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How many character deaths is too many?


Carrion Crown


I am currently on book 4 of the Carrion Crown adventure path and I am just wondering if other GM's are finding very lethal.

I began the campaign with 4 players at my table and they were 15 point buy builds.

After the first book I have one character death (the player stayed) and one character drop out due to work requirements.

Death #1:

The first character to die was my brother's elf ranger. He was killed by the Slaughter Man in the party's first encounter with him.
They had just finished dealing with the other ghosts and traps of the
Harrow Stone when they found themselves drained and facing the Slaughter Man.
Rather than running away (as I thought they would) they proceeded to fight. I used the tactics detailed in the book for the Slaughter Man and after softening the party up with several magic missiles eventually two members of the party ran and hid from him leaving the ranger, the summoner and his eidolon exposed.
No problem right? I just divide the magic missiles between the two and everyone is happy. Unfortunately the summoner was under the effects of "Hide from Undead" and the eidolon had shield cast on it in the first round so I was left with one viable target. BLAM! dead ranger.
My brother took it in stride and at the end of the book he made a fighter to replace the ranger.

In the second book I had a party of 3 players (and things were okay) until the Baron's Keep). My brother died once again in the final dungeon.

Death #2:
Fighting the trolls at the keep entrance he and the cleric found themselves in a tight spot. My brother could have moved out of the fight and left his party member suffer a round from the troll alone while he drank a potion or stick it out and hope he they kill it first. Obviously he elected to stay and it didn't work out too well.

By the end of book 2 we had added a 4th player to the table and things were looking up. In fact the player who had left due to work commitments was able to return to the table bringing the total up to 5 PC's.

Midway through the third book the cleric had to leave due to starting up school and so our table was reduced once more to 4 players.

It was in the final "dungeon" that the player who had returned to the table at the beginning of the book met with his untimely end.

Death #3:
Being the only good aligned character at the time he was killed in Feldgaru by the Demon Wolves and their leader detecting that he was the best target to hit.

It was after this death that I lost two players. My brother had to leave town for his school co-op and second player had to leave for work requirements (the fellow who had returned and died stayed on and created an inquisitor of Desna).

However I managed to find two more players and now my table is back up to 4 as I began book 4 "Wake of the Watchers".

The book has been proceeding well and my party hasn't thrown me any real curve balls in terms of decision making. And in spite of a few misconceptions about the nature of some of the antagonists things went pretty well until...

Death's 4&5:
They arrived at the Undiomede mansion. The party managed to kill and clear out most of the mansions less savory characters by entering through the back door. They explored the upper level and found Voltiaro and thoroughly enjoying his transformation into a beast from beyond. We ended the session here and decided to finish next week.
The next game the noticed the trail of slime leading down stairs and they followed the trail to discover the portal in the stone pillars on the first floor of the house. After some debate they decided to explore the rest of the house.
This led to them eventually encounter a tick swarm which promptly devoured two characters one after the other. Both tried to flee the swarm's wrath but they learned the that Cling special feature of the tick swarm was deadly.

So there you have it 5 deaths in 4 books. I don't really believe any of them were the fault of the players but this has left me with a very weak reason for the party to continue hunting the Whispering Way (only 1 character from the original party remains.) Thankfully my party wants to keep going but I am running out of ideas on how to integrate new characters to the party.

In fact in order to save the last session from ending an hour and a half early I just teleported the two new characters into the party (with the consent of 3/4 players at the table) hand waving any introductions or attempts fitting them into the plot.

If anyone has some suggestions on how to keep introducing new characters please let me know. At this rate I'm going to have at least 2-3 more deaths.

Cheliax

Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber

Five deaths in those four books does not seem to bad. I myself died three times in Carrion Crown and I only played books 2,3,4.

I have come to realize that although I prefer a 15 point buy for character creation, it might be to low for a lot of the Adventure Paths.


Five deaths in four books is fine. I have no problem with a death in every book if circumstances dictate.

My group has had 2 deaths through 4 books.

1. Auren Vrood killed a PC with Circle of Death.
2. Clanartus Viliras with his ghouls ambushed and killed a PC.

Both times the dead PC was raised. This is low for my group usually we'll have about twice as many deaths by now.


