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4,651 to 4,698 of 4,698 << first < prev | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | next > last >>
Scarab Sages

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In the Solomon Kane movie, when Kane says that he sailed with Admiral Drake, he's referring to the poem "That One Black Stain" by creator Robert E. Howard. In the poem Kane speaks out against Drake's execution of Sir Thomas Doughty in 1578 Patagonia, South America, hence why Kane says "That didn't end well."


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Small Soldiers is a 1998 American science fiction action film directed by Joe Dante. The film revolves around two adolescents who get caught in the middle of a war between two factions of sentient action figures, the Gorgonites and the Commando Elite. The voice actors for four of the six Commando Elites (George Kennedy, Ernest Borgnine, Jim Brown, and Clint Walker) were all cast members from the 1967 war film The Dirty Dozen. The voice actors for three of the five Gorgonites (Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, and Harry Shearer) were cast members from the 1984 film This Is Spinal Tap. Actor Frank Langella, who portrayed Archer, the leader of the Gorgonites, also played another toy-related character, the villainous Skeletor, in 1987's Masters Of The Universe (based on the "He-Man" series of action figures).


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Most of the launch sequence of the Jupiter 2 at the beginning of the third season is the crash sequence of the original episode (using the Gemini 12 model from the first un-aired pilot.) run in reverse.


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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Most of the launch sequence of the Jupiter 2 at the beginning of the third season is the crash sequence of the original episode (using the Gemini 12 model from the first un-aired pilot.) run in reverse.

What series is this from?


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Sharoth wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Most of the launch sequence of the Jupiter 2 at the beginning of the third season is the crash sequence of the original episode (using the Gemini 12 model from the first un-aired pilot.) run in reverse.
What series is this from?

Lost In Space, maybe? That's the only Jupiter 2 I can think of.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Sharoth wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Most of the launch sequence of the Jupiter 2 at the beginning of the third season is the crash sequence of the original episode (using the Gemini 12 model from the first un-aired pilot.) run in reverse.
What series is this from?
Lost In Space, maybe? That's the only Jupiter 2 I can think of.

That is what I was thinking too. But you never know.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Stephen King owns two neighboring houses in Bangor. He wanted to build an underground tunnel with a trolley you could ride between them. When asked my, he replied, "because I can".

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Aberzombie wrote:
Stephen King owns two neighboring houses in Bangor. He wanted to build an underground tunnel with a trolley you could ride between them. When asked my, he replied, "because I can".

Did he succeed?


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Aberzombie wrote:
Stephen King owns two neighboring houses in Bangor. He wanted to build an underground tunnel with a trolley you could ride between them. When asked my, he replied, "because I can".

Swiss artist H.R. Giger (famous for his work on the Alien films) had a lifelong fascination with trains, and eventually designed and built an oversized (7-1/4 gauge) model train set that ran through his house and garden.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
David M Mallon wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Stephen King owns two neighboring houses in Bangor. He wanted to build an underground tunnel with a trolley you could ride between them. When asked my, he replied, "because I can".
Swiss artist H.R. Giger (famous for his work on the Alien films) had a lifelong fascination with trains, and eventually designed and built an oversized (7-1/4 gauge) model train set that ran through his house and garden.

There's a BBQ joint not far from me that has a model train running on overhead track throughout the dining area.


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A glimpse at Rod Stewart's massive train set

Rumour has it that, when on tour, he books a second hotel room to accommodate his trains. I'm not sure how true that is.

Neil Young is also an enthusiast, apparently.

Liberty's Edge

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Martin Van Buren was the first U. S. President who was born a U. S. citizen. He was also the first President (only President as far as I know) whose first language was not English.


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Theconiel wrote:
He was also the first President (only President as far as I know) whose first language was not English.

You are indeed correct-- Martin Van Buren, born Maarten van Buren in 1782 in Kinderhook, New York, spoke only Dutch as a child, and continued to speak Dutch at home as an adult.

Theconiel wrote:
Martin Van Buren was the first U. S. President who was born a U. S. citizen.

Yes and no-- Van Buren was the first president born after the Declaration of Independence (1776), but also before the ratification of the U.S. Constitution (1789). In 1782, the United States were just that-- a group of 13 sovereign entities overseen by a federal congress under the Articles of Confederation.

