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What books are you currently reading?


Books

8,801 to 8,816 of 8,816 << first < prev | 167 | 168 | 169 | 170 | 171 | 172 | 173 | 174 | 175 | 176 | 177 | next > last >>

What JW said. Whether or not it's cheating is questionable and it is certainly not 'because girl power'. I wasn't happy with the situation but I can't really fault her actions based on what we have been shown of the characters and situations.


Finished A Clash of Kings and was suitably impressed.

Halfway through To the Finland Station and also decided it's time to pick up where I left off in Leaves of Grass. Hopefully it will be easier to read poetry at work than long chapters about direwolves or dialectics.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I finished Paris in the 20th Century. It had a suitably French, downer ending, with the protagonist dying in a winter cemetary. I can see why it didn't get published in Verne's lifetime.

Now I'm reading another Winter themed book: The Left Hand of Darkness. It's a reread. The last time I read it in high school, so I have totally forgotten the ending, although certain scenes remain in my head. e.g. Genly Ai walking through a forest of red trees, the landships driving over the snow. Le Guin is very good at worldbuilding in her description - just in her own, subtle way. However, on the second reading, I've discovered places where the connections between this book and her other "Hainish" books rubs a bit thin - that is, it stretches probability farther than it needs to go in order to make a tenuous in-text connection. Unless she's trying to make a point about the nature of the novel or point out its construction as a creation of her authorship, which would be very post-modern (despite Cervantes having done it), and I don't think she's trying to do that. It could be stealth marketing...But that kind of thing doesn't affect me. Hmm....Maybe I should go check out Rocannon's World...


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Here we are. I put up The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party. I will come back to it because it is good, if also tedious and suffering from a pretty glaring fault in its argument. It's just not the kind of history I can take right now.

Put it up for a series of Transformers comics, 80s vintage. Never read 'em before and only casually a fan of the franchise. They are toy commercials with all the faults that entails, but they do work fairly well as mostly standalone issues with a loose ongoing plot. Got the first four collections in a Humble Bundle a year or two back, so I read through those. Don't know if I care enough to seek out more of the old stuff, but I've heard good things about the newer IDW ones and I partook of a second Humble Bundle for them. I'll get there eventually, though it looks like I'll need to sort out where the story begins.

Read The Nightmare Stacks. Really liked the protagonist for reasons probably obvious to everyone who reads more than a few of my posts. Would like to read many more books starring him, which will probably never get written. The romance angle worked as a joke (it's consciously structured like a romantic comedy) but I had a little trouble buying that they were that into each other. I get that they're both inexperienced and blundering through. It still came off like a high school thing that's going to last a few months, which undermined the conclusion a fair bit. Probably would have forgiven all of it if it were two dudes, though. Who the hell puts vampires and heterosexuality in the same work? Just disgusting.

Then it was back to non-fiction, which I kicked off with Sven Beckert's Empire of Cotton. I was warned going in that it's dry and tedious, but I don't think it's too bad on that score. Maybe I've read too much Eric Foner. There are certainly parts which are repetitive, but it's a global history s there's a lot of space to span with all its complexities. Beckert is great about laying out his argument in the plain and returning to it often, which is more than I can say for a lot of historians. I tend to note the general trend when he goes into numbers and them blip over. I think I'm about halfway through, but here's the basic thing:

Cotton was the world's first ~industiral ~capitalist affair; it's at the heart of the first industrial revolution. All that's old news. Capitalism is a government program, the product of intensive and extensive statecraft. (Ditto.) It was produced to meet the growing demand of mechanization by the commission of atrocities on a global scale, which Beckert terms war capitalism. WC is the process of states forcibly reordering areas and regimenting labor on their periphery to serve production in the metropole, in ways that just aren't going to fly back home. Cotton cultivation was imposed in just about every way something can be imposed and to meet the demand that the states were creating required massive deindustrialization (in India in particular) and our old friend slavery. Once the periphery is re-ordered into something semi-stable, war capitalism can and probably will transition into industrial capitalism. Basically, this is the process of making an empire, hence the title.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

'Three Against the Witch World' by Andre Norton.

It was superb.


Was putzing around at ye olde usede booke store with Mr. Comrade and picked up an old Pelican volume called Middle Eastern Mythology by S.H. Hooke.

Thus far, Gilgamesh, Ishtar and Tammuz, and the Enuma Elish. Fun stuff.


Samnell wrote:

Here we are. I put up The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party. I will come back to it because it is good, if also tedious and suffering from a pretty glaring fault in its argument. It's just not the kind of history I can take right now.

Samnell, have you come across Matthew Karp’s This Vast Southern Empire: Slaveholders at the Helm of American Foreign Policy ?


Finished To the Finland Station, made some progress in both Hawthorne and Whitman, and got up to Hittites in Middle Eastern Mytholohy.

Liberty's Edge

Bjørn Røyrvik wrote:
What JW said. Whether or not it's cheating is questionable and it is certainly not 'because girl power'. I wasn't happy with the situation but I can't really fault her actions based on what we have been shown of the characters and situations.

