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To murder a fellow player character.


Advice

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lastblacknight wrote:

the only other suggestion I'd make is blatantly ripping off fairy stories , movies and pop culture and using them in the explanations.

Have your clothes made by Rumplestilskin,
Your armour by the Seven Dwarves etc...

I like it, but if you're gonna go that route, I think it'd be more fun to rip of something that really shouldn't make sense in a subtle way so that every item alone seems innocuous, but when looked at together leaves the GM wondering:

"Hey, waitaminute. Is he seriously taking all his item back stories from episodes of Miami Vice?" Or something like that. Bonus points if he only figures it out right as the other GM comes back.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Yeah, I am planning to play it cool, and try to excel within his constraints. My hope is that if he does try to take it farther, then the other players will notice, and call him out.


dragonfire8974 wrote:
yeah, why did your usual GM let him GM? that's just kinda... seems fishy to me

That is the first question I was going to ask.


In a low magic campaign which is basically what he is forcing you, and only you into casters are nice to have. I am only suggesting this after other options fail.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

The only real spell casters is an Inquisitor, and a player who plans to take a level in every full caster class.


blackbloodtroll wrote:
The only real spell casters is an Inquisitor, and a player who plans to take a level in every full caster class.

You weren't kidding about that unwise part, were you?

Anyways, what kind of character are you playing? Is it the same character as before? I could help write some of these item backgrounds if you'd like. Don't approve of your PC-bushwhacking, but I disapprove of the GM calling you a "g~%%+&n dirty power-gamer" to your face.


blackbloodtroll wrote:
a player who plans to take a level in every full caster class.

Well, I guess when looking at the context of the other players, I can sorta see why the guy's calling you a power gamer.

:P

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Laziest solution possible: Enjoy

Just flesh out each result with a few sentences. If he gets suspicious or calls you out on using a generator, you then have even more proof that he's out to get you. If that's what you wanted, I guess. *shrug*

Credit goes to some guy named Scrasamax, I think. Just found this at random.

Anyway, as much as it pains me to know you've had to deal with this guy as a PC and a DM, this has been one of the most consistently entertaining threads I've seen. Kudos on that


The background generator it not that bad. It at least gives a good starting point.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Holy crap that generator is helpful. I must be sure he never finds about it.


Why did the GM give up his seat?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
blackbloodtroll wrote:
Holy crap that generator is helpful. I must be sure he never finds about it.

Well, your secret is safe with me. Unless our very own resident annoying PC somehow knows him and lets him in on it. A player who, by the way, is also planning a campaign down the line, and a few of us are already thinking of excuses to skip it. Friendship can make outright rejection hard to pull off.


I must be missing something here. Why did you all agree to this? The GM doesn't get to just make house rules to the game if all of the players do not agree to it.

The issue really seems deeper than that to me though. Obviously he hasn't learned that you are all in this together and one man's fun should not tread on another man's fun. And that is what is going on. Again.

He may be annoyed that you are a "powergamer" but I don't really see how that can affect anyone else's fun. Aside from that I don't see it as a bad thing anyway. I have been called out as a powergamer and I took it as a compliment and said, "Thank you." The other player looked confused at me and asked why I thanked him. I told him that it was because to be a powergamer it means that I know the system well and that I can make effective characters. When he explained that he didn't mean it as a compliment I pointed out to him that I would be happy to help him with his characters if he'd like as they have always seemed very ineffective to me. He said he doesn't play the game soley to make an effective character. I explained to him that while I understand that everyone has their own play style that there is no in-character reason that my character would want to adventure with someone who was ineffective and that OOC I really have no desire to play with another player that I know wont have the ability to have my back either.

This really put things in perspective for him. It made him realize that there was an in character reason for my characters to excell. Power gamer is NOT the polar opposite of a role player. I am both and enjoy doing both but take neither one to the exclusion of the other. They are equally important to me.

Perhaps you need to have this conversation with your new GM/dead turtle player. While the idea to have a backstory for your gear is a good RP decision it impacts the fun of the game for the players. Unless you are in the minority here?

