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Which fantasy / Sci Fi universe would you live in?


Gamer Talk

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Given the option which fantasy/Sci fi universe would you live in and why?

Naturally you can put yoruself in whatever role you like.

Archmage of Golarion?

Jedi Knight?
Sith lord?

Dragonrider of pern?

Dune universe?


Strawberry fields.

Andoran

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Dilettante in Ian Banks' Culture, or if I was feeling more inclined to danger a historian in Glasshouse. The Culture, because unless you're in Contact Section it's a great place to live with a lot of cool stuff. Glasshouse, because I kind of like the idea of being able to restore from backup after things go really pear-shaped.


I'd go with Archmage (epic level) elf in Golarian or a Golarion like universe.


Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

So many universes, so many choices, I can't choose so easily.


Human Barbarian in Golarion.

Sczarni RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Discworld was the first that popped into mind. I can't say why, but it just seems right...

Qadira

Sci fi world.... the safe one.

Andoran

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Tales Subscriber

I'll take the basic utopia that is ST:TNG

I kind of like being clean everyday, eating regularly, not getting sick, and not worrying too much about demonic possession or being raided by goblins.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Andrew Turner wrote:
I'll take the basic utopia that is ST:TNG

For my part, I'd go with Star Trek: The Original Series. It has most of the advantages of the "Next Generation Universe" but without the "Political Correctness" and it has just enough danger to keep things interresting (+ miniskirts).

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber

Well if I could have any role I like?

I'd be Iron Man in the Marvel U.

Andoran

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Tales Subscriber
Lord Fyre wrote:
Andrew Turner wrote:
I'll take the basic utopia that is ST:TNG
For my part, I'd go with Star Trek: The Original Series. It has most of the advantages of the "Next Generation Universe" but without the "Political Correctness" and it has just enough danger to keep things interresting (+ miniskirts).

Hmmm...miniskirts...


I just realized something: what if this IS the Star Trek universe....the Mirror Mirror one?.....


Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:
I just realized something: what if this IS the Star Trek universe....the Mirror Mirror one?.....

Mindblown!

Cheliax Bella Sara Charter Superscriber

The kid in the Matrix. He was the only one who retained enough of his humanity to understand that the primary function of machines is the creation, distribution, and consumption of pornography.


And Pony Boy's existence proves my theorem posted a scant three posts above.


i'd live in the custom universe that i've created for the novel i'm writing. if i had to pick something that's already out there then i'd probably go for somewhere in the third imperium from the traveller rpg. those guys have their stuff together, don't doubt it.


A moderately wealthy base neuroform from John C. Wright's Golden Age series. Immortality and pretty much any opportunity imaginable... count me in!

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Andrew Turner wrote:

I'll take the basic utopia that is ST:TNG

I kind of like being clean everyday, eating regularly, not getting sick, and not worrying too much about demonic possession or being raided by goblins.

It's a utopia without any artistic or cultural expression of merit of it's own time,so it's forced to dig up stuff from the past. (Apparantly this dearth of culture has been a prolonged one since most of it's takings are four centuries old) Art's really in a bad way if Data's painting of a cloud tunnel is considered master's work.

It's a society which throws away it's virtues under stress as we found out in Deep Space Nine. Despite this, it's full of strutting self-righteous popinjays who think they have the right to judge our time which didn't have the material advantages they did.

I'd almost rather have the Crapsack world of Babylon Five. That has it's own problems of being a world of relatively low life expectancy... given that the various self-styled Space Gods might decide that your species didn't measure up to it's rigid standards of Order, and nuke you with a planet-killer. Or set your society, country against country, family against family, against itself in the name of Chaos.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Pulp Terra from WEG's TORG game (the adventure / hero pulp cosm which over-wrote Egypt, creating the Nile Empire) as one of the 'two-fisted adventurer / scientists common to the genre (The Avenger / Doc Savage / David Innes / Carson Napier, that sort of heroic type).


