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What books are you currently reading?


Books

7,151 to 7,197 of 7,197 << first < prev | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | next > last >>
Silver Crusade

Why oh why did I click on Treppa's link?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

There are links that need James Nicoll's "memetic prophylactic recommended" tag, and that is one of them.


Celestial Healer wrote:
Why oh why did I click on Treppa's link?

Lol, I haven't actually read that story but I know it by reputation.

Don't think I will ever read it though, I would really prefer not to sodomize my imagination with underage Victorian smut. (apparently the main character is like 13 or something and gets molested by a bunch of adult women, though he likes it I guess.)


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Yuugasa wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:
Why oh why did I click on Treppa's link?

Lol, I haven't actually read that story but I know it by reputation.

Don't think I will ever read it though, I would really prefer not to sodomize my imagination with underage Victorian smut. (apparently the main character is like 13 or something and gets molested by a bunch of adult women, though he likes it I guess.)

It's Naughty Treppa's fault, not yours, CH. And the story gets much worse than that as it goes on, Yuugasa, so you've dodged a bullet there. What our Glorious Empire-Building Forebears liked to relax with at the end of a long day shooting people browner than themselves was a rollicking tale of spanking 'n' incest, going by that and other similar books I've read. Make of that what you will.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Not counting the AP books I'm going back and forth between while running one campaign and preping another?

Barry Lyndon.


Yuugasa wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:
Why oh why did I click on Treppa's link?

Lol, I haven't actually read that story but I know it by reputation.

Don't think I will ever read it though, I would really prefer not to sodomize my imagination with underage Victorian smut. (apparently the main character is like 13 or something and gets molested by a bunch of adult women, though he likes it I guess.)

Geez, that's only the first few chapters. He ages during the process of "character development".


Apologies, never judge a book by its cover, and never judge a smutty story because it begins with adults sleeping with a 13 year old....wait...=)


Limeylongears wrote:
What our Glorious Empire-Building Forebears liked to relax with at the end of a long day shooting people browner than themselves was a rollicking tale of spanking 'n' incest, going by that and other similar books I've read. Make of that what you will.

Sounds more intriguing than Horatio Alger novels and Natty Bumpo stories...


Black History and the Class Struggle No. 7: Glory: Black Soldiers Fight for Freedom


2 people marked this as a favorite.

A collection of William Hope Hodgson's classic weird-fiction "Carnacki: The Ghost Finder" pulp stories, about a spritualist-detective... it's kind of like Ghost Busters meets Sherlock Holmes.

I recently finished a collection of Robert Aickman's ghost stories, a collection of Dunsany's fantasy stories, and a collection of Edgar Rice Burroughs' John Carter of Mars novels (now that I've finally read them, the John Carter stories are a very obvious inspiration for Dungeons & Dragons - far more so than Tolkien's work!)

The Exchange

Finally finished reading Lord of Chaos (The Waste of Time #6). I am actually somewhat dazed for having finished the book today and watching the Avengers: Age of Ultron right after, so I'm not even sure what I'll read next. There are a couple of endless series that I have neglected lately (Repairman Jack and The Dresden Files), a couple of trilogies that I am one book away from finishing (Revelation Space, The First Law) and of course a few dozens of other books I would be interested in reading. I think I'll sleep on it tonight and decide what to read next tomorrow.

LORD OF CHAOS thoughts:
Uggh. This one wasn't good. For almost a thousand pages I slogged, and for no payoff whatsoever. It's not only that the pace of events is very slow, it's not the clot of annoying minor characters, it's not even the endless repetetivity of the confrontational way that males and females interact in this story. It's that it is shamelessly not self contained. For example, in the first half of the book the reader is told again and again that Rand has some brilliant trap set up for one of the forsaken. Since that is repeated so much and since about 50% of Mat's thread in the book is about setting up the trap, one would think the confronation with the Forsaken would come up in the book. Welp, it never does. All setup and no payoff.
It gets even worse - after spending dozens of chapter doing nothing in Salidar, Nynaeve and Elayn finally set out to find adventure in the city of Abo Dar, where they... search the streets for a couple of chapters? And nothing happens? Why were they even in this book?