Also, please don't take this the wrong way, BBB, but I am beginning to think that you have confrontation issues. I mean, you did kinda need to post your idea here on the forum to build up the courage to take on this issue. And even then it sounds like you did it all in character with very little OOC discussion. I think killing the character was a good decision as you had explained he was an otherwise fun person to game with. However, it seems another personality trait of this person is to be vengeful. Not only that but he is doing it in the worst way of meta gaming. I hate meta gaming. Perhaps the valid come back to "Your a power gamer!" should be, "Thank you, I take that as a compliment. But you are a meta gamer and there is nothing good about that!"

In the end, I would never play under a GM that I did not enjoy playing under. It is as simple as that. He can only rule with his iron fist if you allow him to rule you. If you are not having fun in his game then leave it. Or better yet, bring up your issues at the game table before you play. If he is unwilling to change his ways and insists on having his fun at everyone else's expense then tell them all that you will not be a party to it and leave the game table. Perhaps the other players may take the hint and realize that the game table may be more fun without his influence.

...or maybe he will notice that he is having his fun at other's expense and stop being so selfish. I wouldn't hold my breath on that one though.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I take your advice to heart Lune. I am somewhat unfamiliar with some of the players, and wanted to feel things out. I am usual rather vocal with DMs and players I have gotten to know. I believe now that I have start to get a feel for others playstyle, I can handle concerns appropriately. Surprisingly enough, the murder of the fellow PC actually helped me to get to know some of my fellow players better. I believe once I get through this last snag, I can voice concerns freely, and improve the fun of all.


I hope you can. Also, I appologize, I had thought that these people were already your friends. That does kind of change matters a bit. Hopefully you all come through this stronger and better people and all have a long lasting healthy friendship.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Some are friends, many are not.


25 people marked this as a favorite.

Big ol post, i spent th epast half hour reading the reast, and it reminded me of my own experience, and i thought given some peoples entusiasm they may enjoy it ^^.

Back when I was a newbie to dnd, when I was about 12, playing with an older brother and his friends, ages ranging from 16-25, a particular party member was playing a very light fingered rogue named Roderick. I was playing a Sorceror, I wasn’t great, but I pulled my weight, buffing, and dealing what dmg I could. After a short while, the dm started handing me pieces of paper telling me that I had less gold than I thought I had, at first I figured, ok im new to this, so, its gotta be a regular thing that happens go with it. And they kept happening, and I would shrug and keep doing what I was doing.
It is at this point id like to point out I have a visual impairment, much worse now, but even back then my eye sight wasn’t great, the player running Roderick had been serupticously writing/handing notes to the dm, who in turn had discreetly read them (I really hold nothing against the dm, he liked being impartial, and I respect him for it, meant he could mediate a lot better between us and the world), eventually one of the other players, the paladin, got sick of what was going on and got into an argument with rodericks player, as it wasn’t right, especially since I was so new to the game and didn’t really know what was going on, let alone being confident to stand up to him being significantly older than myself. Eventualy the argument ended and I surprised everyone by telling them, I was fine with it, its all happening in the game, and I don’t know about it, perhaps someone is stealing my gold, perhaps I didn’t count it properly. And so the game continues, Roderick stops using paper notes and just flagrantly states when hes raiding my belongings, the dm takes me aside after a particularly long session and asks whether everything’s ok, he knew id been bullied a lot as a kid, and that I had a hard time sticking up for myself and he was concerned that I wasn’t so much playing my character as myself. We got to chatting and I asked if it would be alright if I could do some things, “out of play” I had heard some of the other players talking about doing things one on one with the dm outside the regular sessions and was wondering if I could take it a step further, listing the actions I was taking in my gaming journal “I kept logs of the things we did, and often got asked to recap what wed done the last session” he was surprised and said it would be ok, but listed off the things I “couldn’t” do, taking direct action that involved other players without their direct input being the main one, so no combat or pilfering of there belongings etc.

