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22,001 to 22,050 of 24,187 << first < prev | 436 | 437 | 438 | 439 | 440 | 441 | 442 | 443 | 444 | 445 | 446 | next > last >>

I like night wish and Kamelot I can't think of any others in that genre.


I've listened youtube playlists of Sabaton as well, sure.
Folk metal mixes can be entertaining too.

I'll pass on Death metal.


I like After Forever a lot.
Within Temptation is a bit soft but I've been listening to them a lot lately.
And Sonata Arctica are a personal favorite too.


I'll check them out I'm always looking for new music to listen too.


After Forever's Floor Jansen is the current singer of Nightwish.

I've not heard of, but probably should try then, Sonata Arctica.


I find that all music is made better if you add a vuvuzela or twenty.


You would... you would.


Mmm hmm


vick every time I see you I feel something bad is about to happen and that i should separate myself from you.


The Fiend Fantastic wrote:

After Forever's Floor Jansen is the current singer of Nightwish.

I've not heard of, but probably should try then, Sonata Arctica.

I know and I'm glad of it, I never was a big fan of Tarja, even if I like Nightwish a lot.

Sonata Arctica have some impressive works. All their albums are great but Unia. Stay away from Unia!


Vidmaster7 wrote:
vick every time I see you I feel something bad is about to happen and that i should separate myself from you.

I know the feeling.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Two cows walk into a vegetarian restaurant. The owner sees them as they enter, and scowls. He shouts "Get out! We don't serve your kind here!"


That was a racist joke!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Uh oh I think you udderly offended zurgas, You accidentally raised the steaks and now your about to get bull-dozed. You will wish you had never seen her-bi-vore.


This is bullsh*t!


yelp definitely put zurg in a bad MOOde your gonna get put out to pasture


He's getting to the meat of it now.


yes no need to ask where said beef is.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

It appears that we're on the horns of a dilemma.

I bet you think that my favourite HM sub-genre is hair metal, don't you?

Wrongo! I tend to prefer the sludge/doom/stoner side of things.


Pulg wrote:

It appears that we're on the horns of a dilemma.

I bet you think that my favourite HM sub-genre is hair metal, don't you?

Wrongo! I tend to prefer the sludge/doom/stoner side of things.

Life goes by so fast

You only want to do what you think is right.
Close your eyes and then it's past;
Story of my life


I give a puppet the most deadly sword in existence, and people just discuss music genres for the next 11 hours.
That... sounds about right. I must admit to being slightly impressed though.

Edit: I prefer soft rock an classic rock.


He's just a puppet. What could go wrong? We'd rather discuss important things.
I like soft rock too. Who doesn't like talc?

Actually, I like most forms of rock.
About musical styles I hate, I'd rather keep you ignorant of the existence of such abominations and don't even mention the genre I'm thinking about.


An oompa cover of Blitzkrieg Bop. Just gonna leave this here and back away...


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Speechless.
Enough said.


This is also pretty good.


Anyway, nothing beats this version of Aquarius by a famous Spanish singer (who'd rather stick to sing in Spanish).
If you don't know in what language he sings... neither do I.


I've got to admit that I can't look at those right now, since I'm sitting in a classroom, with no headphones, or earphones.


You're lucky. What I posted is something that shouldn't be seen.


oh, I'll look at it later, go insane, and likely die, but that is normal for me on mondays.


The Game Hamster wrote:

I give a puppet the most deadly sword in existence, and people just discuss music genres for the next 11 hours.

That... sounds about right. I must admit to being slightly impressed though.

Edit: I prefer soft rock an classic rock.

Your first mistake was assuming that people have an attention span that's longer than a goldfish's.


Vick Tim wrote:
The Game Hamster wrote:

I give a puppet the most deadly sword in existence, and people just discuss music genres for the next 11 hours.

That... sounds about right. I must admit to being slightly impressed though.

Edit: I prefer soft rock an classic rock.

Your first mistake was assuming that people have an attention span that's longer than a goldfish's.

Your right.


Hold figs!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The One Who Enlightened Me is here...
*Worships*


Ok, I've got to confess--I feel like there is a Romance language anagram in there involving cows and possibly a joke of some sort... but I can't make it work... why didn't I pay more attention in anagrammar school?!


