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[Sargava: The Lost Colony] Elephant Stomp Feat


Pathfinder Player Companion

Taldor

Elephant Stomp [Combat]
You deliver a crushing blow to downed enemies.
Prerequisites: Str 13, Power Attack, Improved Overrun,
base attack bonus +1.
Benef it: When you overrun an opponent and your
maneuver check exceeds your opponent’s CMD by 5
or more, instead of moving through your opponent’s
space and knocking her prone, you may stop in the
space directly in front of the opponent (or the nearest
adjacent space) and make one attack with an unarmed
strike or a natural weapon against that opponent as an
immediate action.
Normal: When your overrun maneuver check exceeds
your opponent’s CMD by 5 or more, you move through the
target’s space and she is knocked prone.

Question: does this feat enable someone to make an attack as an immediate action on an opponent BEFORE proceeding with overrunning the said opponent? This is how I read it, as the attack is an immediate action and in effect, this means the actual overrunning, which is a standard action, has not occurred yet or has not been completed yet... If this is not a feat that effectively allows a creature to make one attack while overrunning then I fail to see the usefulness of the feat.

Any help would be appreciated.


Yeah, as it stands, its kind of saying:

"Make an overrun check. If you make it by five or more, you can change your mind, not overrun, and just make an attack instead."

. . . which you could have done just by walking up to them and using your standard action to attack.

Edit: Upon thinking about it, overrun is a standard action. You could effectively double move, make an overrun check, and get an extra attack. But then again, you could just charge too. Hm.

Taldor

Exactly. I think the wording is a little off... like fish or guests after three days... :)

The feat is called "Elephant Stomp", so imagining an elephant overrunning a poor wizard, my imagination tells me that as he bowls the poor wizard over, the elephant steps on the poor wizard's head thus making a natural attack just before the elephant completely rolls over him, making the overrun per say, and flattening the poor wizard prone.

The feat has improved overrun as prereq so granting a freebie attack ain't uber IMO...

Andoran

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game Subscriber
Purple Dragon Knight wrote:

Exactly. I think the wording is a little off... like fish or guests after three days... :)

The feat is called "Elephant Stomp", so imagining an elephant overrunning a poor wizard, my imagination tells me that as he bowls the poor wizard over, the elephant steps on the poor wizard's head thus making a natural attack just before the elephant completely rolls over him, making the overrun per say, and flattening the poor wizard prone.

The feat has improved overrun as prereq so granting a freebie attack ain't uber IMO...

My belief (and how I'll run it in my games) is that if the attacker succeeds, he knocks the target prone and gets an immediate attack (with the bonus to attacking a prone target).

Paizo Employee Senior Developer

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You make an overrun attack as normal. The feat does nothing unless your combat maneuver check exceeds your opponent's CMD by 5 or more. At that point, the opponent is knocked prone as normal, but you stop (rather than moving through the opponent's space) and can make an immediate unarmed or natural weapon attack against the prone opponent.

Without the feat, the opponent is knocked prone, you move through his space, and you don't get an immediate attack. Likewise, simply moving up and attacking the opponent doesn't knock them prone.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Companion Subscriber
Rob McCreary wrote:

You make an overrun attack as normal. The feat does nothing unless your combat maneuver check exceeds your opponent's CMD by 5 or more. At that point, the opponent is knocked prone as normal, but you stop (rather than moving through the opponent's space) and can make an immediate unarmed or natural weapon attack against the prone opponent.

Without the feat, the opponent is knocked prone, you move through his space, and you don't get an immediate attack. Likewise, simply moving up and attacking the opponent doesn't knock them prone.

The only question I have - why is a monster feat in a player book ? OK, except for Monks, but Monks with Improved Overrun are few and far between.


Rob McCreary wrote:

You make an overrun attack as normal. The feat does nothing unless your combat maneuver check exceeds your opponent's CMD by 5 or more. At that point, the opponent is knocked prone as normal, but you stop (rather than moving through the opponent's space) and can make an immediate unarmed or natural weapon attack against the prone opponent.

Without the feat, the opponent is knocked prone, you move through his space, and you don't get an immediate attack. Likewise, simply moving up and attacking the opponent doesn't knock them prone.

I think the confusing part is that the wording indicates that instead of moving through their square and knocking them prone you instead stop in front of them and get an attack. The knocked prone is on the other side of the "instead," so it looks like you sacrifice both moving through the square and knocking them prone.

Taldor

Robert Little wrote:
Purple Dragon Knight wrote:

Exactly. I think the wording is a little off... like fish or guests after three days... :)

The feat is called "Elephant Stomp", so imagining an elephant overrunning a poor wizard, my imagination tells me that as he bowls the poor wizard over, the elephant steps on the poor wizard's head thus making a natural attack just before the elephant completely rolls over him, making the overrun per say, and flattening the poor wizard prone.

The feat has improved overrun as prereq so granting a freebie attack ain't uber IMO...

My belief (and how I'll run it in my games) is that if the attacker succeeds, he knocks the target prone and gets an immediate attack (with the bonus to attacking a prone target).

Makes sense to me. This is how Trample works too...

Taldor

KnightErrantJR wrote:
I think the confusing part is that the wording indicates that instead of moving through their square and knocking them prone you instead stop in front of them and get an attack. The knocked prone is on the other side of the "instead," so it looks like you sacrifice both moving through the square and knocking them prone.

Knight is correct. As it reads, you (stop and make an attack as an immediate) INSTEAD of ("moving_through" AND "knocking_prone"), which effectively means you have wasted a feat in order to make your character sheet look cool with something called Elephant Stomp... :)

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