Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ

What books are you currently reading?


Books

7,451 to 7,494 of 7,494 << first < prev | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 | 150 | next > last >>

Reading a book on Jewish mysticism and such.

Then going to be reading a book on the history of Japan.


Game Design Workshop by Tracy Fullerton

A great book so far. This will likely go to my top 3 best game design books I read.


Limeylongears wrote:
'The Second Sex' is proving to be excellent, especially as we're now into the rude bits

Oh, Simone, mon amour, je t'aime, baby...Now go find me some other partners, ooh la la!


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Put up Stampp for now to read The Annihilation Score.


Since my last post, I've read Interesting Times, The Last Continent, The Last Hero, and The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, all by Terry Pratchett.

Working my way through the Discworld series...

Review:
Interesting Times is probably one of his best comedic novels, hitting the right balance between the plot and Rincewind's attempts to evade it.

The Last Continent suffers somewhat for lack of a real antagonist - not enough plot, too much avoiding it. The Faculty are reasonably interesting as a B-plot, though it relies somewhat on familiarity with those characters from other books.

The Last Hero and The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents are both interesting (if a bit outside the norm), and each has legitimately touching moments. Spider the Rat King is a terrifying villain.

I can't say enough good things about Paul Kidby's art for The Last Hero - brilliant work.


Fantastic Mr. Fox.

I like Farmer Bean.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, and the rest of the Peter Rabbit stories. I'm trying to read them to Cora the Conqueror, but she much prefers to simply eat them. I do like the watercolors, though.


Most recently, Sardath the Barbarian 3 - SmiloDan was right; it was fun - and Explorers of Gor.

Fellas! Are you glandularly adequate?

Sure?

Ladies! Have you peeled away the hideous encrustations of your antibiological conditioning?

You have? Great! You may now engage in female display behaviours.

Paizo Employee Senior Editor

A Pig of Cold Poison—lots of exciting archaic/dialectal terminology and horrifying early "medicine"!

The Exchange

Finished PATH OF DAGGERS (Waste Of Time #8), and, looking for something completely different, am about to test the waters (railways?) of China Maivel's writing for the first time with RAILSEA. The name is evocative enough to get me more intrigued by the prospect of this book than any of his others, and it appears to be a stand alone, so it seems like a fine place to start.

Path of Daggers thoughts:
This book was... good? Wait, did I just geniunly enjoy a Wheel of Time book? it has been about 3000 pages since last I was able to say that with a straight face.
Path of Daggers could really only be called "fast paced" and "eventful" in comparison to other books in the Wheel of Time series, but after dredging through the muck of its three predecessors, it actually seems that way.

For the first time in a while, side plots are being rsolved across all fronts, making room for new directions for the characters. It ranges from the small - like Perrin finally figuring out how to handle the Faile/Berelain situation, to the bigger with some recurring minor characters dying (that Darkfriend Child of Light chief among them) to major ones like Egwene asserting control over her Aes Sedai and finally moving her army into direct confrontation with Tar Valon. The only regret is that none of the side plots thatt started in this book got resolved, with the ending sort of just petering out just when things can get interesting. This is me saying a Wheel of Time novel should be longer, for those following, which speaks volumes.

The book suffers from bloat - terrible, neigh unforgivable blot that keeps threatening to completely bury any resemblance of a narrative - but unlike the previous three it actually seems to be working to alleviate some of that bloat and place the pieces such that some decisive things could happen shortly.

All of this may sound like high praise, but really it is more the result of a pleasant surprise than anything else. This book would be a serious blunder in almost any other context, but it is a marked improvement in the series and actually makes me look forward more eagerly towards reading the next one.


I'm getting near the end of the First Law trilogy, which has been good fantasy all-around.

It makes fun of itself at one point in a very thinly veiled way, not sure I liked that. Maybe the author was having a late night when he wrote it in. You have to be realistic.


Judy Bauer wrote:
A Pig of Cold Poison—lots of exciting archaic/dialectal terminology and horrifying early "medicine"!

