Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
Pathfinder Society

Pathfinder Beginner Box

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game

Pathfinder Comics

Pathfinder Legends

RPG Superstar 2015

What are some things about the Pathfinder rules that you think most people do not know?


Pathfinder RPG General Discussion

1,051 to 1,100 of 1,401 << first < prev | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | next > last >>

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Pathfinder is 3.5 compatible.

Shadow Lodge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

You mean "was".


Why was? Did the devs retract what they where saying earlier?

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as FAQ candidate. 1 person marked this as a favorite.

After the Core book came out, around the time of the APG, a lot of the "3.5 survives" went away and the focus changed to "PF is not 3.5/3E" very noticably.


Cause it's no longer supported; the rules system does still exist (looking at Devil's Advocate) so I think the present tense is warranted. :P


It still doesn't change the fact that the systems are still close enough to be compatible.


"Devil's Advocate" wrote:
After the Core book came out, around the time of the APG, a lot of the "3.5 survives" went away and the focus changed to "PF is not 3.5/3E" very noticably.

Ah. So PF "is" 3.5 compatible. I don't know why you said it "was" when it clearly still "is".

Star Voter 2013

If you plan on mixing the two you need to triple check anything 3.5 to avoid, unintended stacking or over powered combos. ex allowing a TWF archetype to take oversized TWF from ultimate warrior and then reduce his TWF penalties to zero.


Firstly - it's Complete Warrior.
Secondly - what's wrong with Oversized Two-Weapon Fighting and zero penalties? It's hardly overpowered.
Thirdly - I'm running games with PF and 3.5 mixed and I don't have any problems. It's also not much more trouble to watch for abuses or loopholes than without it.

Star Voter 2013

First Yeah I know.

Secondly it was a example of unintended stacking not overpoweredness, I don't think its overpowered.

Third I haven't run such a game but I do have a player who if I did would have to submit his build in triplicate levels 1-20 for review weeks ahead this guy is that good at breaking a system. Yes I check him over in PF, and it can get bad there, If i give him access to even the complete line from 3.5 its only gonna get worse.

I'm not saying it can't work but it does require a more watchful eye depending on your players.


I'm always having a watchful eye on my players, no matter if it's PF, 3.5 or any combination.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm not willing to comb the entire thread, but is there a compilation of these rules that people can easily find and later access?

Here's one, in the CRB Combat chapter (p. 199), that I found and never noticed before:

Quote:
Performing a Combat Maneuver... Unless otherwise noted, performing a combat maneuver provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of the maneuver. If you are hit by the target, you take the damage normally and apply that amount as a penalty to the attack roll to perform the maneuver.

I always applied d20 + CMB against CMD. But if I'm hit while trying to use a maneuver, then I'm penalized on the roll. And this also applies when monsters try to use maneuvers against me.

This last one is more of a suggestion for the next errata...

The same paragraph quoted above there is a +4 bonus to the combat maneuver's attack roll, if the target is stunned. In the CRB glossary, the "Stunned" condition does not mention this. There should be a way to make this harder to miss (perhaps make it a -4 penalty to CMD).

Silver Crusade

How to scaled or amphibian creatures use animate hair?


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Dot

The Exchange Marathon Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014, Star Voter 2015

Omg I've read this thread start to finish.

Horse companions can easily have 3 primary attacks.
From the FAQ

A: (James Jacobs 11/25/09) War trained is actually detailed in the description of the Handle Animal skill. Of course, there it's called "Combat Training." It's one of the "general purpose" trainings you can give an animal. Horses in particular gain a special benefit once they're combat trained-their hooves are from that point treated as primary weapons, not secondary ones. In any case, once the Cavalier goes to print, the language in the class about "war trained" will be cleaned up. [Source]


The Heal skill can actually heal up hit points. You'd be surprised how many people thought it was only for diseases and caltrops.

Silver Crusade

A paladin can choose to worship no deity, or, in fact, an evil one. It's awkward, because he has to follow the paladin code any time that it contradicts his religion, but still allowed.

