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Off-Topic Discussions

1,651 to 1,700 of 2,493 << first < prev | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | next > last >>
Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

During a total solar eclipse the temperature can drop by as much as 6°C (20°F)

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The rarest type of diamond is green.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

A jägermonster has to earn his hat by defeating a suitably impressive opponent. And remember, any plan that ends with you losing your hat is a bad plan.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

MasterCard was originally called MasterCharge.

Silver Crusade

My grandmother always called it MasterCharge long after they switched it.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The US flag has 13 stripes (representing the original 13 states).


Aberzombie wrote:
The US flag has 13 stripes (representing the original 13 states).

It's interesting and exciting that we might be looking at a 51st star on the flag soon.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Obama's celebrating by invading Canada?

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.


Kajehase wrote:
Obama's celebrating by invading Canada?

Puerto Rico

Qadira

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.

Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day

That's what my younger brother said. But he pointed outthere's no way to know without accurate historical data.

Qadira

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Aberzombie wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
That's what my younger brother said. But he pointed outthere's no way to know without accurate historical data.

True that. Facts are facts and inference is only inference.


Aberzombie wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
That's what my younger brother said. But he pointed outthere's no way to know without accurate historical data.

Then shouldn't that be, There's no way to know whether or not the first city to reach 1 million residents was London?


Hitdice wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
That's what my younger brother said. But he pointed outthere's no way to know without accurate historical data.
Then shouldn't that be, There's no way to know whether or not the first city to reach 1 million residents was London?

Or rather, The first recorded city to reach one million residents is London.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber

...that Thomas Jefferson owned a copy of the Koran, the Islamic holy text? It is currently being kept in the Library of Congress rare book collection.

That same book was borrowed in 2007 to swear in Keith Ellison D-Minn, the first Muslim to be elected to Congress.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

D-Minn is a funny name.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

On average, men are stuck by lightning 7 times more than women.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

That's shocking!

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Tokyo was once known as Edo.


Greek architecture was not the naked-white marble thing we're used to seeing. It was, instead, heavily decorated with bright colours. The Parthenon, for instance, was declared "The Whore of Athens" when first built, as a lot of people considered it was "excessively decorated and ridiculously big".


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Greek architecture was not the naked-white marble thing we're used to seeing. It was, instead, heavily decorated with bright colours. The Parthenon, for instance, was declared "The Whore of Athens" when first built, as a lot of people considered it was "excessively decorated and ridiculously big".

I was known as "The Whore of Mapleton Drive" for much the same reasons.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Wine is sold in tinted bottles because it spoils when exposed to light.


Aberzombie wrote:
Wine is sold in tinted bottles because it spoils when exposed to light.

Olive oil too.

Never buy an olive oil in a transparent bottle, unless you are certain you'll keep it stored in a dark place and will go through it in a week.


-The plastic things at the end of shoelaces are called aglets.


The movie Them! was originally meant to be shot in 3D and in colour, but the rig for it broke down, so it ended up being done in black-and-white 2D instead (except for the title, which is blue).


In Sweden, James Arness and Bruce Boxleitner are more famous for their roles in How the West Was Won rather than for Gunsmoke or Babylon 5


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
-The plastic things at the end of shoelaces are called aglets.

Their true purpose is sinister!

Spoiler:
Got to love Question, especially as a conspiracy nut in the Justice League animated series,

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Justice_League#Question_Authority


Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Greek architecture was not the naked-white marble thing we're used to seeing. It was, instead, heavily decorated with bright colours. The Parthenon, for instance, was declared "The Whore of Athens" when first built, as a lot of people considered it was "excessively decorated and ridiculously big".

Same with Roman architecture and both of their statues would be painted vibrant colors.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The tea bag was invented in 1908.


Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day

And Chang'an during the Tang dynasty. The ancient city is actually geographically larger than the modern city of Xi'an which is built on top of it today.


Saint Caleth wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
And Chang'an during the Tang dynasty. The ancient city is actually geographically larger than the modern city of Xi'an which is built on top of it today.

Indeed, my There's no way of knowing... reply was provoked by the toffee-nosed, imperial-excellence character of the claim about London. It was a cheap shot though; the appropriate response to such (totally unfounded) claims is always "Piltdown Man."


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
The tea bag was invented in 1908.

And yet, people have been teabagging for millenia...

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Hitdice wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
And Chang'an during the Tang dynasty. The ancient city is actually geographically larger than the modern city of Xi'an which is built on top of it today.
Indeed, my There's no way of knowing... reply was provoked by the toffee-nosed, imperial-excellence character of the claim about London. It was a cheap shot though; the appropriate response to such (totally unfounded) claims is always "Piltdown Man."

Like I told the other troll who kept attacking this thread - I just cut and paste from a website. You don't like it? Take it up with them or hide the thread.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Carrots contain 0% fat.

Silver Crusade

Aberzombie wrote:
Carrots contain 0% fat.

What about when I glaze them in butter and brown sugar?


Oni_NZ wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
-The plastic things at the end of shoelaces are called aglets.

