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1,551 to 1,600 of 2,562 << first < prev | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | next > last >>

And both of them got their current name from Roman emperors (Julius Caesar and Caesar Augustus, respectively).


Saint Caleth wrote:
The month of July was originally called Quinctilius. August was Sextilius.

I'd rather say I was born in Sextilius.


Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
And both of them got their current name from Roman emperors (Julius Caesar and Caesar Augustus, respectively).

Tiberius, Nero and Caligula tried to name months after themselves too, but only the first two names stuck.

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:
The month of July was originally called Quinctilius. August was Sextilius.
I'd rather say I was born in Sextilius.

It makes more sense to be conceived in Sextilius.


Celestial Healer wrote:
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:
The month of July was originally called Quinctilius. August was Sextilius.
I'd rather say I was born in Sextilius.
It makes more sense to be conceived in Sextilius.

As I was born about 9 months after dads birthday my birth month makes perfect sense. :-)


Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Saint Caleth wrote:
The month of July was originally called Quinctilius. August was Sextilius.
I'd rather say I was born in Sextilius.
It makes more sense to be conceived in Sextilius.
As I was born about 9 months after dads birthday my birth month makes perfect sense. :-)

September ninth here; it's obvious!

Doodlebug, why haven't you mentioned Thermidor and what not? I mean, you're always talking about razor jenny.


Man, I have a hard enough time tracking the dates of the Russian Revolution on the Gregorian calendar, never mind the one the French Republicans made up.


The first performance of Mozart's The Magic Flute took place on September 30 1791 in Vienna. Meanwhile, in Paris, the National Constituent Assembly was dissolved and replaced by the Jacobin-dominated Legislative Assembly.


On September 30, 1938, Neville Chamberlain returns from negotiations with Hitler in Münich, declaring they have reached an agreement that will ensure "Peace in Our Time." And in Geneva, the League of Nations votes to declare the aerial bombing of civilians illegal.

...Exactly one year later, the Molotov-Ribbentrop non-aggression pact between Nazi-Germany and the Soviet Union is signed.


Kajehase wrote:
The first performance of Mozart's The Magic Flute took place on September 30 1791 in Vienna. Meanwhile, in Paris, the National Constituent Assembly was dissolved and replaced by the Jacobin-dominated Legislative Assembly.

Although the majority of those Jacobins split with the society and went on to be known to history as the Brissotins or the Girondists who were later overthrown by the remaining Jacobins on the road to the Republic of Virtue.

Vive le Galt!


They're re-releasing Kirsty MacColl's first four albums!!


Kajehase wrote:
The first performance of Mozart's The Magic Flute took place on September 30 1791 in Vienna. Meanwhile, in Paris, the National Constituent Assembly was dissolved and replaced by the Jacobin-dominated Legislative Assembly.

One of the things that makes the French Revolution so much harder to read about than the American Revolution is that the cast of characters changes so drastically from year to year. Now, part of that, of course, is because of the Final Blades (Vive le Galt!), but, also, there's this:

So, the Estates-General had morphed itself into the Constituent Assembly, and then Louis XVI tries to do a runner, and they vote to dissolve the monarchy and proclaim a republic. They set up elections for a new Legislative Assembly and then, on, like, the last day, Robespierre gets up and proposes a strict term-limit bill barring anyone who sat in the CA (including himself) from sitting in the LA!

So, you're reading along in the book and, all of a sudden, you have to be introduced to a whole new set of characters, and their backstories, and plotlines, etc., etc.!

It's very confusing.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Fouquier-Tinville wrote:


So, you're reading along in the book and, all of a sudden, you have to be introduced to a whole new set of characters, and their backstories, and plotlines, etc., etc.!

It's very confusing.

That's the truth. I set out to read a translation once (My French isn't that good.) and ended up in part because of the absolutely sterile translation and in part because almost no effort was made to introduce the various figures. They just sort of appear. Some of that's understandable, what with it being written in French for a French audience, but it came off more like a deliberate style choice.

Maybe that's just how the francophone academy rolls. The closest thing I've seen from an anglophone writer aimed at a general audience is Margaret MacMillan's Paris, 1919. (I think it's The Peacekeepers in the rest of the world.) She was really good and taught me a lot, but the way she framed the book in sort of thematic chapters meant that some major events got alluded to and then never dealt with.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

More people are allergic to cows milk than any other food.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

More people are allergic to Cosmo's milk than any other milk.

Silver Crusade

4 people marked this as a favorite.

I don't recommend milking Cosmo.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Celestial Healer wrote:
I don't recommend milking Cosmo.

See, comments like this are the reason we need a thread kind of like the "Overheard in the Paizo Offfices", but with stuff posted here on the boards.

Qadira

Glamour which is a charm or an archaic spell is a bastardization of the word Grammar. During the "dark ages" men and women who could read and write could in fact "spell."

Qadira

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Crimson Jester wrote:
Glamour which is a charm or an archaic spell is a bastardization of the word Grammar. During the "dark ages" men and women who could read and write could in fact "spell."

I'M MAGIC!!!!!!!


On October 1st, 1939, German forces entered Warsaw after a one-month siege. 7 years later, several of those responsible for that war were given their sentences at the Nürnberg-trials.


And on October 1, 1947, a man named Dave Arneson was born.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

On average more people are killed from bees than snakes.


A mumpsimus is an old idea or custom which is adhered to despite having been shown to be wrong or unreasonable.


