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Yet Another Alternative Kingdom Building Rules (Very Different)


Kingmaker

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Hi All,

Like a lot of other people, I wasn't very happy with the kingdom building rules presented in Rivers Run Red, so I drew up some alternative rules, presented below.

Complaints and Objectives
* For reasons that have been rehearsed many times, I didn't like the magic item economy.
* More generally, I wasn't happy with the prominent role of cities. The flavor of my campaign is more rural, and I wanted the kingdom building rules to make cities less economically important (while maintaining their administrative and military roles). Also, I wanted to reduce the "fiddly"-ness of the city buildings.
* On the flip side, I wanted to give players a stronger incentive to expand the kingdom by making the kingdom's economy more dependent on claiming and improving new hexes. Hex resources should influence what is available for the kingdom.
* More generally, I found the economy of kingdoms in the basic rules was "upside-down." By the time players are selling magic items, making the economy checks would likely be automatic, while the rest of the economy was very chancy. I think the most basic parts of the economy (timber, metal, stone) should be the most automatic, while the urban mercantile economy should be the most chancy.
* As a GM, I wanted some explicit tools to restrain "out of control" kingdoms, without feeling like it was pure GM fiat. (See "Law of Diminishing Returns" and "Stagnation" below.)
* Finally, I wanted to change some things for pure flavor reasons ("cities" -> "towns" and "claiming hexes" -> "settling hexes").

So my rules presented below. Nicely formatted Microsoft Word version available upon request.

Introduction

Spoiler:

A major part of the Kingmaker Adventure Path is the creation of a kingdom. These rules describe how kingdoms are created and evolve, including the resources, improvements and towns within a kingdom.
Running a kingdom also involves raising, maintaining and leading armies against your kingdom's enemies. Rules for these activities will be provided later, however items presented in these rules are useful to help your kingdom's military.

Kingdom Phases

Spoiler:

Kingdom activities are abstracted to occur in four phases, which together represent a month of game time. The four phases are upkeep, improvement, income and events, and are described below.

Upkeep Phase
During a kingdom's Upkeep phase, take the following actions. If your kingdom currently controls 0 hexes, skip this phase and proceed to the Improvement phase.
Step 1—Determine Kingdom Stability: Make a Stability check against your control DC to determine your kingdom's level of security for the month. If you make the check, reduce your kingdom's unrest by 1 (if unrest is at 0, gain 1 BP as a result of surplus goods and services). If you fail this check by 5 or more, increase unrest by 2. There is no effect for failing by less than 5.
Step 2—Pay Consumption: Deduct your kingdom's consumption from the kingdom's treasury BP. If you aren't able to pay for the month's consumption, your kingdom's BP drops into the negative. Every time you end an upkeep phase with negative BP in your treasury, your kingdom's unrest increases by 2.
Step 3—Unrest: If the kingdom's unrest is 11 or higher, it loses one hex chosen by the kingdom's leaders. Any improvements in that hex (farmlands, mines, roads, etc.) are lost and must be rebuilt after the hex is reclaimed. Any towns in that hex are lost and must be annexed if they are to be reclaimed into the kingdom (your GM has rules for re-annexation). Finally, if the kingdom employs a royal executioner or has declared martial law, reduce your total unrest by 1 (or 2 if both) at the end of this phase.

Improvement Phase
During a kingdom's improvement phase, take the following actions noted below. The number of improvements you can make during a single phase is limited by your kingdom's size; see the Improvements per Month table for these limits.
Step 1—Select Leadership: Assign leaders to any vacant leadership roles. Leaders must be PCs or closely allied NPCs. You can change leaders as often as you want with no impact on your nation's statistics (apart from changing what bonuses apply, as the ability scores of leaders differ). A PC or NPC can fill no more than one leadership role. Not all leadership roles must to be filled. You can fill the ruler role, the three essential leader roles (treasurer, lord of the commons, marshal), and as many non-essential leader roles as is equal to the ruler's charisma modifier.
Step 2—Settle Hexes: Each hex on the maps of the Stolen Lands measures 12 miles across, and your kingdom must be built hex by hex. To settle a hex, you must explore it and clear it of monsters or dangerous hazards; the hex must also be adjacent to a hex that is already part of the kingdom (with the exception of the first hex, which can be anywhere). At this point, you can settle the hex as part of the kingdom by spending 1 BP. Increase your kingdom's size (and thus its consumption and control DC) by 1 for each hex you settle. You can abandon a hex to reduce your kingdom's size. Doing so increases unrest by 1 (or by 4, if the abandoned hex contained a town). Settling hexes claimed by other countries may initiate hostilities. You can settle hexes with existing towns or other special features to get an immediate benefit. The size of your kingdom limits how many hexes can be settled each turn; see the Improvements Limits table.
Step 3—Build hex improvements: Hex improvements such as roads, farmlands, logging camps, mines and vineyards have an immediate initial cost but over the long term can pay for the investment handsomely. Towns are a special type of hex improvement that allow you to build town improvements. Town improvements increase your kingdom's economy, loyalty or stability modifiers, or have other special effects. The size of your kingdom limits how many roads, towns and other improvements can be built each turn; see the Improvements Limits table.
Step 4—Laws: Pick or adjust you're your kingdom's laws as you wish.

Improvement Limits
Kingdom Size Maximum New … Per Month
Hexes Settled Roads Towns Town Improvements Other Hex Improvements
1-10 1 1 1 1 2
11-25 2 2 1 2 4
26-50 3 3 1 3 6
51-100 5 4 1 5 8
101-200 8 6 2 10 12
201+ 15 10 4 No limit 20

Income Phase
During a kingdom's income phase, take the following actions.
Step 1—Deposits: You can add funds to a kingdom's treasury by donating coins, gems, jewelry, weapons, armor, magic items, and other valuables you find while adventuring. For every full 4,000 gp in value of the deposit, increase your kingdom's BP by 1.
Step 2—Withdrawals: You can also withdraw funds from the kingdom's treasury, but doing so runs the risk of annoying the citizens. Each time you withdraw funds, the kingdom's unrest increases by 1d4. In addition, you must make a loyalty check (DC = control DC + number of BP being withdrawn); a failure causes your kingdom to gain additional unrest equal to the total BP withdrawn. Each BP withdrawn in this manner converts into 2,000 gp.
Step 3—Generate Automatic Income: Add the automatic income from your hex and town improvements (making sure you qualify for any prerequisites) and increase your treasury's BP by that amount.
Step 4—Generate Extra Income: Make an economy check against your control DC at the end of your income phase. If you are successful, divide your result by 4 (dropping any fractions) and increase your treasury's BP by that amount.

Event Phase
During a kingdom's event phase, your GM will determine whether there are any kingdom events and help you resolve them. Kingdom events may change your kingdom's stat block, towns and hex improvements, or even involve the PCs in side adventures.

Establishing a Kingdom

Spoiler:

You begin with a certain amount of BP in your kingdom's treasury, granted by the swordlords of Restov and other patrons, depending upon your success at attracting patrons at the time of the kingdom's founding. Check with your GM for the exact amount.
Your first task is to choose a system of government. It would be simplest to base your kingdom's government on the Brevic system, with which the PCs will be generally familiar. Brevoy is ruled by an absolute monarch who governs through laws and is assisted by a council of advisors. It is possible to choose an alternative form of government such as a constitutional monarchary, rule by committee, a theocracy, a government organized along feudal lines, a republican government with voting citizens or any number of other choices. If you choose a non-Brevic system of government, let your GM know your decision, and he will advise you of any rule changes. For simplicity's sake, the remainder of these rules assume your kingdom uses the Brevic system of government.
During your kingdom's first month, you will skip the upkeep phase (since you have settled no hexes) and proceed directly to the improvements phase. You should select leaders for your new kingdom from among the PCs and cooperative NPCs (who may need to be convinced to accept an office).
You will then settle the first hex of your kingdom. At the beginning, you should start modestly, building income-producing hex improvements like mines and logging camps, as well as plenty of farmlands to keep your consumption low. Be careful not to over-expand too quickly.
You will probably want to decide early on a location for a capital; some good choices would be Oleg's (if you can convince him), or some other location that may give free town improvements and has access to waterways. Remember that to establish a town, you will need a logging camp.

