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What books are you currently reading?


Books

9,151 to 9,181 of 9,181 << first < prev | 174 | 175 | 176 | 177 | 178 | 179 | 180 | 181 | 182 | 183 | 184 | next > last >>
Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
SmiloDan wrote:
Eh. I give BotNS a C+/B-. I wasn't very fond of any of the characters. At least the liquid-core sword was kind of neat.

True on the likeability of the characters, but the mechanics of the sword were somewhat WSoD-breaking for me. Too chaotic in a fight.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Readerbreeder wrote:
I've always been a sucker for a writer that sends me running to the dictionary, which is rare.

Jack Vance. What I love about him isn't so much that he knows every 50-cent word, but that he chooses them only if they express his meaning more precisely. As a result, he gets a lot more out of less word count than most people.


This week, I finished 'Black Venus', a collection of short stories by Angela Carter, and started 'Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire' by Calder Walton.

'Fatal Terrain', which I'm reading during lunchbreaks, is a book that you can't really get the most out of unless you have an all-consuming lust for massive great shiny aeroplanes.


Tim Emrick wrote:
Have you read any of Umberto Eco's historical fiction? He is one of the most challenging authors that I've enjoyed reading, because he expects his reader to keep up with his erudition.

I guess that question was directed to CatholicFan, but I wanted to read The Name of the Rose ever since I saw part of the movie. Imagine my surprise when I found that it was required reading for a college class I was going to take. I then went on to read it, long before the course started. During class, the instructors gave us all kinds of explanations about the book. After the course was over, I felt I just had to read the thing a second time with my newly acquired knowledge and appreciation.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Speaking of Lovecraft, I am currently on one of those 99 cent Kindle compilations. It's actually better than I expected: I was thinking it would all just be public domain pieces from the 1930's or older, but there are actually some stuff from as recent as the 80's, including a T.E.D. Klein story I hadn't read.


Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
I haven't had a chance to read that, but his survey of the American labor movement, There Is Power in a Union was a decent read.

At the Hands of Persons Unknown is a decent read too, but I'm frustrated by the lack of footnotes. It seems he decided to start using them for the union book.

It's also a bit poppy beside that, but I'm more forgiving on that front since it's not a subject I've studied at length. Would probably be less frustrated still if I hadn't confused the book for a different one I recalled from a JAH state of field essay, but so it goes. Dray got a mention in one of the footnotes there and I suspect my memory migrated him up to the main text. Ah well, it only cost as much as a comic for the ebook and it's fine to get me situated. #historydorkproblems

Maybe he'll answer a question I've had for a while. Many lynchings ended with white people taking souvenirs. Bits of the rope, parts of the tree, and that kind of thing I figure become knickknacks and are quickly forgotten. Gobbets of flesh, fingers, toes, and other things not so much. What the hell did they do with the things? I want to know if they were brought out to show the kids the "right" way to deal with black Americans. Did anyone try to start a private collection of 'em, like they did lynching photos? Are there records of people who took something in the moment and then were disgusted with their disgusting selves and tried to make right somehow? Did the grandkids ever find stuff in a box and go WTF?


Kirth Gersen wrote:
Readerbreeder wrote:
I've always been a sucker for a writer that sends me running to the dictionary, which is rare.
Jack Vance. What I love about him isn't so much that he knows every 50-cent word, but that he chooses them only if they express his meaning more precisely. As a result, he gets a lot more out of less word count than most people.

I have a collection of Vance short stories on my to-read pile right now. I've read the Dying Earth series (a while back when I was looking at Appendix N titles), and you're absolutely right about his use of language.

The Exchange

thejeff wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
Quote:
It's why I feel so refreshed reading Lovecraft right now. Sci-fi (or the macabre) should be a challenge to read, but those other books really felt dumbed-down.

The gender stuff in Ancillary Justice didn't feel dumbed down or on the nose to me - I believe some very interesting things could have been done with the concepts there - they mostly felt... shallow. Not well thought out. The culture in this book is not very convincing or interesting, they don't really reflect on modern society or human nature in any meaningful way. They're just... colonial Britain with a bizarre gender fixation. I felt like the gender politics were really more of a gimmick than anything else.

Other than that, the book also featured uninteresting characters and barely had any plot, so I too am struggling to understand the amount of acclaim it garnered.

If you'r looking for a seriously challenging book that takes a strong hard stare at power dynamics and the way humans alienate each other, C.J Cherryh's Downbelow Station is excellent - and deserves the classic status it enjoys.

Oddly, those books, especially the later ones, reminded me a lot of Cherryh's stuff.

Not the gender stuff so much as the rest of the political plays and the later action sequences.

I'll have to concede to your (far) greater knowledge of the subject, as I only really read the one book from each of them. I intended to read more of Cherryh's stuff (Merchanter's Luck is probably next, as I'm really curious to see where the world from Downbelow Station is at after the events of that book), but have no real intention of continuing with Ann Leckie... so I guess I'll never know how similar I'd find their styles.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Ended up inserting "The Doom that Came to Sarnath" before "The Hound," after having found a better list for the mythos chronology. I could certainly tell it was one of his earlier stories, as it was stylistically closer to the other early tales than what I'm seeing reflected a couple years later in "The Nameless City."

