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Off-Topic Discussions

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Kullen wrote:
The Rockefellers are actually a family of reptilian aliens who are suppressing infinite-energy technology and plotting world domination. What? With ...so ...many ...sources, how can it be wrong? There's even a documentary movie about it!

But wouldn't it be more effective for them to actually use that infinite-energy technology to control the world, rather than keep it hidden and employ notoriously more complicated plots to achieve it?

I mean, either if they set up an infinite-energy power plant system and create a world monopoly on electricity or use it to power giant paddles that flip continents like pancakes, in both cases the world-conquering thing becomes much more effective.

In my humble non-reptilian opinion, that's it.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The Grand Canyon can hold around 900 trillion footballs.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

On average, all the blinking in one day equates to having your eyes closed for 30 minutes.


-If you put all elephants in the world in a ring around the Moon, they would all die.

-For the 2010 earthquake that took place here in Chile, my home -and every other house in the city- moved 28 centimetres to the east.

-No one knows for sure where Columbus is buried. Both Spain and Dominican Republic claim to have the actual body, although the latter is the most likely. The remains currently in Santo Domingo were found by a priest inside a leaded urn that had been buried near a church centuries ago, when the French invaded the then Spanish colony and the locals figured they would likely try to steal or destroy Columbus' body (they did destroy the memorial, after all).

-Miguel de Cervantes, writter of the quintessential novel Don Quijote de la Mancha, wrote the book as a way to ridicule the genre of knightly tales. However, the huge success of his work caused the exact opposite, and for a good while, knightly stories and epics became quite the fashion in Spain. In fact, he wrote the second part to the book in order to further try to stomp the genre down, and once again all it did was make it even more popular.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
-If you put all elephants in the world in a ring around the Moon, they would all die.

Hee hee!

Quote:


-Miguel de Cervantes, writter of the quintessential novel Don Quijote de la Mancha, wrote the book as a way to ridicule the genre of knightly tales. However, the huge success of his work caused the exact opposite, and for a good while, knightly stories and epics became quite the fashion in Spain. In fact, he wrote the second part to the book in order to further try to stomp the genre down, and once again all it did was make it even more popular.

Hee hee!

Sancho Panza rawks!!


Danish footballer Niklas Bendtner has been told to change underwear before their next game - good thing, seeing as there's a 4-day wait between that and the latest one.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
The Grand Canyon can hold around 900 trillion footballs.

but would they not Roll out of it at the ends?


You can never step in the same river twice. Especially if it's a river of lava.

The Exchange

The song "Happy Birthday to you" earns about $2 million in royalties every year.

The Exchange

General Santa Anna helped invent bubblegum.

The Exchange

Hundreds of follicle mites live in your eyelashes.

The Exchange

If all the time since the earth was born was shown as an arm, one stroke of a nail file would wipe out all of human history.

The Exchange

A praying mantis can eat a hummingbird.

The Exchange

The Electric chair was invented

by a:
dentist

The Exchange

A woman once cracked her gum so loudly in a courthouse in Fresno, CA. it was mistaken for gunfire and she was arrested.

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Dinosaur fossils have been found on every continent, including Antarctica.

The Exchange

In 1911, a dog in Nakhla Egypt, was hit by a meteorite from mars. It is history's only recorded death-by-meteorite.

The Exchange

the seismosaurus is the longest dinosaur we know of. If its tail was in the endzone, its head would be on the 50-yard line.


Crimson Jester wrote:
The Electric chair was invented....

I had read that it was invented by Thomas Edison, who attempted to use it to discredit Tesla's alternating current by proving how dangerous the stuff was. It backfired.

The Exchange

An eel at the Nagasaki aquarium in Japan is connected to a set of Christmas lights. Every time the eel is fed, it powers up the lights.

The Exchange

Grey Lensman wrote:
Crimson Jester wrote:
The Electric chair was invented....
I had read that it was invented by Thomas Edison, who attempted to use it to discredit Tesla's alternating current by proving how dangerous the stuff was. It backfired.

Alfred P. Southwick

Edison used it to electrocute an Elephant to discredit Tesla.

