Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
Pathfinder Society

Pathfinder Beginner Box

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game

Pathfinder Comics

Pathfinder Legends

Did you know...?


Off-Topic Discussions

1,051 to 1,100 of 2,532 << first < prev | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | next > last >>
Qadira

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

IANABioengineer, so I'll link the relevant article >HERE<. It does have a lot of implications RE future data storage and computing.


Patrick Curtin wrote:

1,000 Gigabytes. Or 1,000,000 Megabytes . Or 1,000,000,000 Kilobytes.

To get an idea of the volume of data, that's the same as having 14,000 50 Gigabyte Blu-Ray movie discs worth of data in an area smaller than your pinky tip.

That boggles the mind! I still can barely wrap my head around the idea of having 1TB in my harddrive, let alone 700 times that in the tippiest tip of my teeniest finger!

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Al Copeland (founder of Popeyes Fried Chicken) once drove a white Lamborghini with a red interior.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The dot on top of the letter "i" is called a tittle.

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Patrick Curtin wrote:

1,000 Gigabytes. Or 1,000,000 Megabytes . Or 1,000,000,000 Kilobytes.

To get an idea of the volume of data, that's the same as having 14,000 50 Gigabyte Blu-Ray movie discs worth of data in an area smaller than your pinky tip.

Now it's my turn to nitpic! (But maybe somebody will find this interesting... It's sort of it's own "did you know" fact.)

Bytes use the standard metric prefixes (kilo, mega, giga) but are not actually metric. Each of level represents 1024 of the unit below it. This is because of the use of binary code; 1000 is not a exponent of 2, but 1024 is (2^10).

Therefore, there are 1024 bytes in a kilobyte, 1024 kilobytes in a megabyte, 1024 megabytes in a gigabyte, and 1024 gigabytes in a terabyte.

So in your example, 1 terabyte is actually 1,073,741,824 kilobytes.

Qadira

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Celestial Healer wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:

1,000 Gigabytes. Or 1,000,000 Megabytes . Or 1,000,000,000 Kilobytes.

To get an idea of the volume of data, that's the same as having 14,000 50 Gigabyte Blu-Ray movie discs worth of data in an area smaller than your pinky tip.

Now it's my turn to nitpic! (But maybe somebody will find this interesting... It's sort of it's own "did you know" fact.)

Bytes use the standard metric prefixes (kilo, mega, giga) but are not actually metric. Each of level represents 1024 of the unit below it. This is because of the use of binary code; 1000 is not a exponent of 2, but 1024 is (2^10).

Therefore, there are 1024 bytes in a kilobyte, 1024 kilobytes in a megabyte, 1024 megabytes in a gigabyte, and 1024 gigabytes in a terabyte.

So in your example, 1 terabyte is actually 1,073,741,824 kilobytes.

I did not know that. It makes perfect sense. Thank you for teaching me something new =)


Celestial Healer wrote:

Bytes use the standard metric prefixes (kilo, mega, giga) but are not actually metric. Each of level represents 1024 of the unit below it. This is because of the use of binary code; 1000 is not a exponent of 2, but 1024 is (2^10).

Therefore, there are 1024 bytes in a kilobyte, 1024 kilobytes in a megabyte, 1024 megabytes in a gigabyte, and 1024 gigabytes in a terabyte.

So in your example, 1 terabyte is actually 1,073,741,824 kilobytes.

I'd understood that manufacturers will often use them in the standard SI sense (1 TB = 1000000000 KB), to make it sound like the product has more memory, but operating systems report in binary (1 TB = 1073741824 KB) as you described. Therefore, if you have a 1 TB operating system, your 1 TB processor is 73,741,824 KB short!

Andoran RPG Superstar 2010 Top 16

1 person marked this as a favorite.

The number of water molecules in a thimble (5 ml) approximately equals the number of thimblefuls of water in all of earth's oceans.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:

Bytes use the standard metric prefixes (kilo, mega, giga) but are not actually metric. Each of level represents 1024 of the unit below it. This is because of the use of binary code; 1000 is not a exponent of 2, but 1024 is (2^10).

Therefore, there are 1024 bytes in a kilobyte, 1024 kilobytes in a megabyte, 1024 megabytes in a gigabyte, and 1024 gigabytes in a terabyte.

So in your example, 1 terabyte is actually 1,073,741,824 kilobytes.

I'd understood that manufacturers will often use them in the standard SI sense (1 TB = 1000000000 KB), to make it sound like the product has more memory, but operating systems report in binary (1 TB = 1073741824 KB) as you described. Therefore, if you have a 1 TB operating system, your 1 TB processor is 73,741,824 KB short!

If you look at the fine print, they admit to doing this. But yeah, it's a scam to make the stuff look like it has more capacity than it does.

Andoran

Kajehase wrote:
That's because we steal the best stuff you make and then add the best from our own traditions (Lex Beatles).