Kingdom Terms and Concepts

Spoiler:

Alignment: A kingdom has an alignment that reflects its basic outlook manner of governing. A kingdom may have any of the same nine alignments as PCs (i.e. good/neutral/evil and lawful/neutral/chaotic). A kingdom's alignment does not need to be identical to the alignment of its ruler or other leaders, but some leaders may try to influence a kingdom towards their alignment.
A kingdom's alignment affects its statistics.
• Lawful kingdoms gain +2 to its economy modifier.
• Chaotic kingdoms gain +2 to its loyalty modifier.
• Good kingdoms gain +2 to its loyalty modifier.
• Evil kingdoms gain +2 to its economy modifier.
• Neutral kingdoms gain +2 to its stability modifier (a true neutral kingdom gains this bonus twice).

Automatic Income: Many hex improvements generate automatic income, measure in BP, every month for a kingdom. A kingdom will receive its automatic income during the income phase.

Build Points (BP): A kingdom's resources are measured in build points (abbreviated BP). BPs primarily represent durable physical capital such as timber, stone, metals, tools, livestock, seeds and money, but also intangibles such as goodwill, labor, favors, recruiting, social capital, etc. BPs are not resources that the kingdom's rulers own, instead they are the resources of the entire kingdom. BPs are not directly translatable into money, although PCs can deposit and withdraw gold pieces into the treasury to add or subtract BPs at the risk of increasing unrest. BPs are usually added to the treasury during the income phase and spent during the upkeep phase (as consumption) or the improvement phase (to build hex improvements or buildings).

Consumption: A kingdom's consumption indicates how many BP it costs to keep the kingdom functioning. If a kingdom is unable to pay its consumption, its unrest increases by 2. Normally, a kingdom's consumption is equal to (a) its population divided by 250 (round up any result of .5 or more) plus (b) its stagnation value, minus (c) 2 per farmland, and adjusted by (d) laws. However, during winter months, farmlands only reduce consumption only by 1 per farmland (instead of 2).

Control DC: A kingdom's control DC is 20 + its size; this value is the DC you'll be rolling against most often with your kingdom's stability, economy, and loyalty checks.

Defense: Defense modifiers are used with army combat (which are beyond the scope of these rules, but will be presented in later rules).

Economy, Loyalty and Stability Checks: An economy, loyalty or stability check is analogous to a saving throw. A kingdom will have economy, loyalty or stability modifiers, similar to how a character has fortitude, will and reflex saving throw modifiers. A natural 1 is always a failure for these checks, and a natural 20 is always a success.
A kingdom's economy, loyalty or stability modifiers start at 0, and may be increased or decreased by the kingdom's alignment, leaders, hex improvements, town improvements and other special adjustments. Whenever a kingdom makes an economy, loyalty or stability, it takes a penalty equal to the current unrest value.
You make stability checks during a kingdom's upkeep phase to determine whether it remains secure. You make economy checks during a kingdom's income phase to determine how much extra income the treasury receives. You make loyalty checks when required by the GM to keep the public peace.

Extra Income: Kingdom income, measure in BP, generated during the income phase if the kingdom succeeds on an economy check against your control DC. If the check is successful, divide your result by 4 (dropping any fractions) and increase your treasury's BP by that amount.

Hex Improvements: Hex improvements such as roads, farmlands, logging camps, mines, orchards and vineyards are located in a specific kingdom hex. Hex improvements have an immediate BP cost but provide ongoing benefits. Towns are a special type of hex improvement that allow you to build town improvements. Many hex improvements have special prerequisites or can only be placed in special hexes.

Improvements: See hex improvements and town improvements.

Income: See automatic income and extra income.

Leadership Roles: PCs or NPCs can take leadership roles for your kingdom. A PC or NPC can fill no more than one leadership role. Not all leadership roles must to be filled. Leaders can affect a kingdom's statistics, kingdom events and roleplaying activities.

Population: A kingdom's population is equal to 250 times its size plus the total population of each of its towns. The population of a town is 25 times the sum of its economy, loyalty, stability and defense modifiers. Population affects your kingdom's consumption.

Size: The number of hexes your kingdom has settled. This number affects a kingdom's population and its control DC.

Stagnation: A kingdom's stagnation value represents how much a kingdom's economy is diverted to non-productive uses such as protecting guild interests, bribery or tax avoidance. Stagnation is applied to increase a kingdom's consumption without any benefits. Stagnation scores are usually changed through kingdom events or roleplaying.

Town: A special type of hex improvement that allows you to build town improvements.

Town Improvements: Affect your kingdom's economy, loyalty, and stability modifiers or otherwise give special bonuses.

Treasury: A kingdom's treasury represents BPs available for future use. Generally, BPs are added to the treasury during the income phase, and spent as consumption during the upkeep phase or to buy improvements during the improvements phase.

Unrest: A kingdom's unrest value indicates how rebellious its people are. A kingdom's unrest score is applied as a penalty on all stability, economy, and loyalty checks. If a kingdom's unrest is above 10, it begins to lose control of hexes it has settled. If a kingdom's unrest score ever reaches 20, it falls into anarchy. While in anarchy, a kingdom can take no action and treats all stability, economy, and loyalty check results as 0. Restoring order once a kingdom falls into anarchy typically requires a number of quests and lengthy adventures by the kingdom's would-be leaders, and may be impossible. Unrest can never go below 0—adjustments that would normally reduce unrest lower than 0 are wasted. If an improvement affects unrest, it does so once at the time it is created.

Vassal: A vassal, or fief, is a political subdivision that provides resources and support to your kingdom. Although a vassal may be part of your kingdom from a legal or political perspective, it is not considered part of your kingdom for purposes of the kingdom-building rules. Vassalage may be established on whatever terms are agreed upon between your kingdom and the vassal; typical terms would be for the vassal to give one-quarter of its BP to your kingdom and to provide an additional army during times of declared war.

Hex Improvements

Spoiler:

Hex improvements such as farmlands, logging camps, mines and vineyards provide raw resources for your kingdom. Towns are a special type of hex improvement that allow you to build Buildings. Hex improvements are located in a specific kingdom hex. Except for roads, each hex can only have a single hex improvement. Hex improvements are purchased in the improvement phase. Many hex improvements have special prerequisites or can only be placed in special hexes. The number of hex improvements you can make during a single phase is limited by your kingdom's size; see the Improvements per Month table for these limits.

Hex Improvements Summary
Grasslands Hills Forest Swamp Mountain
Type Effects
Farmland 2 4 Reduces consumption by 2 (1 in winter)
Fort 10 10 10 10 10 Stability +1; Unrest -1
Knight's Estate 4 6 Stability +1
Logging Camp 5 Automatic Income 1 BP
Mine (Base) 12* 12* Automatic Income 2 BP; Economy +1
Mine (Exotic) 16* Automatic Income 4 BP; Economy +1
Mine (Precious) 12* 12* Automatic Income 4 BP; Economy +2; Unrest +2
Orchard 6 6 Automatic Income 1 BP; Loyalty +1
Peat Cutting 8* Automatic Income 1 BP
Quarry 8* 8* Automatic Income of 1 BP; Stability +1
Road 1 1 2 4 4 Economy +1/4; Stability +1/8
Stronghold 20 20 20 20 20 Stability +2; Unrest -1
Town 2 4 6 8 12 Special
Vineyard 6 Automatic Income 1 BP; Loyalty +1
* Not all hexes of this type can support the indicated improvement.

Farmland: You can develop farmlands to help sustain your kingdom's consumption.
• Costs and Benefit: It costs 2 BP to build farmland in a grassland hex and 4 BP in a hill hex. Every farmland hex in your kingdom normally reduces your kingdom's consumption by 2 (or by 1 during winter months).
• Prerequisites: Farmlands can be built in any grassland or hill hex.

