Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
Pathfinder Society

Pathfinder Beginner Box

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game

Pathfinder Comics

Pathfinder Legends

PaizoCon 2014!

Ross Byers

Round 1: Seer's Tea
Round 2: Terram

Terram


Round 2 - Top 32: Design a Country

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Terram
"The Land of the Bronze Spear"

Alignment: LN

Capital: Cyprium (pop. 227,500)

Notable Settlements: Kilrasha (pop. 52,700), Port Galrin (pop 31,100), Terramina (pop. 25,400), Archon's Retreat (pop. 15,200), Miktal Straits (military garrison, 2,000 soldiers)

Ruler: General Gerras, Archon of Cyprium, Chairman of the Terramic Council

Government: Terram is led by an elected council. In practice, seats on the council remain within particular families or are attached to other offices. For instance, the Archon of Cyprium is traditionally elected Chairman of the Council. All Terramic public offices are elected, directly or indirectly, limiting the power held by any one man to his popularity, as moderated by an elaborate web of loyalty and dependence.

Description: Sandwiched between the Kilien Mountains to the south and the Golden Sea to the north, Terram forms a border between the lands of men and those of more savage races. The lands of Terram are hilly, with rocky soil and a warm climate which favors the cultivation of orchards and vineyards. Staple crops like grains, however, take less readily to the soil, leading to a national diet based in tubers and livestock, supplemented with fresh produce, and a universal preference for wine over beer.

Curiously, Terram is completely devoid of iron deposits, but is rich with copper, zinc, and tin. As a result, Terrami artisans are among the most experienced brassmiths and bronzesmiths in the known world, and their work is greatly valued for both its functional and artistic value. Iron and steel are imported from other nations, but the additional expense limits its general use to situations where iron is greatly superior, such as plow blades and mining tools.

The patron god of Terram is Cyprus, for whom their capital is named. Cyprus is viewed as a philosopher and an artist, but also as a fierce warrior in defense of his people. He teaches the value of honesty, hard work, and the need for vigilance. In keeping with Cyprus's teachings, Terramic culture embraces the pursuit of knowledge, and every citizen is expected to serve in Terram's legions from the ages of 16 to 20. It is this powerful military force that has allowed Terram to stand against the savage tribes along their western border, and to resist the imperial ambitions of their 'civilized' neighbors. In times of peace, this reserve of manpower is put to work building and maintaining roads, bridges, and aqueducts or escorting merchant caravans. In times of war, however, they move quickly to defend Terram's ancient borders. In either case, the legions make a awesome sight: thousands of soldiers marching in formation, equipped with spear and shield, resplendent in shining bronze armor and accompanied by thundering war chariots.

Terram historically has had no interest in expanding beyond its existing borders. These borders are defined in terms of land: despite access to a wide stretch of coastline on the Golden Sea, all of Terram's sea trade travels through a single city, Port Galrin, and Terram maintains no navy or shipping fleets of its own.

The cities of Terram are known for their majestic marble architecture, embellished with the verdigris of aged bronze. Cyprium is built around a massive temple for Cyprus, housing the Office of the Archon and the magnificent Library of Cyprus. The Library is open to the public, but Cyprian priests keep watch against theft or destruction of the works stored there. In addition to maintaining the Library, the Cyprian priests run Terram's schools and provide the legions with magical support. Under the guidance of the church and the current Archon, the charismatic General Gerras, Terram is experiencing a Golden Age of peace and posperity.

Terramic Characters: Characters hailing from Terram are likely to be fighters or multiclass fighters as a result of their military experience. Terramic rangers frequently take goblinoids as their favored enemies due to the perpetual skirmishes with Terram's more aggressive neighbors. Terramic clerics worship Cyprus and have access to the Law, Knowledge, Protection, and War domains. Druids in Terram live outside of ordinary society, and have been known to take birds of prey as animal companions to scout over the hilly terrain. Arcane spellcasters are a rarity in Terram: knowledge is studied for its own sake, rather than as a route to arcane power, and the talent of sorcery is far from common. Terrami of all classes favor spears over other weaponry.

DM Secrets: Terram may be bereft of iron, but it is not without mineral wealth. In addition to its remarkable reserves of copper, deep below the surface lie rich veins of mithril and adamantine. Although these are largely unknown to the Terramic people, these deposits have begun to draw the attention of the dwarven kingdoms in the Kilien Mountains. Even now, dwarven prospectors are beginning to tunnel out under Terramic land. To the Terrami, this is theft: It is under their land. To a dwarf, however, real estate naturally works in three dimensions, and Terram has no claim on neglected underground wealth. In this case, conflict may be inevitable, if only political. Of course, far darker things than dwarves dwell underground that may have an eye on Terram's hidden riches.

Some of Terram's wealthy see their nation’s commitment to its current borders as a pathetic self-limitation. They seek to upset the current balance of power and turn the legions to a force of conquest. They have formed a secret society, calling themselves the 'Reformers'. They know the people would never stand for their actions, so they seek to either supplant the current government, or to fabricate pretext for a war of expansion. For obvious reasons, this puts the Reformers in direct opposition to the Cyprian church.

Other churches in the region view Cyprus with some distrust. They wonder what motive he may have so picking so specific a people and stretch of land to call his own. They believe that there may be something about Terram that the god is hiding.

Founder, Legendary Games & Publisher, Necromancer Games, RPG Superstar Judge

Submission checklist:

Submitted on time? Check.
Submission is a "country"? Check.
Submission contains all of the mandatory content as required by the contest rules? Check.
Submission is within the word limit? Check. 986.
Submission is free of inappropriate content in violation of the "taboo" guidelines? Check.
Submission does not use content from a source other than those listed? Check.
Submission does not reference a published campaign setting? Check.
Submission does not include maps or art? Check.
Submission is a suitable setting for roleplaying with the d20 system? Check.
Submission is not a "joke" or otherwise completely fails to meet the minimum requirements of the competition or other contest rules? Check.

Qadira Contributor; Publisher, Kobold Press; RPG Superstar Judge

Sometimes raising questions draws the reader in. Sometimes you just raise questions and leave a reader puzzled.

This one left me puzzled. How does a bronze age society survive in an iron age world? Having a young army and conscription doesn't seem like enough. How is it that Terram has no ships or navy and yet suffers no raids? Why is the capital named after a major Mediterranean island? And why does Terram have no territorial ambitions?