Well there was no need for the writer to have the main love interest cheat on the character. Let alone a good reason. Considering what happened to the main character compared to the love interest. On a factor of 1-10 of horrible, terrible things happening to who. He is not a 10 nor a 20 but a 30. At most the love interest is in the negatives. I get Stross wanted to try something new. While going for a less comedic tone. More dark. Yet imo it's at the cost of what I consider character assassination. While angering fans and making a popular character unlikeable. If that character were to die next novel I would shed no tears and actually cheer that the character was dead.


Limeylongears wrote:
Samnell wrote:

Here we are. I put up The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party. I will come back to it because it is good, if also tedious and suffering from a pretty glaring fault in its argument. It's just not the kind of history I can take right now.

Samnell, have you come across Matthew Karp’s This Vast Southern Empire: Slaveholders at the Helm of American Foreign Policy ?

I know of it and that it got some pretty good reviews. It's on the list but I've not gotten there yet.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I finished Prudence by Gail Carriger last night. It got better as it went along, but it wrapped up things really quickly at the end.... but didn't seem TOO rushed.

Next up is Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie.

The Exchange

I finished The Left Hand of Darkness. Some things I thought I remembered were not in the book, specifically

Spoiler:
I thought Estraven shared kemmer with Ai, but it was not so! ...so, not as much alien sex as I'd thought there was, in other words.
Still an enjoyable story, with a good message about humanity overcoming differences at the end.
I'm not sure what I want to read next. I'm starting a new job soon and I know I will do more work-related reading so I'm not sure I want to start a big epic novel or anything. I have the "Mr. Holmes" novella on hold at the library, so maybe that will tide me over till the new job starts (just before Xmas!).

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Zeugma wrote:

I finished The Left Hand of Darkness. Some things I thought I remembered were not in the book, specifically ** spoiler omitted ** Still an enjoyable story, with a good message about humanity overcoming differences at the end.

I'm not sure what I want to read next. I'm starting a new job soon and I know I will do more work-related reading so I'm not sure I want to start a big epic novel or anything. I have the "Mr. Holmes" novella on hold at the library, so maybe that will tide me over till the new job starts (just before Xmas!).

Do you consider Jules Verne steampunk, and if so, do you like steampunk?

If you answered "Yes" to some of that, and want some quick fun reads, I suggest Soulless by Gail Carriger (a steampunk comedy of manners with vampires and werewolves, but polite vampires and werewolves, and a kickass heroine, but not an Underworld-type of kickass heroine, even though she also deals with vampires and werewolves...) and Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding (basically a steampunk version of Firefly, but with a distinct lack of vampires and werewolves. Some kickass heroines. ).

The Exchange

Finished reading Night Watch (Terry Pratchett) and started on two books - Theft of Swords and By Virtue Of Stratagem. I'm halfway through on both, currently, and enjoying the latter more than the former.

Night Watch thoughts:
What a brilliant mind the late Pratchett had. this is a rather late Discworld novel and as such focuses less on the lightning-fast wit of the earlier stories in favor of a deep, thoughtful and composed absurdism. The story is as frantic as always, with the various denizens of the Disc doing their thing and being funny, but at it's heart it is also an essay about leadership and society. Vimes is as compelling as he always was when not dead drunk, and spending an entire book with him was an unforgettable experience.

This is a pratchett book, so everything I can say will sound tired and predictable, but there it is - every page of this book has at least one smartly written sentence or insightful remark, the plot is sweeping, the characters lovable and unique, the humor crisp and ever present, the commentary on the real world timeless and brilliant.

If there is anywhere out there who has somehow yet to read a Pratchett book, please do yourself the favour of giving him a try. Your life will be reacher for it.

The Exchange

The "Mr. Holmes" book arrived: A Slight Trick of the Mind, by Mitch Cullins. So far it is tracking pretty closely to the movie, but I read that it will diverge from the film in interesting ways, so I'm hoping to be surprised. I can't judge yet, but it has a high standard to live up to, since I loved Ian McKellen and Laura Linney in the movie.

The Exchange

SmiloDan wrote:
Zeugma wrote:

I finished The Left Hand of Darkness. Some things I thought I remembered were not in the book, specifically ** spoiler omitted ** Still an enjoyable story, with a good message about humanity overcoming differences at the end.

I'm not sure what I want to read next. I'm starting a new job soon and I know I will do more work-related reading so I'm not sure I want to start a big epic novel or anything. I have the "Mr. Holmes" novella on hold at the library, so maybe that will tide me over till the new job starts (just before Xmas!).

Do you consider Jules Verne steampunk, and if so, do you like steampunk?

If you answered "Yes" to some of that, and want some quick fun reads, I suggest Soulless by Gail Carriger (a steampunk comedy of manners with vampires and werewolves, but polite vampires and werewolves, and a kickass heroine, but not an Underworld-type of kickass heroine, even though she also deals with vampires and werewolves...) and Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding (basically a steampunk version of Firefly, but with a distinct lack of vampires and werewolves. Some kickass heroines. ).

I should try Gail Carriger. Some of her books are shelved YA in the public library I work at, and I actually don't read enough YA. I don't think of Verne as being particularly steampunk, but I have read some William Gibson, so perhaps I lean cyberpunk? But I do like historical fiction & sci-fi. I think it would have to be very cleverly done for the historical and the sci-fi to mix just right, to where I'm not constantly questioning the history, or the etiquette, or the language, or the tech. I just don't want to get burned by something that is unfunny and painful to watch and ahistorical, like the Will Smith movie "Wild Wild West."

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