Technically, Van Buren would have been a natural-born citizen of the State of New York. However, the clause in the Constitution that requires the president to be a “natural born” citizen exempted foreign-born citizens living in the United States at the time the Constitution was adopted in 1788. The 12th President of the United States, Zachary Taylor (born 1784) also falls into this strange in-between category.

The first president to be unequivocally a natural-born citizen was the 10th President of the United States, John Tyler, born in 1790.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Sharoth wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Most of the launch sequence of the Jupiter 2 at the beginning of the third season is the crash sequence of the original episode (using the Gemini 12 model from the first un-aired pilot.) run in reverse.
What series is this from?
Lost In Space, maybe? That's the only Jupiter 2 I can think of.

Yappers. In the original unaired pilot for LIS, the spacecraft was called the Gemini 12. It's more than just a rename, the Gemini 12 only had one deck, and the model reflects that.

More Trivia, the Gemini 12 model was rediscovered after 35 years and recently completed a renovation at about the same time as Star Trek's U.S.S. Enterprise. It's going to start making convention tours. Apparantly it's last TV appearance was when both it and the Jupiter 2 model were used to top off underwater sksyscrapers in "City Beneath The Sea" a 1980s TV movie.


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Eight Presidents of the United States were born as British subjects:

George Washington (1), b. 1732, Bridges Creek, Colony of Virginia
John Adams (2), b. 1735, Braintree, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Thomas Jefferson (3), b. 1743, Shadwell, Colony of Virginia
James Madison (4), b. 1751, Port Conway, Colony of Virginia
James Monroe (5), b. 1758, Monroe Hall, Colony of Virginia
John Quincy Adams (6), b. 1767, Braintree, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Andrew Jackson (7), b. 1767, Waxhaws region, Province of North Carolina (disputed)
William Henry Harrison (9), b. 1773, Charles City, Colony of Virginia

Two presidents were born under the Articles of Confederation, before the Constitution was ratified:

Martin Van Buren (8), b. 1782, Kinderhook, State of New York
Zachary Taylor (12), b. 1784, Barboursville, Commonwealth of Virginia


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There was no official office of President of the United States under the Articles of Confederation, only a President of the Congress, an office which had carried over from the pre-war Continental Congress. There were three incarnations of the Continental Congress, and a total of 14 presidents in 16 terms (Peyton Randolph and John Hancock served non-consecutive terms): [name (number) state/colony, term of office (notable event during term):]

1st Continental Congress (1774):
Peyton Randolph (1), Colony of Virginia, 5 Sept. 1774 - 22 Oct. 1774
Henry Middleton (2), Colony of South Carolina, 22 Oct. 1774 - 26 Oct. 1774 (Petition to the King for Redress of Grievances drafted and signed)

2nd Continental Congress (1775-1781):
Peyton Randolph (3), Colony of Virginia, 10 May 1775 - 24 May 1775
John Hancock (4), Massachusetts Bay Colony, 24 May 1775 - 29 Oct. 1777 (Declaration of Independence drafted and signed, Articles of Confederation drafted)
Henry Laurens (5), Colony of South Carolina, 1 Nov. 1777 - 9 Dec. 1778
John Jay (6), Province of New York, 10 Dec. 1778 - 28 Sept. 1779
Samuel Huntington (7), Connecticut Colony, 28 Sept. 1779 - 10 July 1781 (Articles of Confederation ratified)

Congress of the Confederation (1781-1789):
Thomas McKean (8), State of Delaware, 10 July 1781 - 5 Nov. 1781
John Hanson (9), State of Maryland, 5 Nov. 1781 - 4 Nov. 1782
Elias Boudinot (10), State of New Jersey, 4 Nov. 1782 - 3 Nov. 1783
Thomas Mifflin (11), Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 3 Nov. 1783 - 3 June 1784
Richard Henry Lee (12), Commonwealth of Virginia, 30 Nov. 1784 - 4 Nov. 1785
John Hancock (13), State of Massachusetts, 23 Nov. 1785 - 5 June 1786
Nathaniel Gorham (14), State of Massachusetts, 6 June 1786 - 3 Nov. 1786
Arthur St. Clair (15), Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 2 Feb. 1787 - 4 Nov. 1787 (United States Constitution drafted)
Cyrus Griffin (16), Commonwealth of Virginia, 22 Jan. 1788 - 15 Nov. 1788 (United States Constitution ratified by first state)