If the writeup answered some of those questions, I'd be a lot happier. It's not necessary to answer every question that a writeup provokes. But it is necessary to provide a sense that the answers are all available in the next adventure or sourcebook.

I wish it were otherwise, but I can't recommend this country for Top 16.

Founder, Legendary Games & Publisher, Necromancer Games, RPG Superstar Judge

Fluff (writing, grammar, style, evocative prose, etc.): B
The Good: Well written but not brilliant. It has flavor, but not dripping with it.
The Bad: See above.

Crunch (basics, rules issues, depth of the setting, details, etc.): B+
The Good: Finally, a submission that really gives me some crunch. The guidelines don’t call for it, but I strongly felt that any good author would include some. We just wanted to see who would include what crunch. You did, and I appreciate that. Very good. Good info regarding the setting. The Terramic Characters part is very well done.
The Bad: My issues with this submission are some of the design choices and the content of those choices, not so much the crunch. I could have used a bit more in more parts of the submission—notably racial info and perhaps some passing NPC details. I felt the DM Section was weaker than it could have been.

Design (choices made, format, naming, originality, theme, balance--ie, is the submission heavy in one part but lacking in another?): C+
The Good: Including the Terramic Characters material. Good job breaking out of the format and doing something for the purpose of enhancing the submission. Sometimes format is dictated by design; you recognized that and adapted.
The Bad: I’m having a hard time getting past the name “Cyprus.” I mean, I could see it in a sort of epic Bronze Age alternate earth setting, but in this it just stands out like a sore thumb. As I mentioned above, I love the content you provided. The question I have is “why that content?” And to me, that is a big question. I don’t think this hung together from a design standpoint. I get the feeling you really wanted to do a heroic Bronze Age alternate earth setting but were afraid to limit your submission to that niche. So instead we got this sort of half-in half-out not fully committed to a specific vision sort of submission. I wish you had taken a big breath and plunged it with the submission I am guessing you wanted to make.

Play (setting for adventure? campaign? is there conflict? are there play limitations?): B-
The Good: Interesting bronze age ideas. That is a fun idea. All classes seem to work, some possible issue with all races (though dwarves are mentioned)
The Bad: Seeming lack of conflict. Bronze age perhaps not the best high fantasy setting.

Tilt (my personal take, is it evocative? do I want to play there? does it capture my imagination?): C
The Good: I loved that tag—Land of the Bronze Spear. That said to me bronze age and conflict. Good start.
The Bad: Too many unanswered questions, lack of commitment to a theme (in particular to the theme I think you wanted to have), lack of clear conflict and reason for adventure.

Overall: C+
It didn’t deliver on its bronze age promise. Too little conflict. And I am still guessing that this really was a submission that the author didn’t fully commit to and that he really wanted to do an alternate earth submission. Which, in my view, would have been cooler.

NOT RECOMMENDED for top 16.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

This strikes me as an above-average execution of a fairly generic ancient Rome by way of Greece fantasy kingdom. I thought Cyprus was a weird choice for a deity name since it's also a real country. It does have a bit of a fantasy flair and for me conjures images of crumbling Crusader castles, but I'm not sure you intended that and I'm not sure it serves the submission.

It's interesting to me how many of these entries feature dwarves as the "civilization on the border." I wonder if for some reason dwarves are more palatable to people who otherwise generally think of the game in human terms. I dunno. It's an interesting phenomenon.

I bring that up because I think the conflict between the folk of Terram and the dwarves is quite interesting, especially with the little guys tunneling in from the side and stealing all the minerals.

But... I think this entry could use a lot more of a sense of the fantastic. I like the visuals of a Bronze Age culture with chariots and stuff, and what you've presented is competently executed, but I just don't think I'm going to remember much about it tomorrow. I feel like I'm already forgetting some of it now.

I think this is probably good enough to survive into the next round, but there aren't enough "WOW" moments in this to earn my ringing (or even grudging) endorsement.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Here it is: The Land of the Bronze Spear. I had fun writing it and I hope you all like it. I'm disappointed the judges didn't see more in it. I don't want to say too much here, since I can't expand the entry, but I assure you the judges questions have answers. I hope I can get your vote, so I can show you all the awesome villian I've thought up.

I have a Final to go to now. Have fun.


I thought the writing on this was excellent. I could speed through it without stumbling (besides the 2 typos). Very polished. It's almost as if it was in his blood...

Not enough conflict here for me or any kind of idea about what challenges my characters would face. Sounds like a great setting for a novel but I'm not sure about a game. I often bring up that conundrum that good novels do not always make games and even more so the other way around.

Good luck.

Osirion

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Interesting if a bit generic. I think the best part is the section on Terramic Characters. Good Luck.

~Rusty

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Rusty Ironpants wrote:

I think the best part is the section on Terramic Characters. Good Luck.

~Rusty

Thank you.

Osirion

The stuff I loved: I haven't seen many submissions that really hit what daily life is like in their nation like yours. I love the diet and cuisine section. Nice window to your people. I love the idea of a landlocked state that really wishes to remain just as it is rather than conquer everyone. Reminds me of the Mori clan from japanese history. Nice touch. I like that they do import iron and other things--but it baffles me that they do not use that first and foremost for weapons. I'm certain you could easily answer this in a flavorful way. Much the same way as limited iron made the japanese people forge it to death using unimaginable techniques to produce the katana--I could see unique indiginous bronze forging techniques used with alchemy to make a form of special alchemical bronze that became such a part of the national identity that later steel weapons weren't so much better that the military was inclined to switch. I dunno.

I do think a place that seems to need to trade as much as these guys should have more of a naval presence--more port towns, more ships, more merchant houses.

I wish you had called the god Cyprium rather than Cyprus. The name is distracting. Likewise it would have been nice for him to be a bit more defined in terms of doctrine and worship--since he clearly plays a HUGE role in this nation's whole identity. He's sort of a god of knowledge and philosophy, but he's also a god of strength and war. It'd be nice if he had a much stronger flavor or a more clear cut niche. He feels like "the generic god of greek things" which is sort of unfortunate.