Cows? That would be... cool? No, I've just been messing with my real name and this is what came out, this sort of microbian name.
It sounds romance because... well, my surnames are Spanish.


The Anagrammaton wrote:
Hold figs!

Where did you get this one from?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
The Game Hamster wrote:
The Anagrammaton wrote:
Hold figs!
Where did you get this one from?

Goldfish, I guess.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Happy spring, ye buncha lubbers!

Also, we be at the halfway point to International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Yar!!!!


Well, there's a "vaca" in "A Saliva Colonizer"... and "zoar"... but dangit... can't make it all hold together. It's times like this I wish we had brain-USB upgrade chips.


A fellow Game Master!! Greetings brother!!


Kileanna wrote:
The Game Hamster wrote:
The Anagrammaton wrote:
Hold figs!
Where did you get this one from?
Goldfish, I guess.

Thanks


Don't try so hard, it's just my real name: Leila Ascariz Novo. Not as exotic as being called Vaca, cows are common here but I'm not one of them (I've seen stranger names, anyway).
With person names it gets harder because they have so many variations.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
The Anagrammaton wrote:
Hold figs!

I'm hoooolding it

it's good for you!

I'm hoooolding it

it's good for you!

I'm hoooolding it....


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Mostly I just like the challenge of working outside of my native language :)

EDIT: Hold on. "Zank Frappa"... there's something there... it's eluding me...


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I like working outside my native language. I always loved languages, maybe because I'm bilingual since I learned to speak. But it is also frustrating when I'm trying to say things in a foreign language and what I say doesn't reflect what I am thinking.
But I was never afraid of trying. Even if most of my posts are probably full of mistakes. And wrong prepositions, prepositions in English seem to be my nemesis and I always use the wrong ones.

EDIT: Zrank Frappa is definitely a difficult one. Otm Shank? xD


1 person marked this as a favorite.

HA! Otm Shank! I may have snorted a little, accidentally...

Prepositions seem to be hard in any language. I've never taught another language, but many of my friends who have confirm this. It's interesting, and I wonder if there is some cognitive insight in the fact that all those little words about time and position and such are the trickiest part of a foreign language.

I wonder if that is also true in first-language acquisition? Do children beginning to speak get tripped up on prepositions more often than other parts of speech?

To the Researchcopter!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I always thought prepositions in Spanish are not very difficult but then I am used to them, so who knows?

I have a brother who is a lot younger than me. The more difficult from him to learn was that kinship was not reciprocal. He couldn't understand why a brother is a brother of his brother but you are not the father of your father or the son of your son. He gave me a lot of good laughs.

I was a French teacher for a time. That's ridiculous, because my French is even worse than my English, but I taught a very basic level so I knew enough to know more than my pupil. He did well on (in? at?) his exams so I guess I didn't do so bad.


I'm learning Koine Greek, and can confirm that the prepositions are some of the trickiest parts of that language as well.


I didn't find it too difficult in French either, but French has a similar structure to Spanish.
Another difficult thing in English is placing the words in the right place in a sentence. In Spanish you can switch the place of many words in a sentence and it still makes sense and is gramatically correct. But English has a more rigid structure.


Hypothesis: I wonder if it has something to do with the fact that prepositions are often used metaphorically--in the deep metaphor structures of a language. For instance:

Kileanna wrote:
He did well on (in? at?) his exams...

"On," "in," and "at" are all words indicating physical position. They have been repurposed to refer to a student's performance when taking his exam. However, there is nothing intrinsically "on" about how one scores when taking an exam. And, to complicate matters, another typical English usage would say:

"He was good at French. He did well on his exams. In that subject, he succeeded."

The pattern isn't by any means obvious (if you're not a native speaker), and there is no really good reason why it should work that way. The metaphorical structure of English evolved so that we typically say "on" exams (in the predominant dialects). But other languages could indicate performance in lots of other ways. Each one seems obvious to native speakers, while seeming arbitrary and opaque to non-native speakers.

Making things even more confusing, it seems like if you pull any bi-lingual dictionary off the shelf and look up a preposition, it winds up being a one-to-many mapping (at best; sometimes many-to-many). This could be a symptom of the ambiguities that arise from different metaphor-maps that different languages use.

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