Fort: A sturdy structure that serves as a guard post and lookout for danger. It can also serve as a garrison for an army in the field (reducing army maintenance costs).
• Costs and Benefits: It costs 10 BP to build a fort. A fort gives stability modifier +1 and reduces unrest by 1.
• Special: If attacked, Forts have a defense modifier of +3. If a town is built in a hex with a fort, the town automatically gains a guard tower (and the fort is removed).

Knight's Estate: You can establish estates to support knights or other military retainers pledged to your service.
• Costs and Benefit: It costs 4 BP to build a knight's estate in a grassland hex and 6 BP in a hill hex. For each estate in your kingdom, increase your stability modifier +1.
• Prerequisites: Estates can be built in any grassland or hill hex.
• Special: Estates can provide elite armies to your kingdom that do not require outside support (i.e. they do not increase consumption). Rules for raising and maintaining armies are beyond the scope of this ruleset, but will be provided later.

Logging Camp: You can establish logging camps in forests to supply your kingdom with timber. A logging camp is situated in a single hex, but it supports logging in adjacent hexes.
• Costs and Benefit: It costs 5 BP to build a logging camp. Each camp generates automatic income of 1 BP.
• Prerequisites: Logging camps can only be built in forest hexes with a road or river, and cannot be adjacent to another logging camp.
• Special: Logging camps are required to build towns.

Mine (Base): You can establish mines in hills or mountains to supply your kingdom with base metals such as iron, tin and copper.
• Costs and Benefit: It costs 12 BP to build a base metal mine. Each generates automatic income of 2 BP and increases your economy modifier by +1.
• Prerequisites: Base metal mines can only be built in hill or mountain hexes with a road or river. A hex must be assayed by a person with at least +5 Knowledge (Engineering) or Profession (Miner) to determine whether it is suitable for a base metal mine. Only about 15 percent of the hill or mountain hexes in the Stolen Lands are suitable.

Mine (Exotic): You can establish mines in mountains to supply your kingdom with exotic metals such as mithril or adamantine.
• Costs and Benefits: It costs 16 BP to build an exotic metal mine. Each generates automatic income of 4 BP and increases your economy modifier by +1.
• Prerequisites: Exotic metal mines can only be built in mountain hexes. A hex must be assayed by a person with at least +5 Knowledge (Engineering) or Profession (Miner) to determine whether it is suitable for an exotic metal mine. Only a few of the mountain hexes in the Stolen Lands are suitable.

Mine (Precious): You can establish mines in hills or mountains to supply your kingdom with precious metals such as gold and silver. Precious metal mines often increase unrest as miners rush to establish claims.
• Costs and Benefits: It costs 12 BP to build a precious metal mine. Each generates automatic income of 4 BP and economy modifier +2, as well as unrest +2.
• Prerequisites: Precious metal mines can only be built in hill or mountain hexes. A hex must be assayed by a person with at least +5 Knowledge (Engineering) or Profession (Miner) to determine whether it is suitable for a precious metal mine. Only about 5 percent of the hill or mountain hexes in the Stolen Lands are suitable.

Orchard: You can grow fruit for your kingdom in orchards.
• Costs and Benefit: It costs 6 BP to plant an orchard. Each orchard generates automatic income of 1 BP and increases your loyalty modifier by +1.
• Prerequisites: Orchards can only be planted in grasslands or hill hexes with a road or river. Orchards do not generate benefits for two years after planted unless the kingdom's leaders have access to the Plant Growth spell (third level druid or plant domain), or equivalent.
• Special: An orchard planted at the site of an existing bee yard only costs 3 BP.

Quarry: You can establish quarries in hills or mountains to supply your kingdom with stone.
• Costs and Benefits: It costs 8 BP to build a quarry. Each quarry generates automatic income of 1 BP and Stability modifier +1.
• Prerequisites: Quarries can only be built in hill or mountain hexes with a road or river. A hex must be assayed by a person with at least +5 Knowledge (Engineering) or Profession (Miner) to determine whether it is suitable for a quarry. Only about 5 percent of the hill hexes and 50 percent of the mountain hexes in the Stolen Lands are suitable.
• Special: Quarries are required to build certain defensive improvements.

Peat Cutting: You can cut peat in swamps to supply your kingdom with fuel.
• Costs and Benefit: It costs 8 BP to build a peat cutting area. Each peat cutting generates automatic income of 1 BP.
• Prerequisites: Peat can be cut only in swamp hexes with a road or river, and cannot be adjacent to another peat cutting. A hex must be assayed by a person with at least +5 Knowledge (Nature) or Profession (Miner) to determine whether it is suitable for a peat cutting. Only about 10 percent of the swamp hexes in the Stolen Lands are suitable.

Road: You can build roads to speed communications throughout the kingdom, improving its economy and stability.
• Costs and Benefits: It costs 1 BP to build a road though a grasslands hex. This cost increases to 2 BP in forests and to 4 BP in swamps and mountains. If the road crosses a river, a bridge must be built—this doubles the road's cost unless there is already a bridge in the hex. For every 4 road hexes your kingdom controls, the economy modifier increases by +1. For every 8 road hexes your kingdom controls, the stability modifier increases by +1.
• Special: Roads can be built in the same hex as other hex improvements. Roads also decrease travel time in your kingdom (as per normal Pathfinder rules).

Stronghold: A structure that protects strategic points. It can also serve as a garrison for an army in the field (reducing army maintenance costs).
• Costs and Benefits: It costs 20 BP to build a stronghold. A stronghold gives stability modifier +2 and reduces unrest by 1.
• Prerequisites: Strongholds can be built in any hex containing a road or river. A stronghold must be connected by a road or river to a quarry.
• Special: If attacked, strongholds have a defense modifier of +6. If a town is built in a hex with a stronghold, the town automatically gains a guard tower and palisade wall. A Fort can be upgraded to a stronghold for 10 BP.

Town: Towns can host a variety of improvements that make your kingdom more sophisticated and effective. Your kingdom can, but does not need to, designate a town as its capital.
• Costs and Benefits: It costs 2 BP to build a town in a grassland hex; 4 in a hills hex; 6 in a forest hex; 8 in a swamp hex; and 12 in a mountain hex.
• Special: Town improvements can be built in towns for additional costs and benefits. The town's population affects the ability of PCs to buy and sell magic items and other services in the town; see the Town Characteristics table.
• Capital: Your kingdom can designate a single town as its capital. For so long as the capital remains in the kingdom, increase your kingdom's economy, loyalty and stability modifier by 1. You can change your kingdom's capital by enacting a law.

Vineyard: Vineyards grow grapes and process them into wine.
• Costs and Benefit: It costs 6 BP to plant a vineyard. Each vineyard generates automatic income of 1 BP and increases your loyalty modifier by +1.
• Prerequisites: Vineyards can only be built in hill hexes with a road or river. Vineyards do not generate benefits for two years after planted unless the kingdom's leaders have access to the Plant Growth spell (third level druid or plant domain), or equivalent.

Towns and Town Improvements

Spoiler:

Towns are essentially the sum of their parts, and their parts are town improvements. town improvements are created during the improvement phase by spending BP. Basic town improvements increase your kingdom's economy, loyalty and stability modifiers. Other town improvements can affect a town's defense, market for magic items, help implement laws, etc. The number of town improvements you can create during a single phase is limited by your kingdom's size; see the Improvements per Month table for these limits. Unlike a hex, each town can have many improvements; however, except for the basic improvement, a town can only have one of each improvement.