And so time wore in, the DM forgot about our chat, and Roderick kept helping himself to my gear. I specifically asked the DM to roll spot checks for me for the next 16 hours in game, as I devoted as much time as possible to catching the thief, eventually, after a degree of fatigue, I cought him in the act, but pretended I hadn’t, not even reading the dms note until after the game. And it was then I begun setting the wheels in motion.

As I leveled I had begun taking ranks in alchemy, a scattering in diplomacy, knowledge skills, gather information, disguise, professions, etc, everything I would need to make informed decisions in game, or to reflect my characters burgeoning knowledge in such skills.
I began making payments to a band of mercenaries, significantly higher level than our party, a good 7 levels higher, to perform a service in the near future, and received a signed copy of the contract. I discouraged suspicion of these payments with the smokescreen of sending money to my ailing mother, which I had already been doing each time our party made a windfall, so it didn’t raise suspicion when I would take a little longer arranging a courier.

Next I bought a significant number of “fools gold” pyrite, and fake lead gold coins, intermingling them with my own store of gold coins, after having sepperated a number for future expenses in a sepperate pouch “silenced bag of holding” that I stored my spell casting reagents/components inside. I paid a small fortune for these fakes, so as to leave no margin for error of Roderick accidently discovering there true nature. Around this time I also sent word for the Mercenaries “posing as bounty hunters” to begin trailing our party, with orders to question vendors, innkeepers and merchants about a Forger fitting Roderick’s description, this would in turn lead to a number of them having their coins checked, and considering the frequency with which Roderick took my gold, and summarily spent it, a high number of fakes would be found, incriminating Roderick.

Around this same time I also commissioned a Bard to compose a ballad of Rodericks deeds, duplicity, theft, flagrent disregard for the law. In short greatly exaggerating the behaviours he currently exhibited, and adding a few damning qualities to the list for good measure. I also Hired a band of up scale thieves, paying them every gold piece I had just earned from our last dungeon crawl, to steal the Dukes ring of office, for one of their troupe to wear a disguise resembling Rodderick as they performed the crime, and to be intentionally spotted by guards fleeing the castle grounds, and to have drugged and left the duke in a compromising and embaressing position “shaving his head completely bald, this duke was a vain man”, the member of the troupe disguised as Roderick would also go to a number of establishments, and spend yet more “fake” gold, making sure to introduce himself, or for the proprietors to hear hhis name in passing, to another member of the troupe.

As we prepared to set out on our next dungeon crawl/quest, I sent instructions for the bounty hunters to specifically seek out the duke, and inform him of their persuit of Roderick, the Duke would in turn doubtless offer them a reward for bringing Roderick to him to face “justice”. The mercenaries could then wait in the town we would soon be departing until we returned.
I also sent word for the bard to begin spreading the tale of Roderick the Red, including “his” most recent activities, which would, doubtless erve as a constant reminder to the poor duke of his embarrassment, and of Rodericks crime, no doubt infuriating him still further with each passing day.
I also sent word for the thieves to wait in the same town as the mercenaries, ready to plant the ring, and a lock of the dukes hair, on Roderick when we returned.

Once we were finished with the dungeon I send a “sending/message spell to each of the hired parties, who were waiting for us.
So in our intermission I handed over my journal to the DM and he read the highlighted parts, my plans and actions taken, his eye brows just rose higher and higher as he read on, by the end he looked pretty damn surprised and taken aback. I asked whether it was all on the level, and he said it was, and that I had paid far more gold for services rendered than I needed to, and I replied that I had done so as I was doing so as a anonymous client in every case, having no direct or indirect contact with them, using go betweens for initial contact, and sending/message spells there after.

when the intermission ended, the dm played it all out, Roderick made a beeline for the tavern, and when he was refused service by a rather irate barkeep, he didn’t think twice about accepting free drinks from “admirers” (local girls hired by the thieves), after he was suitably drunk, the thieves planted the evidence in his belongings. Soon after, the Mercenaries posing as bounty hunters stormed into the tavern, demanding to know where Roderick was hiding, a short fight ensued, the party trying to defend Roderick, but failing miserably, as we were all fatigued from our forced march and our cleric was out of healing juice. So Roderick was trussed up and was led off toward the city, he was confused as hell, equal parts scared and angry, as clearly there had to be a mistake.