Thanks for sharing your experiences. This is something I've been thinking about a lot as a GM and it depends a bit on your and your players' philosophy. In my game, I would be uncomfortable with that much death and my players would be bummed about it as well, because they are really focused on developing their characters for the long haul. Accordingly, I'm doing a lot to give them some cushion -- hero points, plus harrow cards, plus some special magic items. I did use a 15 point buy, which a bit balances out some of my generosity. Anyhow, some GMs would hate my approach, but I'm fine with it as long as the players are still feeling the fear (they are) and everyone is having fun (lots!).

I'm curious, were you using hero points in your game? I would think that would have helped avoid some of those deaths.

In any event, I guess you were asking about ideas for introducing new characters rather than general thoughts on player death. One suggestion is to prepare notes on several groups operating in Ustalav who are foes of the undead -- The Order of the Palatine Eye, The Pathfinder Society, the Pharasma church, Lastwall, a Royalist group, etc. Then if a new character needs to come in I would have the player choose from one of those groups to provide the character some backstory and motivation. It seems reasonable to presume that those groups could be tailing the WW as well and a character from one of the groups could show up if a current PC dies...

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Maps Subscriber

5 deaths is fine mate. These things happen.

I am a good way through GMing book 6 on Carrion Crown and so far I have had 5 character deaths myself. In Serpent's Skull I had 5 character deaths in the first book!

All of the encounters you have described are deadly so it's no surprise that a few characters died.

As to how to introduce new PC's well here are some suggestions:

1) Players go out to the local temples/taverns/inns and try to find a new member for their group and wouldn't you know it, there's a new adventurer in town.

2) An organisation that the players are affiliated to contacts them to say that their divinations have revealed that the players need help and are sending an agent to assist.

3) The players stumble across a prison in the area they are in with an unconscious player character. Their gear is piled up just outside the room. (I used this one in Carrion Crown myself)

4) An agent of an independent organisation finds his goals coinciding with the players so he offers an alliance for mutual benefit.

I'm sure you may find other ways. To be honest it's always going to feel a little contrived especially at high levels (Oh my god! What a co-incidence that we have found two 13th level characters just when we need them!) Fun trumps this however.

Having run through the rest of the campaign here's some encounters to consider:

Spoiler:
Book 5 doesn't really have any encounter that I would call a player killer. The closest you come is probably the surprise bone devil encounter near the start and the coffin mimics. (I had a PC death here)

Book 6 really ramps up the threat though. Here are some of the truly dangerous encounters:

The Banshee (D1): 140 points of damage to the whole party? That killed one member of my party and another got taken down by her incorporeal touch attack. Very nasty.

The Revenants (F8): This one took me by surprise. It looked fairly innocuous to be honest but turned out to be anything but. The problem was that the two tanky types in the party (a Crusader Cleric and an Oracle) were not the murderers of the revenants so the revenants concentrated on the more squishy PC's instead. After all they were the revenants murderers. To make things worse one of said squishies ran in to engage the revenants and was on the receiving end of 12 attacks at +20 doing 1d8+11 damage each. By the end of the fight it was up to the two non tanks to take out the bad guys as everyone else was down. All in all this encounter killed one player, required another player to receive a breath of life and put the other NPC (Kendra Lorrimor) down to unconsciousness.

The Shadows (F12): This had my players very worried. 8 greater shadows doing 1d8 strength damage each. Plus the shadows got surprise... Judicious use of death ward got the players out of this one but I had some very nervous PC's for a while there.

Urca Namat (aka the Worm that Walks): This was a truly inspired piece of encounter design (kudos Mr Hodge). The rot grubs make this a real danger. 1d6 per round of exposure? Nasty...

I haven't got to Marrowgarth yet but I expect her to be the biggest threat of the rest of the campaign. I also think that the Nightwalker could cause my players some issues.

Andoran

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

We have five players - Paladin, Magus, Cleric, Rogue, and Oracle. 20 point buy. We are wrapping up the second book but we took a detour to Carrion Hill (Module) inbetween book 1 and 2. So far we have had 4 deaths. Paladin once, Cleric once, and Magus twice. Two in the first book, 2 in Carrion Hill and none in Trial of the Beast (yet). So five deaths doesn't sound too bad.