Town Improvements Summary
Type Cost Effects
Basic
Economy 3 Economy +1
Loyalty 3 Loyalty +1
Stability 3 Stability +1
Defense
Guard Tower 10 Defense +2, Unrest -1
Palisade Wall 10 Defense +2
Curtain Wall 20 Defense +4
Castle 20 Defense +4, Unrest -1
Royal Castle 40 Defense +4, Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Unrest -1
Law Improvements
Arena 15 Loyalty +3 and Festival Law penalties halved
Cathedral 15 Stability +3 and Promotion Law penalties halved
Mint 15 Economy +3 and Tax Law penalties halved
Magic Item Improvements
Black Market 10 Economy +1, Unrest +3 and increase buy/sell limit for illicit goods
Magister's Tower 15 Defense +2 and increase buy limit for arcane magic items and arcane spellcasting level
Market 15 Economy +2 and increase buy/sell limit for all magic items
Master Forge 15 Stability +2 and increase buy limit for magic weapons and armor
Sacred Precinct 15 Loyalty +2 and increase buy limit for divine magic items and divine spellcasting level

Basic Improvements

Economy/Loyalty/Stability Improvement: Create buildings and institutions that further your kingdom's economy, loyalty or stability modifier.
• Costs: 3BP.
• Benefit: +1 to economy, loyalty or stability modifier, chosen as the time created. A town can create this improvement many times.

Defense Improvements

Guard Tower: The most basic of defensive fortifications. It may also serve as a gatehouse or prison.
• Costs: 10 BP.
• Benefit: +2 to Defense modifier and reduce unrest by 1.

Palisade Wall: A wooden wall surrounding the town.
• Costs: 10 BP.
• Benefit: +2 to defense modifier.
• Prerequisites: The town must be connected by a road or river to a logging camp.

Curtain Wall: A stone wall surrounding the town.
• Costs: 20 BP.
• Benefit: +4 to defense modifier.
• Prerequisites: The town must be connected by a road or river to a quarry, and must have an existing guard tower.
• Special: A town cannot have both a curtain wall and a palisade wall. If a town builds a curtain wall when it already has a palisade wall, the palisade wall is simply replaced.

Castle: Incorporating a keep, walls and a gatehouse. A castle serves as a lord's residence, as well as the focal point of town defenses.
• Costs: 20 BP.
• Benefit: +4 to defense modifier and reduce unrest by 1.
• Prerequisites: The town must be connected by a road or river to a quarry, and must have a curtain wall and guard tower.

Royal Castle: An improved castle and palace that emphasizes the ruler's power and prestige as much as defenses.
• Costs: 40 BP.
• Benefit: +4 to defense modifier, +2 to economy modifier, +2 to loyalty modifier, +2 to stability modifier, and reduce unrest by 1.
• Prerequisites: The town must be connected by a road or river to a quarry and a precious metals mine, and must have a curtain wall. A town can have both a royal castle and an ordinary castle. However, there can only be 1 royal castle in the kingdom.

Law Improvements

Arena: A large public structure for competitions, demonstrations, team sports, or gladiator fights.
• Costs: 15 BP.
• Benefit: +3 loyalty modifier and the penalties from festival laws are halved.
• Prerequisites: The town must be connected by a road or river to a quarry.

Cathedral: The focal point of a town's worship and religious activities.
• Costs: 15 BP.
• Benefit: +3 stability modifier and the penalties from promotion laws are halved.
• Prerequisites: The town must be connected by a road or river to a quarry.

Mint: This powerful institution converts precious metals to the kingdom's coins
• Costs: 15 BP.
• Benefit: +3 economy modifier and the penalties from tax laws are halved.
• Prerequisites: The town must be connected by a road or river to a precious metals mine.

Magic Item Improvements

Black Market: A network that sells or buys stolen, dangerous or illegal goods or services. Black markets attract criminals to your town.
• Costs: 10 BP.
• Benefit: +1 economy modifier, however unrest increases by 3. In addition, the town's buy and sell limits for poisons, drugs, and other illicit goods is doubled (does not stack with other increases).

Magister's Tower: A workshop and study for the kingdom's leading arcane spellcaster.
• Costs: 15 BP.
• Benefit: +2 defense modifier. In addition, the town's buy limit for arcane scrolls, wands and staffs is double the highest (unmodified) buy limit for any town in the kingdom. Finally, the town's available spellcasting level (for arcane spells only) is 1 higher than the highest (unmodified) spellcasting level for any town in the kingdom.
• Prerequisites: The town must be situated in a place of arcane power, usually far away from the kingdom's capital.

Market: An open area maintained by the town for small, temporary or itinerant merchants, or other outdoor mercantile pursuits.
• Costs: 15 BP.
• Benefit: +2 economy modifier. In addition, the town's buy and sell limits for all magic items is increased by one-third (does not stack with other increases).
• Prerequisites: The town must be situated on a waterfront (or other major trade route, at the GM's discretion).

Master Forge: A magical smithy specialized in powerful weapons and armor.
• Costs: 15 BP.
• Benefit: +2 stability modifier, In addition, the town's buy limit for magic armor and weapons is double the highest (unmodified) buy limit for any town in the kingdom.
• Prerequisites: The town must be situated in a mountain hex and must be connected by a road or river to an exotic metals mine.

Sacred Precinct: A holy (or unholy) site blessed by the gods.
• Costs: 15 BP.
• Benefit: +2 loyalty modifier. In addition, the town's buy limit for divine scrolls, wands, staffs and certain other divine magic items is double the highest (unmodified) buy limit for any town in the kingdom. Finally, the town's available spellcasting level (for divine spells only) is 1 higher than the highest (unmodified) spellcasting level for any town in the kingdom.
• Prerequisites: The town must be situated in a holy place of great power.

Town Characteristics
A town's population is 25 times the sum of its economy, loyalty, stability and defense modifiers.
Population Common Name Buy Limit Sell Limit Spellcasting Level
Up to 250 Village 500 gp 2,500 gp 3rd
251-2,000 Small Town 1,000 gp 5,000 gp 4th
2,001-5,000 Large Town 2,000 gp 10,000 gp 5th
5,001-10,000 Small City 4,000 gp 25,000 gp 6th
10,001-25,000 Large City 8,000 gp 50,000 gp 7th
25,000 plus Metropolis 16,000 gp 100,000 gp 8th

Buy Limit: A town's buy limit is an approximation of the value of magic items that can be found for purchase within that town. A town's basic buy limit is given by the table above, but can be modified by town improvements. There is a 75% chance that any item with a value equal to or less than the buy limit can be found for sale in the town with little effort. If an item is not available, a new check to determine if the item has become available can be made in 1 month. A town will likely have several magic items for sale that are more valuable than its buy limit.

Sell Limit: A town's sell limit is the most money that someone in the town can spend to purchase any single item from the PCs. Like the buy limit, a town's sell limit can be modified by town improvements. If the PCs wish to sell an item worth more than a town's sell limit, they'll either need to settle for a lower price, travel to a larger community, or search for a specific buyer with deeper pockets.

Spellcasting Level: A town's spellcasting for hire is limited by the level of the available spellcasters in town; the number shown is the highest-level spell generally available for purchase from spellcasters in the town. A town's spellasting level can be modified by town improvements. Specific NPCs (and the PCs of course) may be able to cast spells of higher level.

Rule of Diminishing Returns

Spoiler:

At the GM's discretion, if your kingdom is becoming unbalanced because it has too many of a certain type of hex or town improvements, the next improvement of that type may provide half or no benefits. The GM will usually warn you if this will occur.

Laws

Spoiler:

Your kingdom's Laws have several effects. Promotion, Taxation and Festival Laws increase your kingdom's Stability, Economy, and Loyalty modifiers. Other laws can help your kingdom deal with Unrest, change alignment or move the capital.

Promotion Laws: Promotion Laws can include recruitments, advertisements, and even propaganda campaigns.
• None: -1 Stability modifier.
• Token: +1 Stability modifier; +1 Consumption.
• Standard: +2 Stability modifier; +2 Consumption.
• Aggressive: +3 Stability modifier; +4 Consumption.
• Expansionist: +4 Stability modifier; +8 Consumption.

Taxation Laws: Tax Laws are require payments from a kingdom's subjects to help pay for your kingdom's needs.
• De Minimis: +1 Loyalty modifier.
• Light: +1 Economy modifier; -1 Loyalty.
• Normal: +2 Economy modifier; -2 Loyalty.
• Heavy: +3 Economy modifier; -4 Loyalty.
• Very Heavy: +6 Economy modifier; -8 Loyalty.
• Overwhelming: +8 Economy modifier; -16 Loyalty.