More than anything though, I needed to know more about the threats in the savage wilderness that borders your nation. I would have liked two or three strong adversaries out there. I could really see some goshawful 13th Warrior style cult stalking the farm folk. All kinds of stuff. I just would have liked to have felt the darkness and danger that this part of your setting contained. It felt like you just brushed it off. I wish you would have emphasized it. It's part of what makes your nation so cool. Likewise the underground movement to overthrow the government and make it more militant and expansionist is something I would have really loved to see made into something more than a sentence or two.

Good entry, but yeah it really feels like it's lacking what it needs to really impress.


This is a submission that meets the goals of the exercise. It's decently written. However, what makes it stand out as imaginitive or creative or different?


There is a lot that I like. Writing is solid and brings good flavor and there are interesting ideas there, but...for a nation which apparently should be borderland and have issues about warfare technology (ie. lack of iron), the place seems just so...peaceful. Why? How?

I might pilfer some of the ideas here but as a whole entry it would need more.


This would make an excellent article detailing a country in an encyclopedia, although the beginning government section is a non-starter.

I don’t know if it is enough to whet the appetite of a player, except for border skirmishes and a little internecine strife. If you had used the word “whitesmith,” I’d have given you a vote just for that.

Overall, I do like your writing style. I will mull over it a little, while I see if you can sway us with charm and wit.


I like the name Terram for the country.

I have to echo others and say that there doesn't seem much for an adventuring party to get caught up in with respect to current events of the country.

I'm not really fond of the DM Secrets either.

Andoran

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Bronze Age. I think this country has an interesting premise, and the entry is generally well written and structured – a pity that there are not a few more adventure hooks or DM’s secrets in there. I, like others, found the name Cyprus distracting, and once the round is over I would be interested in what your thinking on this was.

At first I thought that this country existed in a Bronze Age world – but it is later suggested that this is not the case. History shows us that iron age weapons and armour will beat bronze age ones every time (well, at least my limited knowledge of history suggests that). There may be a good reason here why this is not the case, but it is not made clear in your entry, and I think this is a mistake.

If anything, I’d probably liked to have seen more of an ancient Greek bent to this one; it seems that’s what you were going for, but if so I don’t think it took it far enough (I’m not suggesting that you make it exactly fantasy ancient Greece, but I would have liked to see more of an ancient world vibe to it).

Marathon Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014

I thought of the tree first, and thought it might be an attempt at ancient Lebanon or something. But tree or island, it is distracting.

I like the kinds of things you choose to tell us. There's game crunch and world building crunch. There's a feel for a real land here, if it existed in isolation.

Why they aren't crushed by their better-resourced neighbors is a very fair question though.

The bronze age idea is a solid one.

Possibly maybe.

Osirion RPG Superstar 2013 , Dedicated Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014 aka Steven T. Helt

It seems clear reading your entry, and then reading the rsponses, that you can't have a bronze-age kingdom thriving amid iron-age rivals. I guess you can allowfor magic, or you can introduce racial characteristics for the people of Terram that just make them better fighters with inferior weapons. I dunno, I guess a reader shouldn't be trying to justify your design choices.

Definitely gets a lot better with more Greek flavor, a unique pantheon with no names stolen from real-world references, and set among similarly primitiveneighbors.

Congrats on making top 32.


With some imagination, some magic and innovativeness, good strategy and geography which supports it bronze era country could manage surviving among iron era neighbors. The entry did not address these issues, which is a glaring omission.

Strangely enough, I didn't mind the name Cyprium...probably because as English is not my native language I don't consider name of that island in Mediterranian to be named Cyprus, so I didn't immediately draw connection :)

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 6 aka adanedhel9

Ross, you created a very well-written entry; add in lots of little details, and this nation really seems to live for me. I really enjoyed reading it, and I think it would make a good addition to a broader campaign setting.

But, there's not enough paths for adventure. If you dropped the standard party into this nation, what would they do? You haven't given the DM enough to work with here.

Again, though, kudos on the writing and details.

Qadira

I think that this was the first time that the designer explains me what a PC from this land could be like. And I love it, not because I can't create my characters for myself but 'cause it shows me that Ross has given thought to playability.

I have often had the feeling that too much room is given to the historyy of a country instead of concentrating on the present state. This is an excellent example of what a land is like at the present. It isn't as original as other entries and don't tries to be so. But what it shows us is well done (I particularly like Cyprus).

May be well worth to be included in my Top 5.

Grand Lodge Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

I'm reading this out of order due to the author's response on another thread. This may or may not be positive.

First sentence: Not an informative tagline, but a decent realistic by-name that draws me to read further.

The land and architecture are well described. I have a solid sense of what the place might look like.

The use of bronze is well explained, doesn't impose any requirements on the rest of the setting and leads to further interesting facts about the place and people.

It's not encouraging that "Cyprus" is a real-world name for something different.

"Terramic culture embraces the pursuit of knowledge, and every citizen is expected to serve in Terram's legions from the ages of 16 to 20": I can see what the author intended by this sentence, but the way it reads is that people serve in the military because they value the pursuit of knowledge. This needs to be better expressed. Generally there are too many of these balanced sentences.

I very much like that there's a Characters section. Most of the information here is useful and sensible.

The first two DM's Secrets are great.

Definitely in.


As people have pointed out the name Cyprus for some people might be a bit jarring and that Terram isn’t loaded with reach out and grab you adventure hooks. But I feel it makes up for that with a sense of identity(an identity that I find appealing). Terram was om my short list of countries contesting for my fifth vote, and ultimately won out even before I decide I was going to cast my all my votes for the entries that I liked that don’t seem to be hogging the lions share of attention.

You can be assured Ross that Terram will live regardless its fate here within my own campaigns. And I really hope I get to see more of your work!

A- for a nounce country and a great homeland for any PC/NPC.

On a side note a few of people who commented are a little mistaken about irons inherent superiority to bronze. Only 3 things really made iron better and to are circumstantial. First bronze is am alloy and the minerals required for its making were often not in close proximity to each other making it more costly due to need to buy its components from far locals. Also bronze cannot be repaired like iron, which as lends itself to being reshaped and melded together which is not true with bronze, which entirely need to be recast to repair breaks or sever gouges. And finally iron use is all but require to the advancement of steel, which was superior to either.
With early Chinese civilization the northern Chinese were bronze using and yet conquered the sophisticated south iron using state merging them into the shared entity they have be near ever since. China, which was expert at using bronze, was still using it well passed when the majority of other nations had adopted iron relinquishing only in the late dark ages.
Another example is that the Gaul despite being able to make iron tools often carried bronze side arms. For they where less likely to loose their shape like their iron swords, Greeks tell us.