Have you read the Wolf Hall series by Hilary Mantel? The plot synopsis you linked sounds . . . relevant, I guess is the best way to describe it.

I actually haven't read the books, but I really enjoyed the BBC dramatization on Masterpiece. Y'know, 'cause watching TV is easier than reading, look, whatever!

Paizo Employee Senior Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Hitdice wrote:
Have you read the Wolf Hall series by Hilary Mantel? The plot synopsis you linked sounds . . . relevant, I guess is the best way to describe it.

I had not—hold now placed!

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Lord Snow wrote:

Finished PATH OF DAGGERS (Waste Of Time #8), and, looking for something completely different, am about to test the waters (railways?) of China Maivel's writing for the first time with RAILSEA. The name is evocative enough to get me more intrigued by the prospect of this book than any of his others, and it appears to be a stand alone, so it seems like a fine place to start.

** spoiler omitted **...

RAILSEA is really fun & subversive. It seems like it's going one way & goes a totally different way. Very fun & inspiring. I want to make a campaign that combines RAILSEA & Snowpiercer & The Half-Made World.

The Exchange

SmiloDan wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:

Finished PATH OF DAGGERS (Waste Of Time #8), and, looking for something completely different, am about to test the waters (railways?) of China Maivel's writing for the first time with RAILSEA. The name is evocative enough to get me more intrigued by the prospect of this book than any of his others, and it appears to be a stand alone, so it seems like a fine place to start.

** spoiler omitted **...

RAILSEA is really fun & subversive. It seems like it's going one way & goes a totally different way. Very fun & inspiring. I want to make a campaign that combines RAILSEA & Snowpiercer & The Half-Made World.

I read like 5 pages from the book before going to sleep and already I'm annoyed with the "&" thing. I hope this is the kind of tick that one gets used to as reading progresses, unlike the sniffing and smoothing of dresses in some other books I've read.

The Exchange

Petty Alchemy wrote:

I'm getting near the end of the First Law trilogy, which has been good fantasy all-around.

It makes fun of itself at one point in a very thinly veiled way, not sure I liked that. Maybe the author was having a late night when he wrote it in. You have to be realistic.

What are you referring to?

Spoiler:
Is it when Ardee reads a book about the history of Bayaz and complains that it's all pointless wizards and battles and that she couldn't bring herself to care?

I thought it was cute, though a bit much. We already get that this trilogy is a deconstruction of the fantasy genre and we don't have to be beaten on the head with that.

Keep reading, though. This third book one is so good it makes the previous two (which I already liked) seem even better. I felt gutted by the end of it. I felt like the fantasy genre has been gutted.


Price of Valor by Django Wexler arrived. Since it's a hardback, I'll need something else for the bathtub - I'm thinking I should re-read Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch in preparation for the fourth book in the series coming out.


I just finished The Palace Job by Patrick Weekes. It is a fantasy version of Ocean's Eleven. The book is very humorous and the plot is ... complicated enough for my taste.


Trying to get Go Set a Watchman downloaded. Squeeee!

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Jetty wrote:

I just finished The Palace Job by Patrick Weekes. It is a fantasy version of Ocean's Eleven. The book is very humorous and the plot is ... complicated enough for my taste.

I've totally been jonesing for a good caper! :-D

I'm currently reading Dragons of the Dwarven Depths by Weis and Hickman. My new library has very slim pickings, and I accidentally picked up book 2 of a series I haven't read book 1 of yet. At least some Vandermeer is now waiting for me on reserve...


Treppa wrote:
Trying to get Go Set a Watchman downloaded. Squeeee!

I'm very curious about that one, but I feel like I'm going to have to wait a year or two for the hubbub to die down before I can give the book an unbiased reading. If I hear one more NPR puff piece about how it's just the worst thing ever that Atticus Finch supported segregation later in life after everything that's gone in South Carolina this summer, I'm just gonna start punching white people, and that's coming from a white guy.

I got ahold of Seven Eves by Neal Stephenson, and want to read it, but am afraid the book may get the better of me.


