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"You keep using that word..."


Off-Topic Discussions

251 to 300 of 305 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | next > last >>
Taldor

The Eldritch Mr. Shiny wrote:
And don't forget linear regressions. If you ever want to become a statistician (NOT ME. I hang out with a lot of math-y guys), you HAVE to be good with imaginary numbers.

You wouldn't happen to know how they intersect, do you? I've only taken an introductory course on regression, but the question of how imaginary numbers might play into it makes me wonder.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

So, OF-fen or of-TEN? Or (as I've heard it occasionally) OR-fen?

Also, barn and born are NOT interchangeable! (Got this in Utahr a couple of times.)

Andoran

Readerbreeder wrote:

So, OF-fen or of-TEN? Or (as I've heard it occasionally) OR-fen?

Also, barn and born are NOT interchangeable! (Got this in Utahr a couple of times.)

OF-fen would be correct, but most people pronounce the "t" anyway, so it's pointless for me to care, but...

It just kind of drives me nuts.

Mostly when people try to correct MY pronunciation of "often".

Andoran

I'll hall often wap th' sumbich.


The only word I feel the need to correct people on is "masonary". I work with rebar so I hear it a lot. It's MASONRY! Three syllables, not four.


houstonderek wrote:
Readerbreeder wrote:

So, OF-fen or of-TEN? Or (as I've heard it occasionally) OR-fen?

Also, barn and born are NOT interchangeable! (Got this in Utahr a couple of times.)

OF-fen would be correct, but most people pronounce the "t" anyway, so it's pointless for me to care, but...

It just kind of drives me nuts.

Mostly when people try to correct MY pronunciation of "often".

I would never correct you, and I don't pronounce the 't either'--During the 15th century English experienced a widespread loss of certain consonant sounds within consonant clusters, as the (d) in handsome and handkerchief, the (p) in consumption and raspberry, and the (t) in chestnut and often. In this way the consonant clusters were simplified and made easier to articulate. With the rise of public education and literacy and, consequently, people's awareness of spelling in the 19th century, sounds that had become silent sometimes were restored, as is the case with the t in often, which is now frequently pronounced. In other similar words, such as soften and listen, the t generally remains silent.

It's very debatable whether or not it's incorrect to pronounce the 't,' and you're as likely to find an English professor who argues for it as against it, as well as differing dictionaries. Some of it is surely regional, and some of it is surely accent (as in barn/born).

Cheliax

Prof. Tolkien wrote:
...blah-blah-blah...

OMG! Give me a break! You know what irritates me? When this guys keeps using that word--any word!


In Virginia, my students used to tease me mercilessly for referring to the cabinets as /Kab'n-ettes/. I was told the "correct" pronounciation was something along the lines of /cah-neh/. Southerners in general seem to have a deep-seated phobia regarding hard consonants (although they tell me that's not so, and that Yankees simply "over-emphasize" them). Still, it occurs to me that if a person is too lazy to pronounce any terminal consonants, then he or she might be happiest speaking French.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber
Kirth Gersen wrote:
In Virginia, my students used to tease me mercilessly for referring to the cabinets as /Kab'n-ettes/. I was told the "correct" pronounciation was something along the lines of /cah-neh/. Southerners in general seem to have a deep-seated phobia regarding hard consonants (although they tell me that's not so, and that Yankees simply "over-emphasize" them). Still, it occurs to me that if a person is too lazy to pronounce any terminal consonants, then he or she might be happiest speaking French.

Next time I got to VA, I've got to look into this. In TX, I've never heard anybody say anything but /kab'-nets -nuts/. My wife's family lives in VA, but in the DC area and they're virtually all imports, so I probably can't base anything off of them.


Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
Next time I got to VA, I've got to look into this. In TX, I've never heard anybody say anything but /kab'-nets -nuts/. My wife's family lives in VA, but in the DC area and they're virtually all imports, so I probably can't base anything off of them.

I've been in TX > 5 years, but don't think I've heard anyone from here say that word yet! Anyway, it might be an expectation vs. actual thing, where I'm expecting to hear hard consonants pronounced firmly (and when I don't, it almost seems like they're missing), and the Virginians were expecting to hear the consonants softened (and when they didn't, it sounded to them as if the letters were being given too much emphasis).

P.S. Dunno if it makes a difference, but I was in southern VA. To the people there, people from D.C./Arlington sounded like Marylanders, whom they amusingly considered to be "Yankees."

Andoran

Funny, my friends in Rhode Island pronounce "milkshake" "Kah-bi-net". weird...

Andoran

Kirth Gersen wrote:
P.S. Dunno if it makes a difference, but I was in southern VA. To the people there, people from D.C./Arlington sounded like Marylanders, whom they amusingly considered to be "Yankees."