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A list of every film reference in Joss Whedon & Drew Goddard's The Cabin In The Woods (2012), with video


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The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles first appeared in an American comic book published by Mirage Studios in 1984 in Dover, New Hampshire. The concept arose from a humorous drawing sketched out by artist/writer Kevin Eastman during a casual evening of brainstorming and bad television with writer/artist Peter Laird. Using money from a tax refund, together with a loan from Eastman’s uncle, the young artists self-published a single-issue comic intended to parody four of the most popular comics of the early 1980s: Marvel Comics’ Daredevil and New Mutants, Dave Sim’s Cerebus, and Frank Miller’s Ronin.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

As a boy, actor Tom Felton owned a pet chinchilla named Stanley.


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David M Mallon wrote:
A list of every film reference in Joss Whedon & Drew Goddard's The Cabin In The Woods (2012), with video

grumble grumble

Scarab Sages

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Laura Vandervoort has a second degree black belt in karate.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Anthony Mackie planned to be an engineer before falling in love with acting. His brother is an engineer in New Orleans, Louisiana who appeared in Spike Lee's documentary on Hurricane Katrina, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts (2006).


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"Bye Felicia," often used online as a dismissive farewell, originates from a scene in F. Gary Gray's 1995 film Friday, in which the character Felisha (Angela Means Kaaya) attempts to obtain marijuana from protagonists Smokey (Chris Tucker) and Craig (Ice Cube):

Felisha: "Let me borrow a joint."
Smokey: "You need to borrow a job with your broke ass. Always trying to smoke up somebody’s s&&~. Get the hell on Felisha."
Felisha: "I’m gonna remember that."
Smokey: "Remember it. Write it down. Take a picture. I don’t give a f!@$!"
Felisha: "Craig?"
Craig: "‘Bye, Felisha."
Felisha: "Damn. Y’all stingy."


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The modern Chinese word for "owl" is "maotouying" (貓頭鷹), which, translated literally, means "cat-head hawk." The archaic Chinese word for "owl," "xiāo," (囂), now refers to a mythological creature described as resembling either an ape or a bird.


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A "ghost word" is a word published in a dictionary or similarly authoritative reference work, having rarely, if ever, been used in practice, and hitherto having been meaningless. As a rule, a ghost word will have originated from an error, such as a misinterpretation, mispronunciation, misreading, or from typographical or linguistic confusion. Once authoritatively published, a ghost word occasionally may be copied widely and take a long time to be erased from usage (if it ever does). Examples of ghost words include:

Abacot (n): misspelling of the word "bycoket" (alt. "bicocket"), a double-peaked hat worn in the Middle Ages (sometimes referred to in modern works as a "Robin Hood hat"). The word was changed through generations of scholarly misspellings from "a bicocket" to "abococket" to "abococke" and finally to "abacot." The word was finally abolished from Webster's English Dictionary in 1882.

Kimes (n): misprint of the word "knives," from an 1808 article on India from the Edinburgh Review: "The Hindoos [sic] ... have some very savage customs ... Some swing on hooks, some run kimes through their hands ..." Never codified, but used infrequently in literature until the late 19th century.

Morse (v): misprint of the word "nurse," first occurring in an early edition of Sir Walter Scott's novel The Monastery. Two independent correspondents later accounted for the word etymologically. One explained it as "to prime, as when one primes a musket," from the Old French amorce, powder for the touchhole, and the other by "to bite" (Latin mordere), hence "to indulge in biting, stinging or gnawing thoughts of slaughter." The latter writes: "That the word as a misprint should have been printed and read by millions for fifty years without being challenged and altered exceeds the bounds of probability." However, when the original manuscript of Sir Walter Scott was consulted, it was found that the word was plainly written "nurse."