The change of pace that the last 50 pages brought was very jarring. Before that, the most people who can channel we had in a single fight were... 4? maybe 5? Suddenly, there are over five hundreds of them, all flinging fireballs and shaking the earth. It feels as if Jordan suddenly recalled that there was no action in the book and shoved some in for an explosive finale.

It's not that the book was entirely a chore to read - certain aspects of the series are alluring to me and I kept enjoying them, but certainly this is the weakest book in the series so far, and by quite a fair margin.


Lord Snow wrote:

Finally finished reading Lord of Chaos (The Waste of Time #6). I am actually somewhat dazed for having finished the book today and watching the Avengers: Age of Ultron right after, so I'm not even sure what I'll read next. There are a couple of endless series that I have neglected lately (Repairman Jack and The Dresden Files), a couple of trilogies that I am one book away from finishing (Revelation Space, The First Law) and of course a few dozens of other books I would be interested in reading. I think I'll sleep on it tonight and decide what to read next tomorrow.

** spoiler omitted **...

Spoiler:
That battle does turn out to have pretty dramatic consequences for at least the next few books and in some ways the rest of the series.

I can see how it sort of came out of nowhere though. And the rest of the book was really setting up plots that didn't pay off in it. Frustrating.


yronimos wrote:

A collection of William Hope Hodgson's classic weird-fiction "Carnacki: The Ghost Finder" pulp stories, about a spritualist-detective... it's kind of like Ghost Busters meets Sherlock Holmes.

I recently finished a collection of Robert Aickman's ghost stories, a collection of Dunsany's fantasy stories, and a collection of Edgar Rice Burroughs' John Carter of Mars novels (now that I've finally read them, the John Carter stories are a very obvious inspiration for Dungeons & Dragons - far more so than Tolkien's work!)

They're definitely part of it. What particularly struck as inspiration?

There's some things that come directly from Tolkien. Probably as much or more the Hobbit than LotR, though there's stuff from both.

I'd say Conan was probably a bigger influence than either. At least it feels that way to me. And Lankhmar.
Alignment out of Moorcock.

The Exchange

Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Black History and the Class Struggle No. 7: Glory: Black Soldiers Fight for Freedom

I went back and re-watched Glory after reading Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers by David Wright and David Zoby.

Link: Goodreads page.

I really liked this book, and it taught me about what happened to a lot of black Civil War soldiers during Reconstruction (not a generally happy time, by any stretch). I also think it would make a great movie or miniseries.

The Exchange

Alright, it is settled. Gonna see what Abercrombie has to say in Last Argument of Kings.


Zeugma wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Black History and the Class Struggle No. 7: Glory: Black Soldiers Fight for Freedom

I went back and re-watched Glory after reading Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers by David Wright and David Zoby.

Link: Goodreads page.

I really liked this book, and it taught me about what happened to a lot of black Civil War soldiers during Reconstruction (not a generally happy time, by any stretch). I also think it would make a great movie or miniseries.

I've been watching a lot of Brooklyn Nine-Nine. I wonder what Andre Braugher was doing between Glory and now?


I know he played a big-time thief who has to carry out a major heist while not alienating his step-daughter after his wife dies in Thief.

Also Homicide: Life on the Streets FFS!

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Kajehase wrote:

I know he played a big-time thief who has to carry out a major heist while not alienating his step-daughter after his wife dies in Thief.

Also Homicide: Life on the Streets FFS!

He was also in a sitcom/drama (?) with Ray Romano and Scott Bakula (?).

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

I'm now reading Half a World by Joe Abercrombie.

Taking a break from Robopocalypse by Daniel Wilson. It seems like a weak version of Daniel Suarez's Daemon and Freedom TM series.


SmiloDan wrote:
Kajehase wrote:

I know he played a big-time thief who has to carry out a major heist while not alienating his step-daughter after his wife dies in Thief.

Also Homicide: Life on the Streets FFS!

He was also in a sitcom/drama (?) with Ray Romano and Scott Bakula (?).

One of the higher-digit channels here used to have it on around when I get home rrom work. Think it was called "Men of a Certain Age," and Ray Romano was surprisingly good.

No new books for me at the moment as I'm binge-watching Orphan Black.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Orphan Black is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO good!!!!