LazarX wrote:
Andrew Turner wrote:

I'll take the basic utopia that is ST:TNG

I kind of like being clean everyday, eating regularly, not getting sick, and not worrying too much about demonic possession or being raided by goblins.

It's a utopia without any artistic or cultural expression of merit of it's own time,so it's forced to dig up stuff from the past. (Apparantly this dearth of culture has been a prolonged one since most of it's takings are four centuries old) Art's really in a bad way if Data's painting of a cloud tunnel is considered master's work.

It's a society which throws away it's virtues under stress as we found out in Deep Space Nine. Despite this, it's full of strutting self-righteous popinjays who think they have the right to judge our time which didn't have the material advantages they did.

I'd almost rather have the Crapsack world of Babylon Five. That has it's own problems of being a world of relatively low life expectancy... given that the various self-styled Space Gods might decide that your species didn't measure up to it's rigid standards of Order, and nuke you with a planet-killer. Or set your society, country against country, family against family, against itself in the name of Chaos.

art isn't art unless it's been around for a few centuries. look at the vast majority of 'masterpieces' today, they were made hundreds of years ago. that said, i completely agree with you about the faux-utopian nature of the startrek universe.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
FuelDrop wrote:


art isn't art unless it's been around for a few centuries. look at the vast majority of 'masterpieces' today, they were made hundreds of years ago. that said, i completely agree with you about the faux-utopian nature of the startrek universe.

Tell that to...

Jack Kerouac
Allan Ginsberg
James Joyce
Pablo Picasso
Andy Warhol,
The Designers of...
The Vietnam War Memorial
The Korean War Memorial
The 9/11 Memorial at Ground Zero
The Keystone Arch

Or these folks from the women's list...

Gertrude Abercrombie (1909–1977) (painter)
Maxine Albro (1903–1966), muralist, printmaker
Catherine Tharp Altvater (1907–1984) (painter)
Evgenia Baykova (1907–1997) (painter)
Dorr Bothwell (1902–2000), painter, printmaker
Lola Álvarez Bravo (1907–1993) (photographer)
Ruth Bernhard (1905–2006) (photographer)
Isabel Bishop (1902–1988) (painter)
Margaret Bourke-White (1904–1971) (photographer)
Emmy Bridgewater (1906–1999) (painter, poet)
Margaret Brundage (1900–1976) (illustrator)
Selma Burke (1900–1995) (sculptor)
Marie Z. Chino (1907–1982), Acoma Pueblo ceramic artist
Dorothy Dehner (1901–1994), sculptor, printmaker
Claire Falkenstein (1908–1997), sculptor, painter, printmaker
Perle Fine (1908–1988), painter
Leonor Fini (1907–1996) (painter)
Cornelia MacIntyre Foley (1909–2010), painter
Gisèle Freund (1908 or 1912–2000) (photographer)
Barbara Hepworth (1903–1975) (sculptor) [1]
Karen Holtsmark (1907–1998) (painter)
Frida Kahlo (1907–1954) (painter)[1]
Maude Kegg (1904–1986), Ojibwe bead artist
Anna Kostrova (1909–1994), painter, graphic artist
Lee Krasner (1908–1984) (painter) [1]
Ruth Harriet Louise (1903–1940) (photographer)
Helen Lundeberg (1908–1999) painter
Mabel McKay (1907–1993), Pomo-Patwin basket weaver
Dora Maar (1907–1997), photographer, painter, poet
Maruja Mallo (1902–1995) (painter)
Hansel Mieth (1909–1998) (photographer)
Lee Miller (1907–1977) (photographer)
Lisette Model (1901–1983) (photographer)
Barbara Morgan (1900–1992) (photographer)
Fannie Nampeyo (1900–1987), potter, ceramic artist
Alice Neel (1900–1984) (painter)
Essie Parrish (1902–1979), Kashaya Pomo basket weaver
Betty Parsons (1900–1982), painter, gallerist
Irene Rice Pereira (1902–1971), painter, author
Leni Riefenstahl (1902–2003) (filmmaker)
Louise Emerson Ronnebeck (1901–1980), painter
Ethel Schwabacher (1903–1984), painter
Bernarda Bryson Shahn (1903–2004), painter, lithographer
Elena Skuin (1909–1986) (painter)
Remedios Varo (1908–1963) (painter)
Henriette Wyeth (1907–1997), painter
Maria Zubreeva (1900–1991), painter, graphic artist

[edit] 1910–1919
Dorothea Tanning, Some Roses and their Phantoms, oil on canvas, 76.3 x 101.5cm, 1952, Tate Modern.