Source. Source.


In 3.5E, a charge attack had to be made "directly toward the designated opponent". But in Pathfinder, there's no such requirement.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
hogarth wrote:
In 3.5E, a charge attack had to be made "directly toward the designated opponent". But in Pathfinder, there's no such requirement.

Huh?

"You must move at least 10 feet (2 squares) and may move up to double your speed directly toward the designated opponent. (Core Rulebook 198)"

Or are you arguing that 'may' modifies the clause 'directly towards the designated opponent'? That sure doesn't seem the intent considering the next paragraph states: "You must move to the closest space from which you can attack the opponent."


Some call me Tim wrote:
hogarth wrote:
In 3.5E, a charge attack had to be made "directly toward the designated opponent". But in Pathfinder, there's no such requirement.

Huh?

"You must move at least 10 feet (2 squares) and may move up to double your speed directly toward the designated opponent. (Core Rulebook 198)"

Or are you arguing that 'may' modifies the clause 'directly towards the designated opponent'? That sure doesn't seem the intent considering the next paragraph states: "You must move to the closest space from which you can attack the opponent."

I don't know what I'm saying. :-)

I looked it up before and I couldn't find the words "directly towards" but now I see it's obviously there. I have no explanation for my confusion. :-)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber
Aldin wrote:
Druid companions can be dismissed at will and replaced at no cost within 24 hours with ANY terrain appropriate alternative. Yesterday a tiger, tomorrow a combat trained mount, next week a T-Rex...

No, I'm sorry Mr.Druid, you can't replace your camel with a Dire Tiger in the middle of the Sahara.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

For those that are still following the old 3.5 rule, in Pathfinder clerics can leave empty slots when they prey the first time in a day and fill them later.

Discovering this was a surprise for me today.


I just got blindsided by this, but a wizard can choose divination as one of his opposing schools.

Shadow Lodge

Diego Rossi wrote:

For those that are still following the old 3.5 rule, in Pathfinder clerics can leave empty slots when they prey the first time in a day and fill them later.

Discovering this was a surprise for me today.

They could in 3.0 and 3.5, too, just wasn't as obvious, and they usually o not have as muh advantage to do so as a Wizard.

Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32 , Marathon Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014, Star Voter 2015

It can eventually start saving you on scrolls for situational "remove X" spells (or lesser restoration, etc).


Ragnarok Aeon wrote:
I just got blindsided by this, but a wizard can choose divination as one of his opposing schools.

I am assuming that's bad because of Read Magic being in the Divination school and all of the fun that ensues as a result?

Marathon Voter 2013

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The reason you couldn't do it before was Read Magic and not being able to prepare opposition slots. Since you can do that now, you can use div as an opposition school.


You can make a five foot step as part of a Readied action as long as you haven't moved that turn.


Some call me Tim wrote:
hogarth wrote:
In 3.5E, a charge attack had to be made "directly toward the designated opponent". But in Pathfinder, there's no such requirement.

Huh?

"You must move at least 10 feet (2 squares) and may move up to double your speed directly toward the designated opponent. (Core Rulebook 198)"

Or are you arguing that 'may' modifies the clause 'directly towards the designated opponent'? That sure doesn't seem the intent considering the next paragraph states: "You must move to the closest space from which you can attack the opponent."

How ever he thought he interpreted it, the "MAY" was referring to the double movement part.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

What a great thread! Lots of surprises - things I overlooked or assumed were the same as before, etc. I've played all versions of D&D (version 4 excluded) since I started at the age of 5, so perhaps that's my excuse :o)

I'm not sure if Telodzrum is still maintaining his copy, but the latest printing of the Core rules changed spellcraft. Specifically, this current entry in the list (emphasis mine):

Awesome thread's summary wrote:
4. Wizards learning new spells require time and a Spellcraft check. If the Spellcraft check fails, it cannot be tried again until the wizard gains a rank in Spellcraft. The wizard may Take 10 on the Spellcraft check.

is now changed by this (ditto):

PRD wrote:
If you fail to learn a spell from a spellbook or scroll, you must wait at least 1 week before you can try again.

http://paizo.com/pathfinderRPG/prd/skills/spellcraft.html

I also have to repeat the mention of that particular rule regarding spell preparation. I never knew that a spell caster could keep slots empty and spend 15 minutes later filling them up again. Found that out for the first time on Sunday while reading Tark's Big Holy Book of Clerical Optimization. Blew me away :o) Yay for reducing Vancian magic limitations!

