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Off-Topic Discussions

251 to 300 of 2,566 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | next > last >>

Arazni wrote:
Also, Roman coins have been found in several places in the Americas, leading some to believe that there may have been trade between American Natives and the Roman Empire.

Maybe they were brought over by the vikings, who had just looted a church. ;D

Remember kids, never, ever, burn down a church. The fools will just fill it back up with more gold and stuff for us to take away from them next year!


4 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm sick and tired of having everything I want to believe debunked.

Andoran

Crimson Jester wrote:


Arazni wrote:

Ten unusual, disturbing, or baffling archaeological artifacts:

8) Several Impossible Fossils
Human handprint in limestone (dated to 110 million years old)
Fossilized human finger in Canadian Arctic (dated to 100 to 110 million years old)
Human footprint (possibly with sandal) in shale deposit (dated to 300 million to 600 million years old)

9) Out of Place Metal Objects (Fossil Record Anomalies)
In several places, objects of metal have been discovered where they should not have been (according to geological fossil record), some in chalk thought to be 65 million years old. A nail embedded in a piece of sandstone dated to the Mesozoic Era.

The "Burdick Track", a human footprint in Cretaceous rock. Glen J. Kuban and Geologist Gregg Wilkerson wrote that anatomic errors on it indicate that is was carved from limestone, similar to other tracks that were carved in Glen Rose.


The "Fossilized Human Finger", a finger where tissues appear to have been replaced by Cretaceous stone. There is doubt about its authenticity since it was not found in situ, and cannot be conclusively associated with Cretaceous formations.

The "Meister Print", two trilobites in slate that appear to be crushed in a sandal print. The print is "questionable on several accounts" such as the shallowness of the print, spall patterns, striding sequence, and similarities to the Wheeler formation

The London Hammer a hammer "found" from the Cretaceous time frame

Hey, thanks, man!

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

A giraffe can clean its ears with its 21 inch tongue.


Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:
Worf isn't really all that tough.

Yeah, it took until sometime in the late 3rd or early 4th season for him to finally whup someone....a group of three or four much smaller opponents whose species were both male and female.


Some fossils indicate that Homo heidelbergensis (the precursor species to both neanderthals and sapiens, stood seven feet tall.

Qadira

Which came first the chicken or the egg?

In the summer of 2010, British researchers cracked the eneggma when they discovered that the protein necessary to create the eggshell was fowlnd exclusively in the ovaries of the chicken. So the chicken had to come first, because the eggshell can't be made without that protein.

Read more: 7 Simple Questions You Won't Believe Science Just Answered | Cracked.com

Andoran

DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Some fossils indicate that Homo heidelbergensis (the precursor species to both Neanderthals and sapiens, stood seven feet tall.

I though this seemed a bit fishy, but after some digging, it turned out to be partially true. There seems to have been immense variation in body size among populations of homo heidelbergensis spread throughout its population range, from individuals of average human height in Europe (where resources were somewhat scarcer during the late Pliocene) to individuals of significantly above-average height in Africa (where resources were much more plentiful at the time). Their Wiki entry does get one thing wrong, though-- the average height for an individual of the species was much closer to 1.6 - 1.7 meters (5'3" to 5'8" - slightly taller than the average Neanderthal, about the same height as the average Cro-Magnon) than to 1.8 - 1.9 meters (5'11" - 6'3").


The Eldritch Mr. Shiny wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Some fossils indicate that Homo heidelbergensis (the precursor species to both Neanderthals and sapiens, stood seven feet tall.
I though this seemed a bit fishy, but after some digging, it turned out to be partially true. There seems to have been immense variation in body size among populations of homo heidelbergensis spread throughout its population range, from individuals of average human height in Europe (where resources were somewhat scarcer during the late Pliocene) to individuals of significantly above-average height in Africa (where resources were much more plentiful at the time). Their Wiki entry does get one thing wrong, though-- the average height for an individual of the species was much closer to 1.6 - 1.7 meters (5'3" to 5'8" - slightly taller than the average Neanderthal, about the same height as the average Cro-Magnon) than to 1.8 - 1.9 meters (5'11" - 6'3").

You're right. I mis-worded my entry, because I did mean to say that some individuals might have stood seven feet tall. That's what I get for not running a self diagnostic first thing when I get up and just start typing instead... lol

I will correct one thing your post, though, if I may. It should read "late Pleistocene" instead of Pliocene. At that particular epoch we were just coming out of the trees, grabbing something to eat, and running like hell back up into them.

Andoran

DungeonmasterCal wrote:

You're right. I mis-worded my entry, because I did mean to say that some individuals might have stood seven feet tall. That's what I get for not running a self diagnostic first thing when I get up and just start typing instead... lol

I will correct one thing your post, though, if I may. It should read "late Pleistocene" instead of Pliocene. At that particular epoch we were just coming out of the trees, grabbing something to eat, and running like hell back up into them.

S+$@, must have been a weird mental slip. I definitely meant Pleistocene... Sorry about that.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Australia was originally called New Holland.