Taisia Afonina (1913–1994) (painter)
Evgenia Antipova (1917–2009) (painter)
Eve Arnold (1912–2012) (photographer)
Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010) (sculptor) [1]
Leonora Carrington (born 1917) (painter)
Elizabeth Catlett (born 1915) (sculptor, printmaker)
Helen Cordero (1915–1994), Cochiti Pueblo ceramic artist
Elaine de Kooning (1918–1989), painter
Maya Deren (1917–1961), Avant-garde filmmaker and theorist, photographer
Jane Frank (1918–1986) (mixed-media painter, sculptor)
Rosalie Gascoigne (1917–1999) (sculptor, assemblage)
Nora Heysen (1911–2003) (painter)
Tove Jansson (1914–2001) (painter, illustrator, novelist)
Gwendolyn Knight (1914–2005) (painter)
Jacqueline Lamba (1910–1993) (painter)
Helen Levitt (1913–2009) (photographer)
Ethel Magafan (born 1916), painter
Agnes Martin (1912–2004) (painter) [1]
Mercedes Matter née Carles (1913–2001) (painter)
Louisa Matthíasdóttir (1917–2000) (painter)
Hilda Grossman Morris (1911–1991), sculptor
Meret Oppenheim (1913–1985) (sculptor) [1]
Tuulikki Pietilä (1917–2009) (illustrator)
Ruth Ray (1919–1977) (painter)
Maria Rudnitskaya (1916–1983) (painter)
Charlotte Salomon (1917–1943) (painter)
Clara Sherman (born 1915) (textile art)
Nadezhda Shteinmiller (1915–1991) (painter, stage designer)
Hedda Sterne (born 1910–) (painter)
Dorothea Tanning (born 1910) (painter)
Gerda Taro (1910–1937) (photographer)
Anya Teixeira (1913–1992) (photographer)
Bridget Bate Tichenor (1917–1990) (painter)
Pablita Velarde (1918–2006) (painter)
Marion Post Wolcott (1910–1990) (photographer)

[edit] 1920–1929
Jay DeFeo, with an unfinished The Rose, c. early 1960s.[2][3]

Ida Applebroog (born 1929) (painter)
Diane Arbus (1923–1971) (photographer)
Alice Baber (1928–1982) (painter)
Jo Baer (born 1929) (painter)
Irina Baldina (1922–2009) (painter)
Hannelore Baron (1926–1987), collage artist
Zlata Bizova (born 1927) (painter)
Esther Bubley (1921–1998) (photographer)
Crucita Calabaza (Blue Corn, ca. 1920–1999), San Ildefonso Pueblo ceramic artist
Marie Cosindas (born 1925) (photographer)
Amanda Crowe (1928–2004) Eastern Cherokee woodcarver
Jay DeFeo (1929–1989), painter, visual artist
Lois Dodd (born 1927) (painter)
Mavis Doering, (1929–2007), Cherokee basket weaver
Rosalyn Drexler (born 1926), painter
Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011) (painter)
Mokarrameh Ghanbari (1928–2005) (painter)
Françoise Gilot (born 1921) (painter, writer)
Elaine Hamilton-O'Neal (1920–2010) (painter)
Grace Hartigan (1922–2008) (painter)
Martha Holmes (1923–2006) (photographer)
Mansooreh Hosseini (born 1926) (painter)
Maya Kopitseva (1924–2005) (painter)
Tatiana Kopnina (1921–2009) (painter)
Elena Kostenko (born 1926) (painter)
Marina Kozlovskaya (born 1925) (painter)
Yayoi Kusama (born 1929) (sculpture/performance/installation)
Valeria Larina (1926–2008) (painter)
Joan Mitchell (1925–1992) (painter)
Inge Morath (1923–2002) (photographer)
Margaret Olley (1923–2011) (painter)
Mimi Parent (1924–2005) (painter)
Galina Rumiantseva (1927–2004) (painter)
Kapitolina Rumiantseva (1925–2002) (painter)
Behjat Sadr (1924–2009) (painter)
Takako Saito (born 1929) (installation art, performance art)
Honoré Desmond Sharrer (1920–2009), painter
Galina Smirnova (born 1929) (painter)
Nancy Spero (1926–2009) (painter)
Hannah Tompkins (1920–1995) (painter, printmaker)
Anne Truitt (1921–2004), sculptor
Nina Veselova (1922–1960) (painter)
Leona Wood (1921–2008) (painter)