- Niilo

Star Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Dotty.

Liberty's Edge

You cannot get a critical hit with a sunder combat maneuver.
Page 174 of the core reads:
"Objects are immune to nonlethal damage and to critical hits. Even animated objects, which are otherwise considered creatures, have these immunities."

A fighter with the archer archetype is actually a very poor sundering class (despite some of the hype in various places for them as one) because of Page 174 of the Core:
"Ranged Weapon Damage: Objects take half damage from ranged weapons (unless the weapon is a siege engine or something similar—see page 434). Divide the damage dealt by 2 before applying the object’s hardness."

This is also true of all (or sometimes, just most) energy attacks, such as magic. Page 173 of the Core reads:
"Energy attacks deal half damage to most objects. Divide the damage by 2 before applying the object’s hardness. Some energy types might be particularly effective against certain objects, subject to GM discretion."

I've seen a few players make these mistakes and even more GMs makes them.


mdt wrote:
Trinite wrote:

If you start a full attack, you can choose to stop after the first one so that it's just a normal attack standard action, and then you can still take a move action.

Also, you can distribute the attacks in a full attack among any number of foes however you choose.

Add to that that if you are taking iterative attacks (Not two or multi-weapon fighting), you can choose which weapon to use with any iterative attack at no penalty.

For example, if a half-orc monk had a bite attack, IUS, a +1 keen temple sword in his left hand, and a +1 ghost touch dagger in his right hand, he could use any or all of them in combination in a standard iterative attack.

If he were level 15 (+11 BAB), he'd have 3 iterative attacks, and could make any of the following legally...

Kick to an ogre, sword chop to a drow, and dagger to a ghost.
Sword chop to an ogre, sword chop to a drow, dagger to a ghost.
Bite to an ogre, sword chop to a drow, dagger to a ghost.
Kick to an ogre, bite to a drow, dagger to a ghost.

or any other combination, as long as the first attack was made at +11, the second at +6, and the third at +1.

Wait, what? So you can technically TWF without using either the feat or the actual TWF rules, you just don't get the additional attacks? And how does this work when you actually are using TWF rukles?

Also aren't natural attacks limited to one extra attack at -5 BAB (-2 if multiattack feat) in addition to any regular weapon attacks you make, as long as you use manufactured weapons?

Mystic_Snowfang wrote:
How to scaled or amphibian creatures use animate hair?

Seeing how hair is basically just dead skin scales i would say individual scales, quills or skin cells on their head extend to do the work.


I'll need to dot this thread, just so I'll know which things to houserule.


Spontaneous casters apply metamagic as a full round, not 1-round.

"Casting a Metamagic Spell : Sorcerers and bards must take more time to cast a metamagic spell (one enhanced by a metamagic feat) than a regular spell. If a spell's normal casting time is 1 standard action, casting a metamagic version of the spell is a full-round action for a sorcerer or bard (except for spells modified by the Quicken Spell feat, which take 1 swift action to cast). Note that this isn't the same as a spell with a 1-round casting time. Spells that take a full-round action to cast take effect in the same round that you begin casting, and you are not required to continue the invocations, gestures, and concentration until your next turn. For spells with a longer casting time, it takes an extra full-round action to cast the metamagic spell.

Clerics and druids must take more time to spontaneously cast a metamagic version of a cure, inflict, or summon spell. Spontaneously casting a metamagic version of a spell with a casting time of 1 standard action is a full-round action, and spells with longer casting times take an extra full-round action to cast."