Plus Bronze is just a whole lot more shiny ; )


A fully civilized country that is still somewhat backward and not interested in expansion? Very different.

It isn't perfect but there is a real sense of potential here. I'm willing to give this a pass and see if the author can sharpen up for round 3.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Place your votes.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Thank you all.

Lets see here. Says all I'm allowed to do is ask for feedback and votes.

So what does everyone else think?

And please, vote for me. I have lots of great stuff coming.

Grand Lodge Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

I think this deserves to do great things.

Description, structure, game usefulness and writing are all top-notch. I'd like to see more game design as solid as this entry.


Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber

I don't like the naming - Terram and Cyprus are too real world. I like the bronzework angle. Having a Terramic Characters section is good. But in the end, it's not all that interesting a place... Not enough "wow factor".

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 16 aka amusingsn

I appreciated the nod to the age of bronze here, as I am eerily drawn to all that is the Bronze Age, though my own interest focuses mainly on the pre-historic post-paleolithic Early Bronze age where civilization took root.


First off, I like the idea that I got kind of a "Greek" vibe from this thing without being clubbed over the head with "historical facts with fantasy names" being used. On the other hand, I got a Greek vibe, but with only one god as patron and no real hooks to play up the mythological, what we have to play with is a more historical feeling Greek setting rather than a the Greek setting with what makes it fun for gaming: the fantastic elements.

Well written for the most port, and useful, but not as colorful as I would have liked. And I guess I could be way off on the whole Greek inspiration, but the whole "philosophers, learning, elected officials, serving in the military, we have bronze" combination does bring up Greek when fed into the old Bat Computer.


Like several of the other entries, I'm left with a single question: "And?"


I like almost everything about this setting at least a little.

I'm not sure about a country who relies on external iron resources coming through a single port not having a navy. Seems ripe for sacking.

I don't see a lot of sources for diverse adventure here above the eventual war with the dwarves and the old adventures' standard of beatin' back the goblin hoards.

I like that the dwarves aren't evil, but they are a thorn that will have to be dealt with. Wars in D&D are too often moral ones. This one is war over resources with no real bad guy side. That part rocks.

I love the imagery of brass and bronze equipment everywhere.

I think this will be an exciting place to campaign once the war with the dwarves dawns, the once non-threatening Terram upgrades their bronze spears not to steel, but to adamantine, and the country is forced to diplomatically reassure its nervous neighbors that its sudden military upgrade and expansion is solely in defense against the dwarves and not a precursor to building the new Great Terram Empire.

I can picture epic battles fought on underground battlefields, a foreign blockade showing up at Port Galrin to secure that country's continued interests in Terram, and hastily constructed smoking citadels scattered (small castles containing little except what maintains the multiple smitheries which each contain) across the land where adamantine is forged into spearheads as quickly as it can be brought to the surface.

Oooo, and as news from the south reports that the forests which provide the hafts for Terram's spears have been seized by the advancing dwarves, the elven warfleet floats into Port Galrin's harbor, delivering fresh elven troops, supplies (including more hafts), and elven warmages to fix the lack of arcane defenses in Terram. Unfortunately, I think you missed that exciting setting by only a decade or more.

Even so, I am obviously inspired, and could easily see myself running a campaign here once the negotiations break down. A better choice might have been to include in the GM's secrets that the negotiations have been terminated, the envoy is retained by the dwarves, and troops are massing on both borders.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Expect a now-I-can-respond-to-everyone update later tonight. Right now I'm still at work and they might frown on me taking a few hours to go over each response in this thread in detail.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Wolfgang Baur wrote:


Sometimes raising questions draws the reader in. Sometimes you just raise questions and leave a reader puzzled.

This one left me puzzled. How does a bronze age society survive in an iron age world? Having a young army and conscription doesn't seem like enough. How is it that Terram has no ships or navy and yet suffers no raids? Why is the capital named after a major Mediterranean island? And why does Terram have no territorial ambitions?

If the writeup answered some of those questions, I'd be a lot happier. It's not necessary to answer every question that a writeup provokes. But it is necessary to provide a sense that the answers are all available in the next adventure or sourcebook.

I wish it were otherwise, but I can't recommend this country for Top 16.

Bronze is not actually that inferior to Iron (in fact, it's better, but it is worse than steel). It cannot be welded, but that's not of much consequence when making swords. The biggest reason that mankind made the transition to Iron was that is was cheaper, not better. Iron is cheaper because it is more plentiful and only requires one resource. Bronze usually required trading for tin or copper, whichever the area lacked.

I have to wonder what you meant by 'raids'. Anyone coming ashore would have had to worry about Terram's legions, and Terram doesn't have very many costal cities to protect. (Just the one). The capital isn't named after the island. It's named after the greek word for copper. I formed the god's name backword from there, and ended up with Cyprus (which also happens to be the root word for Cyprium, which means Cyprian Metal). It sounded appropriate enough for a god to me. Clearly, others have disagreed and I should have picked a name that sounded more made up.

As for territorial ambitions, I thought I made that clear: Cyprus and his clergy don't want it. Why? That's the last DM's secret, isn't it? That one is supposed to make you wonder.

Clark Peterson wrote:

Fluff (writing, grammar, style, evocative prose, etc.): B

The Good: Well written but not brilliant. It has flavor, but not dripping with it.
The Bad: See above.

Crunch (basics, rules issues, depth of the setting, details, etc.): B+
The Good: Finally, a submission that really gives me some crunch. The guidelines don’t call for it, but I strongly felt that any good author would include some. We just wanted to see who would include what crunch. You did, and I appreciate that. Very good. Good info regarding the setting. The Terramic Characters part is very well done.
The Bad: My issues with this submission are some of the design choices and the content of those choices, not so much the crunch. I could have used a bit more in more parts of the submission—notably racial info and perhaps some passing NPC details. I felt the DM Section was weaker than it could have been.