[edit] 1930–1939

Alice Adams (born 1930) (sculptor, textile art, earthworks)
Emma Andijewska (born 1931) (painter, writer)
Gayleen Aiken (1934–2005) (painter, musician)
Helene Aylon (born 1931) (sculptor)
Hilla Becher (born 1934) (photographer)
Lee Bontecou (born 1931) (sculptor, printmaker)
Joan Brown (1938–1990), painter
Judy Chicago (born 1939) (author and installation artist) [1]
Chryssa (born 1933), sculptor
Iran Darroudi (born 1936) (painter)
Irina Dobrekova (born 1931) (painter)
Marisol Escobar (born 1930) (sculptor)
Audrey Flack (born 1931) (painter, printmaker, sculptor)
Elisabeth Frink (1930–1993) (sculptor, printmaker)
Irina Getmanskaya (born 1939) (painter)
Tatiana Gorb (born 1935) (painter)
Elena Gorokhova (born 1933) (painter)
Nancy Graves (1939–1995), sculptor, painter, printmaker
Eva Hesse (1936–1970) (sculptor) [1]
Nicole Hollander (born 1939) (illustration, comics)
Alison Knowles (born 1933) (Fluxus, performance artist)
Lee Lozano (born 1930) (painter)
Totte Mannes (born 1933) (painter)
Emily Mason (born 1932) (painter)
Valentina Monakhova (born 1932) (painter)
Charlotte Moorman (1933–1991), (performance artist, Fluxus)
Vera Nazina (born 1931) (painter)
Carol Heifetz Neiman (born 1937) (xerox artist, printmaker, pastel, pencil, painter)
Yoko Ono (born 1933) (performance art, music) [1]
Nancy Petyarre (1934/38?-2009) (painter)
Deborah Remington (1930–2010) (painter)
Bridget Riley (born 1931) (painter) [1]
Faith Ringgold (born 1930) (painter)
Carolee Schneemann (born 1939), performance artist [1]
Marjorie Strider (born 1930) (sculptor)
Anita Louise Suazo (born 1937) (ceramics)
Atsuko Tanaka (1932–2005) (painting, sculpture, performance art, installation art)