Diego Rossi wrote:
Odraude wrote:

Three things I didn't know.

4) only spells tat deliver some kind of damage can get a critical (no bull strength critical, sorry) and it should not be a effect giving penalty (like ray of enfeeblement).

Correction, my understanding on the RAW says that spells like enfeeblement can crit because they can do damage, its just to abilities rather than hit points.

Touch Attacks: ... You can score critical hits with either type of attack as long as the spell deals damage.

While Ray of enfeeblement calls it a penalty this is a hangover from other versions. The below I think clarifies itL

Ability Score Damage

Diseases, poisons, spells, and other abilities can all deal damage directly to your ability scores. This damage does not actually reduce an ability, but it does apply a penalty to the skills and statistics that are based on that ability.

Unless theres RAW to the contrary my belief is spells that cause penalties are temporary ability damage and there for able to crit.

On another note I'm surprised no ones mentioned yet that Keen and improved critical no longer stack. This might be a 3.5 change but I don't recall.

Also the damage for katanas have changed IIRC.

Faerie fire is now a druid only spell but a huge bane to rogues.

Latern Archons are only a MS3 summon get a ranged touch attack that specifically bypasses ALL damage reduction.

Marathon Voter 2013

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Ray of enfeeblement was meant to be a penalty (as it's the example of ability penalties in this FAQ).

Quote:
Spells and Critical Hits: A spell that requires an attack roll can score a critical hit. A spell attack that requires no attack roll cannot score a critical hit. If a spell causes ability damage or drain (see Special Abilities), the damage or drain is doubled on a critical hit.

Since Ability Penalties are a separate thing in PF that just mimic the effects of ability damage (to the point where they had to edit the FAQ above to avoid mixing up ability penalties and damage), and ability penalties are not listed in the "spells and critical hits" section, I don't think will be multiplied on a critical hit.

The Keen / Improved Crit thing was a 3.5 thing too... There was something about Kukris that got a bit ridiculous :)


Lathiira wrote:
LazarX wrote:
That you can actually create a viable character without a 20 in your prime stat.
That's crazy talk :p My 3.5 PH and my Core rulebook for Pathfinder clearly agree, 20 or nothing! You need to read the errata for both books ;)

Actually it is more optimal to pick 19 that way you end up on a even at level 12 or 20.


Cheapy wrote:


The Keen / Improved Crit thing was a 3.5 thing too... There was something about Kukris that got a bit ridiculous :)

No, it was 3.0 thing so 3.5 can't stack them. SKR has a blog about it.

Pathfinder continued it.

The reason was Crit become less special because they commonly occur. That was it.


Cheapy wrote:

Ray of enfeeblement was meant to be a penalty (as it's the example of ability penalties in this FAQ).

Quote:
Spells and Critical Hits: A spell that requires an attack roll can score a critical hit. A spell attack that requires no attack roll cannot score a critical hit. If a spell causes ability damage or drain (see Special Abilities), the damage or drain is doubled on a critical hit.
Since Ability Penalties are a separate thing in PF that just mimic the effects of ability damage (to the point where they had to edit the FAQ above to avoid mixing up ability penalties and damage), and ability penalties are not listed in the "spells and critical hits" section, I don't think will be multiplied on a critical hit.

I don't see anything on the FAQ link you mentioned to that effect or in regards to ability damage. Had they not intended to have the effect me magnified by damage MM modifiers they wouldnt have called it damaged instead of something else like a penalty. Again i see your thought on this but its not backed up by RAW as far as I can tell.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Diego Rossi wrote:
Odraude wrote:
Three things I didn't know.

4) only spells tat deliver some kind of damage can get a critical (no bull strength critical, sorry) and it should not be a effect giving penalty (like ray of enfeeblement).

Grayfeather wrote:


Correction, my understanding on the RAW says that spells like enfeeblement can crit because they can do damage, its just to abilities rather than hit points.