Dave, it sounds like you provided opportunities for the PCs who died to be raised? I would really appreciate knowing how that played out. Who provided the raisings and how much did you charge the players? Any other details? My impression is that the PCs in many other campaigns are not being raised after they die, but my players will definitely be interested in having their PCs raised.


Voomer wrote:


In any event, I guess you were asking about ideas for introducing new characters rather than general thoughts on player death. One suggestion is to prepare notes on several groups operating in Ustalav who are foes of the undead -- The Order of the Palatine Eye, The Pathfinder Society, the Pharasma church, Lastwall, a Royalist group, etc. Then if a new character needs to come in I would have the player choose from one of those groups to provide the character some backstory and motivation. It seems reasonable to presume that those groups could be tailing the WW as well and a character from one of the groups could show up if a current PC dies...

I completely forgot about Lastwall and the royalist having a vested interest in stopping the Whispering Way.

I have already used the Order, and the PFS hooks though so I don't want to reuse them if I can help it.

I don't mind that the PC's died but I feel the Carrion Crown AP doesn't leave a great deal of time for PC's to go get one of them raised in the middle of an adventure :(.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The common element in most of these deaths seems to be "PC had a chance to get out/get healed/run away, but continued fighting."

That's not a problem with the Adventure Path. The player needs to feel the right amount of fear (enough to motivate them to save the character, not enough to make them unhappy with the game) and learn to act on it.

Shadow Lodge

It all depends on how close to the edge you want to run things and your players like to play. Five isn't excessive for my group, generally about one death per book is... normal.

Our current game has been fairly merciful but that is largely due to a large group and the GM giving us extra encounters so we are a little higher level than average.

Andoran

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Voomer - My players created cool backstories for their PC's so I didn't want them creating new PC's left and right. I also wanted them to feel like croaking is a bad thing and to try to stay alive. For PC's less than 5th level, raising them is too costly. Instead, I added in "The Hand of Menedes" which is a mummified hand from Osirion used to raise royal guards as undead. One of the players stole the hand in his background story - although he did not know what it did (besides give him a +1 to Fort Saves, which is usually enough to make a player want to keep the item forever and never question it). What the hand really did is raise a dead person into an intellegent version of a fast zombie as long as he touched the PC within an hour of death. His profession was a gravedigger so this was not a problem. After the Magus got killed, he mysteriously came back to life the next day. Each day that went by his Int, Wis, and Cha dropped a point, with the threat of turning feral at some point and becoming a danger to the party. The Paladin suffered a similar fate. Eventually Father Grimburrow devised a solution that once they cleared the prison, he turned them both back to the living. Having one of the party turn into an undead creature was fun for the roleplay aspect. So two deaths, no cost to the PC's besides a hunger for the living. In Carrion Hill, one PC got killed and had to pay the 5k+ which the group pooled money for and then the Cleric bit it in the end but the Church of Pharasma helped him out because he helped save the town. No cost to the PC's.

We developed a home rule (throwback to 2e) that said each PC has a 100% chance for success when brought back from the dead. After the first time, roll a d10, minus that from you 100% chance, and now that is your new chance. So the Magus is at 91%. Next death, he needs to roll the % dice at a 91 or less, or he is dead forever. Then a new PC will be needed. This makes death seem more permanent instead of a condition. That is why I try not to make the raising too costly. Hope that helps.


Thanks, Dave. I appreciate your perspective, because most of the GMs on the board don't really seem to encourage raising of dead PCs. "The Hand of Menedes" is a clever and hilarious approach, although I doubt I'll go that direction.

The party in my campaign is about to take on the Splatter Man. If a PC dies but the party succeeds, Grimburrow will probably offer to use a raise undead scroll he's been saving, charging the party a cut rate. If the party succeeds without a PC dying, he'll offer to sell them the scroll at a cut rate (2-3000 gp). If the party doesn't have enough gold I might have Kendra offer to give them an advance on the payment they were to receive from Daramid (Kendra could somehow work this out, either by selling or mortgaging the house, or arranging to get the funds back from Daramid down the road). Kendra trusts the PCs enough to know they will in fact return the books even if they have gotten the gold in advance.

Anyhow, I think letting them have one raise dead scroll on hand will be helpful. I like your home rule idea, so the players don't think they can endlessly raise their PCs.