[edit] 1940–1949

Marina Abramović (born 1946) (performance artist) [1]
Laurie Anderson (born 1947) (performance artist) [1]
Heather Angel (born 1941) (photographer, author)
Tina Barney (born 1945) (photographer, filmmaker)
Lynda Benglis (born 1941) (sculptor)
Vivienne Binns (born 1940) (painter, enamels)
Melinda Bordelon (born 194?) (painter, illustrator)
Rhea Carmi (born 1942) (abstract expressionist and mixed-media artist)
Vera Chino (born 1943), Acoma Pueblo ceramic artist
Susan Crile (born 1942) (painter)
Lynn Davis (born 1944) (photographer)
Bracha Ettinger (born 1948) (painter, photographer, psychoanalyst, writer)
Valie Export 1940 (performance artist, video installations, photography)
Carole Feuerman (born 1945) (sculptor)
Helen Hardin (1943–1984) (painter)
Masumi Hayashi (1945–2006) (photographer)
Miyako Ishiuchi (born 1947) (photographer)
Gayane Khachaturian (1942–2009) (painter)
Barbara Kruger (born 1945) (conceptual artist) [1]
Annie Leibovitz (born 1949) (photographer)
Markéta Luskačová (born 1944) (photographer)
Mary Ellen Mark (born 1940) (photographer)
Linda McCartney (1942–1998) (photographer)
Susan Meiselas (born 1948) (photographer)
Ana Mendieta (1948–1985) (performance art, sculptor) [1]
Sheila Mullen (born 1942) (painter)
Elizabeth Murray (1940–2007) (painter, printmaker)
Gladys Nilsson (born 1940) (painter)
Guity Novin (born 1944) (painter)
Orlan 1947 (performance artist) [1]
Gloria Petyarre (born 1945) (painter)
Adrian Piper (born 1948) (conceptual artist)
Sylvia Plachy (born 1943) (photographer)
Suellen Rocca (born 1943) (painter)
Barbara Rosenthal (born 1948) (photographer)
Barbara Rossi (born 1940) (painter)
Ursula von Rydingsvard (born 1942) (sculptor)
Barbara Schwartz (1949–2006) painter, sculptor
Sandy Skoglund (born 1946) (photographer)
Hollis Sigler (1948–2001) (painter)
Joan Snyder (born 1940), painter
Annegret Soltau (born 1946), graphic, performance, video, photocollage
Pat Steir (born 1940), painter
Carol Sutton (born 1945), painter
Joyce Tenneson (born 1945) (photographer)
Mym Tuma (born 1940) (painter, and mixed-media artist)
Hannah Wilke (1940–1993) (sculptor, photographer) [1]

[edit] 1950–1959

Eija-Liisa Ahtila (born 1959) (videographer, photographer)
Peggy Ahwesh (born 1954) (filmmaker)
Davida Allen (born 1951) (painter, filmmaker)
Cecilia Alvarez (born 1950) (painter, muralist)
Annie Antone (born 1955) (Tohono O'odham basket weaver)
Anne Appleby (born 1954) (painter)
Lynda Barry (born 1956) (illustrator, comics)
Sophie Calle (born 1953) (photographer, author, installation artist, conceptual artist)
Joanne Gair (born 1958) (painter, body art)
Anne Geddes (born 19560 (photographer)
Nan Goldin (born 1953) (photographer) [1]
Akiko Hatsu (born 1959) (illustrator, comics)
Roni Horn (born 1955) (photographer)
Mona Hatoum (born 1952) (video, installation)
Leiko Ikemura (born 1951) (painter, sculptor)
Vanessa Paukeigope Jennings (born 1952), Kiowa-Apache-Gila River Pima bead and textile artist
Maya Lin (born 1959), installation artist
Marita Liulia (born 1957) (photographer, digital and interactive media)
Sally Mann (born 1951) (photographer)
Shirin Neshat (born 1957) (filmmaker, videographer, photographer)
Deborah Niland (born 1950) (painter, illustrator)
Kilmeny Niland (1950–2009) (painter, illustrator)
Cindy Sherman (born 1954) (photographer, filmmaker) [1]
Li Shuang (born 1957) (painter)
Jiang Shuo (born 1958) (sculptor)
Renee Stout (born 1958) (photographer, installation art)
Rumiko Takahashi (born 1957) (illustrator, author)
Zoja Trofimiuk (born 1952) (sculptor, printmaker)
Carrie Mae Weems (born 1953) (photographer, filmmaker)
Emmi Whitehorse (born 1957) (painter)
Francesca Woodman (1958–1981) (photographer)
Zhang Xin (born 1953) (painter)