Design (choices made, format, naming, originality, theme, balance--ie, is the submission heavy in one part but lacking in another?): C+
The Good: Including the Terramic Characters material. Good job breaking out of the format and doing something for the purpose of enhancing the submission. Sometimes format is dictated by design; you recognized that and adapted.
The Bad: I’m having a hard time getting past the name “Cyprus.” I mean, I could see it in a sort of epic Bronze Age alternate earth setting, but in this it just stands out like a sore thumb. As I mentioned above, I love the content you provided. The question I have is “why that content?” And to me, that is a big question. I don’t think this hung together from a design standpoint. I get the feeling you really wanted to do a heroic Bronze Age alternate earth setting but were afraid to limit your submission to that niche. So instead we got this sort of half-in half-out not fully committed to a specific vision sort of submission. I wish you had taken a big breath and plunged it with the submission I am guessing you wanted to make.

Play (setting for adventure? campaign? is there conflict? are there play limitations?): B-
The Good: Interesting bronze age ideas. That is a fun idea. All classes seem to work, some possible issue with all races (though dwarves are mentioned)
The Bad: Seeming lack of conflict. Bronze age perhaps not the best high fantasy setting.

Tilt (my personal take, is it evocative? do I want to play there? does it capture my imagination?): C
The Good: I loved that tag—Land of the Bronze Spear. That said to me bronze age and conflict. Good start.
The Bad: Too many unanswered questions, lack of commitment to a theme (in particular to the theme I think you wanted to have), lack of clear conflict and reason for adventure.

Overall: C+
It didn’t deliver on its bronze age promise. Too little conflict. And I am still guessing that this really was a submission that the author didn’t fully commit to and that he really wanted to do an alternate earth submission. Which, in my view, would have been cooler.

NOT RECOMMENDED for top 16.

I already talked about the name 'Cyprus'above. I didn't want to keep name dropping NPCs because I was making a country, not a character. The big impression I get from your review is that you expected that I wanted to make an alternate Bronze Age setting. I didn't. I thought that the visual and social contrasts between Terram and its contemporaries was part of made it interesting. I do agree with what you and others have said about the lack of conflict, in that perhaps I could have used more of it, but what I was aiming for is a Greco-roman utopia. More greco- than roman. And I didn't want to tell the DM what to do with it.

Erik Mona wrote:


This strikes me as an above-average execution of a fairly generic ancient Rome by way of Greece fantasy kingdom. I thought Cyprus was a weird choice for a deity name since it's also a real country. It does have a bit of a fantasy flair and for me conjures images of crumbling Crusader castles, but I'm not sure you intended that and I'm not sure it serves the submission.

It's interesting to me how many of these entries feature dwarves as the "civilization on the border." I wonder if for some reason dwarves are more palatable to people who otherwise generally think of the game in human terms. I dunno. It's an interesting phenomenon.

I bring that up because I think the conflict between the folk of Terram and the dwarves is quite interesting, especially with the little guys tunneling in from the side and stealing all the minerals.

But... I think this entry could use a lot more of a sense of the fantastic. I like the visuals of a Bronze Age culture with chariots and stuff, and what you've presented is competently executed, but I just don't think I'm going to remember much about it tomorrow. I feel like I'm already forgetting some of it now.

I think this is probably good enough to survive into the next round, but there aren't enough "WOW" moments in this to earn my ringing (or even grudging) endorsement.

Crumbling crusader castles were certainly not my intention. But I'm glad at least one of the judges thought I could make the next round. For that, I thank you. I suppose I find our tomorrow if I did or not. I picked dwarves for the role of 'interesting' antagonists because they are not automatically evil. In this case, they're really closer to being right than the Terrami are. On the other hand, I didn't want to waste any word count on the goblins because well, they didn't do anything you can't just assume goblins to do. I hope you remembered more of it than you indicated.

Ragwaine wrote:

I thought the writing on this was excellent. I could speed through it without stumbling (besides the 2 typos). Very polished. It's almost as if it was in his blood...

Not enough conflict here for me or any kind of idea about what challenges my characters would face. Sounds like a great setting for a novel but I'm not sure about a game. I often bring up that conundrum that good novels do not always make games and even more so the other way around.

Good luck.

Due to the inherent lack of conflict, I didn't so much imagine Terram as a setting for a whole campaign so much as a place a PC or NPC could be from, or a change of scenery for one adventure or sidequest. Hence, the Terramic characters section.

Rusty Ironpants wrote:


Interesting if a bit generic. I think the best part is the section on Terramic Characters. Good Luck.

~Rusty

Thank you.

Grimcleaver wrote:


The stuff I loved: I haven't seen many submissions that really hit what daily life is like in their nation like yours. I love the diet and cuisine section. Nice window to your people. I love the idea of a landlocked state that really wishes to remain just as it is rather than conquer everyone. Reminds me of the Mori clan from japanese history. Nice touch. I like that they do import iron and other things--but it baffles me that they do not use that first and foremost for weapons. I'm certain you could easily answer this in a flavorful way. Much the same way as limited iron made the japanese people forge it to death using unimaginable techniques to produce the katana--I could see unique indiginous bronze forging techniques used with alchemy to make a form of special alchemical bronze that became such a part of the national identity that later steel weapons weren't so much better that the military was inclined to switch. I dunno.

I do think a place that seems to need to trade as much as these guys should have more of a naval presence--more port towns, more ships, more merchant houses.

I wish you had called the god Cyprium rather than Cyprus. The name is distracting. Likewise it would have been nice for him to be a bit more defined in terms of doctrine and worship--since he clearly plays a HUGE role in this nation's whole identity. He's sort of a god of knowledge and philosophy, but he's also a god of strength and war. It'd be nice if he had a much stronger flavor or a more clear cut niche. He feels like "the generic god of greek things" which is sort of unfortunate.

More than anything though, I needed to know more about the threats in the savage wilderness that borders your nation. I would have liked two or three strong adversaries out there. I could really see some goshawful 13th Warrior style cult stalking the farm folk. All kinds of stuff. I just would have liked to have felt the darkness and danger that this part of your setting contained. It felt like you just brushed it off. I wish you would have emphasized it. It's part of what makes your nation so cool. Likewise the underground movement to overthrow the government and make it more militant and expansionist is something I would have really loved to see made into something more than a sentence or two.

Good entry, but yeah it really feels like it's lacking what it needs to really impress.

I think I've learned my lesson on naming gods, but I disagree that he's the simply 'God of greek things'. Moradin is a god of Dwarf things, and no one complains that he's a forge god, an earth god, a warrior god, and a brewery god. Cyprus really has the same portfolio as Athena if you think about it. He's less focused than Pelor or St. Cuthbert, I suppose, but he's god of a nation and a culture, rather than a thing.