Festival Laws: Festival Laws, including parades and other public events, can increase the kingdom's happiness and loyalty.
• None: -1 Loyalty modifier.
• One: +1 Loyalty modifier; +1 Consumption.
• Six: +2 Loyalty modifier; +2 Consumption.
• Twelve: +3 Loyalty modifier; +4 Consumption.
• Twenty-Four: +4 Loyalty modifier; +8 Consumption.
• Continuous: +6 Loyalty modifier; +16 Consumption.

Martial Law: While Martial Law is in effect, your kingdom's Unrest is reduced by 1 each month. However, while Martial Law is in effect, your kingdom cannot settle new hexes nor build new Hex or Town Improvements. Moreover, while Martial Law is in effect, and for an equal period thereafter, your kingdom's Loyalty modifier is reduced by 4.

Alignment Law: You can change your kingdom's alignment. If you change your kingdom's alignment by one step and no more than once per year, increase Unrest by 1. If you change your kingdom's alignment by more than one step increase Unrest by 1d6. If you change your kingdom's alignment more than once per year, increase Unrest by an additional 1d6 each time alignment is changed (after the first).

Capital Law: You can change your kingdom's capital. If changed to any larger town, Unrest will increase by 1. If you change your kingdom's capital to an equal size or smaller town, increase Unrest by 1d4.

Leadership Roles

Spoiler:

A healthy kingdom has leaders filling a number of different roles. Each leader grants the kingdom different benefits; leaving a role unfilled can penalize the kingdom. Leaders can be grouped into three types: the ruler, essential leaders (the marshal, the master of the commons and the treasurer) and nonessential leaders.
In order for a leadership role to grant its bonus, the character filling that role must spend at least 1 week per month engaged in various leadership duties (and must be in appropriate places within the kingdom). For this campaign, it's best to have the party pick the same week to dedicate to their administrative duties so that all of the PCs are all available for "adventuring duty" at the same time. A single character can only occupy one leadership role at a time. Each leadership role has a benefit and, if the rule or essential leaders are vacant, may impose penalties on the kingdom.
Leadership roles also have one or more key abilities which are important for roleplaying reasons but do not directly affect kingdom management rules. For example, a besieging army may make a check opposed by the Master Builder's Knowledge (Engineering) check to find a weakness in town walls, or a Spymaster may make a Perception check to notice the signs of an impending drug epidemic.

Leadership Roles Summary
Type Effects
Ruler Cha modifier to Economy, Loyalty and/or Stability modifier; vacancy penalty
Master of Commons Wis or Cha modifier to Loyalty modifier; vacancy penalty
Marshal Str or Int modifier to Stability modifier; vacancy penalty
Treasurer Int modifier to Economy modifier; vacancy penalty
Constable Con or Wis modifier to Stability modifier
Grand Diplomat Cha modifier to Loyalty modifier
High Justicar Wis modifier to Stability modifier
High Priest Wis modifier to Loyalty modifier
Master Builder Con or Int modifier to Economy modifier; additional improvement
Magister Int or Cha modifier to Economy modifier
Royal Executioner Reduce unrest by 1, Loyalty -2
Spymaster Dex or Int modifier to Economy, Loyalty or Stability modifier
Steward Increase non-essential leaders by Int modifier, max 4
Verderer Decrease consumption by half Wis modifier

Ruler
Ruler: The Ruler is the primary leader of the kingdom. Unlike the other leadership roles, in the Brevic system, a Ruler typically uses one of three distinct titles, depending on the current size of the kingdom. A sovereign country of size 1–20 is known as a grand duchy and its ruler is known as a Grand Duke or Duchess (Brevic GrosserHerzog). A sovereign country of size 21–80 is known as a principality and its Ruler is known as a Prince or Princess (Brevic Prinz). A sovereign country of size 81 or higher is known as a kingdom and ruled by a King or Queen (Brevic Konig).
• Benefit: A Grand Duke chooses one of the economy, loyalty or stability modifiers and increases it by a value equal to the ruler's charisma modifier. A Prince chooses two of the economy, loyalty or stability modifiers and increases them by a value equal to the ruler's charisma modifier. A King chooses two of the Economy, Loyalty or Stability modifiers and increases them by a value equal to the ruler's charisma modifier.
• Vacancy Penalty: A kingdom without a Ruler cannot settle new hexes or create hex improvements (but it can build buildings). Increase unrest by 4 during each upkeep phase in which the kingdom has no ruler.
• Key Abilities: Diplomacy, Knowledge (Nobility) skills.
• Special: Two married characters can fill this role if they are married, in which case they jointly rule the kingdom. Both Rulers add their Charisma modifier to the kingdom's modifiers as appropriate for their rank, and as long as at least one Ruler is present, the kingdom avoids the vacancy penalty.

Essential Leaders

Master of the Commons: Sometimes known as the Chancellor. The Master of the Commons serves as the chief counselor to the ruler and is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that the will of the kingdom's subjects is represented. Often, this role is taken by heroes who capture the public imagination
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's loyalty modifier by a value equal to the Master of the Commons' wisdom or charisma modifier.
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (Local), Perform (Oratory) skills.
• Vacancy Penalty: While the role is vacant, the kingdom has a -3 penalty on all loyalty checks and cannot gain benefits from festival laws. Finally, increase the kingdom's unrest by 1 during each upkeep phase.

Marshal: Sometimes known as the Lord Commander. The Marshal leads the realm's armies and militias. The Marshal may also serve as general of an army.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's stability modifier by a value equal to the Marshal's intelligence or strength modifier.
• Key Abilities: High BAB, Profession (Soldier) skill.
• Vacancy Penalty: While the role is vacant, the kingdom has a -3 penalty on all stability checks, cannot gain benefits from promotion laws, and cannot raise armies. Finally, increase the kingdom's unrest by 1 during each upkeep phase.

Treasurer: Sometimes known as the Master of Coin or Keeper of the Coin. The Treasurer manages the kingdom's finances, collects taxes and regulates economic activities.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's economy modifier by a value equal to the Treasurer's intelligence modifier.
• Key Abilities: Profession (Merchant) skill.
• Vacancy Penalty: While the role is vacant, the kingdom has a -3 penalty on all economy checks, cannot gain benefits from taxation laws. Finally, increase the kingdom's unrest by 1 during each upkeep phase.

Non-Essential Leaders
The kingdom can employ a number of non-essential leaders equal to the ruler's Charisma modifier. The number of non-essential leaders can be increased if the kingdom employs a steward. A ruler's spouse does not increase the number of non-essential leaders.

Constable: Sometimes known as Border Warden or the Master of the Hunt. The Constable patrols the kingdom's borders and outlying areas, watching for incursion and dispensing frontier justice.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's stability modifier by a value equal to the Constable's wisdom or constitution modifier.
• Key Abilities: Survival, Perception skills.
• Special: If the Constable role is filled, the kingdom may get advance warning of border threats at the GM's discretion.

Grand Diplomat: The Grand Diplomat is in charge of a kingdom's foreign relations, meeting with diplomats posted to the kingdom.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's loyalty modifier by a value equal to the Grand Diplomat's Charisma modifier.
• Key Abilities: Diplomacy skill.
• Special: If the Grand Diplomat role is filled, the kingdom may experience better relations with Brevoy at the GM's discretion.

High Justicar: Sometimes known as the Master of Justice. The High Justicar serves as the chief judge of the realm and is charged with the ensuring the administration of the law.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's stability modifier by a value equal to the High Justicar's wisdom modifier.
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (History), Profession (Lawyer) skills.

High Priest: The High Priest guides the kingdom's religious needs and growth.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's loyalty modifier by a value equal to the High Priest's wisdom modifier.
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (Religion) skill, divine spellcasting.