[edit] 1960–1969

Jessica Abel (born 1969) (illustrator, author)
Margarete Bagshaw (born 1964) (painter)
Cecily Brown (born 1969), painter
Carolyn Cole (born 1961) (photographer)
Inka Essenhigh (born 1969), painter
Anna Fox (born 1961) (photographer)
Brita Granström (born 1969) (painter, illustrator, author)
Chantal Joffe (born 1969) (painter)
Zoe Leonard (born 1961) (photographer, visual artist)
Mariko Mori (born 1967) (performance, installation) [1]
Audrey Niffenegger (born 1963) (printmaker, author)
Catherine Opie (born 1961) (photographer)
Lique Schoot (born 1969) (painter, photographer, installation)
Lorna Simpson (born 1960) (photographer)
Roxanne Swentzell (born 1962) (sculptor)
Tomoko Takahashi (born 1966) (installation art)
Jill Thompson (born 1966) (illustrator, author)
Verónica Ruiz de Velasco (born 1968) (painter)
Kara Walker (born 1969), collage artist, painter, printmaker, installation artist [1]
Rachel Whiteread (born 1963) (sculptor) [1]
Melanie Yazzie (born 1966) (sculptor, painter, printmaker)

[edit] 1970–1979

Hiromix (born 1976) (photographer)
Julie Mehretu (born 1970) (painter)
Jenny Saville (born 1970) (painter)

And that's all from ONE measely planet and I didn't even list the last 20 years.

If in the entire run of TNG and DS9, we couldn't see one example of Human culture of that time that was worth showing... it says a lot of that era. I have the opposite view if Art is not relevant to the time that it's produced in... it's not art... it's decorative linoleum.

Osirion

Science Fiction setting: I'd go the Sith route in the Star Wars universe, no question about it. Of course I'd have to change my name from The Mighty Arch Lich Thoth-Amon, to the Mighty Arch Sith Thoth-Amon. Heck, the two names are so close, I probably could save myself some imperial credits and not have my holochecks updated.

Fantasy setting: Either old-school WFRP or an old-school DnD setting - can you guess which by my name and spelling?

Of course, being an immortal epic level Lich, I can have my cake and eat it too - existing in both universes.

Being alive is sooo overrated.

The Mighty Thoth-Amon has left his mental signature.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'd like one where I could do magic, and magic was easy, not like where a wizard has to study and s&~$, I just want to be able to do it and do it as much as I want. I also doesn't really want to be in danger, and I want current day or future level technology. I basically want to live in this world, but with unlimited magic power. Is there an RPG that fits that description? If so I want to try it.

Also, I want to be a Mechwarrior. That'd be sweet too. 2nd choice...


...Downton Abbey?


A planeswalker in Magic: The Gathering. As for the specific setting? In order of preference: Innistrad, Zendikar, Shadowmoor, or Phyrexia.

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Silent Hill.


I prefer the real world.

If I were to inhabit a fantasy world from literature, I think I'd have to go with Lord Dunsany's dream countries.


Necromancer wrote:
A planeswalker in Magic: The Gathering. As for the specific setting? In order of preference: Innistrad, Zendikar, Shadowmoor, or Phyrexia.

Prerevisionist, revisionist or post-mending? :P

Taldor

Wheel of time world as a male channeler of course...ah, war with Tar valon...


Why confine yourself to just one? Maybe spend some time in the ST:TNG universe, then go wander into a Final Fantasy world (for me, that'd probably be FF X, but all are fine), then maybe go on to see the Forgotten Realms. Variety is the spice of life, and I'm rather fond of Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations myself :)


Umbral Reaver wrote:
Necromancer wrote:
A planeswalker in Magic: The Gathering. As for the specific setting? In order of preference: Innistrad, Zendikar, Shadowmoor, or Phyrexia.
Prerevisionist, revisionist or post-mending? :P

"Revisionist" sounds suspiciously like Hasbro messing with things...I just buy the cards and live blissfully unaware of what happens in the books.