The Paladin in our group managed to convince the Duke to give Roderick a fair trial, it didn’t help Roderick much. After the ring and lock of hair were found on his person, combined with eye witness reports of him fleeing the castle, the cornerstone of his defence became his ignorance of the forgeries, something he would soon regret. A expert on forgeries explained that when a certain chemical is combined with Pyrite it changes color, and anyone working with pyrite in sufficient quantities to forge false currency would have trace elements of the pyrite on their hands and so when combined, and he demonstrated on rodericks hands, much to his disbelief, that their hands would change color, in this case a deep red.
Roderick was convicted and sentenced, publicly hung, and his head mounted on a spike outside the Dukes castle.

hiss next character, Rodericks cousin Arthur, a Ranger with a bone to pick, was specialized in rooting out information and tracking people down. And so the next few months our adventures were tracking down and questioning people, slowly picking apart the web of intrigue I had spun, but each party could only give the one name of the man that hired them, Dresper, our party nemesis a powerful Wizard, so after the final lead ran cold, we went on a man hunt, and actually put Dresper to the sword, and that was that, to this day, no one else knows what I did except the DM. He actually congratulated me on the degree of thought and work I put into it, I had after all given him three months of adventuring plotline.

He gave me three levels worth of experience for the collective, roleplaying, planning, prep, expenditure of resources, changes made to my own character, my alignment shifted as my character became increasingly bitter and resentful.. He explained this bonus exp to the others as good role playing rewards, as I had been Rodericks most fervent defender in the ensuing court battles and evidence hearings, even resorting to sorcery to try and get him off, before being talked out of it by the paladin player, and seemingly putting together clues after the trail had gone cold.

On the whole a rather fun experience honestly. And a lesson to be learned, don’t steal another players gold, you never know, maybe there playing a sociopath? And good roleplaying will probably see you hang ^^


I second the episodes of Miami Device Idea. I would use the A-Team instead.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_A-Team_episodes

I would begin each sentence with a line. I found/aquired/got this [item} while [Episode description]

You could even play his game and have fun with the group. Ask other PCs if they mind being in the backstories of your items. If they say yes, then I would match each PC to a character on the A-Team. I would also sub in the name of your adventuring group for that of the A-Team. Here are the list of the main Characters:

Hannibal Smith (The Leader and Brains, he loves it when a plan comes together)

Face (Ladies Man, Investor, Quartermaster)

BA (Mechanic, Anger Issues, scared of heights, played by Mr. T)

Murdock (Pilot, Mechanic, Insane, liked to do goofy things. BA "hates" him)

Intrepid Report (Some random Chick they cast, Plucky, dare doing)

Characters that got the show cancelled because they are stupid, but alas part of the A-Team and you may need more people:

Frankie (Team Special Effects Expert, Gets Awesome 80s shows cancelled)

General Stockwell (Gave Missions, Sometimes Friend Sometimes Foe, Also Gets Awesome 80s shows cancelled).

Running Villain:

The A-Team was generally chased by some army dude for crimes they were falsely accused of in Vietnam. If I remember right your campaign has some kind of Devil Army running around. If there is a name for that, you can use that dude/dudette to replace any plot description containing Decker or something like that.

Summary:

Copy paste episodes (They are about two to three sentences a piece), say you acquired the item by getting through the episode description, replace names to match those in your campaign. Done. Build friends, as who would not want to be in an awesomes 80s action adventure show, and you "learned" the lesson your guest DM is trying so heavy handidly.)

Star Voter 2013

@Asherr, that was an awesome story, and exactly the kind of thing I've always wanted to do, but never given the opportunity.

Grand Lodge

Sounds like the problem wasn't the character after all, but the player.

Since he's now murder-proof, you should murder your own character and seize the guest DM role for yourself.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I will do my best to thrive beneath his thumb. I will create a story for every item I desire. I am one of the few players to create an extensive backstory, available for him to read online, and I will remind him of that. I will envelope him in everything he desires. I will show him that any form of petty vengeance will backfire, and that the fun of all players, is what is really important.