My mother brought home a copy of Go Set a Watchman from the school library and asked me if I wanted to read it. I have never even read To Kill... so I passed.

Back in NH, so I guess it's back to Brackett and Hardy.

F@$*ing Angel Claire...


The Dedalus Book of Surrealism: The Identity of Things

I like it, even though the compiler (?) has a pop at Angela Carter in the intro. Bah.

The Exchange

Judy Bauer wrote:
Hitdice wrote:
Have you read the Wolf Hall series by Hilary Mantel? The plot synopsis you linked sounds . . . relevant, I guess is the best way to describe it.
I had not—hold now placed!

I am reading Wolf Hall right now! The second book is Bring Up the Bodies I think, though that just may be its American title. I am enjoying Cromwell's point of view, but sometimes Mantel's writing makes me confused as to who is speaking, and sometimes when Cromwell speaks it is paraphrased so I am not sure if he is talking or just thinking. But otherwise it is excellent!


Having finished my rereading of the Discworld canon, I turned to The Johnny Maxwell Trilogy (also by Pratchett).

I'd forgotten just how powerful his writing is when he sets aside (most of) the humor. As a young-adult(ish) book set in 1990's Britain, it's a very different flavor compared to Discworld.

I highly recommend it - it might not be available in anthology form everywhere, so look for (in order): Only You Can Save Mankind, Johnny And The Dead, and Johnny And The Bomb.


Hitdice wrote:
Treppa wrote:
Trying to get Go Set a Watchman downloaded. Squeeee!

I'm very curious about that one, but I feel like I'm going to have to wait a year or two for the hubbub to die down before I can give the book an unbiased reading. If I hear one more NPR puff piece about how it's just the worst thing ever that Atticus Finch supported segregation later in life after everything that's gone in South Carolina this summer, I'm just gonna start punching white people, and that's coming from a white guy.

I have no problem believing this is a first novel. Its dialog-heavy exposition is the mark of an untried author. But there is some worth to it: Mockingbird's origin can be teased out of Watchman, and those who complain about the "racism of Atticus Finch" are really missing the point of the book. It's a serious discussion of a knotty problem set within the story of the fall of a god; youthful idealism slams up against harsh reality. The message at the end, though, is a good one. The only way for society to change is for those who don't like it as it is to live within it and work for that change. Props to Lee for an unflinching look at both her own people's inherent racism and the naivete of those who don't want to recognize it.


E. L. Doctorow, Literary Time Traveler Who Stirred the Past Into Fiction, Dies at 84

:(


Seem to have misplaced Tess again. Was delighted to see the return of Eric John Stark in "The Enchantress of Venus." Also,

Black History and the Class Struggle, No. 19: New Orleans Racist Atrocity


Re-read Robert B. Parker's Promised Land, an old favorite.
Am now reading Elmore Leonard's Ride the Rap.


This weekend,' Brak the Barbarian: Mark of the Demon' by John Jakes and 'Llama of Gathol' by Extra Roast Buttocks.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Seem to have misplaced Tess again.

What is it with you and Tess, DA? :)


Got a copy out of the library; finished "Part 5--The Woman Pays" and read the first two chapters of "Part 6--The Convert."

Gee, Hardy's got a real talent for depicting hateful men, huh?


Going to take on the herculean task of reading the Silmarillion in the near future.


Not that herculean - I'd even say the prose flows better than it does in either The Hobbit or Lord of the Rings.

I remember being disappointed the first time I read it when I was about 12 or 13, but when I tried it again at six or seven years later, with a bit more "grown-up" literature in my bag of experiences, it was a relevation.


Some love it. Some can never get through it.

It's definitely uneven. Some parts are little more than summaries. Others are much closer to normal narrative.

There is a lot of language and a number of scenes in it that I really love. "Even now a Silmaril is in my hand."


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Ordered Ta-Nehisi Coates' book last week. Went back to store to check on it, since these things rarely take more than a week. Found out that it's been backordered with no ETA. Bummer.