All depends on what side of the Mason-Dixon line you were. Maryland was on the "Yankee" side of that line and that war.

*shrug*

Andoran

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
In Virginia, my students used to tease me mercilessly for referring to the cabinets as /Kab'n-ettes/. I was told the "correct" pronounciation was something along the lines of /cah-neh/. Southerners in general seem to have a deep-seated phobia regarding hard consonants (although they tell me that's not so, and that Yankees simply "over-emphasize" them). Still, it occurs to me that if a person is too lazy to pronounce any terminal consonants, then he or she might be happiest speaking French.
Next time I got to VA, I've got to look into this. In TX, I've never heard anybody say anything but /kab'-nets -nuts/. My wife's family lives in VA, but in the DC area and they're virtually all imports, so I probably can't base anything off of them.

Yeah, Texans will drop syllables from words. I've gotten used to it after 22 years of living here, I guess.

Osirion

houstonderek wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
P.S. Dunno if it makes a difference, but I was in southern VA. To the people there, people from D.C./Arlington sounded like Marylanders, whom they amusingly considered to be "Yankees."

All depends on what side of the Mason-Dixon line you were. Maryland was on the "Yankee" side of that line and that war.

*shrug*

Maryland may have ended up on the Yankee side of the war, but it was (and is) definitely on the South side of the Mason-Dixon line.

The Mason-Dixon line was drawn to determine the borders between Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware, with Pennsylvania on the north side of the Line, Maryland on the south, and Delaware on the east (the Line actually makes an almost 90 degree turn to the south marking the border between Maryland and Delaware).

Andoran

Ungoded wrote:
houstonderek wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
P.S. Dunno if it makes a difference, but I was in southern VA. To the people there, people from D.C./Arlington sounded like Marylanders, whom they amusingly considered to be "Yankees."

All depends on what side of the Mason-Dixon line you were. Maryland was on the "Yankee" side of that line and that war.

*shrug*

Maryland may have ended up on the Yankee side of the war, but it was (and is) definitely on the South side of the Mason-Dixon line.

The Mason-Dixon line was drawn to determine the borders between Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware, with Pennsylvania on the north side of the Line, Maryland on the south, and Delaware on the east (the Line actually makes an almost 90 degree turn to the south marking the border between Maryland and Delaware).

Delaware was kind of a "tweener", they were a slave state as well. Ok, I take back the first part, but the second part would definitely put them in the "Yankee" camp, as far as Southerners are concerned.


Goddang yankees!

Cheliax

Jimmy-Joe Hayseed wrote:
Whut's uh rickroll?

It's what Rick did with your daughter in the barn last night.

Cheliax

Readerbreeder wrote:

So, OF-fen or of-TEN? Or (as I've heard it occasionally) OR-fen?

Also, barn and born are NOT interchangeable! (Got this in Utahr a couple of times.)

You must have been down around St. Garge, getting some carn for your harses. :p I'm tempted to homeschool just so my kinds won't develop the southern Utah accent.

Osirion

Kirth Gersen wrote:
I've been in TX > 5 years, but don't think I've heard anyone from here say that word yet! Anyway, it might be an expectation vs. actual thing, where I'm expecting to hear hard consonants pronounced firmly (and when I don't, it almost seems like they're missing), and the Virginians were expecting to hear the consonants softened (and when they didn't, it sounded to them as if the letters were being given too much emphasis).

I always thought that it was ammusing how Texans are always "fixin'" things. They're "fixin'" to go to the store. They're "fixin'" to go home. etc.


Jimmy-Joe Hayseed wrote:
Goddang yankees!

The word is "GOLDANG"!


Moff Rimmer wrote:
I always thought that it was ammusing how Texans are always "fixin'" things. They're "fixin'" to go to the store. They're "fixin'" to go home. etc.

True story: I was warmly and enthusiastically welcomed to the state by my colleagues after a year or two, when I finally said, "I gotta meetin' I'm fixin' to head over to."


Almost perfect, Kirth...brings a tear to my eye.
But pure Texan is, "I gotta meetin' I'm fixin' to head on over to."
See how them three prepositions on the end bring it to perfection?

Andoran

Big Tex wrote:

Almost perfect, Kirth...brings a tear to my eye.

But pure Texan is, "I gotta meetin' I'm fixin' to head on over to."
See how them three prepositions on the end bring it to perfection?

Grandpa? Is that you? ;)

Osirion

Big Tex wrote:

Almost perfect, Kirth...brings a tear to my eye.

But pure Texan is, "I gotta meetin' I'm fixin' to head on over to."
See how them three prepositions on the end bring it to perfection?

