition to the fatigue effects.


WampaX wrote:
Zaranorth wrote:
Mornings and evenings the crew uses the stairs in the officers' cabin. It doesn't come out and say it (or maybe it does, I'm blanking now), but it appears that the ship anchors at night.
Its in the description of the Boatswain on page 66.

I commented on the anchoring at night thing before, but I've looked a little closer now.

It might make sense in the early days of the voyage, when they're in among the islands, but according to the "Voyage of the Wormwood" (pg 24) after the storm they're "sailing into the open Fever Sea for the remainder of the voyage." You definitely sail through the night during the storm and apparently on day 20 as well as you're chasing the Man's Promise.

I assume you can't anchor in the open sea and while you could heave-to for the night, I can't see why you would. At sea, you'd still want a night watch, though it could be small if you weren't sailing. Even at anchor, you'd want someone, a trusted officer and a couple of crew on watch. You are in the Pirate islands after all.
I'd also be worried about some of the impressed crew trying to swim to shore on one of the islands, if you anchored with no watch.

It seems to me that the schedule is imposed more for the convenience of the PCs than anything else.

Andoran

Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Is there any way for the PCs to discover Grok's tendency to leave the door unlocked other than just seeing her do it? (i.e., Would this be information that would be available through a gather info Diplomacy check, presumably at the same DC 15 that the other NPCs have?)

What about her lack of knowledge of some of the goods in her store?

How and when can PCs make the requisite gather information and Sense Motive checks to learn more about their fellow shipmates? Is it a separate ship action, or is it just rolled into the "influence" ship action?


Shisumo wrote:


What about her lack of knowledge of some of the goods in her store?

I was just thinking about this same issue. I highly doubt my PCs are going to be asking for any candles to randomly find one that's magic...


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Has anybody completed a spreadsheet for the Wormwood crew? I was probably going to work on one this weekend, but if anyone has already got one built that would be awesome. I'm pretty sure it would be a popular download by GMs prepping for S&S vol 1.


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NPC sheet

Is a work in progress. It has some rolled loot for their lockers and their starting attitude towards the PCs. The second page has some info on the ship.

Suggestions to make it a little better and more usable will be considered :)

Edit: Some things are changed/renamed to match our game, and I took some liberties with their motivations, and other special things. It's not perfect, but it works ok for me.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Ayrphish,
Nice work sir. It has everything that I was looking for. You mentioned that it is a WIP; the only NPCs that I noticed were missing were some of the officers, which are easy enough to add.

Again, thanks for the spreadsheet and putting in your time!


No problem. Glad it is helpful.


Ayrphish wrote:
No problem. Glad it is helpful.

Much obliged good sir, this looks like just what I needed.


thejeff wrote:
WampaX wrote:
Zaranorth wrote:
Mornings and evenings the crew uses the stairs in the officers' cabin. It doesn't come out and say it (or maybe it does, I'm blanking now), but it appears that the ship anchors at night.
Its in the description of the Boatswain on page 66.

I commented on the anchoring at night thing before, but I've looked a little closer now.

It might make sense in the early days of the voyage, when they're in among the islands, but according to the "Voyage of the Wormwood" (pg 24) after the storm they're "sailing into the open Fever Sea for the remainder of the voyage." You definitely sail through the night during the storm and apparently on day 20 as well as you're chasing the Man's Promise.

I assume you can't anchor in the open sea and while you could heave-to for the night, I can't see why you would. At sea, you'd still want a night watch, though it could be small if you weren't sailing. Even at anchor, you'd want someone, a trusted officer and a couple of crew on watch. You are in the Pirate islands after all.
I'd also be worried about some of the impressed crew trying to swim to shore on one of the islands, if you anchored with no watch.

It seems to me that the schedule is imposed more for the convenience of the PCs than anything else.

Yeah, I'm considering a first and second dog watch. Two crewman per watch. Great time to sneak around or for somebody to "accidentally" fall overboard. Screw up bad enough and you get assigned to both watches and still have a full day's work to do (not to mention having just done one) and thus probably suffer from fatigue.

I'm also working on an alternate deck plan. (Yeah, yeah, but there's some stuff that just bugs me.)