Funny, I was going to say the same for US.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The electric chair was invented by a dentist.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
The electric chair was invented by a dentist.

Yep, I can believe it. (supporting evidence)


The guillotine was invented by a surgeon.

Vive le Galt!!


5 people marked this as a favorite.

Most government forms and paperwork were invented by slaadi.


Only the ones that have to be filled out in triplicate, right?


The name for the Australian marsupial Kangaroo came about when some of the first white settlers saw this strange animal hopping along and they asked the Aborigines what it was called. They replied with 'Kanguru', which in the native language meant 'I don't know' .

Andoran

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kip84 wrote:

The name for the Australian marsupial Kangaroo came about when some of the first white settlers saw this strange animal hopping along and they asked the Aborigines what it was called. They replied with 'Kanguru', which in the native language meant 'I don't know' .

I doubt the veracity of this one, but it's still entertaining.

In the same vein:

When the explorer Eric Shipton made his famous journey through the Himalayas in the 1930s, he reportedly glimpsed a strange creature on a far-off mountainside. The apocryphal encounter apparently went something like this:

Shipton: "You see that? What's that?"
Sherpa guide: "Yeh-teh? [That thing, over there?]"

And so the Yeti was born.


Wow a five minute check shows you to be correct Mr. Shiny. That's a little disappointing as its a story I've grown up with that was always presented as fact...


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Bob's Burgers was originally going to be about a family of cannibals that ran a fast food resturant.


DJEternalDarkness wrote:
Bob's Burgers was originally going to be about a family of cannibals that ran a fast food resturant.

I think I'd rather watch that.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
DJEternalDarkness wrote:
Bob's Burgers was originally going to be about a family of cannibals that ran a fast food resturant.

{strums guitar, sings:} "You can get anyone you want, at Bobby's Restaurant"


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I don't want a pickle, I just wanna ride my motorsickle.


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
I don't want a pickle, I just wanna ride my motorsickle.

That phrase is one of those thing my dad has said since I was an infant. It's a "dadism" in my house.


How old are you? My dad never said it, but they were my mother's Arlo records.


Wait, wait, are you implying Doodlebug is your dad?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Wait, wait, are you implying Doodlebug is your dad?

Juan Valdez is my builder.


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
How old are you? My dad never said it, but they were my mother's Arlo records.

I'm 32. Dad is in his 70's.


Yeah, I'm 35. Dirty, stinking, long-haired hippie parents.


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Yeah, I'm 35. Dirty, stinking, long-haired hippie parents.

Dad actually joined the Air Force so he wouldn't have to go to the Vietnam war. Odd as that sounds.

He was in college for much of it so that kept him out. So when he graduated he signed up to be a pilot. The pilot training was long enough that between that, Officer candidate school, and college the war was over. Plus now he could fly heavy aircraft.

Qadira

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Meh. 45 with stinking New Deal Boston Irish Democrat teacher parents.

Anyway, did you know?

There were only six civilian casualties from Japanese bombs on continental US soil in WWII. They came about from a Japanese terror bomb campaign that sent 9,000 'fire baloons' over the Pacific armed with incendiaries to try and ignite the West Coast and cause terror in the populace. Unfortunately for the plan, the season was very wet, and few fires were reported. Only a fraction made it to American soil, and only one caused any deaths.

Qadira

My father joined the Air force and was shipped to Berlin during the Vietnam "conflict"

Qadira

My dad was an Air Force Colonel. He also has a killer goatee and teaches law. Ever heard of the Purple Elephant?

Purple Elephant:
When driving home today after work Do not think about Purple Elephants. You cannot think about Purple Elephants, don't even try to think about Purple Elephants. What ever you do, don't think of Purple Elephants.

Why:
In the court of law, whenever the judge says don't think of something, its going to be one of the first things the jury thinks about when they have to discuss. Its a pretty big tactic if it works.


Crimson Jester wrote:
My father joined the Air force and was shipped to Berlin during the Vietnam "conflict"

That makes sense.

Germany is the jumping off point for europe and the middle east. Lots of supplies, etc go through there. Also several of the bases are joint command, meaning several branches work together for operations.

I was a kid in germany when the Berlin wall came down. I used to have a piece of it, but since I was a kid I lost it somewhere. I suspect it's in the attic of my old house in Ohio.


Tirq wrote:

My dad was an Air Force Colonel. He also has a killer goatee and teaches law. Ever heard of the Purple Elephant?

** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **

Heard of and used the purple elephant before. Not in a courtroom, but mostly just to annoy friends.

"Don't think of (insert something graphic)." Usually while eating.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I would actually call b!$#*$++ on this one, but it's too funny to pass up....

You're more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than by a poisonous spider.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

A crocodile can't stick out its tongue.


The Carpenter's hit We've Only Just Begun started out as just two verses and a bridge to be played in a TV-ad for a bank who needed to attract a younger clientèle.