I actually think that is a very mature and honorable approach, bbb. I applaud you for it. :)


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Thank you Lune, a level of trust and respect can truly enhance the fun of all. In fact, in my Red Hand game, my DM trusts me as his confidant, as I am exceptional at not metagaming.


Huh, imagine that. I'm currently DMing a Red Hand game. The party just got to the final chapter.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

This actually my second time playing through it.

Liberty's Edge

This reply is sure to make me popular... XD

If this was one of my groups, there wouldn't have been an eight-page thread about it. PC's kill one another every real-time year at least. None of my players wine about it ever. Not much meta gaming goes on with us and there's never any drama, thankfully. Not even when we were kids. Never could understand some of the drama that some groups have.

Thread is very long.

BBT, did you kill him or not? Give us a quick CliffsNotes. I'll start:

PCs are a bunch of morally-ambiguous or outright evil pirates; a perfect recipe for kill or be killed right there if I ever saw one. One PC wants to kill the other one for who cares why because it's automatically justified as in-character and outright to be expected. Player doesn't want to hurt other players' feelings.

Then what? (Lemme guess, you don't and it gets worse.)


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Stripe wrote:

This reply is sure to make me popular... XD

If this was one of my groups, there wouldn't have been an eight-page thread about it. PC's kill one another every real-time year at least. None of my players wine about it ever. Not much meta gaming goes on with us and there's never any drama, thankfully. Not even when we were kids. Never could understand some of the drama that some groups have.

Thread is very long.

BBT, did you kill him or not? Give us a quick CliffsNotes. I'll start:

PCs are a bunch of morally-ambiguous or outright evil pirates; a perfect recipe for kill or be killed right there if I ever saw one. One PC wants to kill the other one for who cares why because it's automatically justified as in-character and outright to be expected. Player doesn't want to hurt other players' feelings.

Then what? (Lemme guess, you don't and it gets worse.)

I kill him, every one else is cool, player becomes guest DM, Guest DM tries to get subtle vengeance by making me create a backstory for every magic item, and leaves treasure drops that are optimal for other players, but not me. That's about where I am at now.

Liberty's Edge

blackbloodtroll wrote:
I kill him, every one else is cool, player becomes guest DM, Guest DM tries to get subtle vengeance by making me create a backstory for every magic item, and leaves treasure drops that are optimal for other players, but not me. That's about where I am at now.

Oh, crap. That sucks, man. Total BS. Congrats on doing the right thing, though.

I take it the "backstory" crap is because he's butt-hurt about some sort of min-maxing/power-gaming on your part. That's not too bad of a way to handle it if he's actually upset about it. Rather adolescent to be bothered in the first place, though.

As for the item drops, there's two sides to every story, but if I were a gambling man, I'd bet yours is closer to the truth than his.

What do your fellow players say about this situation? Anything?


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

He seems to be subtle enough that they pass it off as me being paranoid. As stated before, I intend to try to flourish under his thumb. Got any magic item backstory ideas for the above listed items?

Liberty's Edge

Oh, guest GM... Didn't notice that.

Definitely search out a temporary group.

Whatever you do, don't take the big chair and do the same to him. Seriously doubt you would; just saying.

EDIT:

blackbloodtroll wrote:
He seems to be subtle enough that they pass it off as me being paranoid.

Then you're up Ess Creek. You're doing the right thing, but I would still seek out a temporary group.

blackbloodtroll wrote:
As stated before, I intend to try to flourish under his thumb. Got any magic item backstory ideas for the above listed items?

Post your character's race, class, age, description, etc. and his background story and then Copy and paste the items that need stories here. I'll think of some for you.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I would rather not guest DM period. Working with a campaign I had no part of setting up would drive me mad.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Here you go.