I'm glad you like the Reformers, but I didn't want to develop them too much. First of all, I'm writing a country, not an adventure, and I didn't want to limit the DM. All the DM secrets were intended to be just enough to start someone's imagination running for their own campaign. I thought that would go over better than it did.

varianor wrote:


This is a submission that meets the goals of the exercise. It's decently written. However, what makes it stand out as imaginitive or creative or different?

You're intitled to your opinion. I liked the imagery and the contrast to a conventional pseudo-medieval/renaissance setting myself.

magdalena thiriet wrote:


There is a lot that I like. Writing is solid and brings good flavor and there are interesting ideas there, but...for a nation which apparently should be borderland and have issues about warfare technology (ie. lack of iron), the place seems just so...peaceful. Why? How?

I might pilfer some of the ideas here but as a whole entry it would need more.

I hope you like what you take. And I think what history and literature have shown us is that utopias usually have some colossal secret or flaw. What is it in this case? I don't know. That's for the DM to figure out. As for military technology: Bronze isn't much worse than steel, particularly if you have access to a lot of it. Especially in a game world, where it makes a bigger difference to train your army up to Ftr2 or Ftr3 and your enemies are all War1.

mwbeeler wrote:


This would make an excellent article detailing a country in an encyclopedia, although the beginning government section is a non-starter.

I don’t know if it is enough to whet the appetite of a player, except for border skirmishes and a little internecine strife. If you had used the word “whitesmith,” I’d have given you a vote just for that.

Overall, I do like your writing style. I will mull over it a little, while I see if you can sway us with charm and wit.

I followed the given format. Government was near the top.

'Whitesmith' was not a term I was familiar with. Had I known it, I'd've used it. It's a good word. I hope I did win you over.

Swamp Druid wrote:

I like the name Terram for the country.

I have to echo others and say that there doesn't seem much for an adventuring party to get caught up in with respect to current events of the country.

I'm not really fond of the DM Secrets either.

I'm glad you liked the name. I wasn't too too fond of it myself: I just didn't think of anything better. I'll admit I'm not good with names, inventing them or remembering them. I'm sorry you didn't like my adventure hooks. I thought the library was enough of one, and its not even in DM secrets.

Mothman wrote:

Bronze Age. I think this country has an interesting premise, and the entry is generally well written and structured – a pity that there are not a few more adventure hooks or DM’s secrets in there. I, like others, found the name Cyprus distracting, and once the round is over I would be interested in what your thinking on this was.

At first I thought that this country existed in a Bronze Age world – but it is later suggested that this is not the case. History shows us that iron age weapons and armour will beat bronze age ones every time (well, at least my limited knowledge of history suggests that). There may be a good reason here why this is not the case, but it is not made clear in your entry, and I think this is a mistake.

If anything, I’d probably liked to have seen more of an ancient Greek bent to this one; it seems that’s what you were going for, but if so I don’t think it took it far enough (I’m not suggesting that you make it exactly fantasy ancient Greece, but I would have liked to see more of an ancient world vibe to it).

Quote:

I hate to say it, but your knowledge of history is incomplete.Iron has advantages over bronze, but as I've stated above, it's biggest was it was cheap and plentiful. Iron-wielding cultures won because they could field bigger armies. A bronze sword or spear will kill you just as dead as an iron one.

I was going for the greek vibe, but I didn't want to bludgeon the reader over the head with it. Two reasons. One, it's less creative the more it mirrors a real society. Two, with 300 being so recent, I didn't want people to leap to the conclusion that I was making Sparta.

Clouds Without Water wrote:

I thought of the tree first, and thought it might be an attempt at ancient Lebanon or something. But tree or island, it is distracting.

I like the kinds of things you choose to tell us. There's game crunch and world building crunch. There's a feel for a real land here, if it existed in isolation.

Why they aren't crushed by their better-resourced neighbors is a very fair question though.

The bronze age idea is a solid one.

Possibly maybe.

The tree is Cypress. The island is Cyprus. It confused me until my first world history class too.

I think I've already talked enough about bronze vs. iron. And given the abundance of copper Terram possesses, I'm not sure I'd say 'better resourced'.

ancientsensei wrote:


It seems clear reading your entry, and then reading the rsponses, that you can't have a bronze-age kingdom thriving amid iron-age rivals. I guess you can allowfor magic, or you can introduce racial characteristics for the people of Terram that just make them better fighters with inferior weapons. I dunno, I guess a reader shouldn't be trying to justify your design choices.

Definitely gets a lot better with more Greek flavor, a unique pantheon with no names stolen from real-world references, and set among similarly primitiveneighbors.

Congrats on making top 32.

You can. And magic does help. I didn't think I was asking the reader to justify anything, but it would appear that many people assume iron was as great a military breakthough as gunpowder or the airplane. It wasn't.

Joe Outzen wrote:

Ross, you created a very well-written entry; add in lots of little details, and this nation really seems to live for me. I really enjoyed reading it, and I think it would make a good addition to a broader campaign setting.

But, there's not enough paths for adventure. If you dropped the standard party into this nation, what would they do? You haven't given the DM enough to work with here.

Again, though, kudos on the writing and details.

I'm really surpised at all the compliments I have been receiving on the writing: I'm a programmer, not a wordsmith. But I've had several people say I was the best or one of the best written submissions. I'll take it, I guess.

I suppose, that like reconsidering Cyprus, I should have given the DM more to work with. I erred on the side of not doing their job for them.

WormysQueue wrote:

I think that this was the first time that the designer explains me what a PC from this land could be like. And I love it, not because I can't create my characters for myself but 'cause it shows me that Ross has given thought to playability.

I have often had the feeling that too much room is given to the historyy of a country instead of concentrating on the present state. This is an excellent example of what a land is like at the present. It isn't as original as other entries and don't tries to be so. But what it shows us is well done (I particularly like Cyprus).

May be well worth to be included in my Top 5.

Thank you. I wish you thought it was more original, but you caught my intent with the character section perfectly.

Starglim wrote:

I'm reading this out of order due to the author's response on another thread. This may or may not be positive.

First sentence: Not an informative tagline, but a decent realistic by-name that draws me to read further.

The land and architecture are well described. I have a solid sense of what the place might look like.