Generally we rely on scrolls for dealing with player deaths. Reincarnate is the poor man's raise dead, after all, and can be sneaked into treasure without having to worry about who gets what.

We're within one or two sessions of finishing book 6 and we haven't had a death yet. Tactics, running away, emphasis of atmosphere over RAW, and a sacrificial eidolon built for caster-lockdown have kept the body count down. Close calls, though, those are in ready supply.

Even so, they still carry a raise dead scroll just in case.


I have had four character deaths in two books thus far. As I established Judge Daramid as a strong patron for the party in Trial of the Beast, she had the party resurrected in a secretive ritual performed by the Order of the Palatine Eye.

Twice. It helped that one of the people that died (twice) was her beloved assistant and protege.


I am a huge fan of character deaths but I can see how you're concerned about the motivation for the characters being slight (how many of them that are left knew the Professor)? I would be most concerned about writing new characters into the story that had strong backstories that tie them to the storyline and that will require a lot of cooperation between you (as the DM) and the new (or replacing) player.

That said, again, I love character deaths. I think they add a level of fear to the story and really reduce the level of heroics that the players feel. I don't think, personally, that gothic horror protagonists should be heroes. To me, Van Richten is the exception - not the rule. I really prefer to think of my gothic protagonists as just barely above average farmers/blacksmiths/scribes that were for some reason motivated into action. Perhaps that's from all the years of playing Ravenloft . . .

Without exception at my table the most talked about events are the ones that involved character deaths. Make them meaningful, make them painful, make the players deal with the body, the belongings, make them deal with "how do we tell his family? does anyone even know how to contact them?", make them take upon themselves the dead player's quest ("we will avenge you!"), etc.

I ALMOST killed a bard at my table last night fighting the Weaverworm. He got off 50 points of damage on him and paralyzed him. It was going to coup-de-grace him next round if the other PCs hadn't rushed in, dragged him to safety, and kept the worm busy.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Modules Subscriber

If you don't want characters to die, just have 'em miraculously survive. Even though Willie the Dwarf got pulled down into the ghoul pits to certain doom, an hour later the group encounters a wounded Willie who shares his story of how he single handedly fought off the ghouls and found his way here. Think of pulp adventure cliff hangers where the hero is in the plane that crashes at the end of an episode, but next week there is an explanation how he survived the crash or wasn't actually in the plane.

I have used the above as a house rule before, with the exception that any Named opponent could prove to be fatal. So you won't die fighting orks, but when the ork boss Bloodfist shows up, be careful. This way if the character does die, it is to a worthy opponent.

Osirion

When characters are raised in my campaign, they receive some sort of scar, injury, or permanent disability. Generally this is in the form of a "negative feat" associated with their death. Thus a character that was slain by a fireball may have vulnerability to fire, -2 to reflex saves, or perhaps just -4 to fire. Since I plan to run this in Ravenloft, the price of returning to the land of the living is steep. Players coming back will incur a Dark Power.

New characters are created at Party Level -1, which discourages re-rolling.


I like the idea of a disability related to being raised. Demontroll's idea is interesting, but I'd worry the PCs would overly lose their fear. It seems preferable to fudge a roll in the player's favor behind the screen if the GM wants to intervene so directly. I think I'd rather give out hero points and make raising accessible, with a disability.


Killed 3/4 characters in the first book, killed another in book 2.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Had a TPK in the first book, three deaths so far in book 2.

Spoiler:
The Lopper and Father Charlatan together with some abysmal rolls proved too much for them. Then the Erinyes took out the rogue and the magus and cleric were petrified by the basilisk.


One word: benefactor.

Someone or some organization is backing the PCs and has a vested interest in them succeeding. When something happens, the benefactor sends in re-enforcements. It is not a perfect solution but it does offer some explanation.


You might be taking it to easy on them....We are on book 6 of the carrion crown ap. So far all 5 players are on atleast PC number 8. Two player are on PC number 14.

To be fair though , I didnt like the listed tactics on lot of the enemys so I changed them , same stats just doing different things. Five , atleast to me , seem like to few.

Edit - The new PCs that come in are from the order. They are very invested in this thing and cant afford for the PCs to fail so they keep sending in more ppl to keep the specialist team at fighting strength.


Number 8?! Where is the autosave on this merry-go-round. At that point, it would feel like a video game to me.