Στήτη (Stéte?) (n): mistranslation apparently meaning "woman." The supposed Homeric Greek word στήτη = "woman", which arose thus: In the Iliad, book 1 line 6 is the phrase "διαστήτην ἐρίσαντε" = "two [= Achilles and Agamemnon ] stood apart making strife". However someone unfamiliar with dual number verb inflections read it as "διά στήτην ἐρίσαντε" = "two making strife because of a στήτη", and he guessed that "στήτη" meant the woman Briseis who was the subject of the strife.

Sarum (p.n): the place name "Sarum," referring to the city of Salisbury, which arose by misunderstanding of the abbreviation "Sar~" used in a medieval manuscript to mean some early form such as "Sarisberie." The longer name was first abbreviated by writing "Sar-" with a stroke over the "r," but, as such a mark was used to contract the Latin suffix "-um" (common in place names), the name was confused and became "Sarum" some time around the 13th century.

Dord (n): defined as a noun meaning "density." In 1931, the chemistry editor for Webster's sent in a slip reading "D or d, cont./density." This was intended to add "density" to the existing list of words that the letter "D" can abbreviate. The slip somehow went astray, and the phrase "D or d" was misinterpreted as a single, run-together word: "Dord". A new slip was prepared for the printer and a part of speech assigned along with a pronunciation. The would-be word got past proofreaders and appeared on page 771 of the dictionary around 1934. "Dord" was finally discovered and removed in 1947.

Phantomnation (n): Alexander Pope's 1725 translation of the Odyssey originally read, "The Phantome-nations of the dead". Richard Paul Jodrell's 1820 Philology of the English Language, which omitted hyphens from compounds, entered it as one word, "Phantomnation, a multitude of spectres". Lexicographers copied this error into various dictionaries. The Oxford English Dictionary currently explains the ghost word "phantomnation" as "Appearance of a phantom; illusion. Error for phantom nation".

Vicious Hair (n): The Japanese word "kusege" ("癖毛," compounding kuse (癖) "habit; vice" and ke (毛) "hair," to mean "frizzy hair") was mistranslated as "vicious hair" in the authoritative Kenkyūsha's New Japanese-English Dictionary from the first edition in 1918 to the fourth (1974), and finally corrected in the 2003 fifth edition as "twisted [kinky, frizzy] hair; hair that stands up". This phantom word was not merely an unnoticed lexicographical error, and generations of dictionary users copied the mistake. For example, a Tokyo hospital of cosmetic surgery had a long-running display advertisement in the Asian edition of Newsweek that read, "Kinky or vicious hair may be changed to a lovely, glossy hair."

Feamyng (n): a group of ferrets. The word was altered through a centuries-long chain of dictionary typographical errors from "busyness" to "besyness" to "fesynes" to "fesnyng" to "feamyng."

Foupe (n): Samuel Johnson’s 1755 dictionary had the word “foupe” when it should have been “soupe” (another word for “swoop”) because the archaic long “s” (ſ) so closely resembled the letter “f.”

***********************************

Occasionally, a ghost word will enter into popular use for long enough that it becomes a legitimate dictionary entry. For example:

Derring-do (n): Chaucer wrote “in durring don that longeth to a knight,” meaning “in daring to do what is proper for a knight.” The phrase was misprinted in a later work by John Lydgate as “derrynge do,” and then taken by Edmund Spenser to mean “brave actions” or “manhood and chevalrie.” Sir Walter Scott used it in Ivanhoe in the manner of Spenser, using the spelling we use today, writing, “if there be two who can do a deed of such derring-do!”

Tweed (n): a type of woolen fabric. The word stems from a misunderstanding of the Scots English word "tweel," meaning "twill fabric." That mistake may have happened because there’s a Tweed river in Scotland, so when people heard or saw “tweel,” they thought of the Tweed River; but regardless of how it happened, “tweed” became an established word for the cloth in London in the mid-1800s.

Syllabus (n): According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word "syllabus" derives from modern Latin syllabus "list," in turn from a misreading of the Greek "σίττυβας" (sittybas) "parchment label, table of contents", which first occurred in a 15th-century print of Cicero's letters to Atticus. Earlier Latin dictionaries such as Lewis & Short contain the word "syllabus," relating it to the non-existent Greek word "σύλλαβος" ("syllabos"), which appears to be a mistaken reading of syllaba, "syllable"; the newer Oxford Latin Dictionary does not contain this word. The apparent change from "sitty-" to "sylla-" is explained as a hypercorrection by analogy to "συλλαμβάνω" (syllambano "bring together, gather"). Because the word "syllabus" is formed in Latin by mistake, the Latinate plural form "syllabi" could be considered a hypercorrection.