The use of bronze is well explained, doesn't impose any requirements on the rest of the setting and leads to further interesting facts about the place and people.

It's not encouraging that "Cyprus" is a real-world name for something different.

"Terramic culture embraces the pursuit of knowledge, and every citizen is expected to serve in Terram's legions from the ages of 16 to 20": I can see what the author intended by this sentence, but the way it reads is that people serve in the military because they value the pursuit of knowledge. This needs to be better expressed. Generally there are too many of these balanced sentences.

I very much like that there's a Characters section. Most of the information here is useful and sensible.

The first two DM's Secrets are great.

Definitely in.

Thank you very much. You're right that my writing style tends toward that style of sentence. It's one of the reasons I'm surprised by the compliements I have received. And I've learned my lesson about real-world names.

Renewal's_Plume wrote:

As people have pointed out the name Cyprus for some people might be a bit jarring and that Terram isn’t loaded with reach out and grab you adventure hooks. But I feel it makes up for that with a sense of identity(an identity that I find appealing). Terram was om my short list of countries contesting for my fifth vote, and ultimately won out even before I decide I was going to cast my all my votes for the entries that I liked that don’t seem to be hogging the lions share of attention.

You can be assured Ross that Terram will live regardless its fate here within my own campaigns. And I really hope I get to see more of your work!

A- for a nounce country and a great homeland for any PC/NPC.

On a side note a few of people who commented are a little mistaken about irons inherent superiority to bronze. Only 3 things really made iron better and to are circumstantial. First bronze is am alloy and the minerals required for its making were often not in close proximity to each other making it more costly due to need to buy its components from far locals. Also bronze cannot be repaired like iron, which as lends itself to being reshaped and melded together which is not true with bronze, which entirely need to be recast to repair breaks or sever gouges. And finally iron use is all but require to the advancement of steel, which was superior to either.
With early Chinese civilization the northern Chinese were bronze using and yet conquered the sophisticated south iron using state merging them into the shared entity they have be near ever since. China, which was expert at using bronze, was still using it well passed when the majority of other nations had adopted iron relinquishing only in the late dark ages.
Another example is that the Gaul despite being able to make iron tools often carried bronze side arms. For they where less likely to loose their shape like their iron swords, Greeks tell us.

Plus Bronze is just a whole lot more shiny ; )

Ah. The post I'd been wanting to make ever since the judges asked how a Bronze age civilization could survive against iron-wielding neighboors. Thank you for that.

Nem-Z wrote:


A fully civilized country that is still somewhat backward and not interested in expansion? Very different.

It isn't perfect but there is a real sense of potential here. I'm willing to give this a pass and see if the author can sharpen up for round 3.

It was supposed to be different. Thanks.

Starglim wrote:


I think this deserves to do great things.
Description, structure, game usefulness and writing are all top-notch. I'd like to see more game design as solid as this entry.

Thank you again.

Ernest Mueller wrote:

I don't like the naming - Terram and Cyprus are too real world. I like the bronzework angle. Having a Terramic Characters section is good. But in the end, it's not all that interesting a place... Not enough "wow factor".

I wasn't aware Terram was real world.

Erik Anderson wrote:
I appreciated the nod to the age of bronze here, as I am eerily drawn to all that is the Bronze Age, though my own interest focuses mainly on the pre-historic post-paleolithic Early Bronze age where civilization took root.

I'm glad you liked it. I'm sorry to say I didn't like the Ghost Hounds that much. I appeciate that you tried to take the risk.

KnightErrantJR wrote:


First off, I like the idea that I got kind of a "Greek" vibe from this thing without being clubbed over the head with "historical facts with fantasy names" being used. On the other hand, I got a Greek vibe, but with only one god as patron and no real hooks to play up the mythological, what we have to play with is a more historical feeling Greek setting rather than a the Greek setting with what makes it fun for gaming: the fantastic elements.

Well written for the most port, and useful, but not as colorful as I would have liked. And I guess I could be way off on the whole Greek inspiration, but the whole "philosophers, learning, elected officials, serving in the military, we have bronze" combination does bring up Greek when fed into the old Bat Computer.

You have a Bat Computer? Awesome. I disagree that it's Greece without the fantastic elements: Greek cities usually had one favored patron.

Karelzarath wrote:


Like several of the other entries, I'm left with a single question: "And?"

I'm sorry you didn't like it. As for 'And?' that's up to you and your imagination.

Eldrich Gaiman wrote:

I like almost everything about this setting at least a little.

I'm not sure about a country who relies on external iron resources coming through a single port not having a navy. Seems ripe for sacking.

I don't see a lot of sources for diverse adventure here above the eventual war with the dwarves and the old adventures' standard of beatin' back the goblin hoards.

I like that the dwarves aren't evil, but they are a thorn that will have to be dealt with. Wars in D&D are too often moral ones. This one is war over resources with no real bad guy side. That part rocks.

I love the imagery of brass and bronze equipment everywhere.

I think this will be an exciting place to campaign once the war with the dwarves dawns, the once non-threatening Terram upgrades their bronze spears not to steel, but to adamantine, and the country is forced to diplomatically reassure its nervous neighbors that its sudden military upgrade and expansion is solely in defense against the dwarves and not a precursor to building the new Great Terram Empire.

I can picture epic battles fought on underground battlefields, a foreign blockade showing up at Port Galrin to secure that country's continued interests in Terram, and hastily constructed smoking citadels scattered (small castles containing little except what maintains the multiple smitheries which each contain) across the land where adamantine is forged into spearheads as quickly as it can be brought to the surface.

Oooo, and as news from the south reports that the forests which provide the hafts for Terram's spears have been seized by the advancing dwarves, the elven warfleet floats into Port Galrin's harbor, delivering fresh elven troops, supplies (including more hafts), and elven warmages to fix the lack of arcane defenses in Terram. Unfortunately, I think you missed that exciting setting by only a decade or more.

Even so, I am obviously inspired, and could easily see myself running a campaign here once the negotiations break down. A better choice might have been to include in the GM's secrets that the negotiations have been terminated, the envoy is retained by the dwarves, and troops are massing on both borders.

I hope this post answers the above one asking 'And?'. This is the kind of leap of imagination I was expecting people to make. Good show.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

That took way to long to type out. Any more questions, now that I can answer them?


Ross Byers wrote:
I hope I did win you over.