Items wanted:
Amulet of Mighty Fists 5,000 gp (+1)
Breastplate, Mithral 4200 gp
Ring of Protection (+1) 2,000 gp
Ring of the Beast 8,000 gp

Stats:
Character Name: Versel Vyth
Player: blackbloodtroll Level: 2
Class: Fighter (Unarmed) 2
Race: Lizardfolk
Alignment: Lawful Evil
Deity: Tiamat
Str 18 Dex 12 Con 14 Int 10 Wis 12 Cha 12
Feats: Dragon Style, Improved Unarmed Strike, Weapon Focus (claw), Feral Combat Training

Background:
Versel Vyth was never meant to live beyond childhood. Born small and weak, he was left exposed to the elements by his tribe at an early age. Luck (of a sort) was with him that night, though, because his village was burned to the ground by a group of wandering mercenaries. The young Versel was discovered by a spellscale named Darssorn Virlym, the head of a local thieves’ guild known as the Gray Fangs. Darssorn had followed the mercenaries in the hope of picking up stray loot. What he picked up instead was a slave in the making.
Versel spent the next twenty years as a cleaner, servant, and whipping boy at The Grinning Dragon, a tavern in the poorest section of a large city. The place was also a front for the Gray Fangs. Darssorn was never quite sure why he had saved the young creature—perhaps he thought it might be amusing to have a full-blooded lizardfolk laborer—but it was a decision that he and many others would come to regret.
Versel learned early the ability to dodge and weave to avoid the many mailed fists and outstretched legs at the tavern. He learned to conceal his anger and his exceptional mind so that he would not anger Darssorn, who beat him mercilessly while drunk. Through the sly observation of his spellscale “father” and the rest of the Gray Fangs, he learned the craft of the pugilist, and how to strike from the shadows. Mostly, though, he learned how to hate. He despised spellscales, orcs, halflings, and practically anyone else who entered the tavern. In his heart, Versel longed to be reunited with his people, and to live in the great civilization that he was sure he had been stolen from.
He saw his opportunity in Gurn Sirensong, a twisted gnome illusionist who had recently become second in command of the Gray Fangs. Versel befriended Gurn, and offered to poison Darssorn and the guild’s other top lieutenants if the gnome and his trusted men would purge the ranks of anyone loyal to his father. In return, Versel wanted only to burn down the tavern and to secure a pledge of eternal friendship from the new head of the Gray Fangs. Gurn accepted, and the slaughter that followed was brutal. Gurn took over the guild, and Versel left to rejoin the glorious lizardfolk civilization.
What he found was disappointment. The lizardfolk had no great empire: They were merely fractious, primitive tribes living in hovels on the edges of humanoid nations. Versel realized that if he wanted an illustrious lizardfolk civilization, he would have to build it himself. He decided to travel afar, to find a way to awaken the power of the dragon blood within him and his kind, to learn and gain enough resources to exalt himself, and with time, exalt his kind.

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Amulet of Mighty Fists

Swords drawn, three men stood in the middle of the dusty road circling a single, unarmed lizardman. It was Versel the pitfighter and they wern't about to take their chances with him.

Calm and collected, the cold-blooded fighter clinched his empty fists until his knuckles cracked loudly as a tumbling bolder.

He wasn't always so calm. In the scarce, fleeting seconds that past as the men circled with their swords, Versel remembered back to a day years ago...

.

It wasn't often Versel became nervous, but if lizardmen could sweat, he'd have had droplets streaking down his scaly face.

It was the day for which young Versel had been waiting for so long: his chance to prove himself as the meanest, toughest, and most skilled pit fighter in the land. Only one thing stood between himself and the enchanted amulet offered as a prize for winning the tournament: a strapping, powerfully-built seven-feet tall half-orc named Gorefist.

Versel wasn't nervous because he feared loosing or because he was scared of the pain. No, he was nervous because he worried he would be unable to stop himself before beating the half-orc into a bloody corpse of snapped bones and torn flesh. Disqualification had been the way of his only losses, and they numbered more than one.

The announcer stood before a motley audience of hundreds, magic amulet dangling from his fingers, glittering in the noon-time sun for all to see. Thinking back, Versel couldn't remember the announcer's introductions; he could only remember standing and rushing forward with adrenaline-pumped legs before pouncing on the half-orc like a tiger leaping onto its prey.

Fangs barred, hatred gleaming in his serpentine eyes, Versel was a furious cyclone of tooth and claw...