Gravy (n): a type of sauce, likely due to a misprint in a 14th-century English translation of a French cookbook. In Old French, the word was spelled with an “n”: “grane," and it was related to the word “grain,” which meant “anything used in cooking”; but English cookbooks translated from French in the 14th century and later nearly always have a “v” or a “u” instead of the “n." Researchers believe it was simply a scribal error.


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In the original Japanese release of the 1989 sci-fi film Godzilla vs. Biollante (Japanese: Gojira tai Biorante; AKA Godzilla Versus Bioranch), all of the dialog spoken by non-Japanese characters (largely Americans, Russians, and Arabs) was delivered in English, with Japanese subtitles. However, when casting the roles of said characters, the filmmakers simply cast foreign actors who looked "white" or "middle-eastern," with no regard for whether or not they could actually speak English.

This led to dialog that was not only unintelligible, but often misread from the script so as to make no sense (for example, the infamous "Kiss you guys!" line, delivered by an international assassin after gunning down a squad of American commandos), and in some cases consisted partly of English-sounding gibberish. The issue was so pervasive that when the film was released in English-speaking countries, all of the "English" scenes had to be re-dubbed by different actors who could speak better English.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Foupe (n): Samuel Johnson’s 1755 dictionary had the word “foupe” when it should have been “soupe” (another word for “swoop”) because the archaic long “s” (ſ) so closely resembled the letter “f.”

Correction: "Foupe" should be a verb, rather than a noun


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Joe Kieyoomia (November 21, 1919 – February 17, 1997) was a Navajo soldier in New Mexico's 200th Coast Artillery unit (now part of the New Mexico Army National Guard) who was captured by the Imperial Japanese Army after the fall of the Philippines in 1942 and forced into the infamous Bataan Death March.

After surviving the Death March, Kieyoomia was transferred to a Japanese prison camp and tortured because his captors thought he was Japanese-American (and therefore a traitor). Kieyoomia suffered months of beatings before the Japanese accepted his claim to Navajo ancestry, whereupon he was transferred to one of the infamous "hell ships."

The Japanese tried unsuccessfully to have Kieyoomia decode messages in the "Navajo Code" used by the United States Marine Corps, but although he understood Navajo, the messages sounded like nonsense to him because even though the code was based on the Navajo language, it was decipherable only by individuals specifically trained in its usage.

After surviving the prison camps, the "hell ships" and the torture, Kieyoomia was a prisoner in Nagasaki when the city was the target of the second atomic bomb dropped by the U.S. Army Air Forces. Kieyoomia survived the attack due to the protection afforded by the concrete walls of his cell. After 3½ years as a prisoner of war, he was abandoned for several days after the bombing, but was eventually freed by a Japanese officer. Eventually, Kieyoomia was able to flee Japan and return to the United States.


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Tacticslion wrote:
In an attempt to look as cool and professional as Mr. Mallon...

I wouldn't go so far as to say that. More like professional enough. And I think that posting in this thread is about as far away from "cool" as you can get without being a moderator on Wikipedia.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

It's cool to me, bro. It's cool to me. :D


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Tacticslion wrote:
It's cool to me, bro. It's cool to me. :D

Keep thinking that way, and it might make your hair vicious.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Sven-Ole Thorsen was in three films based on the writings of Robert E. Howard - Conan the Barbarian (1982), Conan the Destroyer (1984), and Kull the Conqueror (1997).


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An event recorded in the Chinese Weilue and Book of Later Han for the year AD/CE 166 claims that an embassy (possibly merchants) from Daqin (Rome) sent by their ruler An Dun (Chinese: 安敦; likely Marcus Aurelius Antoninus) landed in the southern province of Jiaozhi (northern Vietnam) and presented tributary gifts to the Chinese ruler Emperor Huan of Han.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

While filming the whipping scene in The Passion of the Christ (2004), one of the whips missed the steel board on Jim Caviezel's back and cut a 13-inch gash into his back.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Aberzombie wrote:
While filming the whipping scene in The Passion of the Christ (2004), one of the whips missed the steel board on Jim Caviezel's back and cut a 13-inch gash into his back.