What kind of music do you usually have here?

Oh, we got both kinds. We got country and western.

Andoran

Moff Rimmer wrote:
Big Tex wrote:

Almost perfect, Kirth...brings a tear to my eye.

But pure Texan is, "I gotta meetin' I'm fixin' to head on over to."
See how them three prepositions on the end bring it to perfection?

What kind of music do you usually have here?

Oh, we got both kinds. We got country and western.

I would like to point out, living in the land of Stevie Ray Vaughn, ZZ Top, Pantera, The Toadies, UGK, Beyonce, Geto Boys, Chamillionaire, Tripping Daisy, (I really could go on here...), that the bar in this quote was in ILLINOIS.

Thank you for playing :)


Moff Rimmer wrote:
Big Tex wrote:

Almost perfect, Kirth...brings a tear to my eye.

But pure Texan is, "I gotta meetin' I'm fixin' to head on over to."
See how them three prepositions on the end bring it to perfection?

What kind of music do you usually have here?

Oh, we got both kinds. We got country and western.

I wish I had a dollar for every time I've heard that joke while living in Texas. :)

Osirion

houstonderek wrote:
Moff Rimmer wrote:
Big Tex wrote:

Almost perfect, Kirth...brings a tear to my eye.

But pure Texan is, "I gotta meetin' I'm fixin' to head on over to."
See how them three prepositions on the end bring it to perfection?

What kind of music do you usually have here?

Oh, we got both kinds. We got country and western.

I would like to point out, living in the land of Stevie Ray Vaughn, ZZ Top, Pantera, The Toadies, UGK, Beyonce, Geto Boys, Chamillionaire, Tripping Daisy, (I really could go on here...), that the bar in this quote was in ILLINOIS.

Thank you for playing :)

I know. It's still funny. I will say that I went to school in Texas (East) and the ONLY thing on the radio between Colorado and Dallas is country stations. It was painful for me.

While we're on the topic of Texas -- What is with the Mums at Homecomings? (And you only really know what I'm talking about if you've been in Texas during Homecoming.)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber

You mean the custom is not universal? Damn, people not from Texas are strange...


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion Subscriber
Moff Rimmer wrote:
While we're on the topic of Texas -- What is with the Mums at Homecomings? (And you only really know what I'm talking about if you've been in Texas during Homecoming.)

*does google search*

Oh damn! I thought it had something to do with rowdy/bawdy soccer moms at homecoming games. Colour me disappointed. :-p

Andoran

Moff Rimmer wrote:
I know. It's still funny. I will say that I went to school in Texas (East) and the ONLY thing on the radio between Colorado and Dallas is country stations. It was painful for me.

Your tuning-fu is weak, apprentice. Amarillo, Lubbock and Abilene all have decent rock stations with range :)

I've driven all over this state, and have never had a problem at least finding an oldies/classic rock station (excepting a couple dead spots on I-10 West where you can hardly get anything).

Eh, keep up the stereotypes, keeps Yankee douche bags from moving here. Cool Yankees are still welcome, of course ;)

Qadira RPG Superstar 2009 Top 8

GentleGiant wrote:
Moff Rimmer wrote:
While we're on the topic of Texas -- What is with the Mums at Homecomings? (And you only really know what I'm talking about if you've been in Texas during Homecoming.)

*does google search*

Oh damn! I thought it had something to do with rowdy/bawdy soccer moms at homecoming games. Colour me disappointed. :-p

It doesn't? Thanks for saving me the google.

I'd move to Texas in a minute if I found a decent job in my area there. Doubt I could convince my wife to go with me ... which makes the prospect even more tempting.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber

I'd think you would not have too hard a time finding a job down here, TD, if you wanted to. If you were ever serious about it, let me know and I could make with the connections and such.

Qadira

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
houstonderek wrote:


Eh, keep up the stereotypes, keeps Yankee douche bags from moving here. Cool Yankees are still welcome, of course ;)

Thing that got me out there was the wide open Texas spaces. Seriously. I'm a forest monkey, open air scares me. Loved the grub in EP, but the heat was a killer ('oh but it's a DRY heat!' ...feh). I missed humidity and the ocean too.

Texans were actually a lot friendlier one-on-one than your average Yankee. I did have to defend the North's honor on several occasions, despite excusing myself in that I had no relatives over here when that brawl was going on. Man you'd figure 140 years would put things in perspective...


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber

Patrick, did you ever see East Texas? We do have woods.

Andoran

Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
Patrick, did you ever see East Texas? We do have woods.

