Falling and Damage Reduction?


Rules Questions

Dark Archive

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Does DR affect the damage from falling?

Sczarni

its physical damage so yes it does.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 16

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Unless you land on something magic/silver/cold iron/ adamantine etc or the DR is x/bludgeoning

Dark Archive

Ok, but DR gained from Barbarian or the alternate Dwarf racial trait, which are both DR/- would reduce falling damage?

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 16

Definitely

Sczarni

what racial trait gives dwarfs DR

Dark Archive

northbrb wrote:
what racial trait gives dwarfs DR

I'm sorry, I'm getting the Invulnerable Rager archetype mixed up with the Magic Resistant alternate Dwarf trait. I was swapping DR & SR in my head because my player has both.

Liberty's Edge

CrackedOzy wrote:
Ok, but DR gained from Barbarian or the alternate Dwarf racial trait, which are both DR/- would reduce falling damage?

Since DR/- is the ultimate DR that protects against all physical, non-energy damage; yes, absolutely.

-Kle.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
CrackedOzy wrote:
Does DR affect the damage from falling?

Absolutely NOT. Damage Reduction protects you from attacks and weapons. Just because you fell doesn't mean the planet suddenly attacked you.

Read the rules everybody:

Damage Reduction Rules:

Some magic creatures have the supernatural ability to instantly heal damage from weapons or ignore blows altogether as though they were invulnerable.

The numerical part of a creature's damage reduction (or DR) is the amount of damage the creature ignores from normal attacks. Usually, a certain type of weapon can overcome this reduction (see Overcoming DR). This information is separated from the damage reduction number by a slash. For example, DR 5/magic means that a creature takes 5 less points of damage from all weapons that are not magic. If a dash follows the slash, then the damage reduction is effective against any attack that does not ignore damage reduction.

Whenever damage reduction completely negates the damage from an attack, it also negates most special effects that accompany the attack, such as injury poison, a monk's stunning, and injury-based disease. Damage reduction does not negate touch attacks, energy damage dealt along with an attack, or energy drains. Nor does it affect poisons or diseases delivered by inhalation, ingestion, or contact.

Attacks that deal no damage because of the target's damage reduction do not disrupt spells.

Spells, spell-like abilities, and energy attacks (even nonmagical fire) ignore damage reduction.

Sometimes damage reduction represents instant healing. Sometimes it represents the creature's tough hide or body. In either case, other characters can see that conventional attacks won't work.

If a creature has damage reduction from more than one source, the two forms of damage reduction do not stack. Instead, the creature gets the benefit of the best damage reduction in a given situation.

Overcoming DR: Damage reduction may be overcome by special materials, magic weapons (any weapon with a +1 or higher enhancement bonus, not counting the enhancement from masterwork quality), certain types of weapons (such as slashing or bludgeoning), and weapons imbued with an alignment.

Ammunition fired from a projectile weapon with an enhancement bonus of +1 or higher is treated as a magic weapon for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Similarly, ammunition fired from a projectile weapon with an alignment gains the alignment of that projectile weapon (in addition to any alignment it may already have).

Weapons with an enhancement bonus of +3 or greater can ignore some types of damage reduction, regardless of their actual material or alignment. The following table shows what type of enhancement bonus is needed to overcome some common types of damage reduction.

Note that in every single case it refers to negating damage from an attack or a weapon, not simply "damage of any kind." It's been this way since v3.0.

Feel free to house rule it if you like, but this is RAW.


I agree with the Dork, by rule DR was never applied to falling damage. All the GM's I played with, including me houseruled it though.

Liberty's Edge

Ravingdork wrote:


Absolutely NOT. Damage Reduction protects you from attacks and weapons.

You're right, I'm wrong - I withdraw my previous answer.

Nice catch.
-Kle.


Ravingdork wrote:
CrackedOzy wrote:
Does DR affect the damage from falling?

Absolutely NOT. Damage Reduction protects you from attacks and weapons. Just because you fell doesn't mean the planet suddenly attacked you.

Read the rules everybody:

Well, I think the problem is that on page 12 "Common Terms" the rules only say that "This amount is subtracted from any damage dealt to them from a physical source." If you don't read all the way to the end of the definition and then go off to the Appendix for the full rules, I can see where someone during a game reads that and closes the book.

I've always played it only applied to weapons and natural attacks.

Liberty's Edge RPG Superstar 2015 Top 16, RPG Superstar 2013 Top 16

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That DR doesn't work against falling damage means that pushing things off high ledges or dropping boulders on them is a time-honored method of beating DR.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Charlie Bell wrote:
That DR doesn't work against falling damage means that pushing things off high ledges or dropping boulders on them is a time-honored method of beating DR.

Brings me back to all those movies and TV shows where the seemingly invincible monster was felled only because it went over a high cliff or was buried under a mountain.

Dark Archive

Ah HA! So I was right! Oy, well thanks RavingDork.