Italy originally meant "Land of Calves"


the name china, in chinese, could be translated as the center of the world. and many chinese certainly believe it.

Qadira

The Japanese do not call their own country Japan. They call it Nippon, which translates to Two Sticks.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Tirq wrote:
The Japanese do not call their own country Japan. They call it Nippon, which translates to Two Sticks.

I'm not sure how you are getting "Two Sticks" for 日本, but then again I don't really speak Japanese. I always thought that it meant "Root of the Sun".

Andoran

Cleo and Caesar were the early stage names of Cher and Sonny Bono.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

.........

Andoran

HarbinNick wrote:
the name china, in chinese, could be translated as the center of the world. and many chinese certainly believe it.

The Greeks refer to their country as Hellas, Ellas, or Ellada. The reason that they are known as Greeks to most other countries is that during the expansion of Rome, the first Greek-speakers encountered by the Romans were the Graioi. This was poorly transliterated into Latin as 'Graecus,' and the name was then applied to all similar ethnic groups.


Nobody calls the Deutsch what they call themselves.


German, Aleman, Nimitz, WTF?!?


The WWII era American slur for the Japanese seems based on what they call thier own homeland. The respectful version comes from somewhere else.


The shortest player at the ongoing European Football Championships is Italy's Salvatore "the Atomic Ant" Giovinco with his 164 cm (shorter than my mother!).

Qadira

He has an inch or two on my wife.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The sentence "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" uses every letter in the English alphabet.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
The sentence "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" uses every letter in the English alphabet.

Now, if only you'd import the ð and þ ðat'd not be the case. (Alðough one of them would be included instead of the "th" at ðe start of the "ðe." I forget which is which, ðough.)


Kajehase wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The sentence "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" uses every letter in the English alphabet.
Now, if only you'd import the ð and þ ðat'd not be the case. (Alðough one of them would be included instead of the "th" at ðe start of the "ðe." I forget which is which, ðough.)

And when I say import, I kinda mean retained...

Andoran

The citrus soda 7-UP was created in 1929; "7" was selected because the original containers were 7 ounces. "UP" indicated the direction of the bubbles.


-The direction in which the water inside a toilet turns when flushing is, in fact, not determined by the hemisphere you are at. Even though planetary rotation does indeed have an effect on it, it is so minimal that the shape of the bowl is what often determines the direction, not the Coriollis Effect (which mostly works on a supra-toilet scale).

-Project Cybersyn was a Chilean attempt in the years 1971–1973 to construct a decision support system to aid in the management of the state-run sector of the national economy. It was to consist of a network of telex machines (Cybernet) in state-run enterprises and government offices that would trasmit information to a government-run mainframe computer in Santiago. Information from the field would be fed into statistical modeling software (Cyberstride) that would monitor production parameters (such as raw material supplies or high rates of worker absenteeism) in real time, and alert government managers if those parameters fell outside acceptable ranges. The information would also be input into economic simulation software (CHECO, for CHIlean EConomic simulator) that the government could use to forecast the possible outcome of economic decisions. Finally, a sophisticated operations room (Opsroom) would provide a space where managers could see relevant economic data, formulate responses to emergencies, and transmit advice and directives to enterprises and factories using the telex network. The principal architect of the system was British operations research scientist Stafford Beer, and the system embodied his notions of cybernetics in industrial management.

-No one knows the exact date when Super Mario Bros. (the original one, for the NES) was released in the USA, not even the people at Nintendo.

-The lore in the original Super Mario Bros. handbook explains that all the people in Mushroom Kingdom were turned into block. That's right, the same blocks that Mario and Luigi gleefully smash into a thousand pieces.

-The Dragon Quest console RPGs were so popular in Japan, that the publishers started releasing the games on weekends, in order to avoid the massive school skipping that happened on weekday releases.

Andoran

Kajehase wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The sentence "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" uses every letter in the English alphabet.
Now, if only you'd import the ð and þ ðat'd not be the case. (Alðough one of them would be included instead of the "th" at ðe start of the "ðe." I forget which is which, ðough.)

Wouldn't þat actually be spelled wiþ þorn, instead of eð?

Also, there's still ƿynn and æesc to consider...


1 person marked this as a favorite.
The Eldritch Mr. Shiny wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The sentence "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" uses every letter in the English alphabet.
Now, if only you'd import the ð and þ ðat'd not be the case. (Alðough one of them would be included instead of the "th" at ðe start of the "ðe." I forget which is which, ðough.)

Wouldn't þat actually be spelled wiþ þorn, instead of eð?

Also, there's still ƿynn and æesc to consider...

Speak English, dang it!

Silver Crusade

For those who are into Family Guy:

Wikipedia wrote:
On the morning of September 11, 2001, [Seth] MacFarlane was scheduled to return to Los Angeles on American Airlines Flight 11 from Boston. Suffering from a hangover from the previous night's celebrations, and with an incorrect departure time (8:15 a.m. instead of 7:45 a.m.) from his travel agent, he arrived at Logan International Airport about ten minutes too late to board the flight as the gates had been closed. Fifteen minutes after departure, American Airlines Flight 11 was hijacked, and at 8:46 a.m. it was flown into the North Tower of the World Trade Center, obliterating the airplane, and killing everyone on board.