Patrick, did you ever see Gulf Coast Texas? We do have beaches. :)

And, Houston has more than enough humidity for anyone...


houstonderek wrote:
And, Houston has more than enough humidity for anyone...

Climatologists rate Houston as "not fit for human habitation." No major city should have 99-degree-plus temperatures and 99-percent-plus humidiy like 250 days a year. But the restauarants here... man, I may never leave. But I sure miss seasons... and mountains... and days with variable numbers of daylight hours... structures built before 1800... Damn, after 15 years, I'm still a yankee!

Andoran

Kirth Gersen wrote:
houstonderek wrote:
And, Houston has more than enough humidity for anyone...
Climatologists rate Houston as "not fit for human habitation." No major city should have 99-degree-plus temperatures and 99-percent-plus humidiy like 250 days a year.

Hehehe! Really, it's generally only 90 days a year at those temps/humidty, but still.

And Kirth, to make things worse, the last two summers have been mild compared to most I've lived through here.

Try the early '90s when it was over 100 (actual) for much of the summer.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

I apologize if these are repeats, but here are a few of my pet peeves:

1. saying "nucular" instead of "nuclear"
2. saying "excape" instead of "escape"
3. saying "triantula" instead of "tarantula"

Maybe you're playing Fallout 3 and exclaim, "I need to escape from those giant tarantulas mutated by the nuclear blast!"

It's not, "I need to excape from those giant triantulas mutated by the nucular blast!"

Qadira

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
houstonderek wrote:
Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
Patrick, did you ever see East Texas? We do have woods.

Patrick, did you ever see Gulf Coast Texas? We do have beaches. :)

And, Houston has more than enough humidity for anyone...

Nope ..see wide open spaces comment I made before. Heck, the base I was on (Ft. Bliss) oversaw as much square milage as Rhode Island! You really have to travel quite a length to get to the Texas woodlands. Isn't Texas the size of France? I never had a car I'd trust taking I-10 East. I had a '76 Plymouth Volare and a 92 Geo Metro, both sh*tboxes ...

I'm sure your areas are pretty, but I must admit I feel a lot more comfortable in the land wherein I was raised ..

Andoran

houstonderek wrote:
Moff Rimmer wrote:
I know. It's still funny. I will say that I went to school in Texas (East) and the ONLY thing on the radio between Colorado and Dallas is country stations. It was painful for me.

Your tuning-fu is weak, apprentice. Amarillo, Lubbock and Abilene all have decent rock stations with range :)

I've driven all over this state, and have never had a problem at least finding an oldies/classic rock station (excepting a couple dead spots on I-10 West where you can hardly get anything).

Eh, keep up the stereotypes, keeps Yankee douche bags from moving here. Cool Yankees are still welcome, of course ;)

There's waaaaaay more Mexican radio than country.

Andoran

What Texans call trees.....
now I know how Minnesotans feel when somebody in a different state actually names a pond.

Andoran

Heathansson wrote:

What Texans call trees.....

now I know how Minnesotans feel when somebody in a different state actually names a pond.

Quite a few of those "lakes" in Minnesota aren't...


Patrick Curtin wrote:
Isn't Texas the size of France?

It I think all of continental Europe fits inside Houston's Beltway 8, area-wise. Certainly, taking a train from Stuttgart to Sofia MUST be faster than driving a pickup from Cypress-Fairfield to downtown...

Andoran

Yeah, France would fit inside of Texas with quite a bit of room to spare.


Did you know that, from Houston, El Paso is exactly halfway to Los Angeles?

Andoran

Kirth Gersen wrote:
Did you know that, from Houston, El Paso is exactly halfway to Los Angeles?

Hmmm, I've driven that. Felt like half way to Mars...


houstonderek wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Did you know that, from Houston, El Paso is exactly halfway to Los Angeles?
Hmmm, I've driven that. Felt like half way to Mars...

Head east instead, and the same distance (Houston to El Paso) puts you in Florida instead. So, Texas is roughly a third of the width of the entire North American contenent.

Andoran

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Tales Subscriber

If Manhattan had as many people per square mile as Alaska, there would be 14 people in Manhattan.

The drive from my house to the next major city is half the distance of El Paso to LA.

If you could lift Alaska off the map and drop it on the Lower 48, it would literally stretch coast-to-coast.

Oh, and Alaska is more than twice as big as Texas.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

"the sun is ris'
The sun is set
But we still is
In Texas yet."


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Tales Subscriber
Moff Rimmer wrote:
I know. It's still funny. I will say that I went to school in Texas (East) and the ONLY thing on the radio between Colorado and Dallas is country stations. It was painful for me.

Where is the oldest, city-owned classical radio station?


Dallas: WRR Classical 101

And it's on the high end of the dial.

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