Grand Lodge

I can see the relationship between Damage Reduction and fall damage interpreted either way. I can appreciate fall damage not being an attack, but this literal reading seems to contradict the spirit of the mechanic.


I agree that the literal reading of DR as suggested by RavingDork feels like it violates the spirit of DR, but that does appear to be the RAW.

Make of it what you will.


So by RavingDork's explanation, does a +1 magic weapon overcome a barbarian's DR/- ?


Charrend wrote:
So by RavingDork's explanation, does a +1 magic weapon overcome a barbarian's DR/- ?

No. Basically RavingDork's response hinges on the description of Damage Reduction generally only applying to attacks. Since falling damage is not the result of an attack, he believes that damage reduction should not be applied.

Obviously an attack with a weapon is well...an attack so damage reduction will apply. And DR/- will always apply to any physical damage attack (as opposed to energy attack).


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber; Pathfinder Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber

I always think of falling damage as damage the creature is essentially dealing to itself (crushing itself by being compressed into the ground).

Also - falling damage is not bludgeoning (or p/s) - that seems somewhat telling. Everything else DR affects is one of those.


I suppose since it mentions conventional and normal attacks then siege weapons would also bypass DR. This would apply to giant-thrown boulders also. So in that case, dropping a boulder on someone might also apply.


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Pizza Lord wrote:
I suppose since it mentions conventional and normal attacks then siege weapons would also bypass DR. This would apply to giant-thrown boulders also. So in that case, dropping a boulder on someone might also apply.

It would certainly be very odd if dropping a boulder on someone was more effective than hitting them with a boulder flung from a catapult...


Don`t think of it as dropping a boulder on someone, so much as rapidly and forcefully increasing their carried load. Then their shins rapidly and forcefully attempting to enter their rib-cage :)

I would say that both dropping a boulder and using a siege weapon would actually not bypass damage reduction. Both require attack rolls and there is the root of the rule I believe. The ground doesn`t attack you, therefore it is not subject to damage reduction. Unless someone throws a planet at you it seems pretty clear (I would totally give you your DR against thrown planets BTW, like it would matter).


Any physical damage is reduced by DR

Shadow Lodge

But if dr applies only to the attack with the weapon and not the damage from the weapon then it does nothing!

Come on people.

You are supernaturally tough, but you have a vulnerability to something. that supernatural toughness applies whether you get hit with a sword, hit the planet, the planet hits you, or a piano drops on your head.

Damage Reduction: How does DR interact with magical effects that deal bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage?

Although the Bestiary definition of Damage Reduction (page 299) says "The creature takes normal damage from energy attacks (even nonmagical ones), spells, spell-like abilities, and supernatural abilities," that's actually just referring to damage that isn't specifically called out as being of a particular type, such as fire damage or piercing damage. In other words, DR doesn't protect against "typeless damage" from magical attacks.
However, if a magical attack specifically mentions that it deals bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage, DR affects that damage normally, as if it were from a physical weapon. (Otherwise the magical attack might as well not have a damage type, as it would only interface with B/P/S damage in a very few corner cases, such as whether or not an ooze splits from that attack.)
For example, the ice storm spell deals 3d6 points of bludgeoning damage and 2d6 points of cold damage. If you cast ice storm at a group of zombies, the zombie's DR 5/slashing protects them against 5 points of the spell's bludgeoning damage. Their DR doesn't help them against the spell's cold damage because DR doesn't apply to energy attacks.

Magical attacks aren't weapons, but if they do a damage type DR works.

The planet is pretty obviously doing Bludgeoning damage (unless you land on the rockies)


I'm surprised no one mentioned anything about the almost 3 year necro...


Sooo...falling 30' onto a door [like a trap door] causes 3d6 damage and your DR/non-bludgeoning won't do anything...but...a giant that wallops you with a door for 3d6 damage has to deal with your DR/non-bludgeoning because getting hit is bludgeoning damage and hitting is untyped damage and this is supposed to make some sort of sense...somehow...?

Even though it sounds like I'm b!$#+ing about this, I'm really trying to understand the difference.

...as always, thanks for putting up with me...


Gravity is just a SU ability of planets (AoE) that attacks everyone who loses their footing by doing an inverse charge, dealing 1d6 bludgeoning damage for every 10 ft of the charge.


Playtest rules:

Gravity [[R]]
Trigger: creature or object is without vertical support.
The creature or object immediately travels vertically towards the next surface 'below' it taking 1d6 bludgeoning damage for every 10ft traveled once it reaches the surface, up to 20d6.

A creature travels up to 600 ft per round in this manner.

A celestial body may take any number of Gravity reactions in a round.


And this was necro'd because ...

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Card Game Subscriber

Someone wanted to defy gravity.


Azothath wrote:
Someone wanted to defy gravity.

Oh, you!


We seem to be having a rash of necromancy going on lately, but at least this one wasn't an ad.

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