Necromancer wrote:
Umbral Reaver wrote:
Necromancer wrote:
A planeswalker in Magic: The Gathering. As for the specific setting? In order of preference: Innistrad, Zendikar, Shadowmoor, or Phyrexia.
Prerevisionist, revisionist or post-mending? :P
"Revisionist" sounds suspiciously like Hasbro messing with things...I just buy the cards and live blissfully unaware of what happens in the books.

It more or less goes like this:

Prerevisionist planeswalkers are undefined godlike beings sort of maybe.

Revisionist planeswalkers are definitely godlike beings that more or less stand in for gods in the setting. In fact, many gods are less powerful than planeswalkers. Except when the plot demands that they be otherwise.

Post-mending planeswalkers are little more than regular spellcasters that can travel between the planes.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Doctor Who universe. Then I could visit all the worlds I wanted!


Ravenloft. Why? I'm either stupid, insane, or suicidal, and I don't know which.


I want to live in the world of my mind's eye, nevermind I'm already there.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

If anyone has read The Anvil of the World by Kage Baker, I'd like to live there, because it seems like all her characters do is get high and copulate.

EDIT: And, unlike in, say, Hyborea, they don't end up getting eaten by shadow demons from the beyond.

Andoran

A Prince of Amber of course - why settle for ONE Universe when you can travel to ALL of them, tailored to how you want them to be.


Sebastian wrote:
The kid in the Matrix. He was the only one who retained enough of his humanity to understand that the primary function of machines is the creation, distribution, and consumption of pornography.

SEBASTIAN WFW!!!

Taldor

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:
And Pony Boy's existence proves my theorem posted a scant three posts above.

Pony boy? Anyone else thinking about being a greaser? No wait even better a member of the Warriors!!

"Warriors come out to playyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy!
I wont join the clown gangs softball team tho no way.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

I got to thinking about different worlds, from Tolkien to George RR Martin to Robert Jordan. And I suddenly realized I wouldn't choose my own game world because it's too dangerous.

Maybe I should re-consider some of my players' complaints... :P

Shadow Lodge

"Put yourself in whatever role" meaning me as me in this other role in this other setting?

While I play a ninja in my footie pajamas, I'm no match for anything with a sharpened stick and a strong desire to kill, let alone a Sith whatever or a Drow-Shade-Vampiric-Were-Lich-Minotaur-Half-Dragon gestalt Ninja-gunslinger.

So, if I'm stuck as me in this other role, I'll take something relatively safe, and relatively clean, and probably in a universe like ST:TNG.

There, for the most part, most people get to explore the mysteries of the universe without great personal harm (and, if they do come to some grisly end, why are they never just reloaded from their last save point/last transporter usage? I'd make sure to make plenty of backup copies, just in case I end up as Redshirt Billy and my console explodes and kills me for no apparent reason other than we got hit by a stray techno-babble ray when Wesley was off in the crapper).

Or, can I put myself into someone else--or at least modify my stats, skills, feats, powers, etc? Are we using House Rules? Gestalt with 3 free templates and 40 build points?

To be honest, as much as I love D&D/Pathfinder, etc., I'm not sure *I* want to live there, nor be my characters, or play in the world I created for my players--sitting at the table, making characters go through sewers that lead to some subterranean lair of gibbering evil is all fun and well--for characters.

And Vancian Magic sucks, so it'd have to be 4e, and...well...hmm...

Even if I was a 40-point uber-twink 8-classed, 16-template badass, I don't want to muck about in sewers. Nor fight Gibbering Things of EEEEeeevil just to get their +1 Thong of Unreachable Rash. Pass.

I love Shadowrun, but, at least in my games, the Corps usually make your life a living hell, and then you die, and they go on about their Evil Business (of taking over The World, no doubt). So, that's out too.

Star Wars...meh...there's an Ewok and GL rant coming if I get into that, so we'll skip it.

Tolkien's LotR--well, everything's DONE. It's Over. The Elves all left, it's the Age of Man...and it's probably as lice-ridden a world as our Dark Ages...so...pass.