Most of the tale is spent describing the great decadence that was found in the city of Sarnath. I suppose one could look at it like watching a great painter craft a beautiful fresco, only to have him take a knife to it at the very end. I did find myself wishing there had been a bit less time spent on the descriptives, and a little more on the details of how the city fell. The ending came off feeling very rushed, and that's a pity.

To the member that asked if I've read Umberto Eco, the answer is I have not. I saw the film version of In the Name of the Rose, and I believe I read his essay on Superman, but that's really been my only exposure to him that I can recall. He's an author that interests me, but I think he's probably pretty far down on my priority list.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Re-reading The Sailor on the Seas of Fate by Master Moorcock. Spent much too time last night pondering the significance of Agak and Gagak and pestering Mr. Comrade who, not too long ago, read Hawkmoon's version of the story.


The Grand Central Arena books by Ryk E. Spoor is fantastic. Challenges of the Deeps just recently came out, and I had a ton of fun with it.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Read "The Hound" to aloud to my partner. I got a response along the lines of, "Well, that was freaky." There's a definite jump in the level of macabre compared to the preceding Lovecraft works. In the scheme of the greater mythos, even though I didn't like the wordier style of previous stories, they do help ease a reader into the setting. I think if "The Hound" had been the first one I'd read, perhaps it would have been a bit much right off the bat.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

South Berwick’s Robert M. Pirsig, ‘Zen’ author, dead at 88

Zen had a pretty big effect on me in high school, even though I don't remember much of it. Something about the pre-Socratic sophists? Anyway, ride on, Robert.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The Bestiary 6 and the Blood of Heroes rulebook (which is really an exact or near exact duplication of the old Mayfair Games "DC Heroes" rules). I'm very excited about both of them, but especially BoH. The greatest fun I ever had as an actual player and not a GM was a 12 year long DC Heroes campaign. I wish the guy who ran that game was still gaming. We had so much fun with that system and the adventures he came up with.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm more than halfway done with "The Wall of Storms" and only now has a character actually gotten to the wall of storms! On page 509 no less! Only 300 pages left to go!


I'm currently reading "Guards! Guards!" By terry Partchett, it's a sort of comesic fantasy

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Zeugma wrote:
I'm more than halfway done with "The Wall of Storms" and only now has a character actually gotten to the wall of storms! On page 509 no less! Only 300 pages left to go!

I read the "Theros Ironfeld" Dragonlance novel to find out how he got his magic arm

and:
it ends with him getting his arm cut off!!! GETTING HIS ARM CUT OFF WAS HOW HE WAS INTRODUCED!!!! IT NEVER TOLD THE STORY OF HOW HE GOT HIS MAGIC ARM!!!!

And that was the last Dragonlance novel I read for 20 years.


Can't bring the house's only computer (a Chromebook) around with me, so to supplement my readings in China 1927, also read a pamphlet by my old comrades, Lenin and the Vanguard Party.

Boring Doctrinaire Communist Stuff

Spoiler:

I've been hearing all kinds of things over the last few years, about how Lenin wasn't really a Leninist, democratic centralism as we understand it today was a Zinovievite invention, the Bolsheviks allowed public factional newspapers, etc., etc. I associate these claims with the work of the Canadian Leninologist Lars T. Lih, although that may be unfair because I haven't read him, just heard people telling me about him.

Anyway, this pamphlet, written in the mid-1970s decades before these controversies, has re-convinced me that proponents of such revisionism are latter-day Mensheviks. For example, yes, it turned out that Lenin did argue for a public factional newspaper in the RSDLP...when Kautsky and Bebel used the influence of the Second International to pressure the Bolshs and Menshs to re-unite in a single party...with the Menshs in organizational control.

Also, I was reconfirmed in my opinion that the comrades who trot out these arguments without taking into account Lenin's theory of the labor aristocracy in Imperialism and how that affected his ideas on the vanguard party have no idea what they are talking about.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
The Bestiary 6 and the Blood of Heroes rulebook (which is really an exact or near exact duplication of the old Mayfair Games "DC Heroes" rules). I'm very excited about both of them, but especially BoH. The greatest fun I ever had as an actual player and not a GM was a 12 year long DC Heroes campaign. I wish the guy who ran that game was still gaming. We had so much fun with that system and the adventures he came up with.

Ah! I was too occupied to check these boards that week (due to Passover) so I didn't see this thread...

Blood of Heroes

...or I would have said something. Outside of D&D / Pathfinder, no tabletop RPG influenced me more than MEGS. And when I first found Blood of Heroes I switched from DC Heroes to that.

Since I have the first edition and you have the second, maybe you can help me on a typo that's been bugging me for years and years. I mean... that BoH First Edition has many editing mistakes, but this one makes a rule particularly obscure. In the chart for the cost of APs during character creation, I'm looking at the column for Factor Cost 2. 13 AP's cost 56 hp's, 14 AP's cost 64 hp's, 15 AP's cost 60 hp's, 16 AP's cost 90 hp's, 17 AP's cost 100 AP's...