The Exchange

Orphan Black is great, though it relies *heavily* on Maslany's performance. It would have never worked with anyone who is even a bit less talented than she. Plus, it has one of the less coherent stories I have ever seen. As one who found it easy to navigate the endless ranks of characters and schemes of A Song of Ice and Fire and who almost never gets confused while watching a movie, I am embarrassingly befuddled by whatever the hack is going on in Orphan Black.
At the start of each season things are pretty straightforward, but by the end I feel like I have only the most tenuous grasp on the identity and motivation of just about everyone involved.

Seeing as how it's a story that's all about scrambling the main characters' sense of identity, I can be convinced that the confusion is intentional - that the maze of shadowy figures and conspiracies is supposed to reflect the confusion of the characters, to show a world that is weird and somewhat out of focus, blurry.

Still sets my head to spinning, though.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Yeah, that's one of the problems with conspiracy theories--they never make any sense. Mostly because real life people and organizations are so bad at keeping secrets.

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2010 Top 32

Alastair Reynolds "Poseidon's Wake"

Loved the first two (and pretty much everything he's written) - looking forward to seeing what the elephants are up to :-)


Re-reading Brust's The Sun, The Moon, and the Stars (one of his best), about a guy painting a painting. Also still trying to get through Clausewitz' On War. I mean, I can dig most of what he's saying, but the dude couldn't write worth a damned.


The Collected Works of Lord Byron. Very good when it's good, but pretty often drivel. Also, there's absolutely poetic buckets of it, so I'll be kept busy for weeks, I should think.

EDIT: Hello, Kirth! :)


Yeah, been a while! But I'm back in H-Town and rollin' hard, now.


Huzzah!


I read 'The Intrepid Enchanter' by L. Sprague De Camp and Fletcher Pratt while on the train today, and also bought:

'Watchtower' by Elizabeth A. Lynn
'Deathblinder' by Bernard King
And 'Discipline of the Private House' by Esme Ombreux (yes, really), who is, of course, a very close personal friend of our very close personal friend, the beautiful and talented Vanessa P. Shachtman!


Bah! Your silver tongue won't work on me, Longears!


That's not what you said last...


SHUT IT!!


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

Currently finishing Of Dice and Men, by David Ewalt. For those who haven't read it yet, it's a narrative history of Dungeons and Dragons, with some observations about RPGs and roleplaying in general thrown in. There's not much there I didn't already know, but it's enjoyable reading it in a comprehensive storyline.

The Exchange

I'm reading The Voyage of the Basilisk: A Memoir by Lady Trent, by Marie Brennan. It's the third book in the series. So far it has been a fun read, full of nautical adventure, and I like Tod Lockwood's illustrations, but I don't like the blue ink the publisher chose to use. I think it's supposed to make it look "old-timey" but it just makes it harder for me to read and does Lockwood's illustrations a disservice IMO.


Readerbreeder wrote:
Currently finishing Of Dice and Men, by David Ewalt. For those who haven't read it yet, it's a narrative history of Dungeons and Dragons, with some observations about RPGs and roleplaying in general thrown in. There's not much there I didn't already know, but it's enjoyable reading it in a comprehensive storyline.

Read this two years ago, hated it, worst book I've ever read.

Currently reading, "The Great Beanie Baby Bubble, Mass delusion and the dark side of cute" - by Zac Bissonnette


I, too, am a great big fan of the works of Vanessa Pablovovitch Shachtman.

Semi-related, it's not Petrarch or nothin', but I used the above Ian McEwan quote on La Principessa and it worked like a charm.

Immature poets borrow, mature poets steal!


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
Terquem wrote:
Readerbreeder wrote:
Currently finishing Of Dice and Men, by David Ewalt. For those who haven't read it yet, it's a narrative history of Dungeons and Dragons, with some observations about RPGs and roleplaying in general thrown in. There's not much there I didn't already know, but it's enjoyable reading it in a comprehensive storyline.
Read this two years ago, hated it, worst book I've ever read.

What was it that turned you off of the book so badly, Terquem? While it's nowhere near the best writing I've ever seen, I must say I've also read far worse.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I have read bad books, but this one is the worst, in my experience, for a lot of reasons.

I suppose it was a combination of things. First, the way the book was sold to me (that is from reading the dust jacket) I was sort of expecting some real insight into the men behind the development of the game (which was never there, never really more than what you can read on Wikipedia, or already read as a boy in Space Gamer or Different Worlds magazine – in fact the research behind Designers and Dragons makes this book look even more amateurish than it already did).