CourtFool wrote:
Number 8?! Where is the autosave on this merry-go-round. At that point, it would feel like a video game to me.

Ya , its a harsh world my friend. When you play in our game there is no pulled punches. The bad guys are treated as people that have just as much will to live as the PCs. Some times that ends up as a TPK. None of that "Now that you are down I will stand over you going MUAHAHAHAHA and run off". A creature downs you , you can preaty much expect it to finish the job .


47 deaths so far, very commendable Tagion.

The answer to the thread title is "there is no such thing as too many character deaths".

<evil grin>

Osirion

Ya'll come talk to me when someone loses almost 60 characters...

Sczarni

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Ask your players if they're having fun. If the answer is yes, then it's not too many deaths. If the answer is no, dial the difficulty back a bit.


Yeah, that sounds suspiciously like "the GM is having fun at the expense of his friends".


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I appreciate people play the game differently, but anything more than one or two sounds like a meat grinder, and that's just not D&D for me.

I bet the player on his third character didn't bother putting much into the backstory (assuming he even did on the first one!).

Also, I feel gothic horror in D&D should be scary, and a splatterfest with a high PC body count just isn't frightening for me. There are other, and better ways to scare people.

Finally, aren't some of these Adventure Paths kind of dependent on having the PCs tied into the story? I'm thinking Jade Regent and Skull & Shackles. Doesn't it destroy credibility to have such a high turnover? I mean, even if you're killing off one PC per episode, you've replaced the entire party by #4. Fine if you play it as a boardgame or something, but that doesn't sound much like a story I'd want any part of.

Lastly, I've noticed that story-driven videogames (Dragon Age, Mass Effect etc) make death fairly rare, but when it happens, it's permanent. I like character death to mean something, and constant ressurections devalues the story as far as I'm concerned.


I agree with you Anlerran. Beside, the players need to be attached to their characters if you want them to be afraid of losing them, and players being afraid is important in a Gothic Horror campaing. I don't think that a player should play more than 3 PCs in an AP.


Kill 'em all. They're doing the same to the bad guys. ;)


Turin the Mad wrote:
Kill 'em all. They're doing the same to the bad guys. ;)

Yes but.. but most of the bad guys are already dead in this AP, so it's not the same! :P


Two thoughts:
1. When the players don't bat an eye and either go with, "Woohoo! Reincarnate time! Spin the wheel!"

or:
2. When the party wizard looks at the new PCs and asks, "How much do you weight?" Before he agrees to let them choice so he is sure that they will be under his weight limit to throw with telekinesis when they die.

Spoiler:
Yes I was that wizard.


Maerimydra wrote:
Turin the Mad wrote:
Kill 'em all. They're doing the same to the bad guys. ;)
Yes but.. but most of the bad guys are already dead in this AP, so it's not the same! :P

Ummm .. .

. Whack them until they fall over, take their stuff, burn the remains and have a cook out? ;)


Anlerran wrote:

I appreciate people play the game differently, but anything more than one or two sounds like a meat grinder, and that's just not D&D for me.

I bet the player on his third character didn't bother putting much into the backstory (assuming he even did on the first one!).

Also, I feel gothic horror in D&D should be scary, and a splatterfest with a high PC body count just isn't frightening for me. There are other, and better ways to scare people.

Finally, aren't some of these Adventure Paths kind of dependent on having the PCs tied into the story? I'm thinking Jade Regent and Skull & Shackles. Doesn't it destroy credibility to have such a high turnover? I mean, even if you're killing off one PC per episode, you've replaced the entire party by #4. Fine if you play it as a boardgame or something, but that doesn't sound much like a story I'd want any part of.

Lastly, I've noticed that story-driven videogames (Dragon Age, Mass Effect etc) make death fairly rare, but when it happens, it's permanent. I like character death to mean something, and constant ressurections devalues the story as far as I'm concerned.

I feel the same way to a point. Yes , the characters are suppose to be heroic people tied closly to the story , but you shouldn't reward bad playing with a hand waved pass. If your PCs rush into a situation that they cant win and refuse to retreat they should be killed. The enemys that they are fighting arent suppose to be sitting around waiting to be killed by PCs. They are suppose to be living things with goals and when something goes wrong for the PC they dont say " Man you guys are getting killed....hey guys lets switch to nerf swords and go half strength."