Touch Attacks: ... You can score critical hits with either type of attack as long as the spell deals damage.

While Ray of enfeeblement calls it a penalty this is a hangover from other versions. The below I think clarifies itL

Ability Score Damage

Diseases, poisons, spells, and other abilities can all deal damage directly to your ability scores. This damage does not actually reduce an ability, but it does apply a penalty to the skills and statistics that are based on that ability.

Unless theres RAW to the contrary my belief is spells that cause penalties are temporary ability damage and there for able to crit.

On another note I'm surprised no ones mentioned yet that Keen and improved critical no longer stack. This might be a 3.5 change but I don't recall.

Also the damage for katanas have changed IIRC.

Faerie fire is now a druid only spell but a huge bane to rogues.

Latern Archons are only a MS3 summon get a ranged touch attack that specifically bypasses ALL damage reduction.

Please don't mangle citations. I am fairly sure that ray of enfeeblement don't critic and don't like to be assigned the opposite position by a bad citation.

Thanks.

Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32 , Marathon Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014, Star Voter 2015

For the record, ability penalties, damage and drain are three separate things which ALL exist in Pathfinder.


dot


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I cast resurrection!

Found this out on Friday. If you have a reach weapon and attack someone non-adjacent to you while there is a creature between you and the victim, they get soft cover against your attack. This is a big deal because it means you cannot take attacks of opportunity against people with soft cover to you. Of course, for creatures at Huge+, it's harder to pull this off since they have more squares to choose as the source of their attacks and could bypass your cover.

Lantern Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Maps, Pawns Subscriber

Even worse, there are no feats or stuff to help you with reach weapons unlike with ranged weapons´s precise shot and improved precise shot.
The only thing there possibly helping are combat expertise, gang-up and outflank, if your mates have that too.
That´s especially bad because 2. row you´re probably something like a cleric or maybe rogue and you are forced to take combat expertise and also have perhaps problems hitting.


It takes two rolls, a Knowledge(Arcana) check followed by a Spellcraft check, to determine the specific qualities of a given magic item.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Rogues can use shields, despite not having proficiency. Buy a mithral Heavy Shield, and since it has no ACP, there's no attack penalty.

Use a Portable Hole (as a mobile lab/apartment) and Ring of Sustenance, along with Craft feats to make magic items and still adventure with the others, if you are a Wizard.

Apparently, ranged touch spells are subject to firing into melee penalties.

Sczarni

2 people marked this as a favorite.

What do I think most people don't know? How most of the lesser-used skills work. Appraise and Spellcraft, for example, are skills that allow you to know what most GM's I've had will just tell you anyway-- I've never had to roll to know what was in the treasure hoard. I've also never seen a GM actually make a Druid or Ranger make a Handle Animal check to control his companion, or even keep track of which tricks it knows.

Linguistics is another big one. People put ranks into it to learn languages, but when was the last time you actually ROLLED a Linguistics check?

More specifically, did you know that Linguistics can act as a psuedo-Bluff? You get a bonus "up to +10" to Bluff checks (to lie) if you have evidence of what you're claiming. You can use Linguistics to forge a document, then show it to your mark as "proof". The opposed check for Bluff is Sense Motive (which everyone and their dog has ranks in), while the opposed check to detect a forgery is Linguistics (most folks don't bother, and it's trained only), so with a little lead time this is practically a free +10 to Bluff.


Cheapy wrote:

I'll start.

A Bard doesn't need the Perform skill. The only performances that require it are Countersong and Distraction. Inspire Courage et al don't mention it at all, and you don't even need to use your primary artform when using it. It was intentionally left ambiguous so bards didn't have to keep on playing their instrument while using the performances. It's a free action to continue the performance.

Not strictly true; you left our versatile performance.

1,051 to 1,100 of 1,401 << first < prev | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | next > last >>
Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Publishing / Pathfinder® / Pathfinder RPG / General Discussion / What are some things about the Pathfinder rules that you think most people do not know? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.