The practice of shrinking heads, strongly associated with primitive tribes of South America, was also a common custom among the Knights Templar.


Crimson Jester wrote:

Which came first the chicken or the egg?

In the summer of 2010, British researchers cracked the enigma when they discovered that the protein necessary to create the eggshell was found exclusively in the ovaries of the chicken. So the chicken had to come first, because the eggshell can't be made without that protein.

Read more: 7 Simple Questions You Won't Believe Science Just Answered | Cracked.com

I love Cracked, but philosophy answered that question long ago: The egg is a "potential chicken": it could become a chicken, but it could just as easily become an omelet. The chicken is an "actual" chicken...it doesn't have to "become" anything, it IS. Since all potential must necessarily spring from some actual source (where else could potential spring from?), it is logically incontrovertible that the chicken (or some variation of it) must have preceded the egg.


The Eldritch Mr. Shiny wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The sentence "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" uses every letter in the English alphabet.
Now, if only you'd import the ð and þ ðat'd not be the case. (Alðough one of them would be included instead of the "th" at ðe start of the "ðe." I forget which is which, ðough.)
Wouldn't þat actually be spelled wiþ þorn, instead of eð?

I said I forgot which one's which!!! ;)

Quote:
Also, there's still ƿynn and æesc to consider...

More runes in modern writing!! Spell "ƿe olde something" correctly!


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Madclaw wrote:
The citrus soda 7-UP was created in 1929; "7" was selected because the original containers were 7 ounces. "UP" indicated the direction of the bubbles.

Much like Coca-Cola and cocaine, for years 7-Up contained lithium.

Soft drinks used to be a lot cooler.

Qadira

This Day in History: 83 years ago today, Anne Frank was born.

Qadira

DungeonmasterCal wrote:
The practice of shrinking heads, strongly associated with primitive tribes of South America, was also a common custom among the Knights Templar.

Having done some research on the KT at one time, this is news to me. Any links to share? Even doing a google search I can only find where this is refuted.

Qadira

Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Madclaw wrote:
The citrus soda 7-UP was created in 1929; "7" was selected because the original containers were 7 ounces. "UP" indicated the direction of the bubbles.

Much like Coca-Cola and cocaine, for years 7-Up contained lithium.

Soft drinks used to be a lot cooler.

I had to look that up. It contained lithium citrate, a mood-stabilizing drug, until 1950. Wow.

Qadira

Scopes 7.up

Qadira

also Cocaine cola

Qadira

A private club (the only place where alcohol is served) is housed in Disneyland's New Orleans Square.

Club 33 , open only to members and their guest, has been a part of New Orleans Square since 1967.

Andoran

The human heart creates enough pressure to squirt blood 30 feet (9 m).


Crimson Jester wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
The practice of shrinking heads, strongly associated with primitive tribes of South America, was also a common custom among the Knights Templar.
Having done some research on the KT at one time, this is news to me. Any links to share? Even doing a google search I can only find where this is refuted.

http://factropolis.com/, about halfway down the page. I don't testify to the veracity of these things. I just post 'em as I sees 'em. lol


The Rockefellers are actually a family of reptilian aliens who are suppressing infinite-energy technology and plotting world domination. What? With ...so ...many ...sources, how can it be wrong? There's even a documentary movie about it!

Osirion

Kullen wrote:
The Rockefellers are actually a family of reptilian aliens who are suppressing infinite-energy technology and plotting world domination. What? With ...so ...many ...sources, how can it be wrong? There's even a documentary movie about it!

*unleashes silencer minions*


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Andrew Vachss wrote:
The answer is that we are fast developing a separate and distinct "Internet culture," populated by those who have no concept of fact checking, no sense of sourcing ... those who persist in deluding themselves that their research is valid simply because they "found it on the Net."

January 1997


Crimson Jester wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
The practice of shrinking heads, strongly associated with primitive tribes of South America, was also a common custom among the Knights Templar.
Having done some research on the KT at one time, this is news to me. Any links to share? Even doing a google search I can only find where this is refuted.

never heard that, too. and I have read quite a few books on the militant orders


Kirth Gersen wrote:
Andrew Vachss wrote:
The answer is that we are fast developing a separate and distinct "Internet culture," populated by those who have no concept of fact checking, no sense of sourcing ... those who persist in deluding themselves that their research is valid simply because they "found it on the Net."

January 1997

Yeah, well, dogs still can't look up.

Sczarni

Speaking of wrong facts, Tennessee may be bordered by 8 states, but so is Missouri.


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Andrew Vachss wrote:
The answer is that we are fast developing a separate and distinct "Internet culture," populated by those who have no concept of fact checking, no sense of sourcing ... those who persist in deluding themselves that their research is valid simply because they "found it on the Net."

January 1997

Yeah, well, dogs still can't look up.

That's all fixed, now. You can trust everything on the net nowadays.

You can see Russia from Sarah Palin's house.

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