Shadow Lodge

Re: Rum Rations

I'm considering adding another Day Ship Action to help with the rum rations balance, curious as to other's thoughts:

Slack Off: Take a –4 penalty on all checks for a job’s daily task. You gain 1 ability point as if you had rested and automatically pass any Con checks to not be fatigued.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

On Master Scourge's stat block, it lists him having a silver wedding ring worth 25 gp, 14 pp, 29 gp. I'm assuming that it's a typo and only worth 25 gp.

RPG Superstar 2011 Top 16

Confused me at first too.

Master Scourge has the following items in his pockets:
- one wedding ring made of silver that is valued at 25 gp
- forteen platinum coins in loose change
- twenty gold coins in loose change

Qadira

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Ayrphish wrote:

NPC sheet

Is a work in progress. It has some rolled loot for their lockers and their starting attitude towards the PCs. The second page has some info on the ship.

Suggestions to make it a little better and more usable will be considered :)

Edit: Some things are changed/renamed to match our game, and I took some liberties with their motivations, and other special things. It's not perfect, but it works ok for me.

Nice work. The only thing I would add is rolling for work that NPC are doing on a given day. That way PC's could possibly work along side NPC's if they both get the same job roll, but this can be roleplayed out as well. I just thought it would be easier during the day for th pc's to interact with the npcs.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Erik Freund wrote:

Confused me at first too.

Master Scourge has the following items in his pockets:
- one wedding ring made of silver that is valued at 25 gp
- forteen platinum coins in loose change
- twenty gold coins in loose change

That makes much more sense, thank you!


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warpi9 wrote:
Ayrphish wrote:

NPC sheet

Is a work in progress. It has some rolled loot for their lockers and their starting attitude towards the PCs. The second page has some info on the ship.

Suggestions to make it a little better and more usable will be considered :)

Edit: Some things are changed/renamed to match our game, and I took some liberties with their motivations, and other special things. It's not perfect, but it works ok for me.

Nice work. The only thing I would add is rolling for work that NPC are doing on a given day. That way PC's could possibly work along side NPC's if they both get the same job roll, but this can be roleplayed out as well. I just thought it would be easier during the day for th pc's to interact with the npcs.

One Step ahead of you! (note the formulas on the second sheet for randomizing roles across the NPCs)

Andoran

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Dotted


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Not to beat a dead horse, but on the rum ration question: how can it knock you out in the Heave game?

Unless I'm missing some fundamental rule here, the rum ration needs to have some kind of variable, cumulative, non-lethal effect for this game to be possible, and as written, it doesn't.

Geeking a bit after reading Wikipedia's article on blood alcohol and playing with washington university's blood alcohol level chart: If a rum ration contains 6oz of alcohol - that's 12 normal drinks - one of them is enough to knock out a fast-drinking low-tolerance character, and would leave a slow-drinking high tolerance character sloppy drunk (fatigued).

Playing Heave essentially means consuming a lethal amount of alcohol and trying to make yourself vomit before the alcohol suppresses your gag reflex or knocks you out and you die. I guess that's why they call it heave - Lovely game!


Mothas the Ominous wrote:

Not to beat a dead horse, but on the rum ration question: how can it knock you out in the Heave game?

Unless I'm missing some fundamental rule here, the rum ration needs to have some kind of variable, cumulative, non-lethal effect for this game to be possible, and as written, it doesn't.

Geeking a bit after reading Wikipedia's article on blood alcohol and playing with washington university's blood alcohol level chart: If a rum ration contains 6oz of alcohol - that's 12 normal drinks - one of them is enough to knock out a fast-drinking low-tolerance character, and would leave a slow-drinking high tolerance character sloppy drunk (fatigued).

Playing Heave essentially means consuming a lethal amount of alcohol and trying to make yourself vomit before the alcohol suppresses your gag reflex or knocks you out and you die. I guess that's why they call it heave - Lovely game!

Except there is no mechanism for vomiting or knocking out in the drug/alcohol rules. RAW, all but one player of Heave dies. And he's going to be in really bad shape for a week or more.

Shadow Lodge

thejeff wrote:


Except there is no mechanism for vomiting or knocking out in the drug/alcohol rules. RAW, all but one player of Heave dies. And he's going to be in really bad shape for a week or more.

That is exactly what Mothas said.


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Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

OK - here's my stab at it. It needs tuning, and it's more complex than I like, but it seems to give results close to reality. The crew ends up in varying degrees of drunkedness in the evenings, and the Heave players have a chance of surviving if they don't go more than 3 rounds.