A mummery is a performance by mummers. A mammery is something completely different.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The average person laughs 10 times a day.


Aberzombie wrote:
The average person laughs 10 times a day.

And farts between fourteen and twenty-three times a day as well. Most of them are not noisy and in fact are barely noticed by the farting person.


Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The average person laughs 10 times a day.
And farts between fourteen and twenty-three times a day as well. Most of them are not noisy and in fact are barely noticed by the farting person.

I've heard much bigger estimates. Like 60. And that we typically fart between 30 and 40 times while we sleep.


meatrace wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The average person laughs 10 times a day.
And farts between fourteen and twenty-three times a day as well. Most of them are not noisy and in fact are barely noticed by the farting person.
I've heard much bigger estimates. Like 60. And that we typically fart between 30 and 40 times while we sleep.

Clearly, Fartology is a deeply fractured and divided school of thought.

Silver Crusade

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
meatrace wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The average person laughs 10 times a day.
And farts between fourteen and twenty-three times a day as well. Most of them are not noisy and in fact are barely noticed by the farting person.
I've heard much bigger estimates. Like 60. And that we typically fart between 30 and 40 times while we sleep.
Clearly, Fartology is a deeply fractured and divided school of thought.

Spoiler:
Would you say that they are split down the middle?

Spoiler:
Are they showing a big crack?

Spoiler:
Are they mostly full of hot air?

Spoiler:
Have they made asses of themselves again?

Spoiler:
Or perhaps the joke is on us and they've been having a gas the whole time?


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Celestial Healer wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
meatrace wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The average person laughs 10 times a day.
And farts between fourteen and twenty-three times a day as well. Most of them are not noisy and in fact are barely noticed by the farting person.
I've heard much bigger estimates. Like 60. And that we typically fart between 30 and 40 times while we sleep.
Clearly, Fartology is a deeply fractured and divided school of thought.

** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

these jokes really stink.


Celestial, Freehold, thank you; this is why I stay on the Paizo boards, :)


My dog Rosie is way ahead of the curve where breaking wind is concerned. I swear she eats animal corpses just to enhance the bouquet.


The Dutch village of Spakenburg is home to two of the Netherlands' most successful amateur football clubs, SV Spakenburg and IJsselmeervogels. The derby between them is known as "the Spellcheck derby."


Kajehase wrote:
IJsselmeervogels.

its pronounce "throat-warbler mangrove"

Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Kajehase wrote:
The Dutch village of Spakenburg.......

I first read this as "Spankyburg".


You never know with the Dutch.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The Atlantic Ocean is saltier than the Pacific.


Top slaad researchers are working on ways to turn the Atlantic Ocean into a giant margarita.


We need more olives, yeeesssss. Flesh-things, petition your overlords for a grant.


The story of Robinson Crusoe was inspired by the actual story of Alexander Selkirk, a scottish sailor who joined the pirate crew of William Dampier and ended up stranded in Juan Fernandez island, a spit of land located hundreds of miles off the coast of Chile.

Unlike the book, though, Selkirk had to endure not a tropical paradise, but a horribly unforgiving barren rock punished by roaring winds, unruly waves and a persistent cold weather. Plus giant lobsters that have reportedly eaten people alive (no, really).

That same island served as a political prison during the XVIII and early XIX centuries, where the Spanish Crown sent Chilean independentists. Many of them carried valuable objects and documents with them, which they hid across the island to avoid being seized by Spanish officials (the prisoners were thrown into the island, but otherwise were free to move around it. Not that there was much to do, anyway). They are highly sought after by collectors and historians.

The island is also supposedly the place where the Spanish sailor Juan Esteban de Ubilla y Echeverria buried nearly 700 barrels of gold pieces in the early XVIII century. British sailor Cornelius Webb claimed to have found it and then buried it again because he was tailed by the Spanish navy.

Thus, Juan Fernandez island has been the obsession of several individuals thoughout the last two centuries, as the value of the treasure is estimated at 10 billion USD. So far, however, save from some intriguing evidence that seems to support Webb's tale, no one has been able to find it.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Your mouth produces approximately 1 litre of saliva a day.


Litre o cola!!


Until 1997, some British nuclear missiles were armed by turning a key in what was essentially a bike lock. To choose whether the bomb should explode in the air or on the ground, you turned dials using an Allen key, Ikea-style.

Among military security specialists*, it's well-known that at the height of the cold war, the "secret unlocking code" for America's nuclear missiles was 00000000.

*:
Says the reporter who's column I took this from, though I've heard the claim before.

Andoran

Kryzbyn wrote:
Litre o cola!!

Liter is French for GIVE ME MY F$+~ING COLA BEFORE I BREAK VOUS F&+$ING LIP!

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Cookie monster originally had teeth.

Andoran

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
Cookie monster originally had teeth.

Terrifying as f$!!.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The average human head contains 22 bones.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
Cookie monster originally had teeth.

And the lesson of that clearly is that you should brush your teeth after you've eaten - especially if it was something sweet (like a cookies). Om-nom-nom!

Silver Crusade

Aberzombie wrote:
Cookie monster originally had teeth.

I hope they were sharp and pointy. That would be adorable.

Andoran

Celestial Healer wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Cookie monster originally had teeth.
I hope they were sharp and pointy. That would be adorable.

Not something I would want to see coming out of a darkened alley.

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