Second, was the way the author talked about his experiences as a player. Now, look I don’t want to sound judgmental, but here I go. You see I’ve been playing since 1976, I’ve met all kinds of players, and for me nothing is as uncomfortable as meeting a player who talks to you as if you just don’t get how awesome his game is, his character is, his world is, his dungeon master is, blah, blah, blah. You know what I mean. When I try to tell people about my hobby, I try to add just a little self deprecating humor, and I do not avoid admitting it is all kind of silly, playing make believe. But I didn’t get that from this guy’s autobiographical asides, they made me feel like I was standing in a store listening to another D&D player talk about his fourteen page character sheet, and desperately wanting to get away as soon as I can.

Third, this is sort of a pet peeve of mine, but I would be the same age as James Dallas Egbert. When the Steam Tunnel incident happened, I was glued to the news. I dug into reports and stories about it my whole life, even read The Dungeon Master as soon as it was released, and Ewalt’s brief and in my opinion poorly researched evaluation of the Steam Tunnel Incident, and his dismissal of William Dear, (who you could say is a bit of a show boat grand stand egotistical type) was way off the mark, was terribly inaccurate (there used to be a letter, you could track it down on the internet back around 2000, to about 2004, that was from the Editor of Dragon Magazine to William Dear that talked about some of the conversations that were had between the people at TSR and Dear during the incident, and how Dear knew D&D was not involved in Egbert’s disappearance and that he was using the D&D angle to keep anyone actually involved in Egbert’s disappearance from getting suspicious and possibly doing harm to the boy, and the people at TSR acknowledged to Dear that they understood why it had to be done the way it was, bad press and all, that letter has since been lost, I can’t find the link to it any more – but what I’m trying to say is the narrative about Egbert’s situation has evolved to be something that both William Dear and the makers of D&D agreed to is best for both of them to sell a story). I was very disappointed by the lack of research into the truth about the James Dallas Egbert story.

And Finally, this really got me angry, was the way the author showed complete unprofessional behavior in dismissing Dave Arneson’s contributions to the game as being poorly written (more than once the author uses derogatory language to suggest that Arneson was an incompetent writer), and playing Gygax up as some literary genius, when the truth is Arneson was a college graduate with a Bachelor’s in History (and a reputation for good writing skills) and it was actually Gygax who was a poor writer (anyone who reads the 1977 DMG can see that Gygax believed his vocabulary could compensate for poor grammar).

Obviously Ewalt was a fan of Gygax, and he lets his fan boy enthusiasm paint over his journalistic integrity.

In the end I found the book was more of a fan boy tribute to his own love of the game, and his personal experience with it, and a very poor treatment of the history and the men behind the game’s development.
Stick with Designers and Dragons – the work there is deeper, better researched, and doesn’t gush with fan boy sentimentality.


Just finished The Fall by Bethany Griffin, whose writing schtick is to retell/expand Poe classics. This one is The Fall of the House of Usher as told from inside the family. Kind of interesting, though it would have been much better if I were vulnerable to creepiness/horror. It has a kind of Silent Hill vibe.

Pet peeve: in The Fall, one person picks up "the reigns" of the carriage. "Reigns"? Really? In a professionally written and edited book? I understand average people getting this wrong, but hate hate HATE to see it creeping into published works. (kind of like lie/lay)

Just started The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. Too soon to say yet, but interesting so far.

Scarab Sages

Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

Anne McCaffrey's Harper Hall Trilogy just got re-release, so I had to read them. Every bit as enjoyable as I remembered them, even the things I mis-remembered.

Started reading Neal Ashers Dark Intelligence Book 1 - Transformation.
Never read anything by him before, but the blurb on Amazon looked interesting. I'm about 2/3 of the way through. Fun read.

The Exchange

Finished reading Last Argument Of Kings (The First Law #3, by Joe Abercrombie). I was going back and forth on the question of my next read. It has been some time since I advanced through either the Repairman Jack cycle or the Dresden Files series - the two structurally similar urban fantasies I am reading.
Given the emotional trauma that Last Argument of King was, I think I can't stand the vaguest notion of a "shades of grey" character, and Dresden is more that than Jack is. I think. Maybe not. Ugh.