Whoa! That can't be right! How could 15 AP's cost less than 14?

AP hp

13 56
14 64
15 60
16 90
17 100

And the correct value isn't so easy to guess because the pattern changes. Going from 13 to 14 is 8 hp's, so maybe 15 AP's is 72 hp's. But going from 15 AP's to 16 AP's is 10 hp's, so maybe 15 AP's is 80 hp's. The answer could be anywhere from 72 to 80.

Could anyone with BoH 2nd Edition - or even DCH 2nd or 3rd Edition - help me out here?

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Also, I was reconfirmed in my opinion that the comrades who trot out these arguments....

I see what you did there.


SmiloDan wrote:

I read the "Theros Ironfeld" Dragonlance novel to find out how he got his magic arm...

<spoiler>
...IT NEVER TOLD THE STORY OF HOW HE GOT HIS MAGIC ARM!!!!
</spoiler>

And that was the last Dragonlance novel I read for 20 years.

The Dragonlance Chronicles saga certainly leaves some unsightly gaps. I've ranted about this before, but when I first heard the Lost Chronicles series was coming out, my first thought was "At last! Now we can finally hear the story of how Gilthanas and Silvara completed the Dragons of Deceit module. I especially wondered how Weis and Hickman - who, for all their faults, have a wonderful gift for characterization - would handle the shadowpeople. But no, we got nothing about that.


John Woodford wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Also, I was reconfirmed in my opinion that the comrades who trot out these arguments....
I see what you did there.

Wish I could say I did it on purpose, but I only noticed it after I posted.


Aaron Bitman wrote:
SmiloDan wrote:

I read the "Theros Ironfeld" Dragonlance novel to find out how he got his magic arm...

<spoiler>
...IT NEVER TOLD THE STORY OF HOW HE GOT HIS MAGIC ARM!!!!
</spoiler>

And that was the last Dragonlance novel I read for 20 years.

The Dragonlance Chronicles saga certainly leaves some unsightly gaps. I've ranted about this before, but when I first heard the Lost Chronicles series was coming out, my first thought was "At last! Now we can finally hear the story of how Gilthanas and Silvara completed the Dragons of Deceit module. I especially wondered how Weis and Hickman - who, for all their faults, have a wonderful gift for characterization - would handle the shadowpeople. But no, we got nothing about that.

I forget, is Theros getting his arm one of those parts of the module series they didn't novelize or was it something Weiss and Hickman made up for the books?


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
I forget, is Theros getting his arm one of those parts of the module series they didn't novelize or was it something Weiss and Hickman made up for the books?

The module DL7: Dragons of Light reveals the story of Theros getting the Silver Arm.


I guess if I had read more closely, I would have realized the question was already answered. Sorry, I meant to ask it earlier and just tossed it in after Aaron's post.


And Aaron's post comes in while I was typing. Oh, so different modules, huh? Thanks!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Yeah, just to make my answer clearer, I don't think the PCs ever see Theros get the Arm, but they might be there to help him start forging dragonlances in DL7.


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
I guess if I had read more closely, I would have realized the question was already answered. Sorry, I meant to ask it earlier and just tossed it in after Aaron's post.

And here's another clarification: I didn't mean to imply that Dragons of Deceit had anything to do with the Silver Arm. I just mentioned the shadowpeople as another example of something missing from the Chronicles (because I happened to wish to see that particular "something").


SmiloDan wrote:
Zeugma wrote:
I'm more than halfway done with "The Wall of Storms" and only now has a character actually gotten to the wall of storms! On page 509 no less! Only 300 pages left to go!

I read the "Theros Ironfeld" Dragonlance novel to find out how he got his magic arm ** spoiler omitted **

And that was the last Dragonlance novel I read for 20 years.

W&H were not shy about only writing the bits of the modules they felt like. I was put off right when they dropped the thread down at Icewall into a song despite it sounding full of action and delivering important plot stuff...which I can no longer recall and fortunately will not be relevant to my PBP for some time.


Samnell wrote:
I was put off right when they dropped the thread down at Icewall into a song despite it sounding full of action and delivering important plot stuff...which I can no longer recall and fortunately will not be relevant to my PBP for some time.

Yeah, the last two times I read the Chronicles I inserted the short story "Finding the Faith" into that part of Dragons of Winter Night. "Finding the Faith" tells the story of DL6: Dragons of Ice, so I came to regard the story as part of the series once I dismissed Dragons of the Highlord Skies as a waste of ink. I have "Finding the Faith" in The Magic of Krynn (a.k.a. Dragonlance Tales Book 1) but I understand that it also appeared in The Best of Tales, Volume One.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

I'm glad I've moved on from DL....

Anyways, I just finished Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding. I forgot how suddenly it ended.

I'm going to read Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo before reading the second book in the Tales of the Ketty Jay series. It sounds like a cross between Oceans 11 and Game of Thrones. So it will probably be Oceans 3 by the end.... :-P

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