Master Builder: The Master Builder is in charge of developing the realm's infrastructure.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's economy modifier by a value equal to the Master Builder's constitution or intelligence modifier.
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (Engineering) skill.
• Special: If the Master Builder role is filled, the kingdom may build one extra hex or town improvement each month.

Magister: The Magister supports the magical needs of the kingdom.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's economy modifier by a value equal to the Magister's intelligence or charisma modifier.
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (Arcane) skill, arcane spellcasting.

Royal Executioner: Sometimes known as the Royal Headsman or the Royal Assassin. His imposing presence inspires fear among the kingdom's subjects, but his methods are unpopular.
• Benefit: Reduce unrest by 1 during each upkeep phase, however also decrease the kingdom's loyalty modifier by 2.
• Key Abilities: High strength, imposing weapons, exotic killing abilities.

Spymaster: Sometimes known as the Master of Whispers. The Spymaster observes the kingdom's underworld and criminal elements and spies on other kingdoms.
• Benefit: Increase the kingdom's economy, loyalty or stability (Spymaster's choice) modifier by the Spymaster's dexterity or intelligence modifier. The Spymaster can change which value he modifies during the kingdom's improvement phase (but only once per phase).
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (Local) skill, Perception, Stealth.
• Special: If the Spymaster role is filled, the kingdom may get advance warning of threats at the GM's discretion.

Steward: Sometimes known as the Master of the Royal Household or the King's Hand. The Steward serves as the ruler's assistant and secretary. With a weak or foolish ruler, the Steward may serve as the "power behind the throne."
• Benefit: Increase the number of non-essential leaders that can be employed by the kingdom by the Steward's intelligence modifier, up to a maximum of +4. Note that the Steward still counts against the limit of non-essential leaders that can be employed.
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (Local), Knowledge (Nobility) skills.

Verderer: Sometimes known as the Master of Gardens or the Forest Warden. The Verderer is charged with overseeing agriculture and natural resources.
• Benefit: Decrease the kingdom's consumption by half (round down) of the Verderer's Wisdom modifier.
• Key Abilities: Knowledge (Nature) skill, druid or domain (plant) spellcasting.
• Special: If the Verderer role is filled, there is a reduced risk of exhaustion of the kingdom's natural resource hex improvements due to kingdom events.

Licenses

Spoiler:

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OPEN GAME LICENSE Version 1.0a
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System Reference Document. © 2000. Wizards of the Coast, Inc; Authors: Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, based on material by E. Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson.
Pathfinder Adventure Path volume #32: Rivers Run Red. © 2010, Paizo Publishing, LLC; Author: Rob McCreary
Quickling from the Tome of Horrors Revised. © 2002, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author: Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.
Rock Troll from the Tome of Horrors Revised. © 2002, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author: Scott Greene.
Scarecrow from the Tome of Horrors Revised. © 2002, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author: Scott Greene, based on original material by Roger Musson.
Scythe Tree from the Tome of Horrors Revised. © 2002, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author: Scott Greene.
Two-Headed Troll from the Tome of Horrors Revised. © 2002, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author: Scott Greene, based on original material by Oliver Charles MacDonald
Tome of Horrors II. © 2004, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author Scott Greene; Additional Authors: Erica Balsley, Kevin Baase, Casey Christofferson, Jim Collura, Meghan Greene, Lance Hawvermale, Travis Hawvermale, Bill Kenower, Patrick Lawinger, Nathan Paul, Clark Peterson, Bill Webb, and Monte Cook.
Tome of Horrors III. © 2005, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author: Scott Greene with Casey Christofferson, Eric Balsley, Kevin Baase, Lance Halvermale, Travis Halvermale, Ian S. Johnston, Patrick Lawringer, Nathan Paul, Clark Peterson, Greg Ragland, Robert Schwalb, and Bill Web.


Kingdom Tracking Sheet
Spoiler:

Name: ____________________
Size: _____ [number of hexes settled]
Population: _____ [250 x Size + Town Population]
Control DC: _____ [20 + Size]
Consumption: _____ [Population/250 – Farmlands x 2 (1 in winter) – Adjust for Verderer]
Auto. Income: _____ [modifiers from Hex Improvements]
Economy: _____ [modifiers from Hex and Town Improvements, Alignment, Leaders]
Loyalty: _____ [modifiers from Hex and Town Improvements, Alignment, Leaders]
Stability: _____ [modifiers from Hex and Town Improvements, Alignment, Leaders]
Treasury: _____
Unrest: _____ [apply as penalty to all Economy, Loyalty, Stability checks]
Stagnation: _____ [increase Consumption]
Hex Improvements
Farmlands: _____ [Reduces consumption by 2 (1 in winter)]
Fort: _____ [Stability +1]
Knight's Estate: _____ [Stability +1]
Logging Camp: _____ [Automatic Income +1, Stability +1]
Mine (Base): _____ [Automatic Income +2, Economy +1]
Mine (Exotic): _____ [Automatic Income +4, Economy +1]
Mine (Precious):_____ [Automatic Income +4, Economy +2]
Orchard: _____ [Automatic Income +1, Loyalty +1]
Peat Cutting: _____ [Automatic Income +1]
Quarry: _____ [Automatic Income +1, Stability +1]
Road: _____ [Economy +1/4, Stability +1/8]
Stronghold: _____ [Stability +2]
Town: _____ [Special]
Vineyard: _____ [Automatic Income +1, Loyalty +1]
Alignment and Laws in Effect
Promotion: _____ [Increase Stability, increase Consumption]
Taxation: _____ [Increase Economy, decrease Loyalty]
Festival: _____ [Increase Loyalty, increase Consumption]
Martial Law: _____ [Unrest -1 each month, Loyalty -4 for long period, other ill effects]

Leadership Name Modifier
Ruler: ___________ ___ [Cha to Eco., Loy. and/or Stab., vacancy penalty]
M. Commons: ___________ ___ [Wis or Cha to Loyalty, vacancy penalty]
Marshal: ___________ ___ [Str or Int to Stability, vacancy penalty]
Treasurer: ___________ ___ [Int to Economy, vacancy penalty]
Constable: ___________ ___ [Con or Wis to Stability]
Grand Diplo.: ___________ ___ [Cha to Loyalty]
High Justicar: ___________ ___ [Wis to Stability]
High Priest: ___________ ___ [Wis to Loyalty]
M. Builder: ___________ ___ [Con or Int to Stability]
Magister: ___________ ___ [Int or Cha to Economy]
R. Executioner: ___________ ___ [Unrest -1 each month, Loyalty -2]
Spymaster: ___________ ___ [Dex or Int to Economy, Loyalty or Stability]
Steward: ___________ ___ [Int additional non-essential leaders]
Verderer: ___________ ___ [Decrease consumption by half Wis]
Vassal Name Terms
__________ _____________________________________________________
__________ _____________________________________________________
__________ _____________________________________________________
__________ _____________________________________________________


Town Tracking Sheet
Name: ____________________
Population: _____ [25 x Economy, Loyalty, Stability, Defense]
Capital: _____ [If yes, Economy +1, Loyalty +1, Stability +1]
Economy: _____ [modifiers from Town Improvements, Capital]
Loyalty: _____ [modifiers from Town Improvements, Capital]
Stability: _____ [modifiers from Town Improvements, Capital]
Defense: _____ [modifiers from Town Improvements]
Town Improvements
Basic
Economy: _____ [Economy +1, multiples allowed]
Loyalty: _____ [Loyalty +1, multiples allowed]
Stability: _____ [Stability +1, multiples allowed]
Defense
Guard Tower: _____ [Defense +2]
Palisade Wall: _____ [Defense +2]
Curtain Wall: _____ [Defense +4]
Castle: _____ [Defense +4]
Royal Castle: _____ [Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Defense +4]
Law
Arena: _____ [Loyalty +3]
Cathedral: _____ [Stability +3]
Mint: _____ [Economy +3]
Magic Item
Black Market: _____ [Economy +1]
M. Tower: _____ [Defense +2]
Market: _____ [Economy +2]
Master Forge: _____ [Stability +2]
Sacred Precinct:_____ [Loyalty +2]
Buy Limit: _____
Sell Limit: _____
Spellcasting: _____
Notes from Magic Item Improvements: ______________________________


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Maps, Modules Subscriber

I'll admit, I've only looked through part of this...but I'm impressed. I particularly like some of the new hex improvement options. And the reduced building list - I'm going to have to play with this a bit to really wrap my brain around how it works, but I like the smaller-town feel.