Overly Complex Revised Rum Ration:

Shackles Rum Ration

Type: ingested; Addition: minor, Fortitude DC 5
Price: 2sp
Effects: +1d4 alchemical bonus to Charisma; Sickened 5 hours - 2 hours per point of Con bonus; +1 chest hairs
Damage: Alcohol poisoning, and extend Sickened duration 6 hours per ration consumed after the first.

Alcohol Poisoning
Save: Fortitude DC 10
Onset 10 minutes; Frequency 1 per 10 minutes for 60 minutes
Effects: consuming additional doses adds additional effects
- one ration = Staggered 1 hours.
- two rations = +Stunned 1 hour, save for nausea 1d20 rounds.
- three rations = +Unconscious 1 hour, save for nausea 1d20 rounds.
- four or more rations = +1d3 Con damage, save for nausea 1d20 rounds.
Cure #: 2

Notes: Don't forget that the poison DC increases with multiple doses, as does the duration: consuming 4 doses means rolling saves at DC 16 to avoid all the listed effects up to 24 times.


I like that, it matches my experiences with strong alcohol much better than the current rule. Though it is complicated. :)

It's probably not as harsh as the writer wanted it, but the crew also isn't dropping in droves.


Well, one way that might be easier to manage is just to keep track of if you're addicted.

If you're not addicted, it affects you exactly as listed.
If you are addicted, it only does 1d3-1 con damage but does not give you the charisma bonus.

Makes it much more survivable for the average pirate (and PC!).


So, how are the crew bonuses from friendly and helpful NPCs working out? I like the idea of friendly NPCs helping out and making life on the ship a bit easier, but I'm afraid that the bonus from "helpful" might be a bit too good. Looking at it, it seems like there may be danger of a cascading effect, making it almost trivial to bring hostile NPCs into the fold (not to mention the PCs being unbeatable at pirate games). I'm wondering if this is the intention, or if the assumption is GMs will restrict the bonuses to only help occasionally.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Mort the Cleverly Named wrote:
So, how are the crew bonuses from friendly and helpful NPCs working out? I like the idea of friendly NPCs helping out and making life on the ship a bit easier, but I'm afraid that the bonus from "helpful" might be a bit too good. Looking at it, it seems like there may be danger of a cascading effect, making it almost trivial to bring hostile NPCs into the fold (not to mention the PCs being unbeatable at pirate games). I'm wondering if this is the intention, or if the assumption is GMs will restrict the bonuses to only help occasionally.

Too soon to tell here, but I think that with Scourge and his cronies working against the PC's, that isn't as much of a problem as it looks. I have him actively trying to discredit the PC's with the crew, and his toadies will be doing it too. If I see that my PC's are getting too much influence too fast, then I figure Scourge and his group will notice it too. I'd have Scourge and Plugg split up the friendlies onto different separate work assignments, make sure they're always tired in the evenings, spread the word that being too friendly with the PC's is unhealthy, etc. They'll basically be making opposed influence rolls at that point.

As for the job assists and pirate game bonuses, what I told my group is that while friendly NPC's will help them if they happen to be assigned the same job, and helpful ones will put in a good word for them and let them cheat at the pirate games, there will be real consequences if they get caught at it. Knowing my group, if I stick some friendly NPC's on punitive work assignments, maybe get Sandara beat up for cheating at Heave, that will make them hesitate to ask for too much help.

I'm hoping to have the PC's making progress on influencing the crew, but with the occasional setback to leave things uncertain until near time for the mutiny to happen.

Qadira

I am wondering if I missed something about being able to be armed while on deck...if the PCs get their gear back can they just wear it? I haven't found anything that says no and the NPCs (Presees included) indicate that they have combat gear.

IF they are allowed to carry weapons, why search the PCs for hidden ones during the bilge ambush?


I ran into this problem as well with recovering gear and wondering about the consequences. I know you are issued a weapon later on. I think once they find gear it is okay to have it equipped unless they lose it to a rival or due to some punishment.


With the ambush, I would assume scourge/plugg would confiscate all weapons prior to bilge duty in order to tip the encounter in there favor. My group deserves that much attention for all the punishments that have come there way.


Area C4. The Mire.

The area is listed as CR 4, but only has two CR1's in the block and description. Mistake in the name of the area?

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