Aberzombie wrote:

I would actually call b$+$#*@* on this one, but it's too funny to pass up....

You're more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than by a poisonous spider.

How many busy people today have room for both deadly champagne corks and poisonous spiders?! What a hassle!

But wait...

What if I told you that you could have both a champagne cork and spider in one!!! (NSFthe spider squeamish) How much would you pay? [/smarmy infomercial voice]


I think I just found my next PC killer scenario...


Tirq wrote:

Ever heard of the Purple Elephant?

** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **

I have heard of something similar, something from Tolstoy about sitting in the corner and trying NOT to think of a white elephant. Or maybe it was a white bear, I don't remember. Anyway, apparently it can't be done.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Patrick Curtin wrote:

Meh. 45 with stinking New Deal Boston Irish Democrat teacher parents.

Anyway, did you know?

There were only six civilian casualties from Japanese bombs on continental US soil in WWII. They came about from a Japanese terror bomb campaign that sent 9,000 'fire baloons' over the Pacific armed with incendiaries to try and ignite the West Coast and cause terror in the populace. Unfortunately for the plan, the season was very wet, and few fires were reported. Only a fraction made it to American soil, and only one caused any deaths.

There's a neat story here, which I'm typing from memory so errors are likely:

Back in the Twenties, a Japanese scientist discovered the jet stream. He thought this was hot stuff and published in Japanese, but he knew that would not get the eyes he wanted on his work. So like a good scientist he publishes in an accessible international language: Esperanto. You may be astonished to learn that nobody read that.

The Japanese remembered the meteorologist's work, so they decided they'd set the great American forests and cities afire by attaching the aforementioned incendiary bombs to some balloons like the meteorologist used to discover the jet stream. Late in the war, they launched thousands of the things from the east coast of Honshu. One made it as far as Michigan. The one that caused the deaths burned a church group in Oregon.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Kryzbyn wrote:

The BBC Europe correspondent described the painting's current state as resembling "a crayon sketch of a very hairy monkey in an ill-fitting tunic."

LOL

ADDENDUM:

The folks on the SA forums have started posting edits of the messed up Jesus painting.
This one is my favorite so far.

Qadira

Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:

I would actually call b$+$#*@* on this one, but it's too funny to pass up....

You're more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than by a poisonous spider.

How many busy people today have room for both deadly champagne corks and poisonous spiders?! What a hassle!

But wait...

What if I told you that you could have both a champagne cork and spider in one!!! (NSFthe spider squeamish) How much would you pay? [/smarmy infomercial voice]

WTF!!!!

Qadira

Samnell wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:

Meh. 45 with stinking New Deal Boston Irish Democrat teacher parents.

Anyway, did you know?

There were only six civilian casualties from Japanese bombs on continental US soil in WWII. They came about from a Japanese terror bomb campaign that sent 9,000 'fire baloons' over the Pacific armed with incendiaries to try and ignite the West Coast and cause terror in the populace. Unfortunately for the plan, the season was very wet, and few fires were reported. Only a fraction made it to American soil, and only one caused any deaths.

There's a neat story here, which I'm typing from memory so errors are likely:

Back in the Twenties, a Japanese scientist discovered the jet stream. He thought this was hot stuff and published in Japanese, but he knew that would not get the eyes he wanted on his work. So like a good scientist he publishes in an accessible international language: Esperanto. You may be astonished to learn that nobody read that.

The Japanese remembered the meteorologist's work, so they decided they'd set the great American forests and cities afire by attaching the aforementioned incendiary bombs to some balloons like the meteorologist used to discover the jet stream. Late in the war, they launched thousands of the things from the east coast of Honshu. One made it as far as Michigan. The one that caused the deaths burned a church group in Oregon.

ohh so close, a minister's wife and his family on a fishing trip.

The balloons did kill six Americans. A minister and his wife had taken some children on a fishing trip in southern Oregon, east of the Cascades, when they discovered a balloon bomb that exploded while they were gathered around it, killing the woman and five children. Japanese propaganda broadcasts announced great fires and an American public in panic, declaring casualties as high as 10,000, but the six people killed in Oregon were the only casualties inflicted by the enemy on the American mainland in World War II.

Qadira

And honestly after our attempts at BAT BOMBS I can see them trying many things.

Qadira

Also William Shatner made a film in Esperanto. Why I don't know. Maybe because he was out of work.


Crimson Jester wrote:
Also William Shatner made a film in Esperanto. Why I don't know. Maybe because he was out of work.

Ĉar li estas iom freneza?


Crimson Jester wrote:
Also William Shatner made a film in Esperanto. Why I don't know. Maybe because he was out of work.

In the sci-fi world of Red Dwarf everything is Esperanto bilingual.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Rubber bands last longer when kept refrigerated.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Women blink twice as much as men.

1,051 to 1,100 of 2,532 << first < prev | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | next > last >>
Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Community / Off-Topic Discussions / Did you know...? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.