With improvements like the mines ("exotic" or "precious"), was the intent that they can roll a % chance to be able to establish such a mine in a given hex, or were you going with the specified resource hexes from the adventures?

Also, can I get the word document?

Spoiler:
cintrabristol at comcast dot net

Andoran

Seconded on the Word file, please and thank you.

Spoiler:
evandhimes at gmail dot com


I'd like to sign-up for the word file as well...

Spoiler:
harkerwade at gmail dot com


Very nice. I'm echoing the request for a copy in Word format if you wouldn't mind.

Spoiler:
forgotteninthemist at yahoo dot com


Yup - I have to say the sheer amount of work/thought is impressive.
I like what I've read thus far & my group will be into RRR soon, so...

Movie plot spoiler:
mindbodysoul at xnet dot co dot nz

Cintra - don't know what the intention on mines was, but I think I'd
make my players roll. Kinda makes it a bit of an unknown for me too,
just like normal prospecting...don'tcha think...? ;-p


Cintra Bristol wrote:

With improvements like the mines ("exotic" or "precious"), was the intent that they can roll a % chance to be able to establish such a mine in a given hex, or were you going with the specified resource hexes from the adventures?

I pre-selected locations for one precious metals mine and one exotic metals mine (the gold mine in Stolen Lands and a mountain hex from Varnhold Vanishing). All other hexes, the PCs can roll, or (since nobody yet has the right skills in my group), they might hire a surveyor to survey claimed hexes or travel with them. The % chance is mostly just to let them know that not every hill hex can be a mine>

-Brian

Andoran

Pathfinder Modules Subscriber

from my initial overview perusal, this appears to be quite good, very well thought out, and some of it quite brilliant.

If you have the time, I would love to see a copy of the word-file that you have

You can email it to

Spoiler:

SirKicley(at)yahoo(dot)com

I look forward to truly having the time to study this and use a portion of it.

Thanks
Robert

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Robert Brambley wrote:

from my initial overview perusal, this appears to be quite good, very well thought out, and some of it quite brilliant.

If you have the time, I would love to see a copy of the word-file that you have

You can email it to
** spoiler omitted **

I look forward to truly having the time to study this and use a portion of it.

Thanks
Robert

Wow! That is a lot of work. It looks good so far. I'd appreciate the word file also. My email is in my profile. Thanks in advance.

PJ


These look really useful. Could I also get a copy of that word file?

kane underscore leal at hotmail dot com


Will gladly take a word document of this. Need to do a lot of reading to see which parts I want to pilfer for our campaign, since we're just days away from starting Rivers Run Red. Thanks for your work on this, it looks mightily impressive.

E-Mail:
ultrace@ultrace.com


This looks wonderful! I also prefer the more rural side of kingdom building, so send me a word file, if you please.

Ee Mail

Spoiler:
Still.Quill at Gmail.com


Nice work.

One question: Your approach obviously required a completely different town population equation. How does your formula compare to the AP version? Does it track slower or faster or is it pretty close to the same?


BryonD wrote:


One question: Your approach obviously required a completely different town population equation. How does your formula compare to the AP version? Does it track slower or faster or is it pretty close to the same?

For the non-town hexes, it is exactly the same.

For the town hexes, its a little hard to compare because the default rule bases the town population on districts. Each district can be wholly or partially filled with buildings. Because the number of buildings in a district can vary and the amount of modifiers for each building can also vary substantially, its very hard to do an apples-to-apples comparison.

However, I can say that my design goal goal was to give each modifier in my system about 25% more population than in the original system (except for special buildings which give about 50% more population). Given the very substantial variation in the original rules, I think it would be hard to spot the difference in population for towns with equal modifiers in my alternative rules vs the original rules.

Having said that, the alternative rules definitely prioritize settling more hexes instead of expanding towns. So I would expect kingdoms built using my alternative rules to have smaller towns (and thus smaller town populations) as compared to the original rules.

In part to compensate, I made it easier to increase the magic item buy/sell limits.


Random Kobold wrote:
... send me a word file, if you please.

I think I've replied to everyone in this thread who requested the nicely formatted word file. Let me know if I've missed you.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Brian McDaniel wrote:
Random Kobold wrote:
... send me a word file, if you please.
I think I've replied to everyone in this thread who requested the nicely formatted word file. Let me know if I've missed you.

I too would greatly appreciate a copy of the word file, if you please.

E-Mail:
IgnusFireSpirit at gmail dot com


Thanks for the response. I agree that apples to apples doesn't work well here. But it seems clear you put good thought into maintaining the same quality.

Silver Crusade

I would like a copy of these rules as well, the RAW seem a bit underwhelming, especially as I have a party with a druid and a barbarian in it. They will probably want more rural improvements.

Email Address:

alex.hunt23@gmail.com


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Would love to have the Word document

Email:
tonyz at eskimo dot com


Awesome work.
Could you please send me the word document?
thanks
Email

Spoiler:
rinnenc at web.de

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game Subscriber

I'd like a copy of the word doc as well, please.

Spoiler:
xzaral at yahoo dot com


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

OK. Sent to all whop have requested. If you haven't received, let me know.

FYI, the current version of the rules has changed in some relatively minor ways from the rules first presented above. The biggest change is that my group prefers to do a fair amount of kingdom management online (instead of face to face) and the sequencing of the rules didn't facilitate online kingdom management. As a result, I've moved around the phases to make it more convenient for online play (essentially, all decisions are made, and then all rolls are made, instead of mixing up decisions and rolls).


Just saw this and if you want to spread the word file some more, I'd like a copy too.

Spoiler:
sothal AT me DOT com

Thanks!

Andoran

I'd like the word doc too. This is impressive.

Thanks!

Spoiler:
jeremy.casanave@gmail.com

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

We just started the second book and the group is going down the path of smaller settlements. This would help out a lot. I would love a copy of the word doc when you get the chance.

email:
crispy3ed@gmail.com


I'm liking it! Please send me the Word file, if you would be so kind.

Spoiler:
mellowgoth@hotmail.com

Cheliax

Could I also get the word file, this save me much time I was planning on rewriting most of the rules myself.

:
aph1997@woh.rr.com


I'd like a copy of the word doc as well, please.

jmperez at gmail dot com


If you could please send me a copy of the Word document as well, it would be greatly appreciated!

Spoiler:
arasaka_au@hotmail.com


I would verily much want the word document as well.

Please send it to mothmail at gmail dotte com

Grand Lodge

I'd love a copy as well, if you'd be so kind! These rules are fantastic, My PCs are wrapping up Stolen Lands and about to get their feet wet in kingdom building. Thanks for your work!

Spoiler:
ads107@zips.uakron.edu


Loved the changes. Your original formatting didn't quite survive the transition to the boards, unfortunately. I'd love a copy of the document.

spoiler:
Could you send it to taeghen@hotmail.com?

Thanks!


The rules in the OP about population, size and control DC are a bit unclear.

1. Size = number of hexes. Does a town hex count as 0, 1, or will size of town affect it?

2. Control DC = 20 + size, so how do towns affect it?

Otherwise I'm loving the rules. I have made some of my own modifications, though. Would you mind if I post my own version once I've playtested it? (Crediting you, of course.)

Could you please send the Word file to me:

Spoiler:
wairryostep@dunflimblag.mailexpire.com
(temp email, works for the next month)

Sczarni

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I would love a copy of the Word file!

Spoiler:
trinite *dot* ethan *at* gmail *dot* com

And congratulations on producing such a useful and popular creation!


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

I would like a copy as well.

Spoiler:
aluvial at carolina dot rr dot com

Thanks!


