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Elf blood, orc blood, racial heritage


Rules Questions


3 people marked this as FAQ candidate.

Racial heritage allows a character to take feats and prestige classes as if he were another race as well as human.

Do the elf blood and orc blood racial traits have the same effect?
Could a half-elf character for example take "elven accuracy"? Or "racial heritage: orc" even? (being descended from an elf and a half-orc perhaps?)

Osirion

No, half-elves and half-orcs, while often lumped in with their namesakes, are distinct races with their own race traits. Elf blood and orc blood do only what they say they do; an effect is the result of something (something can only effect them), not a prerequisite for something (only they can do this).


Zeldenhandel wrote:

Racial heritage allows a character to take feats and prestige classes as if he were another race as well as human.

Do the elf blood and orc blood racial traits have the same effect?
Could a half-elf character for example take "elven accuracy"? Or "racial heritage: orc" even? (being descended from an elf and a half-orc perhaps?)

In a Logical World ... they should.

But in Pathfinder, i can already tell, they went a different direction, when they came out with the APG.

So think of them as different races now.


Oliver McShade wrote:
Zeldenhandel wrote:

Racial heritage allows a character to take feats and prestige classes as if he were another race as well as human.

Do the elf blood and orc blood racial traits have the same effect?
Could a half-elf character for example take "elven accuracy"? Or "racial heritage: orc" even? (being descended from an elf and a half-orc perhaps?)

In a Logical World ... they should.

But in Pathfinder, i can already tell, they went a different direction, when they came out with the APG.

So think of them as different races now.

So you get double the vulnerability but generally speaking, none of the optins of either race? Since bad effects that affect a particular race (bane, favored enemy, etc. are much, much more common than beneficial one, that definitely makes this ability fall into the Weakness category rather than Strength. No other races have a built in weakness like this.


There have been multiple discussions about bane interactions...

Essentially it boils down to how you interpret the rule stating a weapon can only get a property(enchantment) once and if Bane is "Bane" or "Bane(subtype)". (the former probably being correct)

In general, it's a bit of a weakness in that 2 different banes can affect you, but if you balance it against the fact that Bane isn't intended to deal more than 2d6 +2 damage then it's not more bad than most of the benefits of those races.

However I would comment that the more common "abuse" of Bane is trying to make a 'demonslayer'(or devil) by stacking Bane(CO),(EO),(demon) in an attempt to grab all the possible subtypes. (Not included are Axiomatic/Holy which would work -- some subtypes are just dangerous to have NBD)


All it means is they have the subtypes of both their parent races. A half-elf is a humanoid (elf, human) while a half-orc is a humanoid (human, orc) for example.

If it doesn't flag on said subtype, it probably doesn't flag at all.

Grand Lodge

Zeldenhandel wrote:

Racial heritage allows a character to take feats and prestige classes as if he were another race as well as human.

Do the elf blood and orc blood racial traits have the same effect?
Could a half-elf character for example take "elven accuracy"? Or "racial heritage: orc" even? (being descended from an elf and a half-orc perhaps?)

I Want to see a clear ruling from "Paizo" about Elf and Orc Blood. there is a lot of arguments about this as it clearly states they are considered both Human and Elf/Orc for all effects..

1. Are you considered Human when Disguising yourself as human? (thus negating the -2 for disguising as another race.
2. Can A Halforc take a Racial Human/Orc Trait/Archetype/Feat/PrC


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Feats and Classes are not effects.

Cause, and Effect.

Think. If a feat, or class, is an effect, what is the cause?


3 people marked this as FAQ candidate.

The language for elf/orc blood and racial heritage is virtually identical. The only difference is that racial heritage offers examples of how racial heritage would work. Logically speaking (I know..."how can I introduce logic to a fantasy role playing game?), elf/orc blood should work the same as racial heritage. There's no reason the examples for racial heritage would not be applicable towards elf/orc blood.

Elf Blood: Half-elves count as both elves and humans for any effect related to race.

Orc Blood: Half-orcs count as both humans and orcs for any effect related to race.

Racial Heritage: Choose another humanoid race. You count as both human and that race for any effects related to race. For example, if you choose dwarf, you are considered both a human and a dwarf for the purpose of taking traits, feats, how spells and magic items affect you, and so on.


Arkadwyn wrote:
No other races have a built in weakness like this.

Except Slow Speed, Light Sensitivity, Light Blindness, and depending on what you're doing, possibly Negative Energy Affinity, and Spell Resistance. (Generally SR is good, but spending a standard action to drop it any time you want an ally to cast on you can make things difficult)

That's not considering races that don't start out with common, and all the other types/subtypes that might make you more vulnerable to certain effects.


I wonder why there are no Half elf/orcs. Possibly it can be explained that humans have a special genetic quality that allows them to mate with other races, but elves and orcs dont... that it takes a human.

And why no Half Dwarfs/halflings/gnomes/goblins ect.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Dragonamedrake wrote:

I wonder why there are no Half elf/orcs. Possibly it can be explained that humans have a special genetic quality that allows them to mate with other races, but elves and orcs dont... that it takes a human.

And why no Half Dwarfs/halflings/gnomes/goblins ect.

In our homebrew campaign world, orcs and elves are descended from a common ancestor, and every now and then a genetic throw-back is born to either race. The orcs tend to kill these 'weaklings' out of hand while modern day elves view the child as an abomination and often the family is outcast lest they taint the community's bloodlines.

In the past we've basically ruled that players could choose a half-elf or a half-orc to play, but that they counted as elves and orcs rather than elf/human or orc/human and that they took a -4 penalty on Charisma checks when dealing with either race. Now that the new ARG is out, we've been playing with all sorts of options trying to hammer down their unique abilities.


Or possibly humans are so much more common than other races that half-human hybrids are the most likely.


Dragonamedrake wrote:
And why no Half ...halflings...

Our gaming group actually figured this out a few weeks back. The answer is that halfling genes are recessive, so half-halflings are just human. (Enjoy.)


One of the Dark Sun novels had a character who was half elf, half halfling, and completely insane (multiple personality disorder). Needless to say, he was a unique character to that setting -- nobody ever bothered to stat out his race, as far as I can recall.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Dragonamedrake wrote:

I wonder why there are no Half elf/orcs. Possibly it can be explained that humans have a special genetic quality that allows them to mate with other races, but elves and orcs dont... that it takes a human.

And why no Half Dwarfs/halflings/gnomes/goblins ect.

There is. It's a Human with the Racial Heritage feat.


D'arandriel wrote:

The language for elf/orc blood and racial heritage is virtually identical. The only difference is that racial heritage offers examples of how racial heritage would work. Logically speaking (I know..."how can I introduce logic to a fantasy role playing game?), elf/orc blood should work the same as racial heritage. There's no reason the examples for racial heritage would not be applicable towards elf/orc blood.

Elf Blood: Half-elves count as both elves and humans for any effect related to race.

Orc Blood: Half-orcs count as both humans and orcs for any effect related to race.

Racial Heritage: Choose another humanoid race. You count as both human and that race for any effects related to race. For example, if you choose dwarf, you are considered both a human and a dwarf for the purpose of taking traits, feats, how spells and magic items affect you, and so on.

Right now in my own games I rule it that elf/orc blood works the same as the racial heritage feat. And if people would really want to, they can make a half-elf/orc with the racial heritage feat.

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