Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
Pathfinder Society

Pathfinder Beginner Box

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game

Pathfinder Comics

Pathfinder Legends

PaizoCon 2014!

Did you know...?


Off-Topic Discussions

951 to 1,000 of 2,456 << first < prev | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | next > last >>
Silver Crusade

Samnell wrote:
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:


I have seen that people that keep a bunch of large bills in their box. I don't specifically know why, but I suspect it's because they want to appear to have less money for some reason. Tax evasion, qualifying for some sort of government assistance, maybe hiding it from a spouse, maybe drug money. I'm not really sure, but it seems sketchy to me.
It sounds it. There aren't a whole lot of reasons someone would carry around a big pile of physical cash with them in a world with credit cards, checks, and the internet. Banks have to report deposits in excess of $10k or more but my guess would be that most don't want to know, as a matter of course, what's in their safe deposit boxes.

From what I gathered in conversation, a fair few cases were, ironically, distrust of banks. People felt the safe deposit box was safer than their mattress, which was in turn safer than an account. Dumb. Money in a bank account is insured. Money in a safe deposit box is uninsured and unknown to anybody but you. When I worked there, another branch experienced a flood that destroyed a lot of people's stuff in the vault. (Not cash, which is fine if it gets wet, but what if it had been a fire or burglary?)

Qadira

Kajehase wrote:
Samnell wrote:
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:


I have seen that people that keep a bunch of large bills in their box. I don't specifically know why, but I suspect it's because they want to appear to have less money for some reason. Tax evasion, qualifying for some sort of government assistance, maybe hiding it from a spouse, maybe drug money. I'm not really sure, but it seems sketchy to me.
It sounds it. There aren't a whole lot of reasons someone would carry around a big pile of physical cash with them in a world with credit cards, checks, and the internet. Banks have to report deposits in excess of $10k or more but my guess would be that most don't want to know, as a matter of course, what's in their safe deposit boxes.
That said, if I were a rich man (Daidle deedle daidle Daidle daidle deedle daidle dum), I'd definitely be walking around with large sums simply because I happen to prefer using cash when possible.

Thus is... TRADITION.

Shadow Lodge

Celestial Healer wrote:
Money in a bank account is insured.

By the government, which these types tend not to trust.


The 'Dingo fence' in Australia is the longest fence in the world and is about twice as long as the great wall of china!


Less scenic, though.


Kajehase wrote:
Less scenic, though.

True, though the Aussie outback is beautiful in its own way :)


Kajehase wrote:
The Prefab Sprout song Lions In My Own Garden (Exit Someone) is called like that because the songwriter, Paddy McAloon, wanted the words of the title to spell out the name of the city his ex-girlfriend had gone to work as an au pair in when she broke up with him.

Holy crap, someone else on these boards has heard of Prefab Sprout!!!!


Hot dog, jumping frog, Albuquerque!

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Instant coffee was invented in 1901.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The human body of a 70 kg person contains 0.2mg of gold.


That someone's working on a functional hover bike...


-Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world, just after oil.

-During the Middle Ages in Europe, it was customary for kids to drink watered-down beer. Monks originally started advising people to do it, as they found out the alcohol helped avoid diseases contracted from dirty water.

-It is estimated that about half the modern Spanish territory was completely devoid of human population during most of the Moorish occupation of the peninsula, as both Christians and Muslims retreated into their respective domains, leaving entire towns and cities abandoned, which were in perfect state and rarely damaged by sieges, in the process.


Kajehase wrote:

**stuff**

That said, if I were a rich man (Daidle deedle daidle Daidle daidle deedle daidle dum), I'd definitely be walking around with large sums simply because I happen to prefer using cash when possible.

...Until someone gets wind of this and hits you over the head with a brick and takes it.

Curse of the Lottery mini rant:

Kaj, Not that I think you fall into this category, but you reminded me of something.

There is a documentary called "Curse of the Lottery." Basically it's about people whose lives were ruined by the lottery. More accurately it's about people whose lives were ruinded after making monumentally stupid decisions after winning the lottery. Such as "grandpa" getting a briefcase with 100K in it and leaving it in his truck as he went into a country honkey tonk and brag about it. Guess what? When he came out to his truck the window had been broken and the briefcase was gone. Also he facilitated his grandaughter becoming a raging meth head by giving her dumbass a bunch of expensive crap.

Basically, with or without money people will be both very bright and very stupid.