...Until the half-orc sent his sledgehammer of a fist crashing into the lizardman's jaw, nearly unhinging it from his face.

Through the pain and the fatigue, Versel fought. Twenty minutes past, no rounds, no breaks, just two bestial warriors trying their best to kill one another. The crowd was crazed with bloodlust, whipped into a fervor with every spray of crimson gore.

Though the half-orc was a mighty opponent, he could no longer stand against the lizardman's fierce onslaught. He dropped to the blood-soaked dirt and rolled away, trying to put distance between him so he could stand for a desperate, last-ditch effort.

That was when the glass bottle smashed into Versel's left eye, scratching though its nictating membrane to cut his slit-like pupil. Versel roared in pain and anger, staggering back.

Gorefist stood, bewildered at his fortune. A man in the audience who had bet against the lizardman had thrown the bottle, and it had inflicted the desired effect. Gorefist looked at the two referees who both yelled for him to continue fighting. With hesitation, the half-orc waded back into the fray with a haymaker.

Yes, Versel eventually lost the fight ten minutes later, but it was obvious what had turned the tide. So close -- but the shimmering magical amulet was now just a figment of his memory.

The lizard man sat in one dark corner of the tavern covered in blood, nursing his disappointment as well as his swollen, sightless left eye. He knew eventually his wounds would heal, even his eye, but the loss that day would leave a scar deeper than any sword could rend.

Suddenly, the door swing open. A mountainous figure ducked under the threshold and stood scowling at all the tiny humans who dared meet his gaze for even a brief instant.

Gorefist.

One bloody, bandaged hand gripped the chain upon which the magic amulet dangled. His glare scanned the crowd slowly, sweeping across all until it came to rest upon Versel's one good eye. Versel stood from his chair defiantly, ready -- nay, eager -- for another go.

Slowly, eyes never leaving Versel's, Gorefist strode across the crowded room. The way parted before him as people scampered away from the juggernaut's path.

As he approached, Versel used one claw to fling the table away from between them before loosing a bloodcurdling battle hiss -- "Come, orc-blood," Versel roared, "Let me finish what I began in the ring!"

The stone-faced half-orc never flinched as he stood like a statue, brow furrowed, mouth turned down into the deepest frown. Without warning, he tossed the amulet onto a nearby chair's seat and stared back at the seething lizardman.

Leaning forward and pointing, the half-orc delivered a threat in low, gravelly voice: "One day, I'll be back for that. You won't win next time."

With that, he turned and walked away...

.

Not a day passes in which that warning ceases to echo in Versel's memory.

Not a day passes in which Versel doesn't ready himself for its arrival.

Finally, the first of the three men worked up the courage to strike. Sword raised, he rushed forward, shouting, the other two not far behind.

Versel parried, ducked, and whirled, smashing his fists, elbows and knees into their faces, bones breaking with each strike, blood spattering everywhere.

Soon, the lizardman loomed above their lifeless bodies, staring down at them, the sun glinting off the golden Amulet of Mighty Fists' surface.

Like the memory of Gorefist so long ago, Versel turns his back on the broken bodies and walks away, never to be seen there again.


You know... I had a thought. (surprising, right?) If I were to put myself in this guy's shoes and you handed me this stack of papers for all your gear and I thought you were a lousy powergamer that didn't have the ability to roleplay (cause you know, they are mutually exclusive, right?) I would be doubtful. I would probably wonder where it was you were getting all these lovely writeups on your gear. Because there is no way I would believe that you were capable of coming up with such a thing.

So you know what I'd do? I'd probably check some popular message boards like this one. I'd do a search for the name Versal for this last peice of equipment. Do you know where that would lead me? Here.

And honestly?... I hope he does come here and read this thread. The whole damned thing. I hope that this really sheds some light on what people think of him when he acts so selfish.