Black History and the Class Struggle, No. 20: From Mumia Abu-Jamal to Jena Six: Capitalist "Justice" = Racist Repression


I have done very little today except read.

I got through:

'Clansman of Andor' by Andrew J. Offutt (Offutt attempts a Gor-a-like. Alright, but not as good as his Conan knockoffs)
'Lost Worlds Volume 2' by Clark Ashton Smith, which was great, as you'd expect
'The True Story of Ah Q' by Lu Hsun - not bad
And most of the Olympia Press reader, which had some littrachur in it (JP Donleavy, Samuel Beckett, Henry Miller, Jean Genet), albeit pretty mucky littrachur, along with the straight-up porn, if you'll excuse the expression.

They included a chapter from 'The Story of O', which I actually quite liked; I hated it when I read it the first time round, so I may have to have another go at that one...


Just finished Name of the Wind...very slow for the first half, but eventful in the second half. I am interested in where the Author is going to be taking the character in the next book, especially as it seems like a lot of major mysteries/plot developments will not be really solved in the trilogy

The Exchange

MMCJawa wrote:
Just finished Name of the Wind...very slow for the first half, but eventful in the second half. I am interested in where the Author is going to be taking the character in the next book, especially as it seems like a lot of major mysteries/plot developments will not be really solved in the trilogy

The author takes them to the fascinating location known is "nowhere, really". The first half of the first book is more eventful than the entire second book.


Lord Snow wrote:
MMCJawa wrote:
Just finished Name of the Wind...very slow for the first half, but eventful in the second half. I am interested in where the Author is going to be taking the character in the next book, especially as it seems like a lot of major mysteries/plot developments will not be really solved in the trilogy
The author takes them to the fascinating location known is "nowhere, really". The first half of the first book is more eventful than the entire second book.

I think I liked the first book largely because I was incredibly amused to see all the parallels with the modern University system, everything from grad school to college towns to even how labs work.

Of course...the second book kind of spent...a ton of time going over all of that again. Which uh...was less than needed.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
MMCJawa wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
MMCJawa wrote:
Just finished Name of the Wind...very slow for the first half, but eventful in the second half. I am interested in where the Author is going to be taking the character in the next book, especially as it seems like a lot of major mysteries/plot developments will not be really solved in the trilogy
The author takes them to the fascinating location known is "nowhere, really". The first half of the first book is more eventful than the entire second book.

I think I liked the first book largely because I was incredibly amused to see all the parallels with the modern University system, everything from grad school to college towns to even how labs work.

Of course...the second book kind of spent...a ton of time going over all of that again. Which uh...was less than needed.

The book did suffer from "middle book" syndrome, but it was enjoyable; I just want to know what's behind those doors in the library!

The Exchange

MMCJawa wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
MMCJawa wrote:
Just finished Name of the Wind...very slow for the first half, but eventful in the second half. I am interested in where the Author is going to be taking the character in the next book, especially as it seems like a lot of major mysteries/plot developments will not be really solved in the trilogy
The author takes them to the fascinating location known is "nowhere, really". The first half of the first book is more eventful than the entire second book.

I think I liked the first book largely because I was incredibly amused to see all the parallels with the modern University system, everything from grad school to college towns to even how labs work.

Of course...the second book kind of spent...a ton of time going over all of that again. Which uh...was less than needed.

And it didn't even do it nearly as well as the first time, instead commiting a *lot* of time for the annoying subplot of Kvoth's Draco Malfoy analogue.

But yeah, in the first book the university was by far the best section. Story should have moved past that in the beginning of the second book but Rothfuss prefered to stay in that comfort zone.


Rereading the novelization to Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, by Matthew Stover.

Even if you despise the prequels, I can't recommend this book enough. It's extremely well-written, and really sells the seduction of Anakin Skywalker.

(Spoiler alert.)

7,451 to 7,494 of 7,494 << first < prev | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 | 150 | next > last >>
Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo Community / Gamer Life / Books / What books are you currently reading? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.
Recent threads in Books

©2002–2015 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.