I could go into more settings, but Rifts is just waiting to have your head exploded by some psychic, or eaten by some drooling DB, or demon, or--actually Rifts has to be the *worst* place to go if you had to go somewhere--the messy deaths are nearly endless and all gruesome. No wonder no one ever plays when I trot the book(s) out.

WoW--the grind would get boring. Seriously. It's boring sitting at the comp, I can't imagine doing it IRL.

I could go through more, but I think it comes back to ST:TNG, and that's odd since that's not a place I'd ever want to roleplay, or a setting I'd ever want to game in--but it seems like a decent place to live.

So, Star Trek, The Next Generation it is, and I'll be a member of the Q, thanks.


It's so hard to pick. Which universe...?

Harry Potter, for the Quidditch.

Star Wars, for the lightsaber training.

Firefly, but only so I could work on... the engine... [cough] <<;

Batman, just to know what it feels like to make a city full of criminals cry themselves to sleep.

Iron Man, for the... well Tony's got it all...

Skyrim, for the shouting.

There's so much want. o-o;


Tayleron wrote:
I'd like one where I could do magic, and magic was easy, not like where a wizard has to study and s%@#, I just want to be able to do it and do it as much as I want. I also doesn't really want to be in danger, and I want current day or future level technology. I basically want to live in this world, but with unlimited magic power. Is there an RPG that fits that description? If so I want to try it.

Someone brought up Amber below, and the Amber diceless RPG seems like it would fit your description. Just whistle up a shadow world with whatever technology and magic you like and you're set. Toss in a different time flow and you could pass a year or two there on a lazy weekend.


My first thought was a chance to go to the realms and learn magic or be an druid and be able to shapechange into any animal but then I realized that I enjoy my creature comforts waay too much to ever give them up.
Even mighty arch mages in fantasy settings have no idea what a computer is or the easy life we have with today's technology but I still want magic.

My choice would be Shadowrun 3rd before the outaku(computer mages) showed up. I could very easily enjoy life as a gargoyle shaman in my penthouse suite and be surrounded by all the modern luxuries I deserve.

second choice a wookie force adept, there are other force users out there besides the unemotional jedi or the rage mage sith lords. I'd have tech/magic(force) and an awesome powerfully strong fur covered body.


Lightsaber duels would be horrifying. They cut through your arm or neck like an adamantine katana through a stone wall. To be honest, the general issue in most settings is danger. For myself, I would play a timelord in Stross' Palimpsest. Far more awesome. :-)


Umbral Reaver wrote:
Necromancer wrote:
Umbral Reaver wrote:
Necromancer wrote:
A planeswalker in Magic: The Gathering. As for the specific setting? In order of preference: Innistrad, Zendikar, Shadowmoor, or Phyrexia.
Prerevisionist, revisionist or post-mending? :P
"Revisionist" sounds suspiciously like Hasbro messing with things...I just buy the cards and live blissfully unaware of what happens in the books.

It more or less goes like this:

Prerevisionist planeswalkers are undefined godlike beings sort of maybe.

Revisionist planeswalkers are definitely godlike beings that more or less stand in for gods in the setting. In fact, many gods are less powerful than planeswalkers. Except when the plot demands that they be otherwise.

Post-mending planeswalkers are little more than regular spellcasters that can travel between the planes.

In that case, prerevisionist with curly fries and a senior discount.


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Gaea from Vision of Escaflowne/Tenkuu no Escaflowne.

It's got catgirls and giant robots.


Shelzar in the Scarred Lands.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Well sci fi, definately star trek TNG, there are just too many overwhelming advantages of the universe at that time. Sure the federation is a giant self righteous hippy commune...but transporters, easy space travel, and friggan holodecks, plus the whole ludicrous medical technology that could easily fix say a bum knee... I'm totally in. Think of how much fun you could have in life if all but the most elaborate injuries are a minor inconvenience? It is so motor cycle over the grand canyon time!

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