Very un-Christ like language followed.


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Rysky wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
While filming the whipping scene in The Passion of the Christ (2004), one of the whips missed the steel board on Jim Caviezel's back and cut a 13-inch gash into his back.
Very un-Christ like language followed.

How could you tell, if it was all in Aramaic?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Limeylongears wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
While filming the whipping scene in The Passion of the Christ (2004), one of the whips missed the steel board on Jim Caviezel's back and cut a 13-inch gash into his back.
Very un-Christ like language followed.
How could you tell, if it was all in Aramaic?

... yes, because there's no one who understands Aramaic -_-


Rysky wrote:
Limeylongears wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
While filming the whipping scene in The Passion of the Christ (2004), one of the whips missed the steel board on Jim Caviezel's back and cut a 13-inch gash into his back.
Very un-Christ like language followed.
How could you tell, if it was all in Aramaic?
... yes, because there's no one who understands Aramaic -_-

The bigger question is how you know it was "un-Christ like." Maybe the real Jesus (assuming that he isn't entirely fictional) liked to use very saucy language all of the time.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Gisher wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Limeylongears wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
While filming the whipping scene in The Passion of the Christ (2004), one of the whips missed the steel board on Jim Caviezel's back and cut a 13-inch gash into his back.
Very un-Christ like language followed.
How could you tell, if it was all in Aramaic?
... yes, because there's no one who understands Aramaic -_-
The bigger question is how you know it was "un-Christ like." Maybe the real Jesus (assuming that he isn't entirely fictional) liked to use very saucy language all of the time.

Go-eh, yeah, ya got a point.


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The top ten highest-grossing "R"-rated films of all time (sorted by lifetime gross in US dollars, unadjusted for inflation) are:

1. The Passion Of The Christ (Newmarket Films, 2004); $370,782,930
2. Deadpool (20th Century Fox, 2016); $363,070,709
3. American Sniper (Warner Brothers, 2014); $350,126,372
4. The Matrix Reloaded (Warner Brothers, 2003); $281,576,461
5. The Hangover (Warner Brothers, 2009); $277,322,503
6. The Hangover, Part II (Warner Brothers, 2011); $254,464,305
7. Beverly Hills Cop (Paramount Pictures, 1984); $234,760,478
8. The Exorcist (Warner Brothers, 1973); $232,906,145
9. Ted (Universal Studios, 2012); $218,815,487
10. Saving Private Ryan (Dreamworks, 1998); $216,540,909

Both The Passion Of The Christ and The Exorcist achieved the lifetime gross listed above over multiple theatrical releases.


#2 makes me cry.


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Freehold DM wrote:
#2 makes me cry.

Why is that?


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Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Modules, Tales Subscriber

Ryan Reynolds is on the Alton Brown diet.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Linda Hamilton's identical twin sister Leslie Hamilton Gearren was Linda's double in Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991). Leslie is seen when Sarah is remembering playing with John at the park and when the T-1000 is impersonating her.


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British actor Brian Blessed (b. 1936; alt. spelling: BRIAN BLESSED) has attempted to climb Mount Everest three times, reaching heights of 28,200 feet (8,600 m) in 1993 and 25,200 feet (7,700 m) in 1996, but without reaching the summit. However, he has reached the tops of Mount Aconcagua in Argentina and Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. In addition, he is the oldest man to reach the Magnetic North Pole on foot, and has undertaken an expedition into the jungles of Venezuela, during which he survived a plane crash. Blessed has also completed 800 hours of space training at Star City in Russia.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
#2 makes me cry.
Why is that?

FDM has a profound love for everything Joss Whedon, including Deadpool. He is probably really sad that it just barely missed #1 by that much.


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Aberzombie wrote:
Linda Hamilton's identical twin sister Leslie Hamilton Gearren was Linda's double in Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991). Leslie is seen when Sarah is remembering playing with John at the park and when the T-1000 is impersonating her.

She is also the mirror image of Sarah Conner as she and John are removing the chip from the Terminator in T2.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa was a part-time masseur for the University of Hawaii football team. He often helps injured players.

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