Anyway, the scales have been tipped slightly toward Jack's end of the specturm. The latest I read in the series was Hosts (#5), and it was also by far the weakest entry in the story, which was the reason I put it aside for a while. But it is time to come back, I think.

Last Argument of Kings thoughts::
Boy, what a read. As the final book in a trilogy, this one delivers in spades. If the previous two were a bloodbath, this one was an ocean of gore. If before the series was dark, it now became nightmarish. If anybody thought the anticlimax of the second book was a bold move, Abercrombie has a thing or two to say to that.

To say that Abercromibe deconstructed the fantasy genre would not come close to fully describing his debut trilogy. To say that he tore the genre limb from limb would be more accurate.
He seemed to be of a mind that in order to break something down you have to build it first. So he spent an entire book, The Blade Itself, to give us the most bland fantasy setting we have ever seen. A distinctly British central kingdom on an island, barbarians and a race of monsters up north, an empire of glory and power built on the back of slaves to the south. The book didn't in particular have a plot. I remember being seriously annoyed that the kindly wizard, Bayaz, seemed to be the only one who actually knows what is going on and why, but none of the characters bothered to ask him about it.
Then came Before They Are Hanged, and set readers up for the sucker punch. It made the reader really like the characters, despite how despicable each of them is in their own way. Glokta was actually hunting for truth for once, and have shown compassion a number of times. Jezal seemed to mature and better himself, hardened by harsh lessons. Logen became a very positive leader and an example for Jezal and Ferro - who herself found some measure of warmth for her travelling companions. The book ended by failing all the characters despite their obvious compatence - Glokta couldn't win the impossible fight to save a besieged city, and the quest item Bayaz was looking for turned out not to be there, at the end of the world, making a book long journey completely pointless.

But then came Last Argument of Kings. A major theme in it was that people can't change. Put them in a new environment, like in the second book, and they can use a fresh start - but return them to their previous environment and they'll slide right back to what they used to be.
Glokta goes on inane murder sprees, causing an endless amount of suffering for really not much of a better reason than because it occupies him. Jezal has maybe learned a thing or two and became less of a moron, but he is still very much the self centered bastard he used to be, so easily swayed by compliments. Much worse, Logen returns to claim his nickname, The Bloody Nine, with sickening speed. He becomes the terrifying monster that he always described himself as being in the past. We even learn that he very probably was as guilty as Bethod himself was at the way things got worse in the north.

Worst of all, of course, is Bayaz. Even though there were some doubts to him earlier in the series, I was inclined to support him because he was likable and his enemy appeared to be a terrible monster, creating an army of Eaters and attempting to conquer the world. Well, it appears that all this time the characters were fighting against Hitler - and that is still true, Khalul is by all accounts evil - but they have been working for the devil all along. Bayaz already practically controls much of thw world, and his megalomaniac insanity caused more strife throughout history than is imaginable.

The ending was incredibly well constructed. Just about each character got a "happy ever after" that was twisted horribly. Everything coming back to how things started, except for the added lair of misery that the events of the story brought.

It is brilliant. It is exhausting. It is miserable. Quite the book.

Anyway, on to Repairman Jack punching some horrible tentacled monsters in the face with The Haunted Air (Repairman Jack #6)


Agatha Christie "The Patriotic Murders"
The first Christie I've read (I know I know), though I've watched nearly all of Suchet's Poirot. I see why people like her.


Just finished The Book Thief and highly recommend it. Now I need to go wash my face and try to get my eyes less red.

Scarab Sages

Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber
Charles Scholz wrote:

Started reading Neal Ashers Dark Intelligence Book 1 - Transformation.

Never read anything by him before, but the blurb on Amazon looked interesting. I'm about 2/3 of the way through. Fun read.

Edit: Got the name wrong. It should be: Transformation Book 1 - Dark Intelligence.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

I'm taking another break from Robopocalypse.

Started reading Promise of Blood, the first Powder Mage novel by Brian McClelland.


Activism and drama have prevented me from getting much reading done, but I am happy to report that Mr. Comrade has moved on to the second Corum trilogy.

I am headed to Brooklyn this weekend, and hope to take down The Whispering Swarm on the bus. Last time I was reading it, Mike had just run into this book's version of Jerry Cornelius. Huzzah!


And, oh yeah, F@@% Bayaz!!!

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