I'd be interested too.

E-Mail:

alexkilcoyne@hotmail.com


I would be interested as well. Looks good,

Spoiler:
rvermeulen7@hotmail.com


Impressive work. I especially like the hex improvements expansion you made.

Why not share the document through google doc/google site ? A simple link where to direct people would certainly be easier than sending dozen of emails, particularly with the interest your rules are raising. :)


Could I also get a word version? :)

super secret:

jasharen a t gmail dot com


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Please send me a copy!

Thank you.

E-Mail:
nolan@erols.com


In case you are still checking up on this, I'd love a copy.

Spoiler:
rvgifford@yahoo.com

Also, did you have a system for determining stagnation or did you intend for it to be an at the GM's whim sort of thing?


In case someone is interested, below is a link to my Google Docs spreadsheet for kingdom management, using my tweaked version of these rules. There are differences (mainly in town and hex improvements), but it should serve as at least a starting point for one with the OP rules.

To try it, you need to sign in to your Google Account and select File->Make a Copy...

Kingdom Spreadsheet (v0.1)

Please let me know if there are questions, bugs or suggestions. I'm yet to come to the part in the campaign where I use these, so I've only used it when playtesting the rules by myself.

Osirion

I'd love a copy please.

Spoiler:
ricotj at yahoo


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

All,

I know I'm a bit delinquent sharing my updated rules, but I'm right in the middle of play-testing revised army-building rules. I hope to have it done this weekend.

Cheers,


I would like a copy as well please.

Spoiler:
Rydhertr@hotmail.com


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
illuminaughty wrote:


Also, did you have a system for determining stagnation or did you intend for it to be an at the GM's whim sort of thing?

More or less, I wanted it to be at the GM's discretion. Its mostly there as a way to prevent positive feedback loops from getting out of hand, if necessary. In practice, I haven't had to to use it so far.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Updated Kingdom-Building Rules Here:
https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B7OlweVB0wi_MzQwZmRlZTctYWFiNy00NTdjLWJjOT QtOWM4Mzg0MjI0MzE4

In addition, not very user-friendly but here is my kingdom-tracking spreadsheet, which you might find useful:
https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B7OlweVB0wi_ZmE4ZTE5YTAtNWFiNi00Mjc1LWE1Nz gtNjU4Y2Q0NWZhNTgx

Objectives
* For reasons of flavor and balance, I did not want my player's kingdom to run on a "magic item" economy. While acknowledging that magic item exists, making it the focus of kingdom-building gave the wrong flavor for me. As appropriate for a kingdom carved out of wilderness, I wanted the kingdom's economy to be primarily about natural resource extraction (iron, timber, gold, stone, agriculture) and to a lesser extend about general trading.

* In addition, I wanted to down-play the role of cities. The flavor of my campaign is more rural, and I wanted the kingdom building rules to make cities less economically important (while maintaining their administrative and military roles). Also, I wanted to reduce the "fiddly"-ness of the city buildings. Conversely, I wanted to give the PCs strong reasons to explore and claim additional hexes, and to make hexes claimed more differentiated from one another.

* Within the army-building rules, there were some very obvious ways to abuse the army-building rules. Moreover, the rules seemed to encourage creating a single army which could be very customized as to tactics, equipment, etc. I wanted to reduce per-unit customization (treating it all as input into CR), but increase the number of units in any particular army. This was done to increase the tactical feel of mass combat.

* As a GM, I wanted some explicit tools to restrain "out of control" kingdoms, without feeling like it was pure GM fiat. (See "Law of Diminishing Returns" and "Stagnation" below.)

Please let me know if you are using these rules, and any input you might have.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Hassy wrote:

The rules in the OP about population, size and control DC are a bit unclear.

1. Size = number of hexes. Does a town hex count as 0, 1, or will size of town affect it?

Size is based just on hexes, so a town's presence or absence would not affect the kingdom's size.

Quote:


2. Control DC = 20 + size, so how do towns affect it?

Towns don't affect the kingdom's Control DC. The rationale for this is that towns are relatively easy to control/administer by local militia (being centralized and all that), while it can get difficult to administer a sprawling, loosely-connected kingdom.

Indeed, within my rules, the whole point of towns is that they allow Kingdoms to increase their Economy/Loyalty/Stability modifiers without raising the Control DC. As it works out, the larger the kingdom, the larger/more towns are necessary to effectively administer it.

Quote:


Otherwise I'm loving the rules. I have made some of my own modifications, though. Would you mind if I post my own version once I've playtested it? (Crediting you, of course.)

Of course. Even more, I'd love it if you can post your playtesting results here in this thread.


bmcdaniel wrote:
Of course. Even more, I'd love it if you can post your playtesting results here in this thread.

The current version of my rules is based on your rules from the OP, but I changed a lot of things and incorporated some of the changes you made. The campaign is still in early stages, so not much to report yet.

Rules: here
Tracking sheet: here

Most of my changes were to cut down text and options to get the rules to a more manageable size, or encourage the kingdom to grow in directions I liked. Important changes below.

Additions and Highlights:
Self-Sufficiency: All settled hexes produce some food through subsistence agriculture, hunting or fishing. As long as consumption is lower than size, the kingdom is self-sufficient, meaning that it produces any food it consumes. This may become important in times of war. If there are no safe trade routes to non-hostile nations, consumption above size is doubled.

Landmark: A landmark is a natural or supernatural site you develop as a national symbol.
* Costs: 1 BP in grassland, hills or forest. 2 BP in swamp or mountains.
* Benefits: +1 Loyalty.
* Special: A landmark can be in the same hex as any other improvement. Losing a landmark hex causes +1 Unrest. Available only in certain hexes or as kingdom events.

(The Statue of Erastil in Stolen Lands (N.) is an example of an undeveloped landmark. Landmarks replace Vineyards and Orchards that were cumbersome to use.)

Opportunities: Opportunities are improvements that are only available as a kingdom or game event as indicated by the GM.

Leadership: The Leadership feat allows some rulers to qualify the kingdom for opportunity improvements. Example:

Cathedral: The focal point of a town's worship and religious activities.
* Special: At the GM’s discretion, if the kingdom’s High Priest has the leadership feat, she may qualify the kingdom for one cathedral.

(These are available for leaders with no other special ability.)

Other Changes:
Vassal: A vassal, or fief, is a political subdivision that manages a part of your kingdom. A vassal’s hexes are a part of your kingdom and affect its size, but not under your direct control. They don’t cause consumption or produce income, but provide a +1 Stability bonus. Vassalage may be established on whatever additional terms are agreed upon between your kingdom and the vassal; typical terms include a provision to field an army during times of declared war.

Vassal’s Estate: Estates to support knights or other military retainers pledged to you.
* Costs: 4 BP in grassland, 6 BP in hills.
* Benefit: +1 Stability, does not count for Consumption (i.e. -1 Consumption).
* Prerequisites: Only available when an NPC vassal is found in game.
* Special: Vassals can provide wartime support in the form of armies. You can grant settled farmland to a vassal for 2 BP, changing the hex to an estate.

(All vassals are handled in basically the same way.)

Policing: Policing laws can include guard patrols in towns and rural areas or other public safety measures like training and promotion campaigns.
(Replaces Promotions. The players wanted guards even before they got to kingdom building.)

Laws: Changing any law that has already been changed in the past year causes +2 Unrest in addition to any from the law itself.
(Generalizes the Unrest from changing alignment too often.)

Granary: A storehouse for grain and supplies necessary to withstand sieges or poor harvest.
* Benefit: +1 Stability. Each granary also reduces the effect of food shortages by 1 and helps a town withstand siege.
(Necessitated by a string of food shortage events.)


I like the direction that these rules are going - they look much more streamlined and I like the emphasis on structures built outside cities. It has a much more authentic feel to it, since concentration of population in large cities is a relatively new concept and decentralization of resources makes sense to me!

One thing I'm confused about - the granary is supposed to help during sieges? Maybe I'm not finding the rules, but where are the siege rules during which the granary will help?

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