Their true purpose is sinister!

** spoiler omitted **

one of my favorite characters.

"ah -hah! 32 flavors!"


Celestial Healer wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Carrots contain 0% fat.
What about when I glaze them in butter and brown sugar?

Yer going to have some carrotid issues.


Thor Heyerdahl and his crew abandoned their Tigris-project of sailing a reed boat from Iraq to Pakistan and then on to Egypt when they had made it to Djibouti (five months after first setting sail) by setting fire to the boat in a protest against the instability in the middle east and east Africa.


According to the Byzantine calendar it's the year 7521.


I don't know much, but I do know trolls.

And Hitdice ain't no troll.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kajehase wrote:
According to the Byzantine calendar it's the year 7521.

Its like living in the future!

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Carrots contain 0% fat.
What about when I glaze them in butter and brown sugar?
Yer going to have some delicious issues.

Fixed it for you.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Saint Caleth wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
According to the Byzantine calendar it's the year 7521.
Its like living in the future!

So you're telling me it's seventeen-thousand, five-hundred and twenty-one and WE STILL DON'T HAVE FLYING CARS?!

Good Lord! If aliens come by and challenge us to a flying-car race against the most powerful competitors in the galaxy to determine whether or not we survive as a species, they have every right to pull the trigger.

SCIENTIIIISTS!


Scientists just found a ballistic gel that can stop small caliber bullets and seal up the entry.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
Hitdice wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
And Chang'an during the Tang dynasty. The ancient city is actually geographically larger than the modern city of Xi'an which is built on top of it today.
Indeed, my There's no way of knowing... reply was provoked by the toffee-nosed, imperial-excellence character of the claim about London. It was a cheap shot though; the appropriate response to such (totally unfounded) claims is always "Piltdown Man."
Like I told the other troll who kept attacking this thread - I just cut and paste from a website. You don't like it? Take it up with them or hide the thread.

The thing is Aber, if you're just cutting and pasting to this thread without verifying your info-nuggets, you're part of the problem that gave rise to the did you know thread, not part of the solution.

And thank you for the endorsement Herr Burgomeister. Lord Dice would gladly favor your burgh with the purchase of a townhouse; He's pretty awful on equal devision of labor or wealth, but he will increase the average per capita income by infinity percent. :)


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
The tea bag was invented in 1908.

\

And re-invented years later in a college dorm room.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Hitdice wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Hitdice wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
And Chang'an during the Tang dynasty. The ancient city is actually geographically larger than the modern city of Xi'an which is built on top of it today.
Indeed, my There's no way of knowing... reply was provoked by the toffee-nosed, imperial-excellence character of the claim about London. It was a cheap shot though; the appropriate response to such (totally unfounded) claims is always "Piltdown Man."
Like I told the other troll who kept attacking this thread - I just cut and paste from a website. You don't like it? Take it up with them or hide the thread.

The thing is Aber, if you're just cutting and pasting to this thread without verifying your info-nuggets, you're part of the problem that gave rise to the did you know thread, not part of the solution.

You do realize that I was the one who started the thread? Not because there was a problem, but as a fun place to post some interesting tidbits I had come across. Can I help it if some people love to nitpick?

And forgive me, but your little comment (bolded above) came across as a personal attack. So I just figured you were another one of the trolls.


Aberzombie wrote:
Hitdice wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Hitdice wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The first city to reach 1 million residents was London.
Huh, I thought Rome did it back in the day
And Chang'an during the Tang dynasty. The ancient city is actually geographically larger than the modern city of Xi'an which is built on top of it today.
Indeed, my There's no way of knowing... reply was provoked by the toffee-nosed, imperial-excellence character of the claim about London. It was a cheap shot though; the appropriate response to such (totally unfounded) claims is always "Piltdown Man."
Like I told the other troll who kept attacking this thread - I just cut and paste from a website. You don't like it? Take it up with them or hide the thread.

The thing is Aber, if you're just cutting and pasting to this thread without verifying your info-nuggets, you're part of the problem that gave rise to the did you know thread, not part of the solution.

You do realize that I was the one who started the thread? Not because there was a problem, but as a fun place to post some interesting tidbits I had come across. Can I help it if some people love to nitpick?

And forgive me, but your little comment (bolded above) came across as a personal attack. So I just figured you were another one of the trolls.

I'm sorry, if I had realized you actually were toffee-nosed, an imperial citizen, or lived in London, I would have reconsidered my post.

My real point here? No one will ever blame you for checking your own facts; PILTDOWN MAN!

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Hitdice wrote:

I'm sorry, if I had realized you actually were toffee-nosed, an imperial citizen, or lived in London, I would have reconsidered my post.

My real point here? No one will ever blame you for checking your own facts; PILTDOWN MAN!

Meh! It's all good. Just noticed that Anklebiter vouched for you as a non-troll. I'll trust his judgement.

However, I'm not really any of those things. Although I'm not really sure what toffee-noesd is. Sounds kinky. I would like to visit London, one day. Or at least wherever the Young's brewery is.

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