You did, actually. The heartfelt post on the "Woo me!" thread earned you a vote.

Marathon Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014

Ross Byers wrote:


Clouds Without Water wrote:

I thought of the tree first, and thought it might be an attempt at ancient Lebanon or something. But tree or island, it is distracting.

...

The tree is Cypress. The island is Cyprus. It confused me until my first world history class too.

You do realize that part of my post was mostly me stretching to justify your extremely distracting naming choice, right?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Clouds Without Water wrote:

You do realize that part of my post was mostly me stretching to justify your extremely distracting naming choice, right?

I wasn't sure: Sarcasm works poorly when typed. I thought just maybe that the first thing that popped into your head when you read 'Cyprus' was 'Cypress'. I realize now that many people found the name distracting, and I'm sorry you didn't like it.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

An eloquent and thorough defense. You are an intelligent worldsmith.


Ross Byers wrote:
I'm really surpised at all the compliments I have been receiving on the writing: I'm a programmer, not a wordsmith. But I've had several people say I was the best or one of the best written submissions. I'll take it, I guess.

Programmers are forced to strictly conform to grammar and syntax. It often shows when they try writing something (especially project-like somethings) in a natural language. Having to interpret and generate understandable documentation, test procedures, and requirements doesn't usually hurt, either.

Ross Byers wrote:
I hope this post answers the above one asking 'And?'. This is the kind of leap of imagination I was expecting people to make. Good show.

Thanks! Happy to serve!

Thank you for the inspiration.

O, and the name didn't bother me in the least. Lots of things share a name either by homage, shared ancestry, or coincidence. To avoid such things in the future, however, you can try altering the spelling, substituting sounds in the word for similar ones, splitting or joining syllables, or some combination. For example: Syprus, Cytrus, Cykris, Cyperus, Speros, Cykurs, Syperos, et cetera.

Qadira

Ross Byers wrote:
Thank you. I wish you thought it was more original...

In fact I did (and I should have used another word instead of "original" which is some kind of a false friend for us germans). What I meant was that you didn't try to reinvent the wheel as many others have done. And you didn't do this by intent which is, compared to other entries, a bold move.

Here's hoping that this time I used more appropriate words to explain my opinion. :)

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

WormysQueue wrote:
Ross Byers wrote:
Thank you. I wish you thought it was more original...

In fact I did (and I should have used another word instead of "original" which is some kind of a false friend for us germans). What I meant was that you didn't try to reinvent the wheel as many others have done. And you didn't do this by intent which is, compared to other entries, a bold move.

Here's hoping that this time I used more appropriate words to explain my opinion. :)

Ah. That makes sense. While I have you pinned down, there's something I've wanted to ask you. In the first round, you commented that you thought Seer's Tea was based on Golarion. I'd like to know what gave you that impression. It certainly wasn't my intent, though I suppose it fits Golarion better than other worlds, given Golarion has various odd fortune-telling traditions.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Ross Byers wrote:
But I'm glad at least one of the judges thought I could make the next round. For that, I thank you. I suppose I find our tomorrow if I did or not.

Sigh. I didn't make it. Oh well. Now you all don't get to see my fun Werewolf Monk.


Sorry Ross I really am sorry that we will not be seeing you advance. The seer's tea was my favourite item and I thought Terram was a stellar entry, obviously other weren't quite enthusiastic as I :(

I was glad to have helped answer questions for you when you couldn't (I pasted both my knowledge history and weapon smithing checks).

Best of luck as we the public loose access the wonderful resource that your PCs' enjoy. Namely your inspiring ability to blend reality and imagination into something of the highest calibre.

Qadira

Ross Byers wrote:
In the first round, you commented that you thought Seer's Tea was based on Golarion. I'd like to know what gave you that impression. It certainly wasn't my intent, though I suppose it fits Golarion better than other worlds, given Golarion has various odd fortune-telling traditions.

As I've stated in the "Augury Items" thread, Golarion was a world shaped by prophecy until Aroden died a hundred years ago. I assume that the old prophecies' failing must have come as a shock to Golarion's inhabitants and I imagine that those able to craft wondrous items went to lengths to create replacements which could alleviate this loss. That's why I didn't wonder about the mass of augury items in round no.1. Pathfinder is a great resource of inspiration to me and I assume that I'm not the only one. I read your comment in the same thread so I hope that you didn't feel offended when I saw a connection where apparently there is none.

This said, the thread in which I made the connection statement was more about possibilities to use the winner items as a base to analyze the flaws of my own item. The reference to the Seer's Tea in this thread had much to do with the fact that I consider it a really well-designed item (which I'd love to have been able to create myself). I'll steal it for sure for my home campaign (which features a cleric of Pharasma who will most probably love it too).

This makes two times that you convinced me of your ability to design interesting stuff. I feel really sorry that you didn't make the cut. Would have liked to see your villain in the next round.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

WormysQueue wrote:
I read your comment in the same thread so I hope that you didn't feel offended when I saw a connection where apparently there is none.

Offended? Of course not. It means I sparked your imagination, which is always good.

Andoran

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I’m sorry you didn’t make it through Ross. I apologise too for my ignorance about the whole iron / bronze thing (although I did admit my limited knowledge of history) – what I was actually getting at was steel v. bronze – and there was not anything about your entry that indicated that the neighbouring cultures used steel.

I guess the two lessons from this are that real world sounding names jar people the wrong way; and never underestimate the ignorance of the voting public.

I’d be interested in what you come up with for a villain regardless once the round 3 voting is over.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32 , Star Voter 2014

Mothman wrote:
I’m sorry you didn’t make it through Ross. I apologise too for my ignorance about the whole iron / bronze thing (although I did admit my limited knowledge of history) – what I was actually getting at was steel v. bronze – and there was not anything about your entry that indicated that the neighbouring cultures used steel.

It was my fault: I did a decent amount of research to make sure that my idea worked. Then somehow I made the assumption that everyone who read it would be privy to the same information.

Marathon Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014

Mothman wrote:

and there was not anything about your entry that indicated that the neighbouring cultures used steel.

Well, outside of the part about importing steel from the neighbors. :-)

Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Publishing / RPG Superstar™ / Previous Contests / RPG Superstar™ 2008 / Round 2 - Top 32: Design a Country / Terram All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.
Recent threads in Round 2 - Top 32: Design a Country

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.