The Exchange

ladybugs squirt poison out of their kneecaps.

The Exchange

Aphids are born pregnant.

The Exchange

Cans were invented 45 years before the can opener. Early cans were marked "Open with Chisel and Hammer."

The Exchange

An ostrich's eye is bigger than its brain.

The Exchange

The most durable man-made creation ever is

Spoiler:
Buzz Aldrin's foot print on the moon.

Its expected to remain unchanged for hundreds of thousands of years.

The Exchange

The index finger on the Statue of Liberty is 8 ft. long.

The Exchange

6 people marked this as a favorite.

If you were to shrink the solar system down to the size of your body, with the Sun at the top of your head and the Oort cloud at your feet, Uranus would be right where you'd think it would be.

The Exchange

In 1919, a tank explosion at a factory in Boston MA. released a two-story wave of molasses that flooded a residential area, drowning three horses.

The Exchange

For decades Einstein's brain was kept preserved in a jar in a Kansas doctor's office.

The Exchange

Contrairy to popular belief, the Falchion was actually a 1-handed weapon. It was also one of the first weapons used two at one time by the Romans. It also goes by the name "St. Peter's Wrath" because it was the style of weapon and at the appropriate time and place as when Peter cut of the Ear of a Guard.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Do you mean falcata? The falchion was a medieval weapon and I would expect that a Roman guard, especially during the 1st century AD would be armed with a gladius and a dagger.

The falcata on the other hand is attested from the early iron age and may have been used by the Romans, who called it the ensis Hispanicus, or Spanish sword.


Maryland has zero natural lakes.


Crimson Jester wrote:
In 1919, a tank explosion at a factory in Boston MA. released a two-story wave of molasses that flooded a residential area, drowning three horses.

It also killed 20ish people and injured over 100.

The Exchange

Saint Caleth wrote:

Do you mean falcata? The falchion was a medieval weapon and I would expect that a Roman guard, especially during the 1st century AD would be armed with a gladius and a dagger.

The falcata on the other hand is attested from the early iron age and may have been used by the Romans, who called it the ensis Hispanicus, or Spanish sword.

I understand your confusion. First, Peter cut off the Guards ear, not the other way around. As seen here. Falchion pictured here.

Trusted Source wrote:

Falchion - a type of broad-bladed European one-edged sword. The blade was generally slightly curved, although straight-backed falchions are not unheard of. A falchion's tip end is broader than its grip end, making for tip-heavier balance. Related to the German Messer, the falchion is the only type of European sword known to have been taught for occasional use with one in each hand. Also see Messer.

Messer - literally, "knife." A Germanic single-edged sword with a curving edge. Most closely related to the falchion. Messers came in one- and two-handed varieties, and are often depicted in German fencing treatises as slicing off hands. See falchion.

Second, A friend of mine wrote those. He knows a whole lot more about medieval weaponry than I do Which is disgraceful since I'm a History Major and he's an emergancy medic and I understand where you are coming from with your logic.


Is the Club 33 thing a masonic reference? I know how those types love exclusivity.

The Exchange

Zeetle Wyrp wrote:
Is the Club 33 thing a masonic reference? I know how those types love exclusivity.
wiki wrote:

The first and official explanation states Club 33 gets its name solely from its address of 33 Royal street in New Orleans Square at Disneyland.

A second and less well known story speculates the name honors there being 33 corporate sponsors at Disneyland in 1966-1967 when the club was being built and opened.

There is a second Club 33 in Tokyo Disney.

The Exchange

The opening sequence of Raiders of the lost ark, was "inspired" by two issues of the Donald Duck comic book.

The infamous scene of Indy shooting the guy with the big sword was ad-libed. Turns out some of the food did not agree with Harrison Ford and he kept having to run off to the restroom. Finally after hours of trying to shoot the choreographed fight scene of whip vs. sword, he turns to the director and says, "the only way we will get this scene shot today is if Indy pulls his gun and shoots the guy." They then shot it in one take.

On the wall of the well of souls where the ark is first found, carved in the hieroglyphs are none other than C3PO and R2D2. So I guess it really was a long time ago, just not that far away.