/end rant


Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
-Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world, just after oil.

Better recanize!!

Edit: That's "Better Recognize" in hip hop language. Clearly I'm not fluent in that particular dialect. Specifically when typing.


Orthos wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:
Money in a bank account is insured.
By the government, which these types tend not to trust.

FDIC insurance only insures up to 250,000. I think that's per person, but it may be per account. I'm not really sure.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

If you're reading this you're probably older than the internet. Tell that to some kid and watch their reaction.


Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Kajehase wrote:

**stuff**

That said, if I were a rich man (Daidle deedle daidle Daidle daidle deedle daidle dum), I'd definitely be walking around with large sums simply because I happen to prefer using cash when possible.

...Until someone gets wind of this and hits you over the head with a brick and takes it.

** spoiler omitted **

Juan Garcia Esquivel won the Mexican lottery twice.


Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Kajehase wrote:

**stuff**

That said, if I were a rich man (Daidle deedle daidle Daidle daidle deedle daidle dum), I'd definitely be walking around with large sums simply because I happen to prefer using cash when possible.

...Until someone gets wind of this and hits you over the head with a brick and takes it.

** spoiler omitted **

Yeah, by large money I didn't really mean more than I can fit in my wallet without it being hard to fold. :D (I'm guessing... 8-10 thousand in Swedish money, or 1-2000 in US or Canadian ones). Enough to make me feel I could walk into a store and get a new dishwasher if I needed to, but not so much that it'd be showing off.


Stewart Francis' joke "You know who really gives kids a bad name? Posh and Becks," was voted funniest joke at this year's Edinburgh Festival.

Personally I'd say the rest of the top ten were all funnier. But, as we say here in Sweden, "taste is like your butt: divided."


Kajehase wrote:
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Kajehase wrote:

**stuff**

That said, if I were a rich man (Daidle deedle daidle Daidle daidle deedle daidle dum), I'd definitely be walking around with large sums simply because I happen to prefer using cash when possible.

...Until someone gets wind of this and hits you over the head with a brick and takes it.

** spoiler omitted **

Yeah, by large money I didn't really mean more than I can fit in my wallet without it being hard to fold. :D (I'm guessing... 8-10 thousand in Swedish money, or 1-2000 in US or Canadian ones). Enough to make me feel I could walk into a store and get a new dishwasher if I needed to, but not so much that it'd be showing off.

1,000-2,000 isn't so bad. I've seen people walk out of the bank with 20k+ in cash and I just think to myself "You stupid F***." Though, some of that may be rooted in jealousy.


Kajehase wrote:

Stewart Francis' joke "You know who really gives kids a bad name? Posh and Becks," was voted funniest joke at this year's Edinburgh Festival.

Personally I'd say the rest of the top ten were all funnier. But, as we say here in Sweden, "taste is like your butt: divided."

This:

"taste is like your butt: divided."

is far funnier than this:

"You know who really gives kids a bad name? Posh and Becks."

Just saying.

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm guessing there's some kind of social or local context to it, 'cause I don't get the joke.


6 people marked this as a favorite.

Well, you see, Orthos, your butt has two halves...

Shadow Lodge

*Gibbs smack* The other one, goofy goblin =P


Orthos wrote:
I'm guessing there's some kind of social or local context to it, 'cause I don't get the joke.

Me either. I assumed it was a cultural thing.


Orthos wrote:
I'm guessing there's some kind of social or local context to it, 'cause I don't get the joke.

Their kids have silly names. Brooklyn (cause that's where he was made ["thanks for telling everyone, mum and dad!"]), Romeo, Cruz, and Harper Seven.

Qadira

psah
Apple Blossom
Kal-el

Those hollyweird types get all the freaky names.


I once saw an ID registry for a kid named "Haleksanndheer".

Qadira

You know I find that the conversations around here are coming off like this Cracked article. On the one had it has gotten a bit silly on the other hand I am very guilty of #1 on this list. Well complaining about it anyway.


Did you know...

that Superman has never won a race against any version of the Flash?

Qadira

Dal Selpher wrote:

Did you know...

that Superman has never won a race against any version of the Flash?

'cept Kid Flash.


Kip84 wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Less scenic, though.
True, though the Aussie outback is beautiful in its own way :)

In defence of the Aussie outback, I was thinking more of the two constructions. :)

Shadow Lodge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Kajehase wrote:
Orthos wrote:
I'm guessing there's some kind of social or local context to it, 'cause I don't get the joke.
Their kids have silly names.