...I dunno, I guess I just think it would be a bit of poetic justice if he did come and read all this. Not that he would have any real reason to care what some strangers on the interwebs think about him if he doesn't care how other players feel about him.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

If he did, he would only take it as justification of his actions and opinions.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

@Stripe: Good stuff, thank you.
@Lune: Oh no, he is too busy with his "acting" career to do that.
@TriOmegaZero: If for some strange reason he did, then it would be brought to attention to all players, and his vengeful actions would come to light. This may cause me to wait out his DM session, but strengthen my relations with other players.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Got to pull the item back-stories on the guest DM. I got some eye-popping action, as it went down as a spinning cock slap to the face, answered with group narrow eyes, cool smirks, tip nods, and a circle of mental brofists.
So a tip of the hat to the paizo brotherhood that gave me the wings to rise above the madness.


blackbloodtroll wrote:

Got to pull the item back-stories on the guest DM. I got some eye-popping action, as it went down as a spinning cock slap to the face, answered with group narrow eyes, cool smirks, tip nods, and a circle of mental brofists.

So a tip of the hat to the paizo brotherhood that gave me the wings to rise above the madness.

You pulled out actual, serious back-stories and he was genuinely shocked by it? He's apparently new at trying to screw people over if something as simple as actually complying threw him such a curve ball.

How many you pull on him?


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I pulled five full page item back-stories. Actually, one was a page and a half. I had a good amount of help from posters here, for which I am thankful. This act lead him to actually take a look at my character backstory, and he was forced to retract his power-gamer comment. This act also raised a few eyebrows of those who doubted my proclamations of his subtle vengeance.


blackbloodtroll wrote:
This act lead him to actually take a look at my character backstory, and he was forced to retract his power-gamer comment.

Nice. Did he do so in front of everyone, or later?

blackbloodtroll wrote:
This act also raised a few eyebrows of those who doubted my proclamations of his subtle vengeance.

I take it that he hadn't really hounded them about it?


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Poldaran wrote:
blackbloodtroll wrote:
This act lead him to actually take a look at my character backstory, and he was forced to retract his power-gamer comment.

Nice. Did he do so in front of everyone, or later?

blackbloodtroll wrote:
This act also raised a few eyebrows of those who doubted my proclamations of his subtle vengeance.
I take it that he hadn't really hounded them about it?

1) In front of everyone, as the previous powergamer comment was brought up again by a fellow player.

2) The others were somewhat unaware of the extent of unbalance in pressure.


blackbloodtroll wrote:
Poldaran wrote:
blackbloodtroll wrote:
This act lead him to actually take a look at my character backstory, and he was forced to retract his power-gamer comment.

Nice. Did he do so in front of everyone, or later?

blackbloodtroll wrote:
This act also raised a few eyebrows of those who doubted my proclamations of his subtle vengeance.
I take it that he hadn't really hounded them about it?

1) In front of everyone, as the previous powergamer comment was brought up again by a fellow player.

2) The others were somewhat unaware of the extent of unbalance in pressure.

Assuming you refrained from a maniacal cackle as justice was served, I admire your restraint.


Asherr can I play a game with you? That is awesome!

Sczarni Star Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Nice. It seems every twist of this murder tale is more enjoyable then the last.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Oh, for those who are still interested in the garbled recording of the initial murder, it is now available. Private message me for a link. Warning: it is very difficult to understand what going on, but it's all I got.

Star Voter 2013

I snorted in laughter. Seriously hilarious.


So did any of your item back stories include dead turtles?

Star Voter 2013

Can you post your story items here? Did he read every story? Did you manage to slip any super mentors/allies into your stories? Did he just glance through them or read in detail every story item?

Oh, I wish you could have captured his reaction on video.

The little hellion in me smiles in sadistic glee!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Lune wrote:
So did any of your item back stories include dead turtles?

No, I was sure to make the backgrounds simplistic, entertaining, and suited to the tastes of our "thespian" guest DM. I would never be so obvious as to be called out. Even when tainted with mild spite, my words are honeyed.

The cake is delicious, even if it is a lie.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

This is a bit of necromancy, but still an update. The guest DM has just dropped some +2"hand wraps" in a box with tortle language written on it. No one has found any traps or curses, yet, but I am still wary. I am not sure how to go about safeguarding myself in this situation.

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