Shadow Lodge Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 8

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
There is no such thing as a naturally blue food.

Blue Corn!


Saint Caleth wrote:
Tirq wrote:
The Japanese do not call their own country Japan. They call it Nippon, which translates to Two Sticks.
I'm not sure how you are getting "Two Sticks" for 日本, but then again I don't really speak Japanese. I always thought that it meant "Root of the Sun".

You are correct. I don't know where two sticks comes from. /boggle


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Nobody calls the Deutsch what they call themselves.

ドイツ is the Japanese word for Germany. Phonetically it is Doitsu. It's a pretty close approximation. The Dutch word is also very close.

The Exchange

Benchak the Nightstalker wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
There is no such thing as a naturally blue food.
Blue Corn!
your wiki-link wrote:
Different varieties of blue corn range in color from powdery gray to nearly black

Scarab Sages

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The term nitpicking (the pastime of pointing out minor flaws or mistakes)comes from the intense concentration and careful attention to detail required when searching for the eggs of lice, known as nits.

Shadow Lodge Marathon Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

1 person marked this as a favorite.

H.P. Lovecraft once ghost-wrote a story for Harry Houdini.


The Church of the Sagrada Familia, the most iconic building in the city of Barcelona, will measure in height exactly 1 metre less than the highest summit surrounding the city. This was done intentionally by it's architect, Gaudí, who wanted the building "not to surpass God's own creation".

The largest church in Christendom in terms of volume is the cathedral of Seville, which is also the largest Gothic structure ever built. The highest, though, is the Dom in Cologne.

The oldest church in America is a tiny chapel in the Dominican city of Santo Domingo, originally built by Columbus' son.

The southernmost settlement in the world outside Antarctica is Puerto Toro, in Chile, although only a handful of families live there. The southernmost city with a noticeable population is Puerto Williams, also in Chile. The absolutely southernmost permanent settlement inhabited by civilians year-round is Villa Estrella, a chilean village of 300 people in Antarctica. It also contains the southernmost church and ATM in the world, and has the highest birth rates in the White Continent.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Tirq wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:

Do you mean falcata? The falchion was a medieval weapon and I would expect that a Roman guard, especially during the 1st century AD would be armed with a gladius and a dagger.

The falcata on the other hand is attested from the early iron age and may have been used by the Romans, who called it the ensis Hispanicus, or Spanish sword.

I understand your confusion. First, Peter cut off the Guards ear, not the other way around. As seen here. Falchion pictured here.

That painting is from the 16th century and is incredibly anachronistic. They are wearing 16th century, not 1st century clothes and armor. I'm not sure that it is a good source for information about roman era weapons. The middle ages and renaissance especially were famous for drawing ancient people and scenes anachronistically.

That falchion looks really cool though.

The Exchange

Saint Caleth wrote:

That painting is from the 16th century and is incredibly anachronistic. They are wearing 16th century, not 1st century clothes and armor. I'm not sure that it is a good source for information about roman era weapons. The middle ages and renaissance especially were famous for drawing ancient people and scenes anachronistically.

That falchion looks really cool though.

*It does, doesn't it?*

The reason Renaissance painters painted anachronistically is because the current viewer could connect with the paining a bit more than if it were painted authentically. This is the main reason why they are wearing clothes from this time period. They are also wearing clothes with too much color than what was normally worn by the populace at large. This was because the artist wanted for the painting to reach out and grab the viewer.

Plus, do you know how hard it is to find an appropriate picture? Very, just so you know.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

There's actually a difference between "its" and "it's" -- you don't just get to pick at random.

Likewise, "there," "their," and "they're" are all different words, with different meanings; they're not interchangeable, despite the fact that they're often used that way, here and there, by people with no solid footing in their own language.


Crimson Jester wrote:
Benchak the Nightstalker wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
There is no such thing as a naturally blue food.
Blue Corn!
your wiki-link wrote:
Different varieties of blue corn range in color from powdery gray to nearly black

Borage blooms are very blue and edible, I put them in every Salad when it is in bloom

pic


Around here, we actually eat this, which on the inside it looks like this.

It's better than it looks. Though even Andrew Zimmern had second thoughts before trying it.

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