One of the biggest diservises I see DMs giving to thier groups is not allowing a PC to fail. If you take out all the risk and dont let the die why are you even playing, the out come has already been desided for you. If you tell the guy in full plate " I know you just failed your athletics check to walk on the bridge over the gorge but thats to keep going" then whats the point of even having the skill in the game.

Edit - As a PC if I walk up to a bear at level 2 and kick it in the nose I expect it to eat me not for the clouds to part and be saved by deus ex machina. I've been in games like this and its exremely annoying. As soon as I realized I couldnt die I really pushed it until the DM finally killed me. Highlights included , Biting a bear on the ear only to have it "roll" a few fumbles and be scared off by passing gaurds and slapping the local crime boss and being tosses out instead of killed. Its just bad DMing to hand wave everything just so PCs dont die.

This kinda links into my theory of PC building as well. Killing a character teaches players to build a better PC. Your never going to improve as a player if the DM doesnt allow you to learn from your mistakes.

Edit 2 - Also I should probably say the group I play with on a regular basic are kinda insane action junckies. In book 2 they lite the castle on fire because now its more "extreme".

Osirion

cibet44 wrote:

Five deaths in four books is fine. I have no problem with a death in every book if circumstances dictate.

My group has had 2 deaths through 4 books.

1. Auren Vrood killed a PC with Circle of Death.
2. Clanartus Viliras with his ghouls ambushed and killed a PC.

Both times the dead PC was raised. This is low for my group usually we'll have about twice as many deaths by now.

My character's brother (the part DPS Ranger) used a Hero Point to leap in front of the blast from Vrood' Circle and died as well.

Also, kudos on sticking through and killing a PC with the first encounter of WotW; I seriously still question myself whether I could follow through with that.

Osirion

We just started on Book 4, and we're currently up to 4 deaths.
3 at the end of Trial of the Beast, 1 at the end of Broken Moon against their respective big bads.

I'd say you're doing ok. If they were appropriate and mildly epic deaths, don't take that from them. Consider a good death an honor.

Shadow Lodge

Turin the Mad wrote:

47 deaths so far, very commendable Tagion.

The answer to the thread title is "there is no such thing as too many character deaths".

<evil grin>

BLOOD FOR THE BLOOD GODS


But when does it become too much a bother to create another character? I know a person who had 3 TPKs in Shackled City and shelved the adventure because they ran out of monsters/adventures that they could handle and noone wanted to keep going. If I am on my 3rd character, I am going to need a very good excuse to write up a backstory more than 'Kill things and take their stuff'.


Andrea1 wrote:
But when does it become too much a bother to create another character? I know a person who had 3 TPKs in Shackled City and shelved the adventure because they ran out of monsters/adventures that they could handle and noone wanted to keep going. If I am on my 3rd character, I am going to need a very good excuse to write up a backstory more than 'Kill things and take their stuff'.

I prefer to ad-lib my characters' back stories past that point anyway. It's refreshingly organic. Well, that and (Bob/Jane/whomever is still breathing in the party) is my friend/lover/twisted fetish buddy/sibling/fellow cultist of the Great Old Ones... ;)

Backstory is seldom a requirement to having fun in my experience - YMMV of course.


How about when the party gets higher in levels? I made a 10th level character and it was a chore to get all the points and equipment together.
Are there any programs that can speed it along when you just want to get back in quickly?


Herolab is really good, but it cost money. I think PCGen is the free one, but it is more work on the user end.

If I am in a campaign that is deadly enough that I think I might die* I have a backup character already made.

*I believe the chances are close to 50%.

PS:Shackled City is a pretty dangerous adventure, and it is not one I would run for just anyone.


How about 'Equipment packages'? There can be things like 'Fighter pack' that has weapons and armor 'Heal pack' with the curatives and the prices already figured out. Rather than flip through books, the players can buy the packages and split them as needed.


There are no fighter packs either. What I have always intended to do is create copy and paste my equipment from a PC into a word file, but I have never done it. <--Mundane gear only

I guess the same thing could be done for magical feat though, but right now it does not exist in any program. If you check the advice threads there a few prebuilt characters. You can use those as starting points to save time.

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