... Posh and Becks are people? That explains it. I didn't realize those were supposed to be names.


Orthos wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Orthos wrote:
I'm guessing there's some kind of social or local context to it, 'cause I don't get the joke.
Their kids have silly names.
... Posh and Becks are people? That explains it. I didn't realize those were supposed to be names.

Posh Spice

Bend It Like Beckham

Shadow Lodge

*reference flies over head* Yeah I know jack squat about most popular culture....


She were in Spice Girls, and he's a Calvin Klein model.

Edit: And at one point he was a pretty decent footballer too.

No Matt Le Tissier, though.


Link

Link 2


Sporty Spice has topped the British singles charts as part of a quintet, a quartet, a duo and solo.

I always thought Brits were supposed to have better taste than Americans.


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
I always thought Brits were supposed to have better taste than Americans.

???

Their idea of cuisine is to boil beef until it turns to string. And, seriously, any culture that volunatrily eats anything called "Spotted Dick" cannot be commended for taste!

They brew some phenomenally good ale, though, got to give them that.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:
Money in a bank account is insured.
By the government, which these types tend not to trust.
FDIC insurance only insures up to 250,000. I think that's per person, but it may be per account. I'm not really sure.

I think it's per person per institution. If you have 500k you could have it all protected by splitting the wad in two and depositing at two different banks.

But the really rich ones that have millions to squirrel away don't bother. They officially negotiate a private insurance plan or, in the real world, commit tax evasion.


I think he meant taste in music.
I'd have to concur, in general. They also have a much faster paced popular music cycle; things come in and go out of fashion rather quickly.

Since probably 90% of my favorite bands are British or have British members, on the music front, I definitely agree.

Also British television is much better, they have freaking panel shows, why don't we?


Did you know...?

The Ice Cream Sundae was invented in Two Rivers, Wisconsin?


-And the romans had icecreams as well! Rather, snowcones would be the modern equivalent, since it was made with snow and fruit juice.

-In Gladiator, in the scene where the Emperor returns to Rome and is greeted by the senators, you can see the Praetorian Guard in the background (the guys in black). One of them is very evidently sleeping and barely standing on his feet.

-In the same movie (which is one of my all-times favourites, I might add), during the "Barbarian Hordes" fight in the colisseum, in the part where the gladiators cut off the horses from one of the chariots and it turns over, you can see the pressurised gas tank used to cause the effect right inside the vehicle.

-Also, if you check carefully, you can see a guy sporting blue jeans behind a horse when Maximus is preparing his troops for battle against the Germans in the opening scenes.


Marco Polo returned from Asia with a cream based fruit ice recipe, at which point the recipe became a jealously guarded secret of the aristocracy. It was not until the Chicago World's Faire of 1893, that ice cream became available to the common citizen.

I love you, America.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Hitdice wrote:

Marco Polo returned from Asia with a cream based fruit ice recipe, at which point the recipe became a jealously guarded secret of the aristocracy. It was not until the Chicago World's Faire of 1893, that ice cream became available to the common citizen.

I love you, America.

Yet another ploy by the bolsheviks to take away our exclusive and proper right to enjoy pistaccio & chocolate banana blast!


Each vein and artery has a lining of muscle that can contract when a foreign object invades the vein or artery...such as an IV. Ouch.


Kajehase wrote:
Kip84 wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Less scenic, though.
True, though the Aussie outback is beautiful in its own way :)
In defence of the Aussie outback, I was thinking more of the two constructions. :)

Yes I doubt anyone plans a trip to see the dingo fence :)


In 1954 Bob Hawke made it into the Guinness Record Book: he sculled 2.5 pints of beer in 11 seconds. Bob Hawke went on to become the Prime Minister of Australia.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Kip84 wrote:
In 1954 Bob Hawke made it into the Guinness Record Book: he sculled 2.5 pints of beer in 11 seconds. Bob Hawke went on to become the Prime Minister of Australia.

This reminded me of Harold Holt, the Prime Minister of Australia from January of 1966 to December of 1967. That's not because his government fell in a scandal or something. He went to take a swim and never came back, literally.


I wish Julia would go for a swim :O

(not really but I can't wait till the next election)

951 to 1,000 of 2,456 << first < prev | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | next > last >>
Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Community